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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 11, 2020


Keep moving to prevent major mobility disability
According to research, being physically inactive is the strongest risk factor for disability as we age.
News reports of education 'achievement gaps' may perpetuate stereotypes of Black Americans
A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated stereotypes of Black Americans as lacking education and may have increased implicit stereotyping of Black students as less competent than White students.
Which factors control the height of mountains?
Which forces and mechanisms determine the height of mountains? A group of researchers from Münster and Potsdam has now found a surprising answer: It is not erosion and weathering of rocks that determine the upper limit of mountain massifs, but rather an equilibrium of forces in the Earth's crust.
Applying 'magic angle' twistronics to manipulate the flow of light
'Twisted' layers of 2D materials produce photonic topological transition at 'magic' rotation angles.
Freshly printed magnets
During metal processing in the 3D laser printer, temperatures of more than 2,500 degrees Celsius are reached within milliseconds, causing some components of the alloys to evaporate.
Political 'oil spill': Polarization is growing stronger and getting stickier
Experts have documented that political polarization is intensifying in the United States.
Three stages to COVID-19 brain damage identified by top neurologists in Journal of Alzheimer Disease paper
The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease has just published a paper with a comprehensive review of the COVID-19's effect on the nervous system which classifies brain damage caused by COVID-19 into three stages.
Adding noise for completely secure communication
How can we protect communications against 'eavesdropping' if we don't trust the devices used in the process?
E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting.
Outcomes of COVID-19 in countries with different income levels
Possible outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic on low- and middle-income countries are described.
Many children in intensive care may not be getting rehabilitation therapy, study shows
Adult patients in hospital intensive care units (ICUs) are often given rehabilitation therapy and urged to keep mobile from an early point in their hospital stays.
CABI confirms presence of devastating date pest the red palm weevil on Socotra Island
CABI scientist Dr Arne Witt has led an international team of researchers who have confirmed for the first time the presence of the date pest red palm weevil on Socotra Island, Yemen, putting the livelihoods of residents at risk.
Nation must prepare for COVID-19 related drug shortages
A new paper published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the nation's current shortage of vitally needed medications, and how this dangerous situation is being made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Twisted microfiber's network responses to water vapor
Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST): graduate student Kulisara Budpud, Assoc.
Chronic exposure to interferons being tested for COVID-19 therapy may increase the risk of bacterial
Two separate studies in mice suggest that a class of interferons being evaluated in clinical trials as a therapy for COVID-19 may increase susceptibility to bacterial infections, depending on how long patients are exposed to it, and when they receive it.
Viewing dopamine receptors in their native habitat
A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane.
COVID-19 threatens the entire nervous system
A new review of neurological symptoms of COVID-19 patients in current scientific literature reveals the disease poses a global threat to the entire nervous system.
A creative way to expand the geriatrics workforce
In this new study, researchers outlined the results and outcomes of an undergraduate service-learning course that used music and filmmaking to teach person-centered approaches to dementia.
'Matador' guppies trick predators
Trinidadian guppies behave like matadors, focusing a predator's point of attack before dodging away at the last moment, new research shows.
Discovering how the brain works through computation
Researchers from Columbia Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Graz University of Technology propose a new computational system to expand the understanding of the brain at an intermediate level, between neurons and cognitive phenomena such as language.
Female researchers majorly under-represented in COVID-19 research
New research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found significant gender bias in research authorship relating to COVID-19, which means that women's views are not equally shaping the response to the pandemic.
Health care workers at Rush invited to participate in national PCORnet study of hydroxychloroquine
Rush University Medical Center has opened enrollment for a new clinical trial investigating whether the drug hydroxychloroquine is better than a placebo in preventing COVID-19 infection in healthy people working in health care settings.
Rice engineers offer smart, timely ideas for AI bottlenecks
Rice University researchers have demonstrated methods for both designing data-centric computing hardware and co-designing hardware with machine-learning algorithms that together can improve energy efficiency in artificial intelligence hardware by as much as two orders of magnitude.
Cost, distance from hospitals present barriers to surgical care
A Rutgers-led study in Colombia can help health care providers across the globe develop plans to improve surgical care access in their regions.
Bacteria in Chinese pickles can prevent cavities -- Ben-Gurion University study
Prof. Ariel Kushmaro of the BGU Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering and the Chinese research team evaluated 14 different types of Sichuan pickles from southwest China.
Nature provides roadmap to potential breakthroughs in solar energy technology
As policymakers increasingly turn toward science in addressing global climate change, one Michigan State University scientist is looking to nature to develop the next generation of solar energy technology.
Lack of mitochondria causes severe disease in children
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that excessive degradation of the power plants of our cells plays an important role in the onset of mitochondrial disease in children.
New discovery of giant bipedal crocodile footprints in the cretaceous of Korea
A new study has announced the surprising discovery of well-preserved footprints belonging to a large bipedal ancestor of modern-day crocodiles.
The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text
The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing.
How Dashcams help and hinder forensics
Dashcams are vital for helping police investigate car incidents, however the way the footage is submitted to police, managed and processed can cause problems.
Nickel-based catalysts tested at Boca de Jaruco oilfield in Cuba
In this publication, the authors studied transformations of asphaltenes, the compounds determining the viscosity of petroleum.
Antihypotensive agent disrupts the immune system in sepsis
Patients who go into shock caused by sepsis (septic shock) are treated with the antihypotensive agent norepinephrine.
Stiffer roadways could improve truck fuel efficiency
A theoretical study by MIT researchers suggests that small changes in roadway paving practices could reduce that efficiency loss, potentially eliminating a half-percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, at little to no cost.
An aspirin a day keeps the bowel doctor away
A regular dose of aspirin to reduce the risk of inherited bowel cancer lasts at least 10 years after stopping treatment, research has revealed.
Lightning in a (nano)bottle: new supercapacitor opens door to better wearable electronics
Researchers from Skoltech, Aalto University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have designed a high-performance, low-cost, environmentally friendly, and stretchable supercapacitor that can potentially be used in wearable electronics
Better reading proficiency linked to fewer youth homicides
A good education system has long been linked with providing opportunity for people to get better jobs and escape poverty.
Utah's arches continue to whisper their secrets
Two new studies from University of Utah researchers show what can be learned from a short seismic checkup of natural rock arches and how erosion sculpts some arches -- like the iconic Delicate Arch -- into shapes that lend added strength.
Scientists propose data encoding method for the 6G standard
A group of scientists from ITMO University have demonstrated the possibility of modifying terahertz pulses in order to use them for data transmission.
Animal territorial behavior could play larger role in disease spread than formerly thought
Using a mathematical model, linking animal movement and the spread of disease, a new study finds that territorial behaviors in animals, such as a puma using its scent to mark its domain, may help to decrease the severity of a potential disease outbreak -- but not without the cost of increased persistence of the disease within the population.
Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities
Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide.
Type III interferons: Protective or harmful in COVID-19?
Interferons and other cytokines produced by the immune system are important defenses against viral infections, but as we have seen in COVID-19, they can also contribute to damaging, potentially life-threatening lung inflammation.
Comparing survival after minimally invasive hysterectomy or open surgery for early-stage cervical cancer
This study combined the results of 15 observational studies with 9,500 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer to compare the risk of cancer recurrence and death associated with receiving minimally invasive versus open radical hysterectomy.
Research with industry executives reveals impact of COVID-19 on air transport sector
Research has assessed the initial impact of COVID-19 on air transport and found that it is likely to lead to a smaller, consolidated sector in the future.
Researchers model human stem cells to identify degeneration in glaucoma
More than 3 million Americans have glaucoma, a serious eye condition causing vision loss.
Novel noncovalent bond blocks repulsive odor of isocyanides
Researchers at St. Petersburg State University have developed a method for eliminating the overpoweringly unpleasant odor of isocyanides, an important class of organic compounds.
Simple explanation suffices for conduction in nickelates
Some metal oxides, such as nickelates, have a tuneable resistivity, which makes them an interesting material for adaptable electronics and cognitive computing.
Camelina sativa oil and fatty fish have positive effects on lipid metabolism
Camelina sativa oil and fatty fish are rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids, but their health benefits seem to differ.
Landmark study shows inflammation after meals varies dramatically among healthy adults
Researchers led by King's College London announced today the first published results from PREDICT, the largest ongoing nutritional study of its kind.
Strength training benefits patients with cirrhosis
Three hours of weekly strength training combined with protein supplements leads to both bigger and stronger muscles in patients with cirrhosis.
Sound waves transport droplets for rewritable lab-on-a-chip devices
Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a versatile microfluidic lab-on-a-chip that uses sound waves to create tunnels in oil to digitally manipulate and transport droplets.
Clues to ageing come to light in vivid snapshots of brain cell links
Striking images of some five billion brain cell connections have been created by scientists, mapping a lifetime's changes across the brain in minute detail.
A vitamin A analog may help treat diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among the working-age population.
Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds
In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes.
Do you want a cheerleader or a critic? The Voice shows how we really choose our mentors.
We think that we will choose our personal and professional advisors based on reasoned criteria about their expertise, competence and experience.
Warburg effect: Sugar-tagging helps drug compounds to target human prostate cancer cells
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), together with German and Russian colleagues, have developed a lead compound to fight chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer.
Adult stem cell study shows fish oil may help with depression
A study published in Molecular Psychiatry shows that patient-derived adult stem cells can be used to model major depressive disorder and test how a patient may respond to medication and that fish oil, when tested in the model, created an antidepressant response.
The mystery of visual stability
We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina -- making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world.
A breakthrough in developing multi-watt terahertz lasers
Researchers from Lehigh University are reporting another terahertz technology breakthrough: they have developed a new phase-locking technique for plasmonic lasers and, through its use, achieved a record-high power output for terahertz lasers.
Self-driving cars that recognize free space can better detect objects
It's important that self-driving cars quickly detect other cars or pedestrians sharing the road.
Denisovan DNA influences immune system of modern day Oceanian populations
More than 120,000 novel human genetic variations that affect large regions of DNA have been discovered, some of which are linked to immune response, disease susceptibility or digestion.
An ion channel senses cell swelling and helps cells to choose a response
Liz Haswell's lab at WashU provides insight into how plants sense and respond (including suicide) to mechanical signals, such as cell swelling, rather than chemicals signals, such as nutrients or growth factors.
Hallucinations in people with seizures may point to suicide risk
A study from scientists at Trinity College Dublin and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland shows that 8% of individuals with a history of seizures report hallucinations, including experiences of hearing or seeing things that are not based in reality.
Experts clarify subtypes of multiple sclerosis to improve care and clinical trials
An international committee has clarified previously published descriptors of courses of MS and disease activity.
New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe
A cosmic measurement technique independent of all others adds strong evidence pointing to a problem with the current theoretical model describing the composition and evolution of the Universe.
Remixed mantle suggests early start of plate tectonics
New Curtin University research on the remixing of Earth's stratified deep interior suggests that global plate tectonic processes, which played a pivotal role in the existence of life on Earth, started to operate at least 3.2 billion years ago.
Protecting eels protects freshwater biodiversity
An international research team has conducted a field survey on two species of eel native to Japan and other organisms that share the same habitat, revealing for the first time in the world that these eels can act as comprehensive surrogate species for biodiversity conservation in freshwater rivers.
Solving a Parkinson's disease puzzle through protein design
EPFL researchers, in collaboration with UTSW and UCSD scientists, have developed a computational protein design approach, and used it to obtain the first ever high-resolution structure of an activated dopamine receptor in its natural cell membrane environment.
Dopamine signaling allows neural circuits to generate coordinated behaviors
As part of the study, the MIT research team invented a new open-source microscopy platform complete with a parts list and online instructions for other labs to build their own.
COVID-19 triage decisions should 'ignore life-years saved,' writes bioethicist in Medical Care
How do we decide which patients with COVID-19 should get priority for lifesaving ventilators and ICU beds?
Cascade sets the stage for superconductivity in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene
The researchers used scanning tunneling microscopy to observe what happens when they add additional electrons to magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene.
NIH scientists develop blood test to help improve liver cancer screening
Scientists have developed a new test that can help identify people who are likely to develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer.
Ancient crocodiles walked on two legs like dinosaurs
An international research team has been stunned to discover that some species of ancient crocodiles walked on their two hind legs like dinosaurs and measured over three metres in length.
Aspirin reduces long-term colorectal cancer risk in genetically predisposed individuals
Aspirin reduces colorectal cancer risk by half in individuals at high genetic risk.
New study confirms superiority of open surgery for early-stage cervical cancer
A study led by researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center confirms that minimally invasive surgery for early-stage cervical cancer is linked to higher rates of recurrence and death compared with open surgery.
Study examines emotional regulation, family history as risk factors for suicidal behavior
In a recent study, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined the intersection of two risk factors, parental history of suicidal behavior and emotion regulation, in children 6-9 years of age.
Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime
Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time -- a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe.
An essential sustainable farming practice faces one big limitation: Land to produce seeds
The growth in cover cropping in the United States may soon hit a ceiling: planting millions of acres of cover crops requires huge extensions of land to produce cover crop seed.
Effects of potassium fertilization in pear trees
Potassium fertilization effects on quality, economics, and yield in pear orchard.
The disease pyramid: Environment, pathogen, individual and microbiome
Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), the Université de Toulouse and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) show how the microbial colonisation of the organism influences the interactions between living organisms, the environment and pathogens, using amphibians like frogs as examples.
Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos.
Mental disorders in the family affects the treatment of people with bipolar disorder
Patients with bipolar disorder who have multiple family members with severe mental disorders, are more difficult to treat and require more medicine.
A novel mechanism that triggers a cellular immune response
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine present comprehensive evidence that supports a novel trigger for a cell-mediated response and propose a mechanism for its action.
Doing good does you good
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine takes a closer look at the benefits of volunteering to the health and well-being of volunteers, both validating and refuting findings from previous research.
High doses of ketamine can temporarily switch off the brain, say researchers
Researchers have identified two brain phenomena that may explain some of the side-effects of ketamine.
Crop pathogens 'remarkably adaptable'
Pathogens that attack agricultural crops show remarkable adaptability to new climates and new plant hosts, new research shows.
Improving the operation and performance of Wi-Fi networks for the 5G/6G ecosystem
An article published in the advanced online edition of the journal Computer Communications shows that the use of machine learning can improve the operation and performance of the Wi-Fi networks of the future, those of the 5G/6G ecosystem.
Past stressful experiences do not create resilience to future trauma, new study finds
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, new research finds that past stressors and traumatic events increase vulnerability to mental illnesses, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD).
Putting 'super' in natural killer cells
Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and deleting a key gene, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have created natural killer cells -- a type of immune cell -- with measurably stronger activity against a form of leukemia, both in vivo and in vitro.
Human embryo-like model created from human stem cells
Scientists have developed a new model to study an early stage of human development, using human embryonic stem cells.
Army researchers find new ways to test swarming drones
The US Army has implemented a one-of-a-kind outdoor system to test swarming drones -- with a capacity of more than 1,500 times the volume of a typical testing facility.
Chemotherapy/immunotherapy combo shows promise for first-line treatment of mesothelioma
Inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma, is a rare and aggressive cancer of the protective lining of the lungs, or pleura, often caused by exposure to asbestos.
Thematic package: Corona and sustainability
The COVID-19 pandemic remains an important topic throughout the world.
Shift to online consultations helps patients with chronic pain receive support in lockdown
Academics and practitioners from the Centre for Pain Research at the University of Bath (UK) have been active in ensuring those with debilitating chronic pain conditions continue to receive support throughout lockdown, including by championing virtual consultations.
Plastic in the deep sea: Virtually unaltered after a quarter of a century
Even in the most remote regions of the oceans plastic debris can be found.
Half the earth relatively intact from global human influence
If we act quickly and decisively, there is a slim window in which we can still conserve roughly half of Earth's land in a relatively intact state, a UC Davis study suggests.
Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis
Plague was commonplace in medieval times, so finding its victims in a 15th century Lithuanian graveyard was no surprise.
Substandard hand sanitizers readily available on market, confirm pharmacists
AN INTERNATIONAL team of pharmacy experts has researched the effectiveness of hand sanitisers in the fight against CoViD-19 and warned the public to beware of sub-standard products.
Tiny pump builds polyrotaxanes with precision
Northwestern University researchers have developed the most precise way to build polyrotaxanes by using two artificial molecular pumps to install rings onto each end of a polymer string.
The SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain may provide a specific and sensitive target for population
A new analysis of blood sera taken from 63 COVID-19 patients, 71 controls, and various coronavirus-exposed animals provides strong support for the use of the SARS-CoV-2 virus' receptor-binding domain (RBD) as an antigen for reliable tests to detect antibodies to the virus.
Researchers identify 'hot spots' for developing lymphatic vessels
The development of the lymphatic vasculature is crucially dependent on one specific protein -- the growth factor VEGF-C.
Scientists apply 'twistronics' to light propagation and make a breakthrough discovery
A CUNY ASRC research team has employed ''twistronics'' concepts (the science of layering and twisting two-dimensional materials to control their electrical properties) to manipulate the flow of light in extreme ways.
ModGraProDep: Artificial intelligence and probabilistic modelling in clinical oncology
Improving the prediction of survival indicators in patients with breast cancer using tools from artificial intelligence and probabilistic modelling is the aim of ModGraProDep, an innovative system presented in a study led by Ramon Clèries, lecturer at the Department of Clinical Sciences of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Barcelona and member of the Oncology Master Plan/ICO-IDIBELL.
Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers
Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.
People with diabetes are at greater risk of bone fractures
People living with diabetes are at greater risk of bone fractures, new research led by the University of Sheffield has found.
Angling for underwater WiFi
Scuba divers could send sea life shots in real time using an aquatic internet service.
Which businesses should be open?
A new study by MIT researchers uses a variety of data on consumer and business activity to tackle that question, measuring 26 types of businesses by both their usefulness and risk.
People who eat a late dinner may gain weight
Eating a late dinner may contribute to weight gain and high blood sugar, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
Palaeontology: Ancient footprints may belong to two-legged crocodile, not giant pterosaur
The discovery of large well-preserved footprints belonging to an ancestor of modern-day crocodiles from the Lower Cretaceous Jinju Formation of South Korea is reported this week in Scientific Reports.
Temperature, humidity, latitude analysis to estimate potential spread, seasonality of COVID-19
The association between climate and the spread of COVID-19 is examined in this observational study.
Can your gut microbes tell you how old you really are?
Harvard longevity researchers in collaboration with Insilico Medicine develop the first AI-powered microbiomic aging clock
From bacteria to you: The biological reactions that sustain our rhythms
Methylation and the circadian clock are both conserved mechanisms found in all organisms.
Ultra-thin camera lenses of the future could see the light of day
In the future, camera lenses could be thousands of times thinner and significantly less resource-intensive to manufacture.
A compound unlike any other
A compound discovered in the gills of wood-eating clams could be the solution to a group of parasites responsible for some of the world's most common infections.
A new character for Pokémon? Novel endemic dogfish shark species discovered from Japan
A new endemic deep-water dogfish shark: Squalus shiraii, was discovered in the tropical waters of Southern Japan by an international team of scientists led by Dr.
Time-saving high-intensity workouts can benefit people with spinal cord injuries
Research from the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University has found that the practical advantages of high-intensity interval training (HIIT), or short bursts of all-out exercise, could be especially beneficial for people who have experienced spinal cord injuries (SCI).
Promising path found for COVID-19 therapeutics
A team of researchers at the University of Georgia has successfully demonstrated that a set of drug-like small molecules can block the activity of a key SARS-CoV-2 protein -- providing a promising path for new COVID-19 therapeutics.
Research reveals function of genetic pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants
A research collaboration has demonstrated the function of a genetic pathway for anther development, with this pathway proven in 2019 work to be present widely in the flowering plants that evolved over 200 million years ago.
Fuel walking and cycling with low carbon diets, researchers say
Walking and cycling have many benefits and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but researchers say we need to think about what people eat to fuel their walking and cycling.
New findings help design highly efficient metal oxide catalyst for ozone removal
A research team led by Prof. CHEN Yunfa from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences demonstrated the electron generation, compensation and transfer between ZnO and O3 through tuning crystal defects in ZnO.
Opposition to sexual- and gender-minority rights linked to support for Christian dominance
Many Christian and political conservatives in the U.S. support legislation to deny sexual and gender minorities the rights most Americans enjoy: unfettered access to jobs, housing, services and public facilities; the opportunity to marry as they choose; and the right to adopt a child.
Matrix imaging: An innovation for improving ultrasound resolution
In conventional ultrasounds, variations in soft tissue structure distort ultrasound wavefronts.
A protein that helps to fight viruses can also block lung damage repair
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have found that a protein which is initially helpful in the body's immune response to a virus, can later interfere with the repair of lung tissue.
RCSI researchers find potential new way to improve treatment for common bleeding disorder
Scientists have found a potential new way to promote blood clotting that could be used to help develop treatments for Von Willebrand Disease, the most common genetic bleeding disorder.
How to handle fraudulent reviews on online portals? Study gives tips to managers
A new study sought to determine how consumers respond to potentially fraudulent reviews and how review portals (e.g., Amazon, Expedia, TripAdvisor, Yelp) can leverage this information to design better fraud-management policies and increase consumers' trust.
How targeting killer T cells in the lungs could lead to immunity against respiratory viruses
A significant site of damage during COVID-19 infection is the lungs.
New insights into epigenetic modifications
Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Rome, in collaboration with Tim Bestor at Columbia University in New York and John Edwards at Washington University in St.
Neuroscientists discover neural circuits that control hibernation-like behaviors in mice
Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have discovered a population of neurons in the hypothalamus that controls hibernation-like behavior, or torpor, in mice, revealing for the first time the neural circuits that regulate this state.
Only 1 in 3 COVID-19 research authors are women and even fewer are senior authors
Women make up only a third of all authors who have published research on COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic in January this year, and even fewer of them are senior authors on these papers, suggests an analysis in BMJ Global Health.
USC survey suggests the importance of clearly communicating coronavirus risk, behaviors
A newly published USC analysis of March survey data sheds light on our understanding of how perceptions of the virus impact behavior, finding individuals who perceive greater risk from COVID-19 were more likely to engage in protective behaviors like handwashing and social distancing.
Retinitis pigmentosa research probes role of the enzyme DHDDS in this genetic disease
Researchers who made a knock-in mouse-model of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa 59, or RP59, expected to see retinal degeneration and retinal thinning.
Fentanyl tops list of drugs found in Baltimore overdose patients
Hospital testing for illicit drug use does not typically include fentanyl, however, a new University of Maryland study found after expanding testing, that fentanyl, a potent synthetic opioid linked to most fatal overdoses in Maryland, tops the list of drugs detected in overdose patients at two Baltimore hospital emergency departments.
UNC-Chapel Hill researchers create new type of COVID-19 antibody test
UNC School of Medicine researchers Aravinda de Silva, PhD, and Prem Lakshmanane, Ph.D., and colleagues developed a COVID-19 test that pinpoints human antibodies specific to a particular part of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein.
Overactive enzyme causes hereditary hypertension
After more than 40 years, several teams at the MDC and ECRC have now made a breakthrough discovery with the help of two animal models: they have proven that an altered gene encoding the enzyme PDE3A causes an inherited form of high blood pressure.
Clinical updates for diagnostic ultrasound during coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic
An open-access article published ahead-of-print in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) by radiologists in Singapore recommends a number of applied updates to the workflow of diagnostic ultrasound to prevent nosocomial transmission of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to frontline US service providers: patient and visitor screening, segregation and monitoring of staff, scan vetting, strict protocol adherence, and more.
Scientists rescue mini retinas from eye disease via new gene therapy approach
Scientists have developed a new gene therapy approach that offers tremendous promise for one day treating an eye disease that leads to blindness and affects thousands of people across the globe.
Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms, fecal viral shedding in patients with COVID-19
How commonly reported gastrointestinal symptoms were in patients with COVID-19 and viral RNA shedding was detected in these patients' stool are examined in this systematic review and meta-analysis.
New insight into the Great Dying
A new study shows for the first time that the collapse of terrestrial ecosystems during Earth's most deadly mass extinction event was directly responsible for disrupting ocean chemistry.
Treat early or wait? Experts ponder best way to manage milder forms of spinal muscular atrophy
The advent of therapeutic interventions for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has increased the importance of presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment.
Soil biology research can help create a more sustainable future
Soil biodiversity should be incorporated into the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals and other global sustainability targets, researchers said.
Regular physical activity can maintain or improve frailty
Frailty is the medical term for becoming weaker or experiencing lower levels of activity or energy.
Could we run out of sand? Scientists adjust how grains are measured
How we account for sand is important for understanding how reefs, atolls and coastal regions will cope with the effects of climate change.
Coal-tar-sealant major source of PAH contamination in Great Lakes tributaries
Runoff from pavement with coal-tar-based sealant is the most likely primary source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, found in the majority of streambed sediments of Great Lakes tributaries, according to a new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.
Rice lab turns fluorescent tags into cancer killers
Fluorophores with one oxygen atom replaced by a sulfur atom can be triggered with light to create reactive oxygen species within cancer cells, killing them.

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