Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 16, 2020


The nexus between economic inequality and social welfare
A new interpretation of the concept of inequity - in the sense of unequal distributions across individuals, time and states of the world -- and a new, general measure of welfare from a study just published in the Journal of Economic Surveys, with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation.
University of Melbourne to build and launch innovative satellite
Funding helps develop cutting edge space capabilities in Australia and collaboration with multiple Australian space industry companies and the Italian Space Agency
Oncotarget: Preoperative geriatric nutritional risk index is a useful prognostic indicator
The cover for issue 24 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, 'Cancer-specific survival curves based on GNRI according to pTNM stage,' by Hirahara, et al.
Hormone systems can still be adapted in adulthood
Behavioural biologists at Münster University have now been able to demonstrate for the first time that male guinea pigs are still able to adapt their hormone systems to changes in their social environment in adulthood.
Digitize your dog into a computer game
Researchers from CAMERA at the University of Bath have developed motion capture technology that enables you to digitise your dog without a motion capture suit and using only one camera.
Comforting, monitoring 7,600 COVID patients at home
How do you monitor thousands of patients who have COVID-19 symptoms but are not ill enough to come to the emergency department?
Flushing toilets create clouds of virus-containing particles
Researchers used a computer simulation to show how a flushing toilet can create a cloud of virus-containing aerosol droplets that is large and widespread and lasts long enough that the droplets could be breathed in by others.
TERAVOLT registry tracks outcomes among thoracic cancer patients sickened by COVID-19
New data from TERAVOLT, a global consortium that tracks outcomes of people with thoracic cancers affected by COVID-19, offers clues as to why they experienced a high death rate of 33% when the coronavirus swept across Europe.
How COVID-19 affects pediatric patients
New insights into the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of pediatric patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) could facilitate early identification and intervention in suspected patients, according to a study publishing on June 16, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Xihui Zhou of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, China and colleagues.
A sugar hit to help destroy cancer cells
Like any cells in the body, cancer cells need sugar ­-- namely glucose -- to fuel cell proliferation and growth.
Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War.
Australian fossil reveals new plant species
Fresh examination of an Australian fossil -- believed to be among the earliest plants on Earth -- has revealed evidence of a new plant species that existed in Australia more than 359 Million years ago.
HKU scientists uncover new mechanism for balancing protein stability during neuronal development
A School of Biological Sciences research team at the University of Hong Kong recently discovered an unexpected role of the heat shock proteins (HSPs) during neuronal differentiation.
Loss of lipid-regulating gene fuels prostate cancer spread
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers from the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences identified a lipid-regulating protein that conveys what the researchers describe as ''superpowers'' onto prostate cancer cells, causing them to aggressively spread.
Endogenous insulin production is preserved in Type 1 diabetes with anti-TNF drug
A study led by a UB researcher found that a drug called golimumab preserved beta-cell function in children and young adults with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes, according to findings from a Phase 2 study.
Quantum material research facilitates discovery of better materials that benefit our society
By means of the state-of-art quantum many-body simulations, performed on the world's fastest supercomputers, researchers from various institutions including the University of Hong Kong have achieved accurate model calculations for a rare-earth magnet TmMgGaO4 (TMGO).
As many as six billion Earth-like planets in our galaxy, according to new estimates
There may be as many as one Earth-like planet for every five Sun-like stars in the Milky way Galaxy, according to new estimates by University of British Columbia astronomers using data from NASA's Kepler mission.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: UK modelling study finds case isolation and contact tracing vital to COVID-19 epidemic control
In the absence of a vaccine or highly effective treatments for COVID-19, combining isolation and intensive contact tracing with physical distancing measures--such as limits on daily social or workplace contacts--might be the most effective and efficient way to achieve and maintain epidemic control, according to new modelling research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal.
The novel mechanisms for inflammation and cancer induced by HTLV-1
A Japanese research group has clarified the mechanism by which human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes inflammation and oncogenesis.
Shining like a diamond: A new species of diamond frog from northern Madagascar
Despite the active ongoing taxonomic progress on the Madagascar frogs, the amphibian inventory of this hyper-diverse island is still very far from being complete.
Newly discovered plant gene could boost phosphorus intake
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered an important gene in plants that could help agricultural crops collaborate better with underground fungi -- providing them with wider root networks and helping them to absorb phosphorus.
Wildfires cause bird songs to change
A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that wildfires change the types of songs sung by birds living in nearby forests.
Graphics cards farm to help in search of new physics at LHCb
For the first time, data from LHCb, a major physics experiment, will be processed on a farm of GPUs.
Cattle vs. hippopotamus: Dung in rivers of the Savannah
In many regions of the world, populations of large mammalian herbivores have been displaced by cattle breeding, for example in Kenya the hippos by large herds of cattle.
Tobacco industry discounting linked to higher cigarette consumption in Europe
Tobacco industry discounting is linked to higher cigarette consumption the following year, finds an analysis of the impact of pricing differentials in 23 European countries and published online in the journal Tobacco Control.
Researchers develop a compact 28 GHz transceiver supporting dual-polarized MIMO
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology and NEC Corporation have jointly developed a 28 GHz phased-array transceiver supporting dual-polarized MIMO for fifth-generation mobile communications system (5G) radio units.
COVID-19: Impact on environmental justice
COVID-19 is like a heat-seeking missile that targets the most vulnerable.
Study shows how caring responsibilities affect health and restrict ability to work
New research from the University of Southampton has highlighted inequalities faced by men and women over the age of fifty with caring responsibilities.
Team led by Children's Hospital LA researcher generates developmental map of human T-cells
Chintan Parekh, MD, of the The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has led a team of investigators that generated a comprehensive roadmap for how T-cells develop in the human thymus.
New discovery paves way for next generation malaria vaccine
New findings pave the way for a novel, next generation genetically attenuated parasite (GAP) vaccine against the deadliest form of malaria in humans.
Previously undetected brain pulses may help circuits survive disuse, injury
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found previously undetected neuronal pulses in the human brain that activate after an immobilizing illness or injury.
Thinking small: New ideas in the search for dark matter
Magnetic ''quasiparticles'' called magnons may help scientists detect dark matter.
Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents
Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use.
Premature epigenomic aging acts like a 'sleeper cell' that is awaken by Western-style diet
Exposure to certain chemicals early in life can reprogram the liver epigenome so that the organism becomes more vulnerable to diet-triggered metabolic problems later in life.
World's most complete health analysis of nesting sea turtles conducted in Florida
The most comprehensive health assessment for a green turtle rookery in the world to date is providing critical insights into various aspects of physiology, biology, and herpesvirus epidemiology of this nesting population.
What do 'Bohemian Rhapsody,' 'Macbeth,' and a list of Facebook friends all have in common?
A new study shows how vastly complex communication networks can efficiently convey large amounts of information to the human brain.
Including patients in hospital discharge communication would improve outcomes of care
Sending discharge letters to UK patients as well as their GPs when they leave hospital could make a substantial difference to patient outcomes, according to a new study by University of Warwick researchers.
Digital strategies to fight COVID-19
Dr Guy Fagherazzi, Research Leader in ''Digital Epidemiology and E-health'' and colleagues from the Department of Population Health of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) released an editorial on June 16th reviewing international digital responses to the pandemic - including the ''Predi-COVID study'' - and providing recommendations for future initiatives.
Persistent DNA damage in the placenta affects pregnancy outcomes
Scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have shown that a dysfunctional placenta can play a previously unrecognized role during the earliest stages of development in mouse models of Cornelia de Lange syndrome.
Shhhh, the whales are resting
A Danish-Australian team of researchers recommend new guidelines for noise levels from whale-watching boats after having carried out experiments with humpback whales.
Physicists document method to improve magnetoelectric response
University of Arkansas physicists have documented a method of improving the magnetoelectric response in bismuth ferrite, a discovery that could lead to faster and cheaper data storage and better electronic sensors.
New mechanism underlying colorectal cancer reveals a crucial role for intestinal microbes
A collaborative study by research groups from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research and Ghent University uncovered a new mechanism causing colorectal cancer.
Oral antibiotics work, shorten hospital stays for IV drug users with infections
A combination of IV and oral antibiotics can effectively treat invasive infections in people who inject illicit drugs, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Asthma among children with developmental disabilities
How common asthma was among children with various developmental disabilities (including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and vision, hearing or speech delay) was compared to children without disabilities in this survey study.
'Relaxed' T cells critical to immune response
Rice University researchers model the role of relaxation time as T cells bind to invaders or imposters, and how their ability to differentiate between the two triggers the body's immune system.
Multi-institutional study looks at brain MRI findings in COVID-19
A new multi-institutional study published in the journal Radiology identifies patterns in abnormal brain MRI findings in patients with COVID-19.
Fred Hutch and University of Washington experts: Treat COVID-19 earlier to save lives
Infectious disease experts from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and UW Medicine are advocating for earlier actions to reduce hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19.
TU Darmstadt: Pause button for light particles
Researchers at TU Darmstadt halt individual photons and can release them at the push of a button.
Cancer patients less likely to be prescribed cardioprotective medications
As cancer survivor rates increase with modern treatments, cardiovascular disease (CVD) rates are rising in cancer patients and survivors and CVD has emerged as a leading cause of long-term preventable death in this population.
Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides
The lives of honeybees are shortened -- with evidence of physiological stress -- when they are exposed to the suggested application rates of two commercially available and widely used pesticides.
Classes set by ability are hitting children's self-confidence, study finds
The way a vast amount of schools are setup, with classes grouping children based on their ability, is severely affecting pupil's self-confidence.
Irregular findings common in knees of young competitive alpine skiers
Bony lesions on the lower part of the thigh bone near the knee are a common but benign finding on MRI in young alpine skiers and should not be confused with more serious conditions, according to a new study from Switzerland.
16 new papers describe discoveries at long-term deep-sea research site off California
A recent special issue of the journal Deep-Sea Research II features 16 new papers about MBARI's long-term, deep-sea research site Station M.
Virus co-opts immune protein to avoid antiviral defences
By discovering a trick the hepatitis C virus uses to evade the immune system, scientists have identified a new antiviral defence system that could be used to treat many virus infections, according to new research published today in eLife.
Summer favorite bitter gourd genome shows unusual domestication, insight into evolution
The genomic architecture of the Long-read bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) has been elucidated to show nonclassic domestication.
Could the cure for IBD be inside your mouth?
A new collaborative study from the U-M Medical and Dental Schools reveals that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health via a clash between the mouth and gut microbiomes.
Mangroves at risk of collapse if emissions not reduced by 2050, international scientists predict
An international research team comprising scientists from the University of Hong Kong, the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), Macquarie University and the University of Wollongong (Australia) as well as Rutgers University (USA) has predicted that mangroves will not be able to survive with rising sea-level rates reached by 2050, if emissions are not reduced.
Brain research sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of depression
A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, reveals how symptoms indicating depression and anxiety are linked to brain function changes already in healthy individuals.
Tracking Australia's gigantic carnivorous dinosaurs
North America had the T. rex, South America had the Giganotosaurus and Africa the Spinosaurus - now evidence shows Australia had gigantic predatory dinosaurs.
Off-the-shelf tool for making mouse models of COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Iowa and Medical University, Guangzhou, in China, have created a gene therapy vector that is essentially an off-the-shelf tool that allows labs to create their own COVID-19 mouse model within a matter of days.
Effect of high-deductible insurance use in bipolar disorder
A new study led by the Department of Population Medicine finds that individuals with bipolar disorder who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) experienced a moderate decrease in nonpsychiatrist mental health outpatient visits, but rates of psychiatrist visits, medication use, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations did not change.
Researchers identify potent antibody cocktail to treat COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) evaluated several human antibodies to determine the most potent combination to be mixed in a cocktail and used as a promising anti-viral therapy against the virus that causes COVID-19.
Refugee camps vulnerable to COVID-19 outbreaks
A COVID-19 outbreak in a refugee settlement will likely overwhelm the available healthcare capacity and infrastructure and spread through nearly the entire settlement population if left unchecked, according to a new study published June 16 in PLOS Medicine by Paul Spiegel of Johns Hopkins University, United States, and colleagues.
Cholesterol levels dropping in Western nations but rising in Asia
Cholesterol levels are declining sharply in western nations, but rising in low- and middle-income nations - particularly in Asia, according to a study of global cholesterol levels, which involve researchers at the University of Gothenburg.
Continuous glucose monitoring reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes
Laura Young, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, was UNC's principal investigator for this six-month clinical trial that shows the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) reduces serious levels of hypoglycemia compared with standard monitoring by daily use of blood glucose finger-stick test strips.
Amyloid formation in the International Space Station
The collaborative research team of Japan using the International Space Station (ISS) successfully characterized Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibril formation under microgravity conditions.
Characteristics of patients with COVID-19 in Detroit
Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 at a health system in Detroit are described in this case series, which also provides a comparative analysis of hospitalized and ambulatory patient populations.
The balancing act between plant growth and defense
Kumamoto University researchers have pinpointed the mechanism that regulates the balance between plant growth and defense.
IU study finds most people saw a decrease in their sexual behavior early in the pandemic
One in five adults in the United States report they have experienced change -- mostly a decrease -- in their sexual behavior during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.
Simulated sea slug gets addicted to drug
Scientists built a computer model of a simple brain network based on that of a sea slug, taught it how to get food, gave it an appetite and the ability to experience reward, added a dash of something called homeostatic plasticity and then exposed it to a very intoxicating drug.
Seafood helped prehistoric people migrate out of Africa, study reveals
A study, led by the University of York, has examined fossil reefs near to the now-submerged Red Sea shorelines that marked prehistoric migratory routes from Africa to Arabia.
Seaweed takes scientists on trip 'through time' in the waters of Monterey Bay
New research led by Monterey Bay Aquarium tapped into a collection of dried, pressed seaweed to understand what the bay was like before the impacts of modern human activity.
New species extinction target proposed for global nature rescue plan
The 10-year plan for conserving biodiversity adopted as part of the International Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) failed to reach its targets for 2020.
Improved heat-resistant wheat varieties are identified
An international study, including researchers at the University of Cordoba, analyzed 54 genetically improved wheat genotypes from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in order to determine which respond best to high temperatures
The rafts used by viruses
The study may suggest new strategies to limit virus attacks and prevent or combat diseases like Sars and Covid-19 based on biomedical and engineering principles.
Primitive stem cells point to new bone grafts for stubborn-to-heal fractures
Although most broken bones can be mended with a firm cast and a generous measure of tender loving care, more complicated fractures require treatments like bone grafting.
Adding lean beef to a healthy diet does not adversely affect heart health or diabetes risk
Results from a new study show that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes were similar when participants consumed a healthy US-style eating pattern with and without an additional 5.3 ounces of lean beef.
The smallest motor in the world
A research team from Empa and EPFL has developed a molecular motor which consists of only 16 atoms and rotates reliably in one direction.
Coal-burning in Siberia led to climate change 250 million years ago
A team of researchers led by Arizona State University (ASU) School of Earth and Space Exploration professor Lindy Elkins-Tanton has provided the first ever direct evidence that extensive coal burning in Siberia is a cause of the Permo-Triassic Extinction, the Earth's most severe extinction event.
Working in the sun -- heating of the head may markedly affect safety and performance
Prolonged exposure of the head to strong sunlight significantly impairs cognitively dominated functions and coordination of complex motor tasks shows a new study from the Heat-Shield project coordinated by researchers from Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports at University of Copenhagen.
Strangely ordinary strata
Researcher uncovers why most of the records left by ancient rivers preserve commonplace processes.
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may cut greenhouse gas emissions
Switching from general to regional anaesthesia may help cut greenhouse emissions and ultimately help reduce global warming, indicates a real life example at one US hospital over the course of a year, and reported in the journal Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine.
Novel antisense drug shows promise in slowing fatty liver disease
A first-in-class clinical trial suggests a novel treatment measurably slowed progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease to its more progressive and deadly form.
Preparing health practitioners to deal with family violence
A world-first framework that identifies a health practitioner's readiness to address family violence has been developed in a University of Melbourne-led study funded by the Safer Families Centre.
NUS researchers uncover mysterious tanaids
Research Associate Mr Chim Chee Kong and Research Assistant Ms Samantha Tong from the Tropical Marine Science Institute at the National University of Singapore are on a quest to discover more of the still nameless tanaids, specifically in the relatively species-rich but poorly studied tropical Indo-Pacific.
How does our brain trigger different sighs? New findings could provide answers
One group of neurons controls various types of sighing, but they receive their instructions from different areas of the brain depending on the reason for the sigh, according to a study scheduled to publish June 16, 2020 in the journal Cell Reports.
How the beetle got its bang
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. show how the bombardier beetle concocts its deadly explosives and in the process, learn how evolution gave rise to the beetle's remarkable firepower.
Scientists discover a long-sought-after nitrogen allotrope in black phosphorus structure
A long-sought-after black phosphous-structured (BP) nitrogen was synthesized by an international team co-led by Dr.
Determining effective magnetic moment of multicore nanoparticles
Most commercial nanoparticles do not possess a single magnetic core but have small magnetic crystals called crystallites.
'SlothBot in the Garden' demonstrates hyper-efficient conservation robot
For the next several months, visitors to the Atlanta Botanical Garden will be able to observe the testing of a new high-tech tool in the battle to save some of the world's most endangered species.
Wearable patch may provide new treatment option for skin cancer
Purdue University innovators have created a novel wearable patch to provide an improved treatment experience for people with melanoma.
Nanobiohybrids: A synergistic integration of bacteria and nanomaterials in cancer therapy
Nanobiohybrids: A Synergistic Integration of Bacteria and Nanomaterials in Cancer Therapy- BIO Integration.
Teens who say their parents are overcontrolling struggle with relationships, educational goals as adults
A new longitudinal study sought to determine the long-term impact on youth of parenting that is psychologically controlling.
Turning faces into thermostats: Autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy
As lockdown requirements ease, COVID-19 is changing the way we use indoor spaces.
Exercise offers 'profound' benefits for Friedreich's ataxia, research suggests
Well-timed exercise programs may slow the progression of Friedreich's ataxia, which robs patients of their ability to walk, new research suggests.
High antibiotic prescription rates in low- and middle-income countries may indicate misuse
Inappropriate use of antibiotics is an important driver of antimicrobial resistance, yet the extent of antibiotic prescribing in outpatient primary care settings across low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is unknown.
Study evaluates stress level of rehabilitated sea turtles during transport
A new study co-authored by six scientists with the New England Aquarium has found that rehabilitated Kemp's ridley and loggerhead sea turtles experience a substantial stress response when transported to release locations in the southern United States but that the turtles remained physically stable and ready for release.
Support drives fate of protected gold nanoclusters as catalysts
In collaboration with experimentalists from Ghent University, Belgium and Utrecht University, Netherlands, researchers at the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, have recently discovered that the choice of a support material for model catalysts, made from gold nanoclusters protected by organic molecules, may have drastic effects on the structure of the catalyst.
Study in Philadelphia links growth in tree canopy to decrease in human mortality
Increased tree canopy or green space could decrease morbidity and mortality for urban populations - particularly in areas with lower socioeconomic status where existing tree canopies tend to be the lowest.
Antibodies against sugars, internal radiation: Powerful package against cervical cancer
The sugar coating on cancer cells helps them thrive, and a new study indicates patients with cervical cancer who make antibodies to those sugars appear to do better when they also receive internal radiation therapy.
Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma
Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health.
Scientists grow optical chips in a petri dish
The modern photonics industry is constantly working on making its devices more compact, be it computing systems or sensors and lidars.
Hurricane season combined with COVID-19 pandemic could create perfect storm
When extreme climate conditions interact with stressors to social systems, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the consequences could be severe unless experts from diverse backgrounds work together to develop comprehensive solutions to combat their negative impacts.
Report finds that unionist and nationalist identities in NI became stronger in the run-up to Brexit
A research study on political attitudes and identities in Northern Ireland has been released today (Wednesday 17 June) by ARK -- a joint initiative between Queen's University Belfast and Ulster University.
Yale scientists propose explanation for baffling form of childhood OCD
Yale scientists may have found a cause for the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in some children, they report.
Hunting in savanna-like landscapes may have poured jet fuel on brain evolution
Compared to the vast emptiness of open water, land is rife with obstacles and occlusions.
A coordinated COVID-19 response helped western Washington state "flatten the curve"
Despite having the first confirmed case of coronavirus and the first major COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, the state of Washington implemented a response plan that kept its death rate the lowest among all states that have had major outbreaks.
Overlooked: The role of bacterial viruses in plant health
We know how important bacteria and fungi are for the health of plants.
Reliable, High-speed MTJ Technology for 1X nm STT-MRAM and NV-Logic Has Wide Applications
Professor Tetsuo Endoh, leading a group of researchers at Tohoku University, has announced the development of an MTJ (Magnetic Tunnel Junction) with 10 ns high-speed write operation, sufficient endurance (>1011), and with highly reliable data retention over 10 years at 1X nm size.
How to build the plane while flying
In this study the authors show that clinical guidelines can still be created in the midst of a pandemic.
New technique may quickly and accurately predict effective therapies in solid tumors
A new method of screening thousands of drugs in freshly collected human tumor cells can help identify which of the drugs are most likely to be effective against those cancers.
Agroforestry is 'win win' for bees and crops, study shows
Agroforestry has long been suggested as a solution to halt the decline of pollinators, yet observational studies in temperate climates have been virtually non-existent.
Repeated coughing seriously degrades face mask efficiency
Face masks are thought to slow the spread of viruses, including the COVID-19 virus, but little is known about how well they work.
Tomography studies of coins shed light on the history of Volga Bulgaria
Kazan Federal University, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), and Khalikov Institute of Archeology (Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan, Russia) are working together to study the physical properties of the coins found on the territory of former Volga Bulgaria.
Carpet shell clams reveal high levels of pollution in several coastal lagoons in Tunisia
The clams with the greatest levels of heavy metals come from lagoons in which the water temperature is higher, according to a University of Cordoba study
Borrowing from robotics, scientists automate mapping of quantum systems
Riddhi Gupta has taken an algorithm used for autonomous vehicles and adapted it to help characterise and stabilise quantum technology.
All of the performance, none of the fuss: Nitrile hydrogenation done right
Researchers developed a nano-cobalt phosphide catalyst (nano-Co2P) for the hydrogenation of nitriles to primary amines.
Researchers: Homes of North Zealand's elite are most likely to be preserved
Since 1945, the vast majority of historically preserved dwellings in Denmark are architect-designed gems located in North Zealand, according to a study conducted by, among others, a University of Copenhagen researcher.
Experts analyze options for treating multiple sclerosis-related cognitive impairment
'Evidence suggests that cognitive rehabilitation is effective in MS-related cognitive dysfunction, and may confer long-lasting effects,' said Dr.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.