Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

June 17, 2020
During the COVID-19 outbreak in China, marked emission reductions, but unexpected air pollution
Using a combination of satellite and ground-based observations to study air pollution changes in China during COVID-19 lockdowns, researchers report up to 90% reductions of certain emissions, but also an unexpected increase in particulate matter pollution.

Soap bubbles pollinated a pear orchard without damaging delicate flowers
Soap bubbles facilitated the pollination of a pear orchard by delivering pollen grains to targeted flowers, demonstrating that this whimsical technique can successfully pollinate fruit-bearing plants.

Research finds deployment affects mental health of veterans differently
As the largest study of its kind, more than 212,000 men and women Army active duty personnel completed a questionnaire that measured different psychological characteristics before deployment and after returning from combat.

Prone positioning in awake, nonintubated patients with COVID-19 hypoxemic respiratory failure
Whether the prone position is associated with improved oxygenation and decreased risk for intubation in spontaneously breathing patients with severe COVID-19 hypoxemic respiratory failure is investigated in this observational study.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study from Chinese city of Guangzhou provides key insights on how COVID-19 spreads in households
New modelling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, suggests the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that causes COVID-19 may spread more easily among people living together and family members than severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS).

Young people with early psychosis may not require antipsychotic medications to recover
Researchers at Orygen have found that some young people with early stage first episode psychosis (FEP) can experience reduced symptoms and improve functioning without antipsychotic medication when they are provided with psychological interventions and comprehensive case management.

A proven method for stabilizing efforts to bring fusion power to Earth
Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and General Atomics have demonstrated a method for stabilizing fusion plasmas by suppressing edge localized modes (ELMs).

Centenarian study suggests living environment may be key to longevity
Where you live has a significant impact on the likelihood that you will reach centenarian age, suggests a new study conducted by scientists at Washington State University's Elson S.

Geoscientists create deeper look at processes below Earth's surface with 3D images
Geoscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas recently used massive amounts of earthquake data and supercomputers to generate high-resolution, 3D images of the dynamic geological processes taking place far below the Earth's surface.

Evidence lacking for drug treatment of multiple sclerosis-related cognitive impairment
There was insufficient evidence for cognitive efficacy across the spectrum of pharmacologic agents used in multiple sclerosis.

Not smoking and being socially active keys to longevity
University of Otago researchers have discovered some of the secrets to longevity with new research revealing not smoking and being social engaged throughout older age are common traits of New Zealand centenarians.

Astronomers detect regular rhythm of radio waves, with origins unknown
Astronomers detect a regular pattern of radio bursts from 500 million light years away.

Researchers develop microscopy technique for noninvasive evaluation of wound healing
The GSK Center for Optical Molecular Imaging at the University of Illinois' Beckman Institute has designed a new microscopy technique that can be used to study the progression of wound healing.

Fish evolution in action: Land fish forced to adapt after leap out of water
Many blennies - a remarkable family of fishes - evolved from an aquatic 'jack of all trades' to a 'master of one' upon the invasion of land, a new study led by UNSW scientists has shown.

'Remarkably high' rate of suicide among elderly patients after hip fracture
Older adults who suffer a hip fracture requiring surgery are at a higher risk of suicide, suggests a study in the June 17, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected.

Brainsourcing automatically identifies human preferences
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique, using artificial intelligence, to analyse opinions and draw conclusions using the brain activity of groups of people.

NIH-funded study links endometriosis to DNA changes
DNA from uterine cells of women with endometriosis has different chemical modifications, compared to the DNA of women who do not have the condition, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Using a Gaussian mathematical model to define eruptive stages of young volcanic rocks
Precise dating of young samples since the Quaternary has been a difficult problem in the study of volcanoes and surface environment.

Quantum-inspired approach dramatically lowers light power needed for OCT
Researchers have shown that a detection technology borrowed from quantum optics can be used to perform optical coherence tomography (OCT) with much lower light power than previously possible.

Engineers develop new fuel cells with twice the operating voltage as hydrogen
Engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.

Antarctic sea ice loss explained in new study
Scientists have discovered that the summer sea ice in the Weddell Sea sector of Antarctica has decreased by one million square kilometres -- an area twice the size of Spain -- in the last five years, with implications for the marine ecosystem.

Detecting antibodies with glowing proteins, thread and a smartphone
To defend the body, the immune system makes proteins known as antibodies that latch onto the perceived threat, be it HIV, the new coronavirus or, as is the case in autoimmune disease, part of the body itself.

Study finds 82 percent of avocado oil rancid or mixed with other oils
The country's first extensive study of commercial avocado oil quality and purity finds the vast majority of avocado oil sold in the U.S. is of poor quality, mislabeled or adulterated with other oils.

New test paves the way for tailored treatment of deadliest form of ovarian cancer
University of British Columbia (UBC) researchers have led an international team in developing a new test to better diagnose different types of ovarian cancer, a tool that could one day guide and improve treatment options for women diagnosed with the most common and deadliest form of the disease.

Vitamin D could help mitigate chemotherapy side effects
New findings by University of South Australia researchers reveal that Vitamin D could potentially mitigate chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis and provide relief to cancer patients.

Study finds Oregon's gender-affirming health care good on paper; still lacking in practice
While Oregon ranks highly nationwide for its gender-affirming policies and health care for transgender women, many of those polices are not fully realized in practice, a recent study from Oregon State University found.

Liver perfusion could save 7 in 10 rejected donor livers
A major study investigating the effectiveness of liver perfusion as a technique to improve the function of donor livers that would have otherwise been rejected has shown that up to 7 in every 10 could be used after just 4-6 hours of the assessment.

Quasar jets are particle accelerators thousands of light-years long
An international collaboration bringing together over 200 scientists from 13 countries has shown that the very high-energy gamma-ray emission from quasars is not concentrated in the region close to their central black hole but in fact extends over several thousand light-years along jets of plasma.

Uncovering hidden flow patterns in coastal waters likely leads to faster disaster response
With more accurate modeling data, response teams can better predict the search area grid from the air, and reduce emergency response time when lives are on the line.

Gut bacteria may modify behavior in worms, influencing eating habits
Gut bacteria are tiny but may play an outsized role not only in the host animal's digestive health, but in their overall well-being.

Research brief: New discovery allows 3D printing of sensors directly on expanding organs
In groundbreaking new research, mechanical engineers and computer scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a 3D printing technique that uses motion capture technology, similar to that used in Hollywood movies, to print electronic sensors directly on organs that are expanding and contracting.

Scientists gain detailed images of how a protein that calms brain activity works
Elucidation of the 3D structure of the pharmacologically important GABAB receptor in four distinct conformations along its activation trajectory from an inactive state to an active state leads to a model of signal transduction by GABAB and its modulation by a positive allosteric modulator.

Stocks of vulnerable carbon twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in
Twice as much carbon in permafrost is vulnerable to microbial respiration when researchers from Northern Arizona University accounted for subsidence, the gradual sinking of terrain caused by loss of ice and soil mass.

UConn, Army Research lab collaborate on new portable, renewable energy technology
For decades, scientists have been experimenting with pyroelectric power, a method to generate energy from heat that would otherwise be wasted in a catalytic chemical reaction.

Permo-Triassic biodiversity patterns could offer a window into our climate future
A new study by the University of Leeds and University of Oxford has examined spatial biodiversity patterns surrounding one of the most severe extinction events of the last 500 million years.

10 percent of patients continue to use opioids three to six months after heart surgery
Nearly 10 percent of patients who are prescribed opioid medications following heart surgery will continue to use opioids more than 90 days after the procedure, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn Medicine.

African lion counts miss the mark, but new method shows promise
The current technique used for counting lion populations for research and conservation efforts doesn't add up, according to a University of Queensland researcher.

Earth's species have more in common than previously believed
In the largest mapping of proteins ever to be conducted across different species, an international team of researchers have analysed and compared the proteins of 100 animal, plant and bacterial species.

Data Security in Website Tracking
Tracking of our browsing behavior is part of the daily routine of Internet use.

This supernova in a lab mimics the cosmic blast's splendid aftermath
Mystery enshrouds the birth of swirls typical for supernova remnants like the Crab Nebula.

Cellular nanosponges could soak up SARS-CoV-2
Scientists are working overtime to find an effective treatment for COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.

Better than cyclodextrins
Molecular containers that remove drugs, toxins, or malodorous substances from the environment are called sequestering agents.

To make a good impression, leave cell phone alone during work meetings
New hires especially should keep their cell phones stashed away during business meetings, a new study strongly implies.

How Toxoplasma parasites glide so swiftly (video)
If you're a cat owner, you might have heard of Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan that sometimes infects humans through contact with contaminated feces in litterboxes.

Juicy genomics
When Pulitzer Prize and Grammy award winner Kendrick Lamar rapped 'I got millions, I got riches buildin' in my DNA,' he almost certainly wasn't talking about the humble tomato.

Tibetan antelope thrive at high altitudes using a juvenile form of blood oxygen transport
Adult Tibetan antelope have overcome oxygen deprivation on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau through an unusual adaptation in which they permanently express a form of hemoglobin (the iron-containing oxygen transport protein in red blood cells) that other members of the cattle family only express as juveniles or when under extreme oxygen deprivation.

Nanosponges could intercept coronavirus infection
Nanoparticles cloaked in human lung cell membranes and human immune cell membranes can attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce.

Light-activated 'CRISPR' triggers precision gene editing and super-fast DNA repair
In a series of experiments using human cancer cell lines, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used light as a trigger to make precise cuts in genomic material rapidly, using a molecular scalpel known as CRISPR, and observe how specialized cell proteins repair the exact spot where the gene was cut.

Order from disorder
An international team of researchers have harnessed turbulence in light to create a specific type of high-precision laser, known as a laser frequency comb, in a system previously thought incapable of producing such a laser.

Fighting fish synchronize their combat moves and their gene expression
When two betta fish are fighting for dominance, not only do their attacks mirror each other, but the gene expression in their brain cells also starts to align.

Combination biomarker predicts response to immune checkpoint therapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer
A combination of two biomarkers was predictive of improved clinical responses and prolonged survival following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with advanced bladder cancers.

A step forward in solving the reactor-neutrino flux problem
Joint effort of the nuclear theory group at the University of Jyvaskyla and the international collaborative EXO-200 experiment paves the way for solving the reactor antineutrino flux problems.

New structural 'map' solves mysteries of gigantic gene regulator
Structural biology has been used to 'map' part of a protein called SMCHD1, explaining how some changes in SMCHD1 cause certain developmental and degenerative conditions.

A Neandertal from Chagyrskaya Cave
Until now, only the genomes of two Neandertals have been sequenced to high quality: one from Vindjia Cave in modern-day Croatia and one from Denisova Cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains.

4,000th comet discovered by ESA and NASA Solar Observatory
On June 15, 2020, a citizen scientist spotted a never-before-seen comet in data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO -- the 4,000th comet discovery in the spacecraft's 25-year history.

New techniques improve quantum communication, entangle phonons
PME scientists and engineers have demonstrated a new quantum communication technique, which bypasses traditional channels that can corrupt or lose information.

Tomato's hidden mutations revealed in study of 100 varieties
A new analysis of difficult-to-access genetic variation is the most comprehensive ever conducted in plants.

Factors associated with decision to withdraw life-supporting treatment in patients with severe traumatic brain injury
Researchers examined what demographic and clinical factors are associated with the decision to withdraw life-supporting treatment in patients with severe traumatic brain injury using data from more than 825 trauma centers in the US.

Microbes might manage your cholesterol
Researchers discover a link between human blood cholesterol levels and a gene in the microbiome that could one day help people manage their cholesterol through diet, probiotics, or entirely new types of treatment.

Photonics: From custom-built to ready-made
An international collaboration team of University California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and EPFL has developed an integrated technology that may revolutionize photonic systems.

CUNY SPH weekly COVID-19 survey update week 12 -- Vaccines
Slightly less than half (48%) of New Yorkers know how vaccines actually work, but those who do are about 7% more likely to say they will take a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available.

Examining association between common antibiotic use, risk of cardiovascular death
This observational study examined the risk of cardiovascular death and sudden cardiac death associated with use of the antibiotic azithromycin compared with amoxicillin.

An excessive amount of propionic acid (PPA) in food preservatives may hinder brain development
This research proves the mechanism of autism induced by an imbalance of human gut microorganisms.

CMU method makes more data available for training self-driving cars
For safety's sake, a self-driving car must accurately track the movement of pedestrians, bicycles and other vehicles around it.

Call for caution for using a CAR-T immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute prove that the preclinical implementation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia immunotherapy, based on CD123-redirected CAR T-cells, affects hematopoiesis, blood cells production, and reconstitution.

Manipulating tiny skyrmions with small electric currents
A research group from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science have managed to manipulate and track the movement of individual magnetic vortices called skyrmions, which have been touted as strong candidates to act as information carriers in next-generation storage devices and as synapses for neuromorphic computing.

Study calls for reallocation of subsidies for biocontrols to fight fall armyworm
A new CABI-led study is calling for governments to reallocate subsidies to encourage the use of lower risk control options - such as biopesticides - in the fight against the devastating maize pest fall armyworm.

NJIT researchers develop easier and faster way to quantify, explore therapeutic proteins
Researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology in collaboration with Ohio University and Merck & Co.

The DNA tricks that gave us 100 different kinds of tomatoes
This expansive analysis of genetic variation among tomatoes is the most comprehensive study to date of structural genome variation for a major crop.

Air quality impacts early brain development
Does living close to roadways pose a risk to the developing brain?

Weed's wily ways explained in Illinois research
Like antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some herbicide-resistant weeds can't be killed by available chemicals.

Non-invasive fetal oxygen monitor could make for safer deliveries
A device to directly measure blood oxygen saturation in a fetus during labor has been developed by researchers at UC Davis.

Managing pain after sports medicine surgery
A Henry Ford Hospital study published in the Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery has found that patients who underwent knee surgery and other types of sports medicine procedures could manage their pain without opioids or a minimal dosage.

FSU researchers uncover new insights into Alzheimer's disease
FSU researchers looking at mouse models found impaired functional interactions between the hippocampus and the parietal cortex during the memory replay period, which may yield new insights into Alzheimer's Disease.

Observation of Excess Events in the XENON1T Dark Matter Experiment
Scientists from the international XENON collaboration . . . announced today that data from their XENON1T, the world's most sensitive dark matter experiment, show a surprising excess of events.

Poor sleep significantly linked with teenage depression
Teenagers who experience very poor sleep may be more likely to experience poor mental health in later life, as depressed teens in study slept 30 minutes less per night than other groups.

Virtual demolition
Scientists at Osaka University show how buildings and moving objects can be virtually removed from real-time images in a process of ''diminished reality.'' This work can be beneficial for urban and campus planners.

Nanomaterial gives robots chameleon skin
A new film made of gold nanoparticles changes color in response to any type of movement.

How the giant sequoia protects itself
A three-dimensional network of fibers makes the bark resistant to fire and rock fall.

Half of the world's population exposed to increasing air pollution, study shows
Half of the world's population is exposed to increasing air pollution, new research has shown.

A changing mating signal may initiate speciation in populations of Drosophila mojavensis
When choosing a mate, females of different subspecies of Drosophila mojavensis recognize the right mating partners either mainly by their song or by their smell.

EULAR: Early and intensive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis reduces fatigue
Disease-related, profound fatigue impairs the quality of life of many people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases.

Energy storage using oxygen to boost battery performance
Researchers have presented a novel electrode material for advanced energy storage device that is directly charged with oxygen from the air.

Envy divides society
Can class differences come about endogenously, i.e. independent of birth and education?

Women commuting during rush hour are exposed to higher levels of pollutants
Studies have shown associations between exposure to traffic-related air pollution and adverse health outcomes, including preterm birth and low birthweight.

Adhesive film turns smartwatch into biochemical health monitoring system
UCLA engineers have designed a thin adhesive film that could upgrade a consumer smartwatch into a powerful health-monitoring system.

Crop residue decisions affect soil life
New findings share how prescribed fire and no-till management impact soil microbes.

High performance sodium-ion capacitors based on Nb2O5 nanotubes@carbon cloth
Nb2O5 nanotubes and nanowire-to-nanotube homojunctions were directly grown on carbon cloth (CC) from a simple hydrothermal process by adjusting the pH value and adding pyridine as growth regulator.

Quantum diamond sensing
Researchers from the University of Maryland and colleagues report a new quantum sensing technique that allows high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on small molecules in dilute solution in a 10 picoliter sample volume -- roughly equivalent to a single cell.

NASA's IBEX charts 11 years of change at boundary to interstellar space
Now, for the first time, scientists have used an entire solar cycle of data from NASA's IBEX spacecraft to study how the heliosphere changes over time.

A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information.

New family of enzymes reveals the Achilles' heel of fungal pathogens
Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal species that can cause serious illnesses in immunocompromised individuals.

Homeless likelier to go on ventilators for respiratory infections than the non-homeless
During a recent six-year period, homeless people in New York state were more likely to hospitalized and treated with mechanical ventilators for respiratory infections than people who are not homeless.

Mild thyroid dysfunction affects one in five women with a history of miscarriage or subfertility
Mild thyroid abnormalities affect up to one in five women with a history of miscarriage or subfertility which is a prolonged time span of trying to become pregnant, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

A new study on rare 'split brain' patients sheds light on feature of human sleep
A new study of researchers at IMT School for Advanced Study Lucca demonstrates for the first time that the slow waves of NREM-sleep travel and propagate in the brain through ''anatomical highways''.

UConn researchers overcome a vexing problem in vaccine research
Researchers at UConn's Center of Excellence in Vaccine Research (CEVR) have made a breakthrough in vaccine development for a common and difficult to treat pneumonia-causing pathogen.

National tick surveillance survey identifies gaps to be filled
New Cornell-led research shows that inadequate funding is the main barrier to better surveillance and control of ticks, including the blacklegged tick, which spreads Lyme disease, the No.

Wind farms on the Black Sea coast could endanger bat populations in Eastern Europe
The Via Pontica, an important migration route for birds in Eastern Europe, runs along the Black Sea coast of Romania and Bulgaria.

Without intervention, a 70% reduction in strokes or death in patients with brain AVMs
For people with a brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM), a congenital vascular system defect, fate has a name: stroke.

How fish got onto land, and stayed there
Research on blennies, a family of fish that have repeatedly left the sea for land, suggests that being a 'jack of all trades' allows species to make the dramatic transition onto land but adapting into a 'master of one' allows them to stay there.

Efficient indium oxide catalysts designed for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol
A team jointly led by Profs.SUN Yuhan, GAO Peng, and LI Shenggang at the Shanghai Advanced Research Institute (SARI) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a successful case of theory-guided rational design of indium oxide (In2O3) catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol with high activity and selectivity.

Red squirrels making comeback as return of pine marten spells bad news for invasive grey squirrel
The number of red squirrels is on the increase in Ireland thanks to the return of the pine marten, a native carnivore, a new survey led by NUI Galway has found.

Custom-built to ready-made
Information technology continues to progress at a rapid pace. However, the growing demands of data centers have pushed electrical input-output systems to their physical limit, which has created a bottleneck.

RNA structures by the thousands
Researchers from Bochum and Münster have developed a new method to determine the structures of all RNA molecules in a bacterial cell at once.

CAR T cells beyond cancer: Targeting senescence-related diseases
Scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering have genetically engineered immune cells to find and kill cells that contribute to diseases caused by a tissue-damaging process called senescence.

Chinese scientists construct high-quality graph-based soybean genome
Recently, the research group led by Prof. TIAN Zhixi from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in cooperation with Profs.

First-degree incest: ancient genomes uncover Irish passage tomb dynastic elite
Archaeologists and geneticists, led by those from Trinity College Dublin, have shed new light on the earliest periods of Ireland's human history.

Association between morbidity and poverty reversed during early US COVID-19 epidemic
In the US, counties with greater poverty, lower social mobility and life expectancy had more confirmed cases in January through March, but this trend reversed by April 1, while a higher death rate from COVID-19 remained associated with poverty throughout.

Quantum physics: Physicists develop a new theory for Bose-Einstein condensates
Bose-Einstein condensates are often described as the fifth state of matter: At extremely low temperatures, gas atoms behave like a single particle.

What it means when animals have beliefs
Humans are not the only ones who have beliefs; animals do too, although it is more difficult to prove them than with humans.

Researchers map out intricate processes that activate key brain molecule
For the first time, scientists have revealed the steps needed to turn on a receptor that helps regulate neuron firing.

Tick surveillance and control lagging in US, study shows
While the prevalence of Lyme disease and other illnesses spread by ticks has steadily increased in the United States over the past 20 years, a new study of the state of American tick surveillance and control reveals an inconsistent and often under-supported patchwork of programs across the country.

First dinosaur eggs were soft like a turtle's
New research suggests that the first dinosaurs laid soft-shelled eggs -- a finding that contradicts established thought.

First egg from Antarctica is big and might belong to an extinct sea lizard
An analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has found that a mysterious fossil discovered in 2011 is a giant, soft-shell egg from about 66 million years ago.

Seeing corneal degeneration in a new light
The molecular changes that lead to Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) occur decades before the disease causes blurry vision and other noticeable symptoms in patients, new research by UT Southwestern scientists shows.

Knock-knock? Who's there? How coral let symbiotic algae in
New work from a team of Carnegie biologists solves a longstanding marine science mystery that could aid coral conservation.

Simple blood test could one day diagnose motor neurone disease
Scientists at the University of Sussex have identified a potential pattern within blood which signals the presence of motor neuron disease; a discovery which could significantly improve diagnosis.

Multispecialty centers for pediatric dysphagia deliver better outcomes, reduced costs
A new study has found that by combining different medical disciplines in one center to treat pediatric swallowing disorders rather than a typical care journey making appointments one specialist at a time, children had better outcomes, reduced the number of procedures needed, and health care costs were reduced.

Why do so many of us feel guilty about taking a lunch break?
New research from health psychologists at Staffordshire University explores why some employees feel guilty about taking their legally entitled breaks.

Using tiny electrodes to measure electrical activity in bacteria
Scientists at Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed an organic electrochemical transistor that they can use to measure and study in fine detail a phenomenon known as extracellular electron transfer in which bacteria release electrons.

Self-powered 'paper chips' could help sound an early alarm for forest fires
Recent devastating fires in the Amazon rain forest and the Australian bush highlight the need to detect forest fires at early stages, before they blaze out of control.

How commonly do patients develop persistent opioid use after cardiac surgery?
A large, national database was used to determine how common it was for patients who hadn't used opioids before undergoing a coronary artery bypass grafting or heart valve procedure to subsequently develop persistent opioid use after surgery.

AI goes underground: root crop growth predicted with drone imagery
Root crops like cassava, carrots and potatoes are notoriously good at hiding disease, or deficiencies which might affect their growth.

Nanofiber masks can be sterilized multiple times without filter performance deterioration
There is a worldwide shortage of N95 masks. Scientists tested the effectiveness of reusing masks through disinfection with ethanol.

New nanoparticle drug combination for atherosclerosis
Physicochemical cargo-switching nanoparticles (CSNP) designed by KAIST can help significantly reduce cholesterol and macrophage foam cells in arteries, which are the two main triggers for atherosclerotic plaque and inflammation.

Why the Mediterranean is a climate change hotspot
MIT analysis uncovers the basis of the severe rainfall declines predicted by many models.

Bouillon fortified with a new iron compound could help reduce iron deficiency
Iron fortification of food is a cost-effective method of preventing iron deficiency.

For babies born with a rare immune deficiency, a unique new test to better target care
A new test developed at CHU Sainte-Justine in Montreal will enable better management of patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

Physical activity prevents almost 4 million early deaths worldwide each year
At least 3.9 million early deaths are being averted worldwide every year by people being physically active, according to a new study using data from 168 countries, and published in The Lancet Global Health by researchers at the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh.

Patient-personalized sequencing pipeline steps up sensitivity of tumor DNA monitoring
A sequencing pipeline that integrates a patient's specific tumor genetic data boosts the sensitivity of tests that detect cancer cell DNA circulating in the blood, according to a newly published study.

Combination of healthy lifestyle traits may substantially reduce Alzheimer's disease risk
Data from two NIH studies shows that combining four or five healthy lifestyle behaviors -- physical activity, not smoking, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption, a high-quality diet, and cognitive activities -- may lower risk of Alzheimer's disease by 60%.

Latest findings on bitter substances in coffee
Coffee is very popular around the world despite or perhaps because of its bitter taste.

SFU researchers working to improve quality of life for seniors in long-term care
Simon Fraser University researchers are hoping their latest study on seniors will help to address one of their biggest physical challenges -- injury from falls.
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