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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 09, 2020


New method to identify genes that can drive development of brain tumors
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a method for identifying functional mutations and their effect on genes relevant to the development of glioblastoma.
Human presence weakens social relationships of giraffes
Living close to human settlements disturbs the social networks of giraffes.
Fecal transplants show promise as treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
A new study from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University suggests that fecal transplants could be used as a treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
How magnetic fields and 3D printers will create the pills of tomorrow
Doctors could soon be administering an entire course of treatment for life-threatening conditions with a 3D printed capsule controlled by magnetic fields thanks to advances made by University of Sussex researchers.
Ancient micrometeoroids carried specks of stardust, water to asteroid 4 Vesta
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis are the first to study presolar materials that landed on a planet-like body.
Ischemic stroke rates decrease during COVID-19 pandemic
Research reveals fewer people have been admitted to stroke centers in Michigan and northwest Ohio since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, and significantly fewer patients received a mechanical thrombectomy for their ischemic stroke.
Novel DNA analysis will help to identify food origin and counterfeit food in the future
Estonian scientists are developing a DNA-based method of analysis that enables them to identify food components and specify the origin of a foodstuff.
Putting COVID-19 diagnostic tests to the 'test' -- how do they hold up?
As SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to mutate, it is important to check the efficacy of current diagnostic tests, say York University researchers, who found seven out of 27 methods had potential sequence mismatch issues that may lead to underperforming or false-negative COVID-19 test results.
Alzheimer research: Noise-inducing neurons shut down memories
Neurons that are responsible for new experiences interfere with the signals of neurons that contain memories and thereby disturb the recall of memories - at least in mice.
Female athletes at risk for nutritional deficiencies
Two decades of research among female athletes over the age of 13 years shows that a lack of nutrition knowledge about what they need to eat to stay healthy and compete may contribute to poor performance, low energy and nutrient intake, and potential health risks, according to a Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School study.
An alternative route for studying the intrinsic properties of solid-state materials
To understand the origin of conflicting reports on TaGeIr, scientists from MPI CPfS and Northwestern University investigated the deviation of the crystal structure from the ideal MgAgAs model, possibility of off-stoichiometry (presence of homogeneity range), impact of the synthesis route on the real structure, as well as metallographic features of TaGeIr.
Birmingham scientists 're-train' immune system to prevent attack of healthy cells
The body's immune system can be re-wired to prevent it from recognising its own proteins which, when attacked by the body, can cause autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, a significant new study by UK scientists has found.
Study: National calorie menu labeling law will add years of healthy living, save billions
The national law requiring calorie labeling on menus at large chain restaurants is estimated to prevent tens of thousands of new heart disease and type 2 diabetes cases--and save thousands of lives--in just five years, according to a new study that estimates the law's impact.
National survey shows different bacteria on cell phones and shoes
The largest study of its kind in the US shows thousands of different types of bacteria living on cell phones and shoes, including groups that have barely been studied by scientists.
Predictors of 5-year mortality in young dialysis patients
The analysis published in NDT [1] evaluated for the first time the association of a large number of demographic, HD treatment and laboratory variables with mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis treatment since childhood.
Mexican immigrant obesity rates climb with deportation fears
Mexican immigrants, especially those who are undocumented and fear deportation, have limited access to healthy foods and are at increased risk for obesity because of stress, anxiety and depression, according to a Rutgers study.
Majority of first-wave COVID-19 clinical trials have significant design shortcomings, study finds
Most of the registered clinical trials of potential treatments for COVID-19 underway as of late March were designed in ways that will greatly limit their value in understanding potential treatments, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
Women's communication shapes division of labor in household
For many couples, COVID-19 quarantine has shattered the normal routine and led some to renegotiate who does what around the house.
Feeding habits differ by age and sex in Asian black bears: Data may help wildlife experts better manage bears' habitats
A ten-year study shows that Asian black bears' diets vary greatly depending on sex, stage of life, and resource availability, providing important information on foraging strategy according to age-sex classes.
Women generate lower travel-related greenhouse gas emissions, NZ study finds
Women use more diverse modes of travel and generate lower greenhouse gas emissions than men, despite men being more than twice as likely to travel by bike, a New Zealand study has found.
Researchers put a price tag on alcohol use
Alcohol use disorders are associated with high social welfare and health care costs -- but what causes them?
Happiness might protect you from gastrointestinal distress
Serotonin, a chemical known for its role in producing feelings of well-being and happiness in the brain, can reduce the ability of some intestinal pathogens to cause deadly infections, new research by UT Southwestern scientists suggests.
Chemotherapy and cancer gang up to cause a neurological side effect, study says
Chemotherapy has been the lone suspect in a neurological ailment, but cancer also appears to be to blame.
Black hole's heart still beating
The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed.
Researchers have found a molecular explanation to a longstanding enigma in viral oncology
The oncogenic herpesvirus (HHV8 or KSHV) causes a cancer known as Kaposi's Sarcoma.
Armor on butterfly wings protects against heavy rain
An analysis of high-speed raindrops hitting biological surfaces such as feathers, plant leaves and insect wings reveals how these highly water-repelling veneers reduce the water's impact.
Botox is an effective treatment for some common sports injuries, new research suggests
While botulinum toxin is commonly known as a cosmetic treatment for facial lines and wrinkles, a growing body of evidence suggests that 'Botox' can also be an effective treatment for certain sports injuries and chronic pain conditions, according to a review in the June issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports, official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).
Living near oil and gas wells may increase preterm birth risk
New research shows living near oil and gas development in California is a risk factor for preterm birth, the leading cause of infant death in the United States.
The neurobiology of social distance
Never before have we experienced social isolation on a massive scale as we have during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic.
Study reveals birth defects caused by flame retardant
A new study from the University of Georgia has shown that exposure to a now-banned flame retardant can alter the genetic code in sperm, leading to major health defects in children of exposed parents.
Nuclear medicine and COVID-19: New content from The Journal of Nuclear Medicine
In one of five new COVID-19-related articles and commentaries published in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Johnese Spisso discusses how the UCLA Hospital System has dealt with the pandemic.
High-salt diet impacts health of gut microbiome
Particularly in females with untreated hypertension, reducing salt intake to what's considered a healthier level appears to be good for both their gut microbiome and their blood pressure, scientists report.
Predicting cancer behavior requires better understanding of tumor cells
Our ability to predict who will get cancer, how patients will respond to treatment, or if patients will relapse is still quite limited, despite advances in the detection of genetic mutations and the establishment of risk factors; recently researchers were inspired to find new ways of looking at the problem.
23 years of water quality data from crop-livestock systems
Researchers summarize runoff water quantity and quality data from native tallgrass prairie and crop-livestock systems in Oklahoma between 1977 and 1999.
Ways to disrupt protein synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus found
It is well known that many strains of Staphylococcus are resistant to antibiotics, and research groups around the world seek new targets in the bacteria to decrease their infectious potential.
Presence of airborne dust could signify increased habitability of distant planets
Scientists have expanded our understanding of potentially habitable planets orbiting distant stars by including a critical climate component -- the presence of airborne dust.
Lung development may explain why some non-smokers get COPD and some heavy smokers do not
According to a new study, people with small airways relative to the size of their lungs may have a lower breathing capacity and, consequently, an increased risk for COPD -- even if they don't smoke or have any other risk factors.
Water vapor in the atmosphere may be prime renewable energy source
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that water vapor in the atmosphere may serve as a potential renewable energy source in the future.
Developing better fabrication techniques for pH-responsive microcapsules
Researchers have developed a new method to create microcapsules, which are tiny droplets surrounded by a solid shell.
New pathway to attack tumor cells identified
A study led by the Institut de Neurociències (INc-UAB) describes a new strategy to tackle cancer, based on inducing a potent stress in tumor causing cell destruction by autophagy.
Use of emergency departments plummets during COVID-19
A new commentary highlights the dramatic decline in emergency department visits during the COVID-19 pandemic and what could be causing the decrease.
Late blight research pairs spectroscopy with classic plant pathology diagnostics
Gold and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently published research showing how they used contact spectroscopy to non-destructively sense how plant pathogens differentially damage, impair, and alter plant traits during the course of infection.
Scientists warn against 'greenwashing' of global coastal developments
An international team of scientists has said the artificial structures and reclaimed land that are now commonplace in coastal urban areas all over the world are often poor surrogates for the natural environment they replace.
An unusual cobalt compound
A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Carleton University in Ottawa has manufactured a novel, highly versatile cobalt compound.
AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study.
Targeting SARS-CoV-2 enzyme with inhibitors
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread, many researchers are studying epidemiological models to predict its propagation.
Biomedical sciences researchers provide methods to inactivate and safely study SARS-CoV-2
Detailed methods on how to perform research on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, including procedures that effectively inactivate the virus to enable safe study of infected cells have been identified by virologists in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
Simple way of 'listening' to chicks could dramatically improve welfare
New research led by the University of Plymouth suggests a simple and low-cost method of 'listening' to chicks may allow welfare issues to be picked up at the earliest possible opportunity.
Scientists lament 'Humpty Dumpty' effect on world's spectacular, rare wildlife
A new study reveals how runaway human population growth collapses the role of wildlife in the world's ecosystems.
Research reveals insights into bioprinted skeletal muscle tissue models
SUTD collaborates with NTU to provide in-depth analysis of 3D in vitro biomimetic skeletal muscle tissue models, highlighting the great potential of bioprinting technology.
USPSTF recommendation on screening for unhealthy drug use
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for unhealthy drug use in adults 18 or older by asking questions about such use when services for diagnosis, treatment, and care can be offered or referred.
The world is much more alike than different
A new study from UC Riverside asserts the world population may have much more in common than it has differences.
Heat and humidity battle sunshine for influence over the spread of COVID-19, research
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that while higher heat and humidity can slow the spread of COVID-19, longer hours of sunlight are associated with a higher incidence of the disease, in a sign that sunny days can tempt more people out even if this means a higher risk of infection.
New antivirals for influenza and Zika
Leuven researchers have deployed synthetic amyloids to trigger protein misfolding as a strategy to combat the influenza A and Zika virus.
Strahl lab decodes another piece of the histone code puzzle
Published in the journal Cell Reports, this research reinforces the notion that the multiple chemical modifications placed on histones by a single enzyme ensures multiple and distinct functions -- an idea that was postulated by Strahl and his former mentor, David Allis, Ph.D., and was called the Histone Code hypothesis.
Use of cystatin C for precise assessment of kidney function and cardiovascular risk
In many situations, it is essential that the physician knows a patient's kidney function as precisely as possible.
Orthotics breakthrough helps children with Cerebral Palsy walk and play
Children with Cerebral Palsy have more energy to play and be physically active for longer thanks to specially designed orthotics.
Clocking in with malaria parasites
Discovery of a malaria parasite's internal clock could lead to new treatment strategies.
Artificial intelligence enhances brain tumour diagnosis
A new machine learning approach classifies a common type of brain tumour into low or high grades with almost 98% accuracy, researchers report in the journal IEEE Access.
Study identifies network of genes that directs trachea and oesophagus development
A new study reporting how a network of genes directs the development of the trachea and oesophagus in mice has been published today in eLife.
Volcanic activity and changes in Earth's mantle were key to rise of atmospheric oxygen
Evidence from rocks billions of years old suggest that volcanoes played a key role in the rise of oxygen in the atmosphere of the early Earth.
Study finds another reason to wash hands: Flame retardants
Harmful flame retardants may be lurking on your hands and cell phone, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.
NAFLD in pregnancy increases risks for mother and baby
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in pregnancy has nearly tripled over the past ten years.
Kidneys deteriorate with age, regardless of health
Why we age remains an unanswered question. But recently, researchers at UiT, along with colleagues in Berlin and Reykjavik, have discovered that kidneys age, regardless if people are sick or not.
A new mechanism improves the efficiency of antibacterial surfaces
Universitat Rovira i Virgili researchers have developed a nanometric-scale theoretical model to create structures that kill bacteria by using elastic forces.
Microneedling therapeutic stem cells into damaged tissues
Small and minimally invasive 'Detachable Microneedle Depots' effectively deliver stem cells for localized MSC therapy of skin disorders.
Widespread facemask use could shrink the 'R' number and prevent a second COVID-19 wave
Cambridge-led modelling looks at population-level facemask use. The more people use facemasks in public, the smaller the 'R'.
Study shows cannabis temporarily relieves PTSD symptoms
People suffering from post-traumatic distress disorder report that cannabis reduces the severity of their symptoms by more than half, at least in the short term, according to a recent study led by WSU psychology professor Carrie Cutler.
AGA does not recommend the use of probiotics for most digestive conditions
After a detailed review of available literature, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has released new clinical guidelines finding that for most digestive conditions there is not enough evidence to support the use of probiotics.
Oregon timber harvests don't appear to affect rare salamander, study finds
The Oregon slender salamander only exists on the western slopes of the Cascades, where it lives most of the year underground or burrowed in woody debris on the forest floor.
Scientists identify ancient origin for key hormone system
A key set of proteins that help regulate hormones necessary for many essential functions in humans and other vertebrates have ancient origins in much simpler creatures such as sea cucumbers, says a new study published today in eLife.
EULAR advocates deployment of health care professionals -- study confirms effectiveness
Inflammatory-rheumatic disorders are a widespread ailment, affecting at least 1.5 million people in Germany alone.
Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments
An algorithm which analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis.
NASA tracks Tropical Depression Cristobal moving toward Great Lakes
Once a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, now a tropical depression in the Mississippi Valley, NASA's Aqua satellite is tracking Cristobal as it continues to generate large amounts of rainfall while it heads toward the Great Lakes region.
Racial, gender disparities observed in heart transplant recipients with COVID-19 infection
Researchers suggest focusing on disparities to help identify which patients with a heart transplant may be at higher risk for a worse course of COVID-19 infection.
Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check
When a lake is covered with green scums during a warm summer, cyanobacteria -- often called blue-green algae -- are usually involved.
Serious complication of Crohn's disease may be preventable in young people
For children and young adults with Crohn's disease, steroid-sparing therapies may help reduce the risk of developing a severe and common complication of the inflammatory bowel condition, a new study suggests.
Renewable fuel from carbon dioxide with the aid of solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are attempting to convert carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, to fuel using energy from sunlight.
Study tracks decades of life cycle changes in nonwoody plants
For 25 years, Carol Augspurger visited a patch of ancient woods near Urbana, Illinois to look at the same 25 one-square-meter plots of earth she first demarcated for study in 1993.
Lab makes 4D printing more practical
Soft robots and biomedical implants that reconfigure themselves upon demand are closer to reality with a method developed at Rice University to print shapeshifting materials.
Lizard legacy sheds new light on web of life
Austral Ecology published 12 new studies this month that together represent a vast progression in knowledge on species like Australia's endangered pygmy bluetongue and iconic sleepy lizard, and share new insights on the roles of parasites, bacteria, environmental change, chemical communication and more - to lizards ecology and ecosystems broadly.
Study by NUI Galway researchers into DNA biology could impact future anti-cancer therapies
A study by the Centre for Chromosome Biology at NUI Galway, Ireland, in partnership with the University of Zurich, has uncovered new insights into how the replication of DNA occurs which can be applied to help develop novel cancer treatments.
Accounting for nature in economies
Gross Domestic Product, the standard metric for measuring national economies, doesn't account for the valuable services provided by nature.
New study finds drinking fruit juice in early years can have long term dietary benefits
A new study from Boston University found that drinking 100% fruit juice early in life was associated with healthier dietary patterns in later childhood without adversely impacting weight gain.
Essential components of dietary restriction revealed
Studies by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), have provided a new understanding into the roles two essential amino acids play in metabolic health, which may help scientists in the fight against obesity.
Does sarcoponic obesity link to metabolic syndrome? An issue that needs clarification
A systematic review and meta-analysis with the main scope to provide benchmark data on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (Mets) among individuals with Sarcopenic Obesity (SO), as well as to detect the potential association between the presence of SO and the higher risk of Mets.
Undersized airways may explain why nonsmokers get COPD
A mismatch between airway and lung size may explain why some nonsmokers get COPD and some heavy smokers do not, according to a new study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
Snapshot of exploding oxygen
For more than 200 years, we have been using X-rays to look inside matter, and progressing to ever smaller structures -from crystals to nanoparticles.
Re-trafficking proteins to fight Salmonella infections
New study demonstrates how monitoring all cellular proteins over time and space can improve our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.
Survival of coronavirus in different cities, on different surfaces
One of the many questions researchers have about the COVID-19 virus is how long it remains alive after someone infected coughs or sneezes.
Study on shorebirds suggests that when conserving species, not all land is equal
Princeton researchers may have solved the long-standing puzzle of why migratory shorebirds around the world are plummeting several times faster than coastal ecosystems are being developed.
Scientists use machine learning to predict major clinical forms of drug cardiotoxicity
Scientists use machine learning to predict major clinical forms of drug cardiotoxicity.
Computer modelling predicts where vaccines are needed most
Researchers have developed a model that can estimate regional disease burden and the impact of vaccination, even in the absence of robust surveillance data, a study in eLife reveals.
Pitt researchers' new material allows for unprecedented imaging deeper in tissues
A team from the Department of Chemistry has established an approach for the creation of a metal-organic framework material that provides new perspectives for biological imaging.
Tuberculosis: Discovery of an ancestral lineage in the African Great Lakes region
Two exceptional strains of tuberculosis, isolated from East African patients with multi-resistant forms of the disease have been discovered.
Mysterious Australian Night Parrots may not see in the dead of night
Australia's most elusive bird, the Night Parrot, may not be much better at seeing in the dark than other parrots active during the day.
How effective are language learning apps?
Researchers from Michigan State University recently conducted a study focusing on Babbel, a popular subscription-based language learning app and e-learning platform, to see if it really worked at teaching a new language.
Paper-based device provides low-power, long-term method for analyzing sweat
Researchers at North Carolina State University have constructed a paper-based device as a model of wearables that can collect, transport and analyze sweat in next-generation wearable technology.
Unexpected uncertainty can breed paranoia, researchers find
In times of unexpected uncertainty, such as the sudden appearance of a global pandemic, people may be more prone to paranoia, Yale University researchers suggest in a new study published in the journal eLife.
COVID-19 loneliness linked to elevated psychiatric symptoms in older adults
A new study has linked COVID-19-based loneliness in older adults with elevated psychiatric symptoms of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms that immediately follow exposure to trauma.
Immune cell discovery could improve the fight against hepatitis B
For the first time, researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) have identified and described a new and unique subset of human cells that are involved in the immune response against hepatitis B (HBV) infection.
BU researcher: Screening for drug use can be reasonable, but not evidence-based
In the June 9 issue of JAMA, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians screen for unhealthy drug use (that is, any use of drugs that are illegal or medications not used for medical purposes) for all adult patients, but admits that there is still little evidence weighing the benefits and risks of this practice.
Magnesium ductility improvement elucidated thru first principles and molecular dynamics simulation
The mechanism of how stacking faults and basal slips occur was elucidated through molecular dynamics simulations.
Antihistamines and similar drugs could slow down Huntington's disease
Scientists have described a potential new therapeutic strategy for slowing down early-stage Huntington's disease in a new study published today in eLife.
Health services should learn long-term lessons of earlier coronavirus outbreaks
Patients recovering from COVID-19 could suffer significant long-term effects, according to research into the experiences of people hospitalised by previous coronavirus outbreaks.
Eye scanner detects molecular aging in humans
People often say that eyes are windows to the soul.
Telemedicine effective for monitoring patients in large pediatric neurology network
As the COVID-19 pandemic sent entire communities into lockdown, doctors quickly adopted telehealth strategies without knowing whether they would be effective or feasible.
Phenothiazine derivatives may find use in photodynamic therapy
A group on organic compounds under Professor Ivan Stoikov's guidance has been working on phenothiazine derivatives at Kazan Federal University since 2016.
Invasive rushes spreading in upland farm fields
Scientists have used a series of Google Earth images to plot the spread of rushes in farm fields in the West Pennine Moor SSSI -- an area of the Lancashire uplands between Bolton, Bury and Darwen.
Nature's 'slow lanes' offer hope for species feeling heat of climate change
Pockets of landscape less prone than adjacent areas to disturbances like fire and drought may hold the key for scientists, conservationists and land managers seeking to preserve vulnerable species in a changing climate.
Study proves that magma chambers can be totally molten
The paper shows that basaltic magma chambers may develop as large bodies of crystal-free melts in the Earth's crust.
Twitter fight: Birds use social networks to pick opponents wisely
In a new article published in the journal Current Opinion in Psychology, UC biologist Elizabeth Hobson says animals such as monk parakeets seem to understand where they fit in a dominance hierarchy and pick their fights accordingly.
Cryoablation comparable to surgery for treating early-stage kidney cancer
A minimally invasive procedure that destroys cancer cells by freezing them is as effective as surgery for treating early-stage kidney cancer, offering similar 10-year survival rates with a lower rate of complications, according to a new study.
Predicting unpredictable reactions
New research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, in collaboration with the Laboratory of Catalysis and Catalytic Processes (Department of Energy) at Politecnico di Milano in Milan, Italy, advances the field of computational catalysis by paving the way for the simulation of realistic catalysts under reaction conditions.
Infected insects may warn of impending citrus disease a year in advance
Despite the first appearance of citrus greening disease in Florida in 2005, the bacterium wasn't found in Texas until 2011, when scientists detected it in the psyllids.
American Cancer Society updates diet and physical activity guideline for cancer prevention
The American Cancer Society updated guideline for diet and physical activity for cancer prevention increases recommended levels of physical activity and have an increased emphasis on reducing the consumption of processed and red meat, sugar-sweetened beverages, processed foods, and alcohol.
Biohybrid model uses organic lungs, synthetic muscles to re-create respiration mechanics
Discussed in APL Bioengineering, researchers created a high-fidelity respiratory simulator that accurately represents the interplay between the abdomen, diaphragm, lungs and pleural space, the fluid-filled membrane surrounding the thorax and lungs.
Virginia Tech research provides new explanation for neutrino anomalies in Antarctica
A new research paper co-authored by a Virginia Tech assistant professor of physics provides a new explanation for two recent strange events that occurred in Antarctica -- high-energy neutrinos appearing to come up out of the Earth on their own accord and head skyward.
Machine learning predicts nanoparticles' structure and dynamics
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have demonstrated that new distance-based machine learning methods are capable of predicting structures and atomic dynamics of nanoparticles reliably.
Holders of negative opinions towards GM food likely to be against other novel food tech
Scientists at NTU Singapore and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health have found that people who hold negative opinions of genetically-modified (GM) food are likely to feel the same about nano-enabled food -- food with nano-additives to enhance flavor, nutrition or prolong shelf life.
NUS and Stanford researchers uncover a new mindset that predicts success
To succeed in modern life, people need to accomplish challenging tasks effectively.
To understand COVID-19, researchers review aging, immune response to viral infections
As clinicians learn about a new disease in real-time, researchers are also investigating what lessons from other respiratory infections could apply to COVID-19.
Signatures of fractional electronic charge observed in topological insulators
Because electrons -- the subatomic particles that carry electricity -- are elementary particles and cannot be split, fractions of electronic charge are not normally encountered.
New hints of volcanism under the heart of northern Europe
Scientists have discovered new evidence for active volcanism next door to some of the most densely populated areas of Europe.
Down to the bone: Understanding how bone-dissolving cells are generated
Bone-dissolving cells called osteoclasts are derived from a type of immune cells called macrophages.
New nanodevice could use solar energy to produce hydrogen
Amsterdam, June 9, 2020 - Solar energy is considered by some to be the ultimate solution to address the current energy crisis and global warming and the environmental crises brought about by excessive consumption of fossil fuels.

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