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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 08, 2020


What do electric vehicle drivers think of the charging network they use?
A new study provides the best insight yet into the attitudes of electric vehicle (EV) drivers about the existing network of charging stations.
Artificial brains may need sleep too
Neural networks that become unstable after continuous periods of self-learning will return to stability after exposed to sleep like states, according to a study of simulated spiking neural networks, suggesting that even artificial brains need to nap occasionally.
Red tape may have a silver lining for micro businesses -- new study
Small business owners who complain about excessive regulation may be overlooking the business benefits it brings, according to a new study from the University of Bath.
JNCCN: Many hospitalized people with advanced cancer struggle with important daily tasks
New research from Mass General Cancer Center, published in the June 2020 issue of JNCCN -- Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, found 40.2% of hospitalized patients with advanced, incurable cancer were functionally impaired at the time of admission, meaning they needed assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) like walking, bathing, getting dressed, or other routine tasks.
Study finds path for addressing Alzheimer's blood-brain barrier impairment
In Nature Medicine, MIT researchers pinpoint the molecular pathway by which having the APOE4 gene variant leads to excess amyloid buildup in the blood brain barrier.
Army researchers enhance communications for multi-agent teaming
Army researchers are collaborating to enhance multi-agent teaming capabilities for the Soldier that will lead to improved situational awareness and communication capabilities on the battlefield.
Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip
MIT engineers have designed a 'brain-on-a-chip,' smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors -- silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain.
Boys' poor reading skills might help explain higher education gender gap
Researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Essex in the United Kingdom found boys' poor reading skills in adolescence, combined with the social attitudes about women attending college, can help explain why fewer men than women enroll in higher education or other types of post-high school education.
When cancer cells can't make their own fat, they eat more of it
Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to compensate for a halt in fat production by importing more fat molecules from their environment.
'Social distancing' saves frogs: New approach to identify individual frogs noninvasively
Amphibians possess diverse colour patterns and body markings that can be used to identify individuals, just like fingerprints for humans.
Addressing sexual violence in sport: American Medical Society for Sports Medicine issues position statement
Sexual violence is a serious problem with potentially severe and lasting negative effects on the physical, psychological, and social well-being of victims -- including athletes.
'Playing hard to get' really works; here's why
A team of researchers from the University of Rochester and the Israeli-based Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya examined the effects of playing hard to get, a mating strategy that is likely to instill a certain degree of uncertainty.
Newly identified gene reduces pollen number of plants
Producing less sperm cells can be advantageous in self-fertilizing plants.
Astronomers find elusive target hiding behind dust
Some young, still-forming stars are surrounded by regions of complex organic molecules called ''hot corinos.'' In some pairs of young stars forming together as binary pairs, astronomers found a hot corino around one, but not the other.
New tool helps nanorods stand out
Rice University scientists introduce an open-source method to simplify nanoparticle analysis using scanning electron microscope images.
Researchers advance fuel cell technology
Washington State University researchers have made a key advance in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that could make the highly energy-efficient and low-polluting technology a more viable alternative to gasoline combustion engines for powering cars.
Acute kidney disease in critically ill COVID-19 patients
A current study [1] is the first to evaluate and characterize the occurrence of COVID-19-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) in a larger number of critically ill patients.
Researchers developing quick and simple method of glyphosate detection
Glyphosate is a very widely used herbicide. It is suspected to be carcinogenic, which is why a quick, low-cost method for detecting glyphosate would be highly beneficial.
COVID-19: Are we handling this the right way?
COVID-19: Herd Immunity needs to be considered.
Early childhood intervention programs may reap benefits across generations
Youth programs designed to prevent drug use and delinquency and support healthy development can reap lasting benefits not only for participants, but also for their kids, according to a decades-long study.
NASA calculates soaking rainfall in Tropical Depression Cristobal
When Tropical Storm Cristobal made landfall in southern Louisiana yesterday, May 7, it dropped a lot of rain, and continues to as it weakens and moves inland.
Deadly superbug could get a vigorous foe in repurposed antibiotic
A new medium that mimics the conditions of the human body opens the door for testing antibiotics against infections other than what they are typically used for.
Photodynamic therapy used to treat ovarian cancer
Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the most promising methods of treating localized tumors.
Unravelling complex brain networks with automated 3D neural mapping
KAIST researchers developed a new algorithm for brain imaging data analysis that enables the precise and quantitative mapping of complex neural circuits onto a standardized 3D reference atlas.
Cosmic quasars embrace 1970s fashion trend
Researchers have studied more than 300 quasars -- spinning black holes that produce beams of plasma.
Novel computer-assisted chemical synthesis method cuts research time and cost
Hokkaido University scientists have succeeded in synthesizing an α,α-difluoroglycine derivative, a type of α-amino acid, based on a reaction path predicted by quantum chemical calculations.
Monkeys appreciate lifelike animation
Monkeys can overcome their aversion to animated monkeys through a more realistic avatar, according to research recently published in eNeuro.
Physicists study mirror nuclei for precision theory test
A precision measurement of helium and hydrogen mirror isotopes reveals new questions in understanding of nuclear structure.
The impact of disclosure laws on prescription patterns from companies that pay them
It's not uncommon for U.S. pharmaceutical companies to pay medical doctors to promote their medications.
Better detection of a type of ovarian cancer could lead to better treatments
Scientists have found that a specific type of ovarian cancer could possibly benefit from existing platinum-based chemotherapy and new DNA repairing treatments, following better testing.
New algorithm helps select patients for urgent surgery or chemotherapy during pandemic
A new approach to better select breast cancer patients in need of urgent surgery or chemotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic has been developed by researchers at The Royal Marsden and the Breast Cancer Now Research Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, in collaboration with colleagues in the UK, Germany and US.
Integrating nanomaterial with light-absorbing molecule powers hydrogen production from water and sun
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) developed a hybrid material constructed from a metal oxide nanosheet and a light-absorbing molecule for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2) under sunlight.
Researchers develop 3D-printable material that mimics biological tissues
University of Colorado Denver researchers are the first to 3D print a complex, porous lattice structure using liquid crystal elastomers creating devices that can mimic cartilage and other biological tissues.
Switching from aluminum to zinc alloys could improve sustainability of automotive parts
A new study reveals that switching from aluminum to zinc alloys in the production of automotive parts could greatly enhance their longevity and sustainability.
Shock waves created in the lab mimic supernova particle accelerators
In experiments at the National Ignition Facility, a SLAC-led team found new details about how supernovas boost charged particles to nearly the speed of light.
New light for plants
Scientists from ITMO in collaboration with their colleagues from Tomsk Polytechnic University came up with an idea to create light sources from ceramics with the addition of chrome: the light from such lamps offers not just red but also infrared (IR) light, which is expected to have a positive effect on plants' growth.
First systematic report on the tug-of-war between DNA damage and repair
IBS scientists have screened almost 163,000 DNA mutations in 2,700 C. elegans roundworms to shed light on DNA damage.
Northern California's COVID-19 epidemic resulted from multiple virus strains entering state
Distinct from virus transmission patterns identified elsewhere, analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes from a small number of California-based patients suggests the virus arrived in northern California through a complex series of introductions, not only from state to state but also from international travel.
Ancient asteroid impacts created the ingredients of life on Earth and Mars
A new study reveals that asteroid impact sites in the ocean may possess a crucial link in explaining the formation of the essential molecules for life.
New study: Chemists at the University of Halle are able to induce uniform chirality
Chirality is a fundamental property of many organic molecules and means that chemical compounds can appear in not only one form, but in two mirror-image forms as well.
Threats to global food security from emerging fungal crop pathogens
Amongst the world's most challenging problems is the need to feed an ever-growing global population sustainably.
Many factors may contribute to steep, decades-long muskrat population drop
Muskrat populations declined sharply across North America over the last 50 years or so, and wildlife scientists have struggled to understand why.
Drug researcher develops 'fat burning' molecule
Santos and his colleagues have recently identified a small mitochondrial uncoupler, named BAM15, that decreases the body fat mass of mice without affecting food intake and muscle mass or increasing body temperature
New research shows how complex chemistry may be relevant to origins of life on Earth
Scientists would like to understand how life began on Earth.
Ultrathin nanosheets separate harmful ions from water
An international research team, led by Monash University and ANSTO (Australia's Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation), has created an ultrathin membrane with high porosity that can filter potentially harmful ions from water.
Replacing GDP with Gross Ecosystem Product reveals value of nature
Replacing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) with a new ''ecosystem'' measure reveals the enormous value of the natural world, new research shows.
Giving GDP a needed ecological companion
Gross ecosystem product (GEP) summarizes the economic value of nature's contributions to humans.
Marine energy devices likely pose minimal impacts to marine life, report shows
On World Oceans Day, an international team of marine scientists reports that the potential impact of marine renewable energy to marine life is likely small or undetectable.
Scientists identify targets for COVID-19 vaccine using cancer immunotherapy tools
Cancer researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have harnessed tools used for the development of cancer immunotherapies and adapted them to identify regions of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to target with a vaccine, employing the same approach used to elicit an immune response against cancer cells to stimulate an immune response against the virus.
Undisclosed financial conflicts of interest in Canadian clinical guidelines on medications
Failure to disclose organizational financial conflicts of interest by producers of Canadian clinical practice guidelines on medications is widespread, pointing to the need for reform, a new research paper highlights in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191737.
Stroke bleeds in the brain not decreasing, Framingham study finds
The incidence of intracerebral hemorrhages has not decreased in senior adults 75 and older during the past three decades, researchers reported in JAMA Neurology. Growth of this age group suggests that the cumulative burden of this form of stroke is likely to increase, authors indicated.
Infants have a basic knowledge of the role and limitations of language
Marc Colomer and Núria Sebastián Gallés, members of the Speech Acquisition and Perception (SAP) research group of the Center for Brain and Cognition (CBC) at UPF have investigated whether 14 month-old infants understand that language is a communication tool for transmitting information between speakers of the same language.
Milkweed, only food source for monarch caterpillars, ubiquitously contaminated
New evidence identifies 64 pesticide residues in milkweed, the main food for monarch butterflies in the west.
Educational video may assist with decision to pursue hospice at the end of life for cancer patients
An educational video about hospice care can provide valuable information for patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers, improve perceptions of this quality form of care at the end of life, and increase its use.
New study filters to search for non-randomized studies in PubMed and Medline
In collaboration with McMaster University/Canada, IQWiG developed two study filters to search for non-randomized studies (NRS) in PubMed and Medline (OVID).
Using multiomics in an agricultural field, scientists discover that organic nitrogen plays a key rol
Researchers from a collaboration led by the RIKEN BioResource Science Center in Japan have analyzed agricultural systems using a multiomics approach, and successfully digitalized the complex interactions between plants, microbes and soil in an agricultural field.
BAME women account for over half of pregnant women in UK hospitals with COVID-19
More than half of pregnant women recently admitted to a UK hospital with covid-19 infection were from black or other ethnic minority groups, finds a national surveillance study published by The BMJ today.
Patterns in permafrost soils could help climate change models
A team of scientists spent the past four summers measuring permafrost soils across a 5,000 square-mile swath of Alaska's North Slope.
Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife
Loss of estrogen has an effect on muscles and leads to a decline in muscle mass.
How to gently caress atoms
It is extremely difficult to study oxygen molecules on the metal oxide surface without altering them.
Protection of seagrasses is key to building resilience to climate change and disasters
Seagrass meadows can be a powerful nature-based climate solution and help sustain communities hard-hit by stressors such as the COVID-19 pandemic, but these important ecosystems continue to decline.
You are what you eat is as important for fish as it is for people
There is truth in the saying 'you are what you eat'; even more so if you are a salmon or herring swimming off the British Columbia coast, a recent University of British Columbia study discovered.
University of Cincinnati research points to potential new treatment for pancreatic cancer
As the next step in finding a potential targeted treatment for pancreatic cancer, researchers at the University of Cincinnati are publishing a new study revealing how a combination therapy may improve outcomes for patients with this disease.
Appetite can be increased by cells in the brain
Tanycytes are glial cells, which communicate with neurons in the brain to inform it of what we have eaten.
Discovery of important molecular mechanism of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease
Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin, in collaboration with colleagues from Milan, Paris and Mexico, have been able to highlight a new molecular mechanism of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: According to their discovery, the protein Rab35 and the mTOR signaling pathway it regulates play a central role in the formation of myelin sheaths in the peripheral nervous system.
Single-cell yolk-shell capsules with high biological activity and stability
The expansion of the global market for microbes and microbial products have been increasingly demanding the full exploitation of bacteria with high activity and stability.
Radiocarbon dating pins date for construction of Uyghur complex to the year 777
Dating archaeological objects precisely is difficult, even when using techniques such as radiocarbon dating.
Ground-breaking research makes childhood vaccines safe in all temperatures
A new system for delivering vaccines to children in low-income nations has taken a vital step forward, thanks to groundbreaking work at the University of Bath
Rate over time of stroke caused by brain bleeding
This observational study looked at the rate and risk factors of stroke caused by bleeding within the brain (intracerebral hemorrhage) between 1948 and 2016 among 10,000 participants in the Framingham Heart Study.
Researchers develop ultra-sensitive device for detecting magnetic fields
The new magnetic sensor is inexpensive to make, works on minimal power and is 20 times more sensitive than many traditional sensors.
Kidney problems more prevalent in NYC COVID-19 patients
The first 1,000 COVID-19 patients treated at a NYC medical center had more kidney complications than other patient groups, two peaks in time from symptom onset to intubation.
The mental health of fathers of babies born very prematurely
Following the journey of 100 fathers of babies born before 30 weeks' gestation, the study found that almost one in five fathers experienced high depressive symptoms, and approximately half of all fathers experienced moderate anxiety symptoms that persisted throughout the first year of their baby's life.
Specific kidney proximal tubular injury caused by SARS-CoV-2
A French study [1] investigated acute Fanconi syndrome as a kidney injury associated with COVID-19.
Pregnancy complications in assisted reproduction linked to a specific process
An experimental study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania links a specific procedure -- embryo culture -- that is part of the assisted reproduction process (ART) to placental abnormalities, risk for preeclampsia, and abnormal fetal growth.
Doing more with terahertz: Simplifying near-infrared spectroscopy systems
Researchers from Beihang University, China, and Tokushima University, Japan, have developed a terahertz spectroscopy scheme that offers outstanding resolution using a single laser.
Global oncology pharmacists face restricted access to essential PPE items
Oncology pharmacy practitioners around the globe are fighting to provide cancer patients high quality cancer care with increasingly limited and sometimes restricted personal protective equipment supply as well as impaired access to essential anticancer medication, according to University of California, Irvine-led study.
The state of China's climate in 2019: Warmer and wetter, but less loss
The National Climate Center (NCC) of China has just completed a report in which it provides an authoritative assessment of China's climate in 2019 based on the NCC's operational system.
Study shows opioid, sedative and antidepressant use pre-surgery leads to worse outcomes
A study led by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers showed that patients who already used opioids, sedatives or antidepressants prior to colorectal surgery experience significantly more complications post-surgery.
New smart parking software cuts congestion, emissions
New smart parking software developed by Cornell University researchers, which matches drivers with parking garage spots based on travel time and other factors, could reduce congestion and emissions while saving drivers the time of circling to look for available spots.
Researchers shed light on new enzymatic reaction
Researchers have discovered that repurposed enzymes and light are key to producing chemical compounds in an environmentally friendly fashion.
Health disparities prove to be multidimensional
Hollings Cancer Center researcher Chanita Hughes-Halbert, Ph.D. shows in two recent health disparity studies the work being done by the Transdisciplinary Collaborative Center in Precision Medicine and Minority Men's Health at the Medical University of South Carolina.
Opioid prescriptions after childbirth linked to increased risk of overdose, persistent use
Women who are prescribed opioids after childbirth have an increased risk of persistent opioid use or other serious opioid-related events, including overdose, in their first year postpartum, according to a new study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers.
Research team to study food resilience in the face of catastrophic global events
An interdisciplinary team of Penn State professors has received $3 million from Open Philanthropy to study food resilience in the face of catastrophic global events such as an all-out nuclear war, a large asteroid strike or a supervolcano eruption.
Titanium oxide-based hybrid materials promising for detoxifying dyes
Photoactive materials have become extremely popular in a large variety of applications in the fields of photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, water splitting, organic synthesis, photoreduction of carbon dioxide, and others.
Spontaneous formation of nanoscale hollow structures could boost battery storage
An unexpected property of nanometer-scale antimony crystals -- the spontaneous formation of hollow structures -- could help give the next generation of lithium ion batteries higher energy density without reducing battery lifetime.
Heart injury among hospitalized COVID-19 patients associated with higher risk of death
Study findings may help doctors better triage coronavirus patients in admitted to the hospital.
Recycling old genes to get new traits -- How social behavior evolves in bees
Researchers learned from some unusual sweat bee species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, how the sophisticated division of labor in highly complex insect societies can arise from humble beginnings.
Green cities roadmap touts COVID-19 recovery stimulus
COVID-19 has helped add urgency to a call for industry and government to support a plan to ensure Australian cities become more sustainable by adopting green roofs, walls and facades.
Scientists propose new naming system for uncultivated bacteria and archa
The long-standing rules for assigning scientific names to bacteria and archaea are overdue for an update, according to a new consensus statement backed by 119 microbiologists from around the globe.
California's climate refugia: Mapping the stable places
Some landscapes can hold their own against climate change better than others.
Zero rates preferable to negative rates for investors' risk-taking -Ben-Gurion U study
In several lab experiments, the researchers demonstrated that a zero-interest rate policy has the strongest impact on individuals' investment decisions driving their decisions to borrow money and the percentage of risky assets in their portfolios.
3-D shape of human genome essential for robust inflammatory response
The three-dimensional structure of the human genome is essential for providing a rapid and robust inflammatory response but is surprisingly not vital for reprogramming one cell type into another.
Case Western Reserve-led research uncovers connections between psoriasis and joint disease
A team led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers has made two major discoveries involving psoriasis, a chronic and debilitating skin disease with no known cure.
Crystalline 'nanobrush' clears way to advanced energy and information tech
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory synthesized a tiny structure with high surface area and discovered how its unique architecture drives ions across interfaces to transport energy or information.
Do COVID-19 apps protect your privacy?
Many mobile apps that track the spread of COVID-19 ask for personal data but don't indicate the information will be secure.
Impressive result for mental health therapy
As Australia looks for the most efficient assessment and treatment of mental health in the era of COVID-19 lockdowns and disruptions, the outcomes of a national trail, published by Flinders University researchers, has identified the effectiveness of a low intensity Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.
Engaging in family meals starts with healthy family communication
Engaging in family meals may be a matter of improving communication and support at home.
Temperate insects as vulnerable to climate change as tropical species
In previous research, it has been assumed that insects in temperate regions would cope well with or even benefit from a warmer climate.
Viewing the topology of thermonuclear reaction in nuclear landscape from the network perspective
Nucleosynthesis is a complicated process in astrophysics. By constructing a directed, un-weighted, multilayer nuclear reaction network, which consisted of all nuclides and reactions within the JINA REACLIB database, researchers in Shanghai have investigated important topological features as well as identified the most frequent reaction patterns of the interconnections that occurred amongst the different nuclides in nuclear landscape, i.e. motif structures of nuclear reactions.
Countries must work together on CO2 removal to avoid dangerous climate change
The Paris Agreement lays out national quotas on CO2 emissions but not removal, and that must be urgently addressed, say the authors of a new study.
Discovering the prehistoric monuments of Arabia
In contrast to the prehistoric remains of the Near East, the megalithic monuments of Arabia remain largely unknown.
New treatment target verification for myelodysplastic syndrome
A Japanese research group analyzed the pathophysiology of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a blood cancer that presents often in the elderly, and found the presence of transcription factor RUNX3, thereby revealing a cancer growth function for what had been considered be a tumor suppressor.
Intestinal health: Dresden research team identifies enzyme essential for stem cell survival
Which pathways govern intestinal epithelial differentiation under constitutive conditions? Epithelial differentiation is largely controlled by the tissue-specific activity of transcription factors.
Census of viral spike protein antigens reveals candidates for use in a COVID-19 vaccine
A group of researchers has determined how different proteins associated with SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes COVID-19 -- generate immune responses when given to rabbits as immunizations.
Advances in the production of minor ginsenosides using microorganisms and their enzymes
Advances in the Production of Minor Ginsenosides Using Microorganisms and Their Enzymes - BIO Integration https://bio-integration.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/bioi20200007.pdf Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.
Forgot where you parked the car? Research suggests memory is a game of all or nothing
An online study, involving more than 400 participants aged 18-35, reveals that memories for specific locations are either totally forgotten or, if they are remembered, it's with as much precision as when they were first learnt.
Research team builds better rock models
Once you crush, cut or fracture a rock, there are no do-overs.
Disjunct distribution across the equator
Podonychus gyobu sp. nov., a second species of the genus Podonychus Jäch & Kodada, 1997, hitherto known only to inhabit Indonesia, is reported to have been found in Kyushu, Japan.
Bluetooth technology, the best ally to detect COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing
A study carried out by researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and published in the IEEE Access journal concludes that Bluetooth technology is the best ally to detect possible COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing.
Functional polymers to improve thermal stability of bioplastics
One of the key objectives for contemporary chemistry is to improve thermomechanical properties of polymers, in particular, thermostability of bioplastics.
Preventing pancreatic cancer metastasis by keeping cells 'sheltered in place'
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that pancreatic cancer metastasis--when tumor cells gain the deadly ability to migrate to new parts of the body--can be suppressed by inhibiting a protein called Slug that regulates cell movement.
How much color do we really see?
Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive.
Indirect effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the kidneys: beware of the genetic background
A current study [1] reports on two COVID-19 patients with acute kidney injury.
Rice team makes tiny, magnetically powered neural stimulator
Rice University neuroengineers have created a tiny surgical implant that can electrically stimulate the brain and nervous system without using a battery or wired power supply.
Kawasaki-like syndrome linked to COVID-19 in children is a new condition
A study on children suffering from severe inflammatory symptoms shows the condition is new and distinct from Kawasaki disease.
First global map of rockfalls on the Moon
A research team from ETH Zurich and the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen counted over 136,000 rockfalls on the moon caused by asteroid impacts.
Novel eco-friendly electrochemical reaction can synthesize useful semiconductor materials
In the field of electronics, developing novel strategies for organic semiconductor synthesis are crucial.
Potential biomarker identified to screen quality of donor's stem cells before harvesting
A new study released in STEM CELLS identifies a potential biomarker for prescreening donors for their MSCs' growth capacity and potency.
Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species
Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a involving UCL and led by the Chinese Academy of Science, in a study published in Nature Communications.
Sharing of tacit knowledge is most important aspect of mentorship, study finds
In one of the largest ever multidisciplinary investigations into mentorship and mentee performance, the Kellogg School of Management researchers found that the most impactful mentors are those who teach students to think independently and communicate their unique viewpoints effectively.
Why the Victoria Plate in Africa rotates
The East African Rift System is a newly forming plate tectonic boundary at which the African continent is being separated into several plates.
Scientists engineer one protein to fight cancer and regenerate neurons
A team led by Stanford bioengineer and department chair Jennifer Cochran has tweaked one ligand in slightly different ways to produce two startlingly different results.
Blood pressure medications help even the frailest elderly people live longer
Taking prescription blood pressure medication helped even the frailest elderly patients live longer, according to a large study in Italy.
Super-cooled metallic ammonia gives clues about electron behavior
Photoelectron spectroscopy maps electrons in alkali metal - liquid ammonia microjets capturing the blue electrolyte-to-bronze colored metal transition.
Stanford-led study suggests a new approach to reducing spread of mosquito-borne diseases
Stanford researchers working in rural Kenya have identified the most productive breeding habitats for mosquitoes that spread a range of untreatable viruses.
A sharper view of flood risk
Extreme weather patterns and regions at risk of flooding could be easier to spot using a new statistical model for large spatial datasets.

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