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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 15, 2020


Carbon emission from permafrost soils underestimated by 14%
Picture 500 million cars stacked in rows. That's how much carbon -- about 1,000 petagrams, or one billion metric tons - -is locked away in Arctic permafrost.
Scientists discover three-dimensional structure in smaller water droplet
A research team led by Prof. JIANG Ling and Prof.
The benefits of slowness
Wrinkles, furrows, spots: a person's aging process is accompanied by tell-tale signs on their face.
Brothers in arms: The brain and its blood vessels
The brain and its surrounding blood vessels exist in a close relationship.
Cell wall research reveals possibility of simple and sustainable method to protect crops
Antonio Molina and his research group at Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Spain aimed to understand the role of the cell wall in the regulation of plant resistance responses to pathogens.
Wounded plants: How they coordinate their healing
When we cut our fingers, blood rushes out of the wound to close it.
Perceived harm of e-cigarettes vs cigarettes after outbreak of vaping-associated lung injury
This survey study looked at perceptions of the harms of electronic cigarettes compared to regular cigarettes among current smokers in England before and after the US outbreak of vaping-associated lung injury in 2019.
Electronic health information exchange improves public health disease reporting
Disease tracking is an important area of focus for health departments in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Atomic physics: Radiation pressure with recoil
Light exerts a certain amount of pressure onto a body: sun sails could thus power space probes in the future.
New fossil discovery shows 50 million-year-old Canada-Australia connection
The discovery of a tiny insect fossil in Western Canada is unearthing big questions about the global movement of animals across deep time.
Researchers flush out worrying trend of designer drug use
In a sign that designer drugs are becoming more prevalent in Australia, synthetic cathinones -- commonly known as 'bath salts' -- have been detected in the nation's wastewater in the largest study of its kind in the country.
Anaerobically disinfect soil to increase phosphorus using diluted ethanol
Anaerobic disinfection of soil is an effective method to kill unwanted bacteria, parasites and weeds without using chemical pesticides.
Use of unproven COVID-19 therapies by African American patients poses risks
Nearly one out of every 10 African Americans has a genetic variant that puts them inherently at an increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.
Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma
A new study from psychologists at the University of Kansas attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences -- a topic that has received scant study.
Researchers uncover drivers of healthy gut maintenance
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have found two genes that regulate the differentiation of stem cells in the small intestine, offering valuable insight into how the body develops and maintains a healthy gut.
Molecules that reduce 'bad' gut bacteria reverse narrowing of arteries in animal study
Scientists at Scripps Research have developed molecules that can remodel the bacterial population of intestines to a healthier state.
Extra police powers during COVID-19 could affect relationship with public for good
Serving police officer and Huddersfield PhD researcher Dan Jones warns against police forces adopting an authoritarian or militarised approach, following new study
Neurons can shift how they process information about motion
New research from the University of Rochester indicates some neurons can shift to process information about movement depending on the brain's current frame of reference.
GLP-1-based treatment of diabetes does not cause pancreatitis
The commonly used treatment for type 2 diabetes and obesity, GLP-1, does not cause pancreatitis.
Directly printing 3D tissues within the body
In the TV series Westworld, human body parts are built on robotic frames using 3D printers.
Study examines the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in pregnant women
A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has now provided a report on the prevalence of infections with the SARS-CoV-2 virus in women admitted to such units in several Boston hospitals.
As food insecurity continues to plague New Yorkers, impact on children is worrisome
One in four households with children have reported a child experiencing hunger as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis, according to the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey.
Tuberculosis vaccine strengthens immune system
A tuberculosis vaccine developed 100 years ago also makes vaccinated persons less susceptible to other infections.
Calling for nursing support amid COVID-19 pandemic
There are close to 28 million nurses around the world who comprise a global workforce that delivers about 90 percent of primary healthcare, including frontline response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Scientists review the metallogenesis and challenges of porphyry copper systems above subduction zone
Porphyry copper ± molybdenum ± gold deposits (PCDs) are the most economically important magmatic-hydrothermal metallogenic system above subduction zones, which have supplied nearly 3/4 of the world's copper, 1/2 of the molybdenum and 1/5 of the gold, as well as large amounts of silver, zinc, tin and tungsten, with however their metallogenesis remaining controversial.
MIT, NIST create first room-temp 'magnon switch' with industrially useful properties
NIST and MIT scientists have demonstrated a practical technique for controlling magnons, which could lead to computer chip switches that would use less energy and radiate less heat.
Scientists unravel the evolution and relationships for all European butterflies in a first
For the first time, a complete time-calibrated phylogeny for a large group of invertebrates is published for an entire continent.
The Lancet Global Health: Estimates suggest one in five people worldwide have an underlying health condition that could increase their risk of severe COVID-19 if infected
An estimated 1.7 billion people, 22% of the world population, have at least one underlying health condition that could increase their risk of severe COVID-19 if infected, according to a modelling study that uses data from 188 countries, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.
The first intuitive programming language for quantum computers
Several technical advances have been achieved recently in the pursuit of powerful quantum computers.
Research reveals how material defects influence melting process
A new study helps to reconcile a Nobel Prize-winning theory with experiments on how solids actually melt.
Treating relapsing multiple sclerosis with hookworm infection
This randomized clinical trial assessed the effect of treating patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis with a therapeutic hookworm infection compared with placebo.
Who is at risk of heart rhythm disorders?
Use the right tool for the job. Today experts outline the best way to identify people most likely to develop common and devastating heart rhythm disorders.
Two new, powerful small molecules may be able to kill cancers that other therapies can't
Scientists have identified and developed two potent small molecules that appear to suppress tumor growth in multiple cancers even when other treatments cease to work, possibly due to the development of drug resistance.
Minimally-invasive treatment for 'frozen shoulder' improves patients' pain and function
A new nonsurgical treatment decreases errant blood flow in the shoulder to quickly reduce pain and improve function in patients with adhesive capsulitis, also known as 'frozen shoulder,' according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 13.
Drug with new approach on impeding DNA repair shows promise in first clinical trial
Berzosertib, an ATR-targeting drug, improves progression-free survival in combination with chemotherapy in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer.
Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them
Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests.
3D X-ray reveals secrets from inside bones
An international team of researchers from Aarhus University, the European Synchotron (ESRF), Chalmers University and the Paul Scherrer Institute have uncovered a previously unknown substructure in bone tissue using a new X-ray technique to produce 3D images of the internal structure of bones.
Maternal transmission of COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, study finds
Transmission of COVID-19 from mother to baby during pregnancy is uncommon, and the rate of infection is no greater when the baby is born vaginally, breastfed or allowed contact with the mother, according to a new study.
Multilevel interventions improve HPV vaccination rates of series initiation and completion
New research from Boston Medical Center shows that providing education and training to pediatric and family medicine providers about the importance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, in tandem with healthcare systems changes including starting an HPV vaccination series before the age of 11, improves the overall rate of HPV vaccinations among adolescent patients.
Even 'low-risk' drinking can be harmful
It's not just heavy drinking that's a problem -- even consuming alcohol within weekly low-risk drinking guidelines can result in hospitalization and death, according to a new study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
A carbon sink shrinks in the arctic
Ice melts in the Arctic Ocean were thought to be drawing large amounts of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, acting as a carbon sink and helping to mitigate greenhouse gases.
Genetic rescue of SHANK3 is potential therapy in rare forms of autism spectrum disorder
A mouse study by Craig Powell, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues suggests that early genetic rescue may be a potential therapy in autism spectrum disorder, or ASD.
Taking a landslide's temperature to avert catastrophe
Duke engineers have developed a comprehensive model of deep-seated landslides and demonstrated that it can accurately recreate the dynamics of historic and current landslides occurring under varying conditions.
Magnetic guidance improves stem cells' ability to treat occupational lung disease
Results of a study released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) may point the way to a cure for a serious lung disease called silicosis that affects millions of workers worldwide.
A raft that won't save you
New interdisciplinary research published in the Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids sheds light on how and why the cell membrane forms and grows lipid rafts triggered by ligand-receptor activity.
COVID-19 hospitalizations could mean significant out-of-pocket medical costs for many Americans
If past hospitalizations for pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses are any guide, many Americans could face high out-of-pocket medical costs for COVID-19 hospitalizations.
COVID-19 associated with dramatic decline in ED use by pediatric asthma patients
The number of patients visiting the emergency department (ED) for asthma treatment dropped by 76% in the first month of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
Examining the association between healthy eating patterns and risk of cardiovascular disease
Whether several recommended healthy eating patterns that combine various nutrients and foods are associated with long-term risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, was the focus of this observational study that used data from three large study groups with up to 32 years of follow-up.
Rochester researchers unlock clues to a dramatic chapter of Earth's geological history
How could the planet be covered entirely in ice--a state known as 'Snowball Earth'--and still give rise to multicellular life?
New indication of a link between Alzheimer's and diabetes
Pathological protein clumps are characteristic of a series of diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and type 2 diabetes.
COVID-19 will affect the food and financial security of many for years to come
The complex food shopping patterns that financially insecure families employ have been upended by COVID-19.
Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection -- which is not that big
In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells.
One minute simultaneous analysis of pungency components in kimchi
The World Institute of Kimchi (WiKim) announced its development of a rapid analysis method for quantifying capsaicin (CAP) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), which are major pungency components in kimchi, within 1 min.
Ethnic minorities' employment prospects lag behind white majority
The employment prospects of some ethnic minorities in the UK have improved since the 1970s but still lag behind the white majority because of 'persistent racism', a major new study says.
73% of LGBTQ youth bullied for reasons beyond their sexual identity
73% of SGM adolescents surveyed reported experiences of bias-based bullying for reasons beyond their sexual or gender identities, such as being bullied because of their body weight (57%), race/ethnicity (30%) and religion (27%).
Stanford researchers develop artificial synapse that works with living cells
Researchers have created a device that can integrate and interact with neuron-like cells.
A new family of nanocars ready for the next nano Grand Prix
A collaboration of researchers in France and Japan has developed a new family of nanocars ready to compete on a gold surface against the 9 other teams selected for the 2nd Nanocar Race in 2021.
Study demonstrates feasibility of hologram technology in liver tumor ablation
Data from one of the first clinical uses of augmented reality guidance with electromagnetically tracked tools shows that the technology may help doctors quickly, safely, and accurately deliver targeted liver cancer treatments, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 14.
Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue, reverses aging in mice
A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers reveals that replacing half of the blood plasma with a mixture of saline and albumin reverses signs of aging and rejuvenates muscle, brain and liver tissue in old mice.
The many lifetimes of plastics
Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment.
Research sheds new light on intelligent life existing across the galaxy
Is there anyone out there? This is an age-old question that researchers have now shed new light on with a study that calculates there could be more than 30 intelligent civilizations throughout our Galaxy.
Muscles support a strong immune system
In the fight against cancer or chronic infections, the immune system must be active over long periods of time.
Vegetarians are slimmer and less extroverted than meat eaters
The less animal products someone consumes, the lower his body mass index on average and the less he tends to be extroverted.
Low physical function increase the risk for bone loss in older hip fracture patients
Low physical function and low muscle mass after hip fracture increased the risk for accelerated bone deterioration in older hip fracture patients.
Super-potent human antibodies protect against COVID-19 in animal tests
A team led by Scripps Research has discovered antibodies in the blood of recovered COVID-19 patients that provide powerful protection against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the disease, when tested in animals and human cell cultures.
Otago researchers discover the origins of the beloved guinea pig
New University of Otago research sheds light on guinea pig domestication and how and why the small, furry animals became distributed around the world.
Novel treatment for mesothelioma shows promise for patients
novel treatment for advanced mesothelioma is safe and effective and may improve the quality of life for patients who have few treatment options, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 14.
Immune properties in ancient DNA found in isolated villages might benefit humanity today
Could remnants of DNA from a now extinct human subspecies known as the Denisovans help boost the immune functions of modern humans?
When board members get involved, corporate tax burden goes down
New research finds that corporate tax-planning practices improve when a company's board takes an interest -- and better planning results in both less tax uncertainty and a lower tax burden.
Intelligence is impacted if born small for gestational age
People born small for gestational age (SGA) have a lower IQ throughout development, however the differences in IQ to those born appropriate for gestational age (AGA) reduce by adulthood.
Unpacking the two layers of bacterial gene regulation during plant infection
A new study has revealed new insights into how pathogenic bacteria regulate gene expression during plant infection as well as the strategies employed by plants to protect themselves from bacterial invaders.
Black and female principal candidates more likely to experience delayed and denied promotions
Black and female assistant principals are systematically delayed and denied promotion to principal, compared to their White or male counterparts, despite having equivalent qualifications and more experience on average, according to a new study.
NIST develops benchmark for detecting large genetic mutations linked to major diseases
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a way for laboratories to determine how accurately they can detect large mutations.
New technical approach can enhance diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension
The management and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension heavily relies on whether the pathology is localized in pulmonary arteries or veins.
Mindfulness combined with hypnotherapy aids highly stressed people, study finds
A new treatment for stress which combines mindfulness and hypnotherapy has shown positive results in a Baylor University pilot study.
Scientists find key factors impacting sideswiping tropical cyclone precipitation
Scientists find that the distribution of sideswiping tropical cyclones precipitation(STP) includes extreme STP events that appear not only over the island and coastal areas, but also over inland areas
Electrically charged dust storms drive Martian chlorine cycle
The group that previously studied Martian dust storms in this paper shifts focus to the electrochemical processes resulting from dust storms that may power the movement of chlorine, which is ongoing on Mars today.
Romosozumab in osteoporosis: Considerable added benefit for women after menopause
Treatment leads to fewer vertebral fractures and to fewer other typical fractures in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis at high risk of fracture.
House-call model tapping interventional radiology improves outcomes and access to care
Interventional radiologists participating in a collaborative house call model in rural Indiana helped reduce emergency department use by 77% and hospital readmissions by 50 percent for nearly 1,000 elderly homebound patients with chronic illnesses, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 13.
Excitons form superfluid in certain 2D combos
Mixing and matching computational models of 2D materials led scientists at Rice University to the realization that excitons can be manipulated in new and useful ways.
Treatment plan helps keep young cancer patients home
An Australian program that avoids hospital admission for some young cancer patients with a fever is helping to ease pressure on the UK health system during the COVID-19 crisis.
New findings from groundbreaking study shows extended delay in onset of type 1 diabetes
Data presented today at the ADA 80th Scientific Sessions by Emily Sims, M.D. details the Phase 2 Teplizumab Prevention Study Clinical Trial findings that showed a two-week course of teplizumab delayed the onset of clinical T1D by three years.
New study reveals racial disparities in fear of police brutality
Nationwide survey shows minorities are five times more likely than white people to worry about police brutality.
Using Jenga to explain lithium-ion batteries
Tower block games such as Jenga can be used to explain to schoolchildren how lithium-ion batteries work, meeting an educational need to better understand a power source that has become vital to everyday life.
New analysis of human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition
Human cognition and cultural norms have changed the composition of human portraits, according to a new analysis of European paintings from the 15th to the 20th century.
A continental-scale prediction on the functional diversity of stream microbes
Climate mediates continental scale patterns of stream microbial functional diversity.
Elasticity key to plants and animals' ability to sting
A new study explains for the very first time the principles behind the design of stings, needles, and spikes in animals and plants.
Coffee, cocoa and vanilla: an opportunity for more trees in tropical agricultural landscapes
The cultivation of coffee, cocoa and vanilla secures the income of many small-holder farmers and also drives land-use change.
Parents twice as likely to be concerned about ticks than of mosquitoes
When it comes to bug bites, parents are twice as likely to be concerned about ticks as they are about mosquitoes transmitting disease, a new national poll finds.
Exposure to air pollution impairs cellular energy metabolism
Exposure to air particulate matter impairs the metabolism of olfactory mucosal cells, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Addressing the safety of high folate levels in the older population and implications for fortification in Ireland
A new study from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College challenges claims from some international scientific circles, that having high blood levels of folate (folic acid) increases the risk of poor cognition in older adults, especially in those with low levels of vitamin B12.
Barriers exist to using risk stratification tools to evaluate pulmonary embolism in the ED
Common barriers exist to the use of risk stratification tools in the evaluation of pulmonary embolism in the emergency department and provide insight into where to focus efforts for future implementation endeavors.
N95, KN95, and surgical mask filtration efficiency after sterilization
This is a quality improvement study that examines the effects of sterilization with hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide on the filtration efficiency of N95, KN95 and surgical face masks.
Why pulsars shine bright: A half-century-old mystery solved
Pulsars act like stellar lighthouses, shooting beams of radio waves from their magnetic poles.
AI reduces 'communication gap' for nonverbal people by as much as half
Researchers have used artificial intelligence to reduce the 'communication gap' for nonverbal people with motor disabilities who rely on computers to converse with others.
Tuberculosis spread from animals to humans may be greater than previously thought
The number of human tuberculosis (TB) cases that are due to transmission from animals, as opposed to human-to-human transmission, may be much higher than previously estimated, according to an international team of researchers.
Three new studies identify neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
A trio of papers describes several newly discovered human antibodies that target the SARS-CoV-2 virus, isolated from survivors of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV infection.
More and safer heart transplants could become possible with new heart box
A donated heart can now be transported and preserved for longer than what has previously been possible.
BU study: Alcohol taxes have never been lower
Inflation has reduced American alcohol tax rates by 70% since 1933, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
Red Sea plankton communities ebb and flow with the seasons
Studies of plankton communities in Red Sea waters provide insights into seasonal variations and dominant control mechanisms.
Combination drug treatments for COVID-19 show promise in cell culture tests
A team of Norwegian and Estonian researchers have established a cell culture that allows them to test antibody-laden plasma, drugs and drug combinations in the laboratory.
Discovery of graphene switch
Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) successfully developed the special in-situ transmission electron microscope technique to measure the current-voltage curve of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) with observing the edge structure and found that the electrical conductance of narrow GNRs with a zigzag edge structure abruptly increased above the critical bias voltage, indicating that which they are expected to be applied to switching devices, which are the smallest in the world.
Comparing life expectancy between insured adults with or without HIV
Researchers estimated the difference in overall life expectancy and years free from major chronic illnesses between individuals with HIV infection with access to care and similar uninfected adults from the same health care system from 2000 to 2016.
Ushering an antibody cocktail, designed to reduce antibody resistance, to trial as COVID-19 therapy
Following two studies that screened thousands of human antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 to identify highly potent pairs, in which the antibodies bind non-overlapping regions of the viral target, a resultant antibody cocktail is being tested in human trials.
Loneliness alters your brain's social network
Social media sites aren't the only things that keep track of your social network -- your brain does, too.
Diabetic mice improve with retrievable millimeter-thick cell-laden hydrogel fiber
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel fiber-shaped hydrogel transplant for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Accelerating biological systems design for sustainable biomanufacturing
A new cell-free platform developed by Professor Michael Jewett rapidly identifies optimal enzyme combinations for sustainable fuels and materials.
Superlens squeezes light into nanospace
Russian and Danish researchers have made a first-ever experimental observation of a plasmon nanojet.
Your brain shows if you are lonely or not
Social connection with others is critical to a person's mental and physical well-being.
Susceptibility to carcinogens varies due to genetics
A new study led by Michele Carbone of the University of Hawai'i Cancer Center looks into how and why certain individuals develop cancer and others do not.
From clickbait to transparency: Reimagining the online world
Behavioral science perspectives on an alternative Internet.
Following a variety of healthy eating patterns associated with lower heart disease risk
Greater adherence to a variety of healthy eating patterns was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to new research led by Harvard T.H.
A phase battery for quantum technologies
The work has been published today in the prestigious journal Nature Nanotechnology and has been led by the groups of Francesco Giazotto (NEST-CNR Institute, Pisa) and Sebastian Bergeret (CFM, CSIC-UPV/EHU, DIPC, Donostia / San Sebastian), with the collaboration of Salerno University.
Study finds significant parental hesitancy about routine childhood and influenza vaccines
A national study measuring parental attitudes toward vaccinations found 6.1% were hesitant about routine childhood immunizations while nearly 26% were hesitant about the influenza vaccine.
Disrupted circadian rhythms linked to later Parkinson's diagnoses
Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson's disease, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences who analyzed 11 years of data for nearly 3,000 independently living older men.
Melting a crystal topologically
Physicists at EPFL have successfully melted a very thin crystal of magnetic quasi-particles controllably, as turning ice into water.
Survey: In Vermont, pandemic's impact falling disproportionately on lower income groups
High percentages of Vermonters agree with the social distancing measures put in place by the state in response to the coronavirus pandemic and have complied with them, according to a new survey.
Higher parental stress linked to low screen-time enforcement, research finds
When parents are under stress, household rules about screen time often get abandoned, new University of Guelph research finds.
Study finds depression associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study co-led by Simon Fraser University health sciences professor Scott Lear provides further evidence of the link between depressive symptoms and an increased risk of heart disease and early death.
COVID-19 pandemic could decimate outdoor environmental, science education programs
A survey of 1,000 outdoor education programs nationwide finds that nearly two-thirds are in danger of folding because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
NASA follows Tropical Storm Nuri's path
An animation of four days of imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed the progression and landfall of Tropical Storm Nuri.
Surprising growth rates discovered in world's deepest photosynthetic corals
New research published in the journal Coral Reefs revealed unexpectedly high growth rates for deep water photosynthetic corals.
Most people accessing USC COVID-19 patient self-assessment tool report mild symptoms
Most people who accessed a USC web-based COVID-19 patient self-assessment tool reported mild symptoms that would not typically require immediate medical attention, according to new research by the Keck School of Medicine of USC.
What has caused more extreme summer heat events over northeast Asia?
A new study found that anomalous anticyclone over Northeast Asia was responsible for nearly half of the magnitude in extreme heat events of 2018.
Researchers develop model to predict likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19, disease outcomes
Cleveland Clinic researchers have developed the world's first risk prediction model for healthcare providers to forecast an individual patient's likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19 as well as their outcomes from the disease.
A blood sample can be used to assess the severity and prognosis of FTLD in the future
Biomarkers to support the diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and to assess the severity and expected prognosis of the disease are needed.
Multi-ethnic study suggests vitamin K may offer protective health benefits in older age
A new, multi-ethnic study from researchers at Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center found adults aged 54-76 with low circulating vitamin K levels were more likely to die within 13 years compared to those with adequate levels, suggesting vitamin K may offer protective health benefits as we age.
Improved gut microbiota with cholesterol-lowering medication
There is a clear link between improved gut microbiota and one of our most common cholesterol-lowering drug groups: statins.
First report of systemic delivery of micro-dystrophin gene therapy in children with DMD
Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital have published in JAMA Neurology results from the first four patients treated in the first clinical trial of systemic delivery of micro-dystrophin gene therapy in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) -- and initial findings suggest that the therapy can provide functional improvement that is greater than that observed under the standard of care.

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