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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 10, 2020


A rare heart bone is discovered in chimpanzees
Experts from the University of Nottingham have discovered that some chimpanzees have a bone in their heart, which could be vital in managing their health and conservation.
How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control COVID immune response
A long-ignored white blood cell may be central to the immune system overreaction that is the most common cause of death for COVID-19 patients--and University of Michigan researchers found that rod-shaped particles can take them out of circulation.
Aerosol-printed graphene unveiled as low cost, faster food toxin sensor
Researchers in the USA have developed a graphene-based electrochemical sensor capable of detecting histamines (allergens) and toxins in food much faster than standard laboratory tests.
Levels of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in sewage rose with COVID-19 cases in Dutch cities
Scientists have detected RNA from the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, in the feces of people with COVID-19.
Transforming spleen to liver brings new hope for organ regeneration
Scientists from Nanjing University and University of Macau have transformed the spleen into a functioning liver in living mice, which could bring new hope for patients suffering from organ shortage worldwide.
Reusing chicken litter shows benefits
Beneficial bacteria in reused poultry litter can reduce Salmonella levels.
Bedrock type under forests greatly affects tree growth, species, carbon storage
A forest's ability to store carbon depends significantly on the bedrock beneath, according to Penn State researchers who studied forest productivity, composition and associated physical characteristics of rocks in the Appalachian ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania.
Review: A good vitamin D status can protect against cancer
A good vitamin D status is beneficial both in cancer prevention and in the prognosis of several cancers, according to a new research review.
Scientists reveal regional coupled C-N-H2O cycle processes and associated driving mechanisms
From a molecular level to an ecosystem scale, different coupling mechanisms take place during coupled carbon-nitrogen-water (C-N-H2O) cycles, of which essential are water flux and related biogeochemical processes through physicochemical reactions associated with terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems that will subsequently impact regional gross primary productivity (GPP) and C and N exchanges during air-water interactions that occur downstream of watersheds.
New 'sun clock' quantifies extreme space weather switch on/off
Extreme space weather events can significantly impact systems such as satellites, communications systems, power distribution and aviation.
What can maritime shipping learn from brain network science?
Dr. Carlo Vittorio Cannistraci from TU Dresden's Biotechnology Center (BIOTEC) is focusing his research on network science applied to biological systems and neuroscience.
Glycolysis involved in immunosuppression by polyphenol; PCB2DG
Researchers at Shinshu University in Japan found that glycolysis is involved in immunosuppression by polyphenols.
How stimulus dollars are spent will affect emissions for decades
The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have led to a record crash in emissions.
Potential high-risk clones identified among S. maltophilia strains in European hospitals
UAB researchers, based on a collection of clinical isolates from several countries, have established a link between the cell-to-cell communication system (the quorum sensing) and the virulence and resistance phenotypes in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.
People make irrational trust decisions precisely
Online health information is deemed doubly less trustworthy if the text includes both ''shouting'' and spelling errors together, according to a new study at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS).
Secondary school admissions system is still a work in progress
A new study by Lancaster University Management School highlights important inequalities in access to chosen secondary schools in England with minority ethnic families 17% less likely to achieve their first choice school.
Sounds of sickness: Perceptions of coughs, sneezes not diagnosed accurately
You're standing in the store's check-out line, and the customer behind you viciously coughs.
COVID-19 mouse model will speed search for drugs, vaccines
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a mouse model of COVID-19 that is expected to speed up the search for drugs and vaccines for the potentially deadly disease.
Risk of stroke may more than double for African Americans who smoke
Current cigarette smoking and the number of cigarettes smoked per day are associated with more than double the risk of stroke among African Americans.
Physics principle explains order and disorder of swarms
Physicists from the University of Konstanz prove correlation between behaviour of collective animal systems and a so-called 'critical point'.
After a century of searching, scientists find new liquid phase
Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder's Soft Materials Research Center (SMRC) have discovered an elusive phase of matter, first proposed more than 100 years ago and sought after ever since.
Skoltech researchers use machine learning to aid oil production
Skoltech scientists and their industry colleagues have found a way to use machine learning to accurately predict rock thermal conductivity, a crucial parameter for enhanced oil recovery.
Researchers identify new genetic defect linked to ALS
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have identified how certain gene mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
A continuous simulation of Holocene effective moisture change in East and Central Asia
Based on a transient climate evolution model, a lake energy balance model and a lake water balance model, the effective moisture change during the Holocene in East and Central Asia is continuously and quantitatively traced by constructing a virtual lake system.
National Autism Indicators Report: the connection between autism and financial hardship
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute released the 2020 National Autism Indicators Report highlighting the financial challenges facing households of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including higher levels of poverty, material hardship and medical expenses.
One silver-lining amid the pandemic: College students are sleeping better
A new study shows that since stay-at-home orders took effect, university students are devoting 30 more minutes per weekday and 24 minutes per weekend to sleep, keeping more regular sleep hours and experiencing less 'social jetlag' on Monday mornings.
COVID-19 antibody tests: How reliable are they?
With stay-at-home orders expiring around the world, many hope that COVID-19 antibody testing will help businesses and institutions reopen safely.
Decisions made for incapacitated patients often not what families want
Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University report in a study published in JAMA Network Open that nearly half of the time medical treatments and orders received for incapacitated patients were not compatible with goals of care requested by their surrogate decision makers.
Study investigates potential for gut microbiome to alter drug safety and efficacy
Princeton University researchers have developed an approach for studying how the gut microbiome chemically alters oral medications, unlocking possibilities for improving efficacy, reducing side effects, and creating drugs personalized to an individual's microbiome.
Breast cancer treatment costs highest among young women with metastic cancer
In a fight for their lives, young women, age 18-44, spend double the amount of older women to survive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large statewide study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Simulations on biologically relevant time scales
Freiburg researchers deliver new insights into molecular mechanisms relevant for drug development.
Potent tetrahydroquinolone can eliminate parasites that cause toxoplasmosis and malaria
Researchers discovered a lead compound that can significantly reduce or eliminate toxoplasmosis as well as malaria.
New protocol on breast cancer and breastfeeding
Managing women with breast cancer who are breastfeeding is a complex issue.
Oncotarget: The role of EGFR mutations in predicting recurrence in lung adenocarcinoma
Volume 11, Issue 22 of @Oncotarget reported that while lobectomy can improve mortality in this group, about 30 55% of patients will experience disease recurrence.
Fluid mechanics mystery solved
An environmental engineering professor has solved a decades-old mystery regarding the behavior of fluids, a field of study with widespread medical, industrial and environmental applications.
Engineers find neat way to turn waste carbon dioxide into useful material
Making catalysts to convert waste carbon dioxide into useful industrial products has been expensive and complicated -- until now.
Texas A&M researchers light cells using nanosheets for cancer treatment
Scientists in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University are developing new ways to advance the field of regenerative medicine and cancer treatment.
SLC35B1 as a key modulator of a UDPGA transporter into the endoplasmic reticulum
Researchers from Kanazawa University identified SLC35B1 as a key regulator of the glucuronidation process in the human liver.
A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects.
Researchers mimic nature for fast, colorful 3D printing
Brilliantly colored chameleons, butterflies, opals - and now some 3D-printed materials -- reflect color by using nanoscale structures called photonic crystals.
First confirmation of new theory by metamaterial
Physicists in Würzburg have experimentally demonstrated a novel effect for the first time by exploiting topological metamaterials.
Researchers uncover novel approach for treating eczema
Researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) have identified a key enzyme that contributes to eczema, which may lead to better treatment to prevent the skin disorder's debilitating effects.
Microplastic background pollution in the Curonian Spit beach
An article written by an international team of scientists was published recently in Marine Pollution Bulletin magazine.
Flu vaccine coverage linked to reduced antibiotic prescribing
Researchers at CDDEP, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine assessed the impact of influenza vaccination coverage on state-level antibiotic prescribing rates in the United States between 2010 and 2017.
Link between liver and heart disease could lead to new therapeutics
A newly published study of flies found that protecting liver function also preserves heart health.
'Building wealth and health network' reduces food insecurity without providing food
As the coronavirus pandemic forces so many to reckon with growing food insecurity and increased health challenges, the Building Wealth and Health Network program of Drexel University's Center for Hunger-Free Communities is reducing food insecurity and improving mental health - without distributing any food or medicine.
Oncotarget: Exploring the role of survivin in neuroendocrine neoplasms
Volume 11, Issue 23 of @Oncotarget reported that tissue microarrays of 132 patients were stained for survivin using immunohistochemistry and correlated with outcomes.
Experts outline research methods to study puberty suppression impacts on brains of transgender youth
A new set of expert consensus-based recommendations lays out how best to study possible neurodevelopmental impacts of pubertal suppression treatment in transgender youth.
Oncotarget: Hyperprogression to immune blockade followed by a response with cabozantinib
Volume 11, Issue 22 of @Oncotarget reported that more and more patients receive first-line treatment with immunotherapy combinations and not all patients respond in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
New procedure 'rewires' the heart to prevent recurrent fainting spells
A procedure conducted for the first time in the United States at University of Chicago Medicine has provided much-needed relief for a patient who suffered from recurrent fainting spells.
Study suggests Baboon model could aide in Alzheimer's disease interventions
Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute's (Texas Biomed) Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) recently published findings indicating the baboon could prove to be a relevant model to test therapeutics and interventions for neurodegenerative diseases, such as early stage Alzheimer's and related dementias.
Reprogramming of immune system cures child with often-fatal fungal infection
In the June 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, a team of UCLA physicians and scientists describes the first case of immune modulation being used to cure a severe and often fatal fungal infection.
Cannabis poisonings in children linked with drinking and illicit drug use
Most cannabis poisoning incidents involving children resulted from the intentional use of cannabis combined with alcohol, illicit drugs and/or medication, new research suggests.
Gaps in data on marijuana use limit public health response
Better data on marijuana use in the US is needed to support critical public health research, according to a review of relevant surveys conducted by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers.
How COVID-19 has altered sleep in the United States and Europe
Two studies in Current Biology show that relaxed school and work schedules and more time spent at home has led people to sleep more on average with less 'social jetlag' as indicated by a reduced shift in sleep timing and duration on work days versus free days.
Responding to challenges of older adults with COVID-19
Older adults with COVID-19 who survive hospitalizations and return to their homes confront substantial health challenges and an unpredictable future.
NIH study links cigarette smoking to higher stroke risk in African Americans
African Americans who smoke are nearly 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke than those who never smoked, while former smokers show a similarly lower risk as never smokers, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
New control technique could improve accuracy of industrial robots
The brains of humans and other animals often practice feedforward control as they are very good at whole-system modeling.
Singapore team develops online atlas of human immunome for precision medicine
Interactive web-based tool 'EPIC' hosts and analyses comprehensive immune cell data to understand the mechanisms of immunity and how they respond to disease.
Population ecology: Origins of genetic variability in seals
A new study led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers shows that fluctuations in population sizes in the past have had a significant effect on contemporary seal populations, and estimates the risk of genetic impoverishment in the species investigated.
Oncotarget: miR-151a enhances Slug dependent angiogenesis
Volume 11, Issue 23 of @Oncotarget reported that the authors have previously established that mi R-151a functions as an onco-mi R in non-small cell lung cancer cells by inducing partial EMT and enhancing tumor growth.
New recommendations on genetic testing for prostate cancer
Genetic testing for prostate cancer is still not common. New guidelines show why it's important, and which genes to test for.
Roadkill study identifies animals most at risk in Europe
New method used to predict how many birds and mammals are being killed on European roads, as well as identifying species whose long-term survival is threatened by roads.
Antarctic sea-ice models improve for the next IPCC report
All the new coupled climate models project that the area of sea ice around Antarctica will decline by 2100, but the amount of loss varies considerably between the emissions scenarios.
Scientists predict the best strategy for lifting COVID-19 lockdown
Scientists from the University of Oxford and the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology show that a gradual strategy with two discrete releases of subgroups of the quarantined population would be optimal for society as a whole to minimize deaths while protecting the economy.
Study discovers BAM15 as a potential treatment for obesity
A new study offers the first evidence that a protein named BAM15 acts as an energy uncoupler and could be an effective drug for treating obesity and related diseases.
Healthcare professional revenue falls nearly 50% across nation during COVID-19 pandemic
In April 2020, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare professional services declined 68 percent in utilization and 48% in revenue based on total estimated in-network amounts compared to April 2019 nationally.
Acoustics put a fresh spin on electron transitions
Electrons are very much at the mercy of magnetic fields, which scientists can manipulate to control the electrons and their angular momentum -- i.e. their 'spin.'
Liquid metals break down organic fuels into ultra-thin graphitic sheets
For the first time, FLEET researchers at UNSW, Sydney show the synthesis of ultra-thin graphitic materials at room temperature using organic fuels (which can be as simple as basic alcohols such as ethanol).
New in Ethics and Human Research
Covid-19: Why Challenge Trials of Vaccines Could be Ethical, Despite Severe Risks, Equitably Sharing the Benefits and Burdens of Research.
A method has been developed to study the 'traces' of coronal mass ejections at the Sun.
Scientists at Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (skoltech), together with colleagues from the Karl-Franzens University of Graz and the Kanzelhoehe Observatory (Austria) developed an automatic method for detecting 'coronal dimmings', or 'traces' of coronal mass ejections at the Sun, and also proved that they are reliable indicators of the early diagnosis of powerful emissions of energy from the atmosphere of the Sun, traveling to Earth at great speed.
Different hormone therapies affect brain function differently
Sex hormones influence the structure and function of the brain, but little is known about the effect of hormone therapies (HT) on changes in the brain during menopause.
Falling clean energy costs can provide opportunity to boost climate action during COVID-19 recovery: UN
A UN report says 184 GW of clean power capacity was added in 2019, a 20 GW jump from the 164 GW added in 2018.
Government health, safety regulations backfire with conservatives, study shows
A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows government-imposed restrictions can backfire, depending on political ideology.
A 'hole' lot of sponge! New technique to create super-sponges is a game changer
Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are sponge-like organic-inorganic hybrid materials and have a variety of uses due to their ultra-high 'porosity,' or the ratio of pores or air pockets to the solid material.
Cellular stress causes cancer cell chemoresistance
Resistance of cancer cells against therapeutic agents is a major cause of treatment failure, especially in recurrent diseases.
Surprisingly strong and deformable silicon
Researchers at ETH have shown that tiny objects can be made from silicon that are much more deformable and stronger than previously thought.
Oncotarget: Adoptive cell therapy in combination with checkpoint inhibitors
Volume 11, Issue 22 of @Oncotarget reported that there are rationale and evidence supporting immune therapy in Ovarian Cancers.
Marijuana concentrates spike THC levels but don't boost impairment
A study of 121 regular users of legal market cannabis found that higher potency does not necessarily mean greater intoxication.
Speed of space storms key to protecting astronauts and satellites from radiation
Measuring the speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as they erupt from the sun, in addition to their size, found to be crucial in providing accurate early warnings that keep astronauts and technology safe.
Considering health when switching to cleaner electricity
Power plants that burn coal and other fossil fuels emit not only planet-warming carbon dioxide, but also pollutants linked to breathing problems and premature death.
Yale researchers find potential treatment for Rett Syndrome
An experimental cancer drug can extend the life of mice with Rett Syndrome, a devastating genetic disorder that afflicts about one of every 10,000 to 15,000 girls within 6 to 18 months after birth, Yale researchers report June 10 in the journal Molecular Cell.
What makes a giant jellyfish's sting deadly
With summer on the way, and some beaches reopening after COVID-19 shutdowns, people will be taking to the ocean to cool off on a hot day.
Scientists reveal relationship between Dek and Intron retention during muscle stem cells quiescence
Adult stem cells are essential for tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of quiescent adult stem cells remain elusive.
Study identifies strategies states use to limit local government control
A new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, takes a closer look at the strategies state legislatures use -- often behind closed doors -- to pass preemptive laws that limit local government control.
Synthesized cell culture process sets stage for more efficient cancer research
Researchers in Japan have replicated cancer cells from diseased bladder tissue in dogs, minimizing the use of costly stem cell products.
NASA finds post-tropical depression Cristobal soaking the Great Lakes
NASA's GPM satellite gathered data on what is now Post-Tropical Cyclone Cristobal and revealed some areas of heavy rain were occurring.
Nanopatterned 'lab-on-a-chip' noninvasively detects early and advanced breast cancer
A scalable 'lab-on-a-chip' technology based on inkjet printing methods detected breast cancer in plasma samples from patients with more than 90% accuracy, according to a new study.
COVID-19 false negative results if used too early
In a new study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that testing people for SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes COVID-19 -- too early in the course of infection is likely to result in a false negative test, even though they may eventually test positive for the virus.
Scientists present new method for remote sensing of atmospheric dynamics
Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a new method for wind speed remote measurements.
Mental, physical health of people with obesity affected during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a significant impact on people with obesity as they struggle to manage their weight and mental health during shelter-in-place orders, according to research led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and UT Southwestern.
Newly synthesized fungal compound can switch on a self-destruct button for cancer
Cancers cells use a special technique to propagate; they delete their 'programmed death' gene through mutation, 'forget' to die when their lifetime is over, and continue to grow instead.
Pre-term deliveries due to COVID-19 could be avoided by studying EHRs
Using electronic health record (EHR) data to simulate drug trials for pregnant patients could one day offer a solution to the current practice of delivering babies pre-term if an expectant mother contracts COVID-19, according to a position paper published in Nature Medicine.
Study finds older physicians and those of asian ancestry are at highest risk of suicide
Health care professionals who die by suicide are more likely to be older and nearing the end of their careers, or be of Asian or Pacific Islander ancestry, or confronting physical, mental health or medical malpractice issues.
18.2 million at increased risk of severe COVID-19 uninsured or underinsured: Harvard study
Harvard researchers found that 18.2 million Americans who are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 due to age and underlying health conditions were also either uninsured or underinsured.
Noise disturbs the brain's compass
Our sense of direction tends to decline with age. In 'Nature Communications', researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and experts from the USA report on new insights into the causes of this phenomenon.
Kissing bugs also find suitable climatic conditions in Europe
An infection with Chagas disease is only possible in Latin America since the insect species that spread the disease only occur there.
Proposed seismic surveys in Arctic Refuge likely to cause lasting damage
Winter vehicle travel can cause long-lasting damage to the tundra, according to a new paper by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers.
Immunodominant epitopes identified for designing peptide-based vaccine against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers have identified a set of potential immunodominant epitopes from the SARS-CoV-2 proteome.
Minority students can become 'hyperpersistent' when they achieve better than middling grades
Scientists report that undergraduate students from underrepresented groups who score below a C- in general chemistry are less likely to persist in STEM classes than their classmates with similar grades, but they are much more likely than their peers to persist if they earn a C+ or better.
Study confirms the importance of informal learning in hospitals
The coronavirus crisis has shaken the structure of the Spanish healthcare system, leaving staff backed into a corner in their fight to beat the infection.
Intracellular biopsy technique for fast microRNAs profiling in living cells
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are gaining more attention in researches. To achieve fast and highly sensitive profiling of miRNAs, a research team from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed a novel high-throughput intracellular biopsy technique that isolates targeted miRNAs from living cells within around 10 minutes by using diamond nanoneedles.
New study of endangered pacific pocket mice provides valuable genetic insights
Drawing on genetic data from six generations of Pacific pocket mice in this program, a new study has tracked reproductive success relative to a mouse's ancestral population.
NIH-funded study to evaluate drugs prescribed to children with COVID-19
Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have launched an effort to evaluate drugs prescribed to treat COVID-19 in infants, children and adolescents across the country.
Ancient enzymes can contribute to greener chemistry
A research team at Uppsala University has resurrected several billion-year-old enzymes and reprogrammed them to catalyse completely different chemical reactions than their modern versions can manage.
An ISGlobal team achieves massive sexual conversion of the malaria parasite in a dish
The technique will facilitate the design of new tools to block disease transmission.
Obesity patients report health challenges during shelter in place
Shelter-in-place orders to reduce the spread of COVID-19 put unusual strains on people with obesity, making it more difficult for them to eat properly and manage their weight, according to a UT Southwestern study.
We're not all equal in the face of the coronavirus
HLA genes, responsible for the adaptive immune system, differ between individuals.
Beavers are diverse forest landscapers
Beavers are ecosystem engineers that cut down trees to build dams, eventually causing floods.
Will lockdown loneliness make us loners?
Over the past months at least half of the world's population has been affected by some form of lockdown due to COVID-19.
Island 'drowning' is not inevitable as sea levels rise
An international study led by the University of Plymouth (UK) suggests islands composed of gravel material can evolve in the face of overtopping waves, with sediment from the beach face being transferred to the island's surface.
Bees? Please. These plants are putting ants to work
This is the first plant species in the world found to have adapted traits that enables a mutually beneficial relationship with ants.
Mozart may reduce seizure frequency in people with epilepsy
A new clinical research study by Dr. Marjan Rafiee and Dr.
First impressions can sway financial professionals' forecasts of firms for up to 6 years
A new study looked at the influence among finance professionals of first impression bias of firms' performance, which spurs people to place undue weight on early experiences.
Extinct camelids reveal insights about North America's ancient savannas
A new study looking at extinct camelids -- ancestors of today's camels and llamas -- tells the story of North America's ancient savannas and highlights how past climatic and environmental conditions influenced the composition of mammalian faunas.
Ebola transmission risks would be taken more seriously with ground-up interventions
A study led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found significant differences in disease risk perception and channels of information about Ebola virus disease (EVD) in rural areas and urban centres of Guinea, West Africa.
Fewer complications after organ transplantation
A large international study coordinated by University Hospital Regensburg and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has demonstrated the safety of new cell therapy approaches for use in kidney transplant recipients.
C. diff captures blood cell cofactor to build defensive shield
In a cruel twist, the bacterium Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) makes us bleed and then uses our blood to defend itself against us.
Look to precision public health to address the perfect storm fueling COVID-19 mortality
The interaction of COVID-19 with co-existing non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is a perfect storm, particularly for communities of poverty.
ASTRO issues first clinical guideline on radiation therapy for cervical cancer
A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides recommendations for radiation therapy to treat patients with nonmetastatic cervical cancer.
Three research groups, two kinds of electronic properties, one material
An outstanding collaboration combines materials science, experimental and theoretical physics.
How the brain controls our speech
Speaking requires both sides of the brain. Each hemisphere takes over a part of the complex task of forming sounds, modulating the voice and monitoring what has been said.
New study finds surface disturbance can limit mule deer migration
Researchers used 145 migrations from 56 individual deer to examine disturbance effects at various scales.
Flexible and recyclable optoelectronics move a step closer
A cheap, flexible and recyclable alternative to indium tin oxide in electrodes has been presented by researchers in Australia, where a nanosphere lithography process was used to create transparent metal nanomesh.
Nutraceuticals for promoting longevity
The review, published in Current Nutraceuticals, offers a special focus on the nutraceuticals that impact insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling and sirtuin activity in mediating longevity and healthspan.
Climate change: Warm springtime's unwelcome legacy
A new study shows that the severe impact of the summer drought that hit Europe in 2018 was partly due to the spring heatwave that preceded it, which triggered early and rapid plant growth, depleting soil moisture.
HKUST scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
An international team led by HKUST scientists has developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment.
Self-healing bone cement
Material scientists at the University of Jena have developed a bone replacement based on calcium phosphate cement and reinforced with carbon fibers.

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