Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

June 18, 2020
No disadvantages to having kids early
Maturing and reproducing early hardly has any downsides. If you're a wild boar, that is.

Achievement isn't why more men are majoring in physics, engineering and computer science
Researchers at New York University's Steinhardt School found that the reason there are more undergraduate men than women majoring in physics, engineering and computer science is not because men are higher achievers.

How common are taste, smell dysfunction in COVID-19 patients
This survey study of patients with COVID-19 investigates how common the ability to taste and smell was reduced at the onset of the disease.

Simulating cooperation in local communities
In new research published in EPJ B, a new simulation-based approach is introduced which could help to reduce the proportion of people who misuse welfare payoffs, through a cost-effective system which rewards individuals who use them responsibly.

Laser technology: The Turbulence and the Comb
While the light of an ordinary laser only has one single, well-defined wavelength, a so-called ''frequency comb'' consists of different light frequencies, which are precisely arranged at regular distances, much like the teeth of a comb.

Google's new light field video research showcases high-quality experience
Google is taking immersive media technology to the next level, showing a practical system for light field video.

Boston partnership leverages local manufacturing to quickly produce reusable face shields
Researchers at a major Boston academic medical center designed, fabricated, tested, and implemented a reusable face shield for front-line medical staff within a couple of weeks.

Protecting Earth from asteroid impact with a tethered diversion
A new paper published in EPJ Special Topics, co-authored by Flaviane Venditti, Planetary Radar Department, Arecibo Observatory, University of Central Florida, Arecibo, suggests the use of a tether assisted system to prevent PHA impact.

Researchers design a system to reduce the noise of space rockets in the launch phase
Researchers at the Gandia campus of the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) have developed a new system to reduce the noise of space rockets during the first phases of launching.

Nanoparticle for overcoming leukemia treatment resistance
One of the largest problems with cancer treatment is the development of resistance to anticancer therapies.

"Fake news" lowers trust in mainstream media across party lines, study finds
A Rutgers-led study finds that online misinformation, or ''fake news,'' lowers people's trust in mainstream media across party lines.

Study sheds light on why retinal ganglion cells are vulnerable to glaucoma
Millions of sufferers of glaucoma might someday benefit from a study released in STEM CELLS in which a ''disease in a dish'' stem cell model was used to examine the mechanism in glaucoma that causes retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to degenerate, resulting in loss of vision.

Reducing the risk of space debris collision
In a new paper published in EPJ Special Topics, authors Antônio Delson Conceição de Jesus and Gabriel Luiz F.

Viruses can steal our genetic code to create new human-virus genes
Study unveils novel mechanism that allows viruses to produce unexpected proteins.

Goodbye 'extinction,' hello 'evanescence'? Validating a new paradigm
Naturalist and zoologist Georges Cuvier established extinction as a distinct field of science in a series of publications beginning in 1799.

US cities with pro sports see more flu deaths
Sports leagues may want to consider calling a timeout on reopening their doors to fans, based on new West Virginia University-led research that links an uptick in seasonal flu deaths to US cities with pro sports teams.

KKH's novel clinical triage protocol for threatened miscarriages saves pregnancies
A study conducted by clinicians from KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) and researchers at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU), which evaluated and demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of a KKH-developed novel clinical protocol to screen and triage women with threatened miscarriages, has been published in the journal, Scientific Reports.

Predicting side effects
Scientists develop AI-based tool to predict adverse drug events. Such events are responsible for some 2 million U.S. hospitalizations per year.

Two-dimensional carbon networks
Lithium-ion batteries usually contain graphitic carbons as anode materials. Scientists have investigated the carbonic nanoweb graphdiyne as a novel two-dimensional carbon network for its suitability in battery applications.

Age discrimination laws don't protect older women as they do older men
Older women in the workforce should be considered collectively as a unique demographic group that includes both gender and age if they're to receive adequate protection against workplace discrimination, according to a new paper published by a University at Buffalo economist.

Unique metabolic markers detect over 50% of children affected by autism spectrum disorder
Blood sample analyses from the Children's Autism Metabolome Project have now reproducibly identified unique metabolic signatures in over 50% of the participating children with autism.

Optogenetic odors reveal the logic of olfactory perception
Using optogenetic control, researchers have created an electrical signature that is perceived as an odor in the brain's smell-processing center, the olfactory bulb, even though the odor does not exist.

Anal cancer's first randomized trial for inoperable disease sets the treatment standard
Results from first randomized trial for inoperable anal cancer suggest that carboplatin-paclitaxel become the standard treatment for these patients.

How chandelier cells light up the brain
Chandelier cells stand out among brain cells for their elaborate, branching structure.

Measles origin finding could inform COVID-19 research
Virus genome sequencing study and comment published in Science. University of Sydney and University of Melbourne evolutionary scientists provide commentary on important new study.

New research shows tiny, decoy 'sponges' attract coronavirus away from lung cells
New nanotechnology tested at BU's NEIDL stops SARS-CoV-2 from infecting cells and replicating.

Cyclosporin study may lead to novel ways of approaching mitochondrial dysfunction
Fungi producing cyclosporins exist as two reproducing stages: asexual -- soil fungi from which cyclosporin was initially extracted, and sexual -- parasitic fungi close to a popularly known genus Cordyceps.

COVID-19 affects adolescent and young adults sexual and reproductive health
Social distancing and limited access to contraceptive and abortion care during the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents and young adults according to a new study.

Forest loss escalates biodiversity change
New international research reveals the far-reaching impacts of forest cover loss on global biodiversity.

The origins of measles: Virus diverged from cattle-infecting relative earlier than thought in history
The measles virus diverged from a closely related cattle-infecting virus in approximately the sixth century BCE - around 1,400 years earlier than current estimates - according to a new study of dozens of measles genomes.

Survey finds many are buying fireworks this year due to COVID-19 cancellations
Fireworks are a time-honored tradition of July Fourth celebrations and a signature sound of summer in America, but many public displays are being cancelled this year amid COVID-19 social distancing.

Researchers discover unique material design for brain-like computations
Over the past few decades, computers have seen dramatic progress in processing power; however, even the most advanced computers are relatively rudimentary in comparison with the complexities and capabilities of the human brain.

The Parkinson's disease gut has an overabundance of opportunistic pathogens
In 2003, Heiko Braak proposed that Parkinson's disease is caused by a pathogen in the gut that could pass through the intestinal mucosal barrier and spread to the brain through the nervous system.

Fighting the COVID-19 pandemic through testing
Research labs are racing to develop innovative testing methods and overcome the bottlenecks to more widespread testing, which is crucial to controlling the spread of the disease.

SARS-CoV-2 transmission to animals: Monitoring needed to mitigate risk
As evidence mounts for the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 infecting various animals, scientists at UCL say a global effort is needed to reduce the risk of the virus later returning to people, in a comment piece published in The Lancet Microbe.

9 in 10 Americans concerned pharma will use COVID-19 pandemic to raise drug prices
Nearly 9 in 10 US adults are ''very'' (55%) or ''somewhat'' (33%) concerned that the pharmaceutical industry will leverage the COVID-19 pandemic to raise drug prices.

Yale scientists solve a thorny problem
''Why do plants have thorns?'' is an easy question: The thorns help protect against hungry animals that like to munch on the plants.

Five steps to stop the death of the most threatened birds of prey
A new study presents a new five-step protocol to mitigate the mortality of birds of prey due to accidents with infrastructures (power lines, etc.) and other unnatural causes.

Researchers study catastrophic disease events in marine mammals
Viruses were responsible for 72 percent of these events and caused 20 times the number of deaths than bacterial outbreaks.

Australian scientists reveal a lost 8 billion light years of universe evolution
Scientists, from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash University in Australia, reveal it's likely there are 2 million gravitational wave events from merging black holes - a pair of merging black holes every 200 seconds and a pair of merging neutron stars every 15 seconds - that are missed every year.

Targeting stem cells: The path to curing poor-prognosis leukaemia
Researchers have been investigating what they believe to be the root cause of treatment resistance, leukaemia stem cells, and have now hit upon a new therapeutic approach that works by targeting these cells.

Bobwhites listen to each other when picking habitat
Northern bobwhites are attracted to a habitat based on whether other bobwhites are present there, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign report.

New Argentine fossils uncover history of celebrated conifer group
Newly unearthed, surprisingly well-preserved conifer fossils from Patagonia, Argentina, show that an endangered and celebrated group of tropical West Pacific trees has roots in the ancient supercontinent that once comprised Australia, Antarctica and South America, according to an international team of researchers.

Antioxidant agent may prevent chronic kidney disease and Parkinson's disease
Researchers from Osaka University developed a novel dietary silicon-based antioxidant agent with renoprotective and neuroprotective effects.

Study examines how the COVID-19 pandemic impacts quality of life in patients with cancer
Quality of life of cancer patients during coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

AJR: Chest CT can distinguish negative from positive lab results for COVID-19
American Journal of Roentgenology investigators from five infectious disease hospitals across four districts in Guangzhou, China found that the less pulmonary consolidation on chest CT, the greater the possibility of negative initial reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results for 21 patients (nine men, 12 women; age range, 26-90 years).

Veterinary medicine: Risk factors for heatstroke in UK dogs
Dogs that are older and heavier than their breed average or that have flat faces are at higher risk of heat-related illness, according to a study in Scientific Reports.

Addressing the persistent gender gaps in some STEM pursuits
In a Policy Forum, Joseph Cimpian and colleagues identify blind spots in current educational policy designed to remedy gender inequity in STEM and argue that interventions may need to become more nuanced concerning student achievement.

Crowded homes, poor neighborhoods linked to COVID-19
A study of nearly 400 pregnant women is among the first to show that socioeconomic status and household crowding increase the risk of getting COVID-19.

UC Davis study details use of extreme risk protection orders in Calif. over first four years
The population-based study is one of the first to detail the early use of ERPOs in California.

Study: Urban density not linked to higher coronavirus infection rates -- and is linked to lower COVID-19 death rates
A new study suggests that denser places, assumed by many to be more conducive to the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, are not linked to higher infection rates.

Hubble provides holistic view of stars gone haywire
As nuclear fusion engines, most stars live placid lives for hundreds of millions to billions of years.

Innovation by ancient farmers adds to biodiversity of the Amazon, study shows
Innovation by ancient farmers to improve soil fertility continues to have an impact on the biodiversity of the Amazon, a major new study shows.

Strenuous daily exercise may shorten, not prolong, longevity
By analyzing longevity data for professional Japanese traditional artists, researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have found that Kabuki actors, known for their vigorous movements, surprisingly had shorter lifespans compared with other traditional arts performers who lead mostly sedentary lifestyles.

Vapor fix lifts up perovskite crystal performance
A facile and mild bromine treatment eliminates surface and bulk defects from perovskites to boost the materials' optoelectronic properties.

22,000 tiny tremblors illustrate 3D fault geometry and earthquake swarm evolution
By mapping the more than 22,000 tremblors, researchers composed a detailed, three-dimensional image of the complex fault structure below southern California's Cahuilla Valley.

Diabetic ketoacidosis threatens hospitalized patients with COVID-19
Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common and potentially fatal complication in hospitalized patients with COVID-19, according to a new clinical perspective published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

URI researcher: Antioxidant-rich diet reduces stress response during bird migration
A research team led by a University of Rhode Island ornithologist had birds fly in a wind tunnel to simulate migration and found that birds that consume dietary antioxidants before and during fall migration can reduce the endocrine stress response triggered by long-duration flights.

Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
We want you to continue having access to the latest Johns Hopkins Medicine research achievements and clinical advances, so we are issuing a second tip sheet every Thursday, covering topics not related to COVID-19 or the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Spacecrafts get a boost in 'aerogravity assisted' interactions
In a recently published paper in EPJ Special Topics, Jhonathan O.

Lancet Neurology publishes results of AFFiRiS' Phase 1 trial with PD01A in Parkinson's
AFFiRiS AG, a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing novel disease-modifying specific active immunotherapies (SAITs), today announced that detailed results of the phase 1 clinical program with its lead candidate PD01 in early Parkinson's disease (PD) patients were published in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Neurology

Uncovering the genetic basis of hermaphroditism in grapes, the trait that allowed domestication
Plant experts at UC Davis have defined the genetic basis of sex determination in grapevines, one of the oldest and most valuable crops worldwide.

Researchers take a bloody good look at the medicinal leech genome
An international team of researchers, led by Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) scientist Sebastian Kvist, have announced the completion and results of their work to sequence the genome of Hirudo medicinalis, a European leech, and one of the most prominently used medicinal species.

Using LEGO to test children's ability to visualize and rotate 3D shapes in space
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a test that uses children's ability to assemble LEGO pieces to assess their spatial visualization ability.

Studying the Neandertal DNA found in modern humans using stem cells and organoids
Protocols that allow the transformation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines into organoids have changed the way scientists can study developmental processes and enable them to decipher the interplay between genes and tissue formation, particularly for organs where primary tissue is not available.

Simple oral health steps help improve elite athletes' performance
Elite athletes who adopted simple oral health measures, such as using high fluoride toothpaste and cleaning between their teeth, reported significantly reduced negative effects on performance related to poor oral health, finds a study led by UCL.

Researchers identify key steps in development of kidneys
The discovery of how certain key structures in the kidneys are formed could have important implications for treating renal fibrosis (or scarring), a feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Researchers make next-generation, high-toughness battery component
By combining a ceramic material with graphene, Brown University engineers have made what they say is the toughest solid electrolyte built to date.

Know the risks of investing in forests
Given the tremendous ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, some governments are counting on planted forests as offsets for greenhouse gas emissions--a sort of climate investment.

Artificial intelligence could revolutionize sea ice warnings
Today, large resources are used to provide vessels in the polar seas with warnings about the spread of sea ice.

KU Leuven researchers shed new light on solar flares
Plasma astrophysicists at KU Leuven have created the first self-consistent simulation of the physical processes that occur during a solar flare.

Natural fluid injections triggered Cahuilla earthquake swarm
Scientists generated a catalog of 22,000 seismic events from a four-year period to reveal the structure of an active fault zone.

Study links financial hardship to more ED visits; less preventive care
A new study finds higher medical and nonmedical financial hardships are independently associated with more emergency department visits, lower receipt of some preventive services, and worse self-rated health in cancer survivors.

Design, analyses of oncology trials during COVID-19 pandemic
The challenges associated with conducting and assessing results of clinical trials during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed in this Viewpoint.

Homeless patients are more likely to be readmitted to a hospital within 30 days
Patients who are homeless are far more likely than housed individuals to be readmitted to a hospital within 30 or 90 days of their discharge, according to a new study of inpatient data from Florida, Massachusetts and New York.

Are planets with oceans common in the galaxy? It's likely, NASA scientists find
Several years ago, planetary scientist Lynnae Quick began to wonder whether any of the more than 4,000 known exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system, might resemble some of the watery moons around Jupiter and Saturn.

Researchers find a new therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer
The development of pancreatic cancer is driven by coexisting mutations in an oncogene involved in controlling cell growth, and in a tumor suppressor gene.

Suicide rate for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders 170 times higher
The suicide rate for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) is 170 times higher than the general population according a study just published in the journal Schizophrenia Research, a figure the authors call 'tragically high.'

High-tech CT reveals ancient evolutionary adaptation of extinct crocodylomorphs
New insights into the anatomy of the inner ear of prehistoric reptiles, the thalattosuchians, revealed details about the evolutionary adaption during the transition into the ocean after a long semiaquatic phase.

New study: Publicizing OSHA violations increases compliance
A single press release naming a company that has violated workplace health and safety regulations can result in a 73 percent improvement in compliance by other facilities, a Duke researcher finds in a study published in the American Economic Review.

Forests can be risky climate investments to offset greenhouse gas emissions
Given the tremendous ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, some governments are counting on planted forests as offsets for greenhouse gas emissions -- a sort of climate investment.

A deep-learned E-skin decodes complex human motion
A deep-learning powered single-strained electronic skin sensor can capture human motion from a distance.

Off the scales: Fish armor both tough and flexible
Humans have drawn technological inspiration from fish scales going back to ancient times: Romans, Egyptians, and other civilizations would dress their warriors in scale armor, providing both protection and mobility.

First known case of a potentially deadly heart rhythm disturbance induced by chloroquine therapy for COVID-19 reported
A patient who met many of the published safety guidelines for chloroquine therapy against COVID-19 was observed to have a very abnormal ECG pattern after treatment began, leading to multiple episodes of torsade de pointes (TdP), a life-threatening arrhythmia in which the lower chambers of the heart beat out of sync with the upper chambers.

International study indicates shift to raw/home-made food diet for pets over past decade
While most cats and dogs are still being fed 'conventional' wet and dry food, there has been a distinct shift in feeding practices over the past decade to include raw and home-made foods, particularly in Australia, finds an international study, published in this week's issue of Vet Record.

It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work.

Decide now or wait for something better?
When we make decisions, we don't always have all options available to choose from at the same time.

Biology in art: Genetic detectives ID microbes suspected of slowly ruining humanity's treasures
New from Leonardo da Vinci DNA Project collaborators: 1) A study led by the J.

How sexual competition and choice could protect species from extinction
New research shows that removing sexual competition and choice through enforced monogamy creates populations that are less resilient to environmental stress, such as climate change.

COVID-19 toll in nursing homes linked to staffing levels and quality
A new study shows that residents of long-term care facilities with lower nurse staffing levels, poorer quality scores, and higher concentrations of disadvantaged residents suffer from higher rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths.

Mutations linked to intellectual disability point to overly active ion channe
Two mutations identified in individuals with developmental and epileptic brain disease can be traced back to the same ion channel.

Exploring mass dependence in electron-hole clusters
A study published in EPJ B reveals that the behaviour of one type of three-particle cluster displays a distinct relationship with the ratio between the masses of its particles.

How EU safety legislation has affected UK vapers
New research shows that vapers have been largely reassured by recent EU regulations, but some have been pushed to the black market for stronger hits.

Hookworm trial offers new hope to MS patients
Parasitic worms could offer a new treatment hope for patients suffering from the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis, according to experts from the University of Nottingham.

Researchers create a photographic film of a molecular switch
Molecular switches are the molecular counterparts of electrical switches and play an important role in many processes in nature.

Stunning new hubble images reveal stars gone haywire
The NASA/Hubble Space Telescope demonstrates its full range of imaging capabilities with two new images of planetary nebulae.

Women and men still choose partners like they used to
Men and women choose partners according to different criteria. These are the same almost all over the world and have remained unchanged in the last 30 years, according to a new survey of 14 000 people.

Disparities in COVID-19 reported incidence, knowledge, behavior among US adults
The association of sociodemographic characteristics with reported incidence, knowledge and behavior regarding COVID-19 among US adults is examined in this survey study.

The first model proposed to simulate the functioning of concept cells in the brain
Lobachevsky University scientists together with foreign colleagues for the first time theoretically substantiated the existence of concept cells.

Scientists unlock secrets of Ethiopia's superfood in race to save it from warming climate
Teff, an ancient grain originally from Ethiopia, is a staple crop for 50 million people in the country.

Researchers study a novel type of extracellular vesicles
Researchers from Sechenov University and the University of Pittsburgh compared the properties of two groups of extracellular vesicles.

Less sleep reduces positive feelings
Sleep deprivation makes us feel less happy, active, attentive and purposeful, according to a new study.

COVID-19 collaboration reduces infections in long-term care facilities
A collaborative program to battle COVID-19 in long-term care facilities is saving lives and offers a model for communities across the country, UVA doctors report.

Human brain size gene triggers bigger brain in monkeys
Dresden and Japanese researchers show that a human-specific gene causes a larger neocortex in the common marmoset, a non-human primate.

Simple is best? Simple and universal design for fuel cell electrolyte
Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) and Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences have successfully established a universal synthetic design using porous organic polymers (POPs) for fuel cell electrolyte, according to an Editor's choice hot article published in the journal Materials Chemistry Frontiers.

Complications of premature birth decline in California, Stanford-led study finds
California's most vulnerable premature babies are now healthier when they go home from the hospital, according to a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative.

Disparities in stroke care at urban vs. rural hospitals impacts quality of care, patient survival
Stroke patients in rural areas are less likely to get the most advanced treatments and are more likely to die before leaving the hospital than people treated for stroke at hospitals in urban areas.

Fish fossils become buried treasure
Rare metals crucial to green industries turn out to have a surprising origin.

Silicosis: Ominous resurgence of an occupational lung condition reported
A new study appearing in the journal CHEST®, published by Elsevier, documents an increased incidence of silicosis, which progressed rapidly to massive pulmonary fibrosis in a significant proportion of patients who had previously worked artificial stone (AS), also called artificial quartz agglomerate or conglomerate, a popular new countertop material, despite cessation of exposure after diagnosis.

Study shows sedentary behavior independently predicts cancer mortality
In the first study to look at objective measures of sedentary behavior and cancer mortality, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that greater inactivity was independently associated with a higher risk of dying from cancer.

Neandertal genes in the petri dish
Protocols that allow the transformation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines into organoids have changed the way scientists can study developmental processes and enable them to decipher the interplay between genes and tissue formation, particularly for organs where primary tissue is not available.

New research says displaying fake reviews increases consumer trust in platforms by 80%
Many people are using COVID-19 quarantine to get projects done at home, meaning plenty of online shopping for tools and supplies.

Why and to what extent a large hip protects from type 2 diabetes and CVD
In a Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology review article Norbert Stefan from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), the University Hospital of Tübingen and the Boston Children's Hospital, highlights why and to what extent a large hip circumference, an estimate of increased fat mass in the lower part of the body, protects from type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD).

Popular doesn't mean influential among Cambodian farmers
Published in the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, their research examined the role of social network brokers - well-connected individuals within a community - in the adoption of innovative farming practices in Battambang Province in North-Western Cambodia.

Mayo finds convalescent plasma safe for diverse patients with COVID-19
Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have found investigational convalescent plasma to be safe following transfusion in a diverse group of 20,000 patients.

New research leads to Army drones changing shape mid-flight
oon, the U.S. Army will be able to deploy autonomous air vehicles that can change shape during flight, according to new research presented at the AIAA Aviation Forum and Exposition's virtual event June 16.

High cortisol levels associated with greater risk of death from COVID-19
COVID-19 patients with extremely high levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their blood are more likely to deteriorate quickly and die, according to new research published today.

Stroke survival rates worse in rural areas, study says
A major US study reveals large gaps between urban and rural patients in quality of care received after a stroke and rates of survival.

COVID-19 may have consequences for mental health
The COVID-19 pandemic appears to be adversely affecting mental health among hospitalised patients, the healthcare professionals treating them and the general population.

UAlberta clinician-scientists identify pink eye as possible primary symptom of COVID-19
A case of pink eye is now reason to be tested for COVID-19, according to University of Alberta researchers.

Quantum rings in the hold of laser light
Ultracold atoms trapped in appropriately prepared optical traps can arrange themselves in surprisingly complex, hitherto unobserved structures, according to scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow.

Clear signs of brain injury with severe COVID-19
Certain patients who receive hospital care for coronavirus infection (COVID-19) exhibit clinical and neurochemical signs of brain injury, a University of Gothenburg study shows.

Information recorded over time in medical records tells more about diseases
A new study describes an approach that uses machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to carefully track patients' medical records over time in EHRs to predict their likelihood of having or developing different diseases.

Graphene smart textiles developed for heat adaptive clothing
New research on the two-dimensional (2D) material graphene has allowed researchers to create smart adaptive clothing which can lower the body temperature of the wearer in hot climates.

More than 80% of Americans report nation's future is significant source of stress
More than 8 in 10 Americans (83%) say the future of our nation is a significant source of stress, according to the American Psychological Association's most recent survey report, Stress in AmericaTM 2020: Stress in The Time of COVID-19, Volume Two.
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