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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 22, 2020


Online program improves insomnia in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors
In a study published today by Pediatric Blood and Cancer, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute show that an online program developed specifically for AYA cancer survivors can significantly alleviate insomnia and improve overall quality of life.
A new synthesis of poly heterocyclic compounds: Expected anti-cancer reagents
In this article, we have described a new practical cyclocondensation synthesis for a series of [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]pyrido[3,2-e] pyrimidine and pyrido[2',3':4,5] pyrimido[6,1-c][1,2,4] triazine from 2-amino-3-cyano-4.6-diarylpyridines.
A second COVID-19 wave could be avoided if social distancing and the use of face masks are maintained
Individual behaviour has a significant effect on preventing a large second wave of COVID-19 infections.
Assessment of COVID-19 community containment strategies in China
Measures implemented in a community in China to restrict the spread of COVID-19 are examined in this case series.
Catalyzing a green future
Highly modular metal-organic framework-based materials show great potential for photocatalytic hydrogen production.
Positive YouTube videos of wolves linked to greater tolerance
A new study from North Carolina State University suggests that people have more tolerance for wolves after seeing positive videos about them, which could make YouTube an important wolf conservation tool.
Research in land plants shows nanoplastics accumulating in tissues
As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments, say Baoshan Xing at UMass Amherst and colleagues in China.
New article clarifies details of COVID-19 respiratory transmission
In a new article, scientists provide an exhaustive, evidence-based review of how COVID-19 droplets from infected patients spread through the air and describe how health care professionals can protect themselves.
Evidence supports 'hot start' scenario and early ocean formation on Pluto
The accretion of new material during Pluto's formation may have generated enough heat to create a liquid ocean that has persisted beneath an icy crust to the present day.
Pioneering research reveals certain human genes relate to gut bacteria
The role genetics and gut bacteria play in human health has long been a fruitful source of scientific enquiry, but new research marks a significant step forward in unraveling this complex relationship.
Bread mould avoids infection by mutating its own DNA
Whilst most organisms try to stop their DNA from mutating, scientists from the UK and China have discovered that a common fungus found on bread actively mutates its own DNA as a way of fighting virus-like infections.
Climate change and the rise of the Roman Empire and the fall of the Ptolemies
The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 B.C.E. triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the rise of the Roman Empire.
FSU researchers find resilience, not loneliness in nationwide study of pandemic respon
Social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic has not led to an overall increase in loneliness among Americans.
LJI scientists investigate a powerful protein behind antibody development
Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered a potential new way to better fight a range of infectious diseases, cancers and even autoimmune diseases.
Southwestern correctional facilities' drinking water puts inmate health at risk
The first nationwide analysis of drinking water quality in United States correctional facilities found average arsenic concentrations in drinking water in Southwestern United States correctional facilities were twice as high as average arsenic concentrations in other Southwest community drinking water systems.
UBC study identifies social and behavioral factors most closely associated with dying
Smoking, divorce and alcohol abuse have the closest connection to death out of 57 social and behavioural factors analyzed in this study.
'Game changer' for reporters: 2016 US presidential election coverage
The 2016 US presidential election is considered a 'game changer' for journalists covering the US presidential elections by causing them to dramatically reconsider how they view their role -- either as neutral disseminators of information or impassioned advocates for the truth -- according to researchers at the University of Missouri's School of Journalism.
New technique may enable all-optical data-center networks
A new technique that synchronises the clocks of computers in under a billionth of a second can eliminate one of the hurdles for the deployment of all-optical networks, potentially leading to more efficient data centres, according to a new study led by UCL and Microsoft.
Strainoptronics: A new way to control photons
Researchers discovered a new way to engineer optoelectronic devices by stretching a two-dimensional material on top of a silicon photonic platform.
Sugary drink tax models show health gains, cost reductions, but vary by tax design
A simulation model details how different taxing strategies for sodas and other sugary drinks could impact health gains linked to heart attacks, strokes and diabetes while also lowering health care costs in the US.
Research sheds new light on the role of sea ice in controlling atmospheric carbon levels
A new study has highlighted the crucial role that sea ice across the Southern Ocean played in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during times of past climate change, and could provide a critical resource for developing future climate change models.
Hormone involved in obesity is a risk factor for sepsis
A group of scientists from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), led by Luís Moita, discovered that a hormone that has been pointed out as a treatment for obesity reduces the resistance to infection caused by bacteria and is a risk factor for sepsis.
UMN report shows sexually transmitted infections continue to rise among MN youth
The 2020 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD-PRC) reports that while pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline to historic lows for 15 to 19-year-olds, Minnesota youth are contracting sexually transmitted infections (STI) at alarmingly high rates.
300-million-year-old fish resembles a sturgeon but took a different evolutionary path
A re-examination of a 300-million-year-old fish, Tanyrhinichthys mcallisteri, revealed that its lifestyle more closely resembled that of the bottom-dwelling sturgeon, rather than the stealthy pike, as was previously believed.
Study finds new mentoring model supports underrepresented minority women faculty in STEM
Results of a new experiment by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that an online mutual-mentoring model called 'Amplifying Voices' can create 'trusting and supportive environments' among underrepresented minority women in STEM across academic institutions.
Seasonal sea ice changes hold clues to controlling CO2 levels, ancient ice shows
New research has shed light on the role sea ice plays in managing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.
Helping to protect the most illegally trafficked mammals in the world
As China upgrades pangolins to the highest protected status level, an alternative approach to using long standing forensic methods is helping wildlife crime investigators disrupt poachers and animal traffickers in an effort to bring them to justice.
Genetic study of Arabian horses challenges some common beliefs about the ancient breed
A study involving Arabian horses from 12 countries found that some populations maintained a larger degree of genetic diversity and that the breed did not contribute genetically to the modern-day Thoroughbred, contrary to popular thought.
Proper location of solid feed can improve nutrient intake and growth of dairy calves prior to weaning
Encouraging solid feed consumption by calves on high-milk diets can be challenging.
Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products
Growing inside pipes and on the surfaces of medical devices, bacterial biofilms cause major headaches for the food processing industry and healthcare professionals alike.
New class of precision medicine strips cancer of its DNA defenses
A new precision medicine targeting cancer's ability to repair its DNA has shown promising results in the first clinical trial of the drug class.
Proportion of children born into care in England now one in 200
Following Freedom of Information (FOI) requests issued to the Department for Education, which provided access to national data collected from local authorities in England, researchers found that in the decade to 2018, the proportion of children in England born into care rose from 26 to 48 per 10,000 live births -- or from around one baby in 400 to one in 200.
Alzheimer's: New gene may drive earliest brain changes
A newly discovered Alzheimer's gene appears to drive the first appearance of amyloid plaque in the brain, and could lead to new therapies that prevent the disease from developing.
Initial COVID-19 infection rate may be 80 times greater than originally reported
A new study from Penn State estimates that the number of early COVID-19 cases in the U.S. may have been more than 80 times greater and doubled nearly twice as fast as originally believed.
Bioactive factors-imprinted scaffold vehicles for promoting bone healing
Bioactive Factors-imprinted Scaffold Vehicles for Promoting Bone Healing: The Potential Strategies and the Confronted Challenges for Clinical Production- BIO Integration http://ow.ly/58Co30qSp7b Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.
"Bright spot" during COVID-19: Increased power from solar panels thanks to cleaner air
During the COVID-19 pandemic, one unexpected outcome in cities around the world has been a reduction in air pollution, as people stay home to avoid contracting the coronavirus.
Early pandemic paradox: fewer UK deaths from December 2019 to March 2020 compared to the previous 5 years
An analysis of national weekly mortality rates between December 2019 - March 2020, compared to the same period for the previous five years, by researchers at WMG and WMS, University of Warwick, has shown that there have been fewer deaths registered this year during the lead up to the Covid-19 pandemic.
Vitamin D may help prevent a common side effect of anti-cancer immunotherapy
New research published in CANCER indicates that taking vitamin D supplements may help prevent a potentially serious side effect of a revolutionary form of anti-cancer therapy.
The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience.
Undergraduate student discovers 18 new species of aquatic beetle in South America
Rachel Smith has published a description of 18 new species of aquatic water beetle from the genus Chasmogenus in the peer-reviewed journal ZooKeys.
Urine test reveals quality of your diet -- and whether it's the best fit for your body
Scientists have completed large-scale tests on a new type of five-minute urine test that measures the health of a person's diet, and produces an individual's unique urine 'fingerprint'.
Super-resolution microscopy reveals a twist inside of cells
EPFL biophysicists have developed a high-throughput super-resolution microscope to probe nanoscale structures and dynamics of mammalian cells, showing in unprecedented detail the twists and turns of an organelle important for cell division.
Synthetic materials mimic living creatures
Researchers have developed a family of soft materials that imitates living creatures.
Product recommendation systems can help with search of antiviral drugs
Scientists from Skoltech and the Chumakov Federal Scientific Center for Research and Development of Immune-and-Biological Products of RAS checked the ability of artificial intelligence that suggest products to buy, recommend new antiviral compounds.
Virginia Tech scientists confirm usually harmless virus attacks the heart's electrical system
Virginia Tech researchers studying how a usually benign virus attacks the human heart with sometimes fatal consequences determined that the virus disrupts the heart's electrical system -- and with dual impacts not previously recognized.
Economic and social consequences of human mobility restrictions under COVID-19
A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by the research group coordinated by professor Fabio Pammolli at Politecnico di Milano analyzes the steep fall on the Italian mobility network during the pandemic and reveals a counterintuitive and somehow paradoxical result, since the contraction of mobility, in relative terms, has been more intense in the Regions where the diffusion of the virus has been negligible.
Giving people 'digital literacy' tips can help them spot dubious information online
Giving people 'digital literacy' tips can help them identify dubious information online, a new study shows.
Changing environment at home genetically primes invasive species to take over abroad
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have found that a constantly fluctuating environment can enable some species to invade new areas by helping them maintain the genetic diversity they need to settle into their new homes.
Study: Planting new forests is part of but not the whole solution to climate change
The large-scale planting of new forests in previously tree-free areas, a practice known as afforestation, is hailed as an efficient way to remove excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere -- a so-called natural climate solution.
This enigmatic protein sculpts DNA to repair harmful damage
Sometimes, when something is broken, the first step to fixing it is to break it even more.
Fluorocarbon bonds are no match for light-powered nanocatalyst
Rice University engineers have created a light-powered catalyst that can break the strong chemical bonds in fluorocarbons, a group of synthetic materials that includes persistent environmental pollutants.
Focused ultrasound shows promise against deadliest brain tumor
Focused sound waves create tiny bubbles inside cancer cells, causing them to die.
Scientists produce first open source all-atom models of full-length COVID-19 'S' protein
The virus SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the known cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
Parallel evolution in three-spined sticklebacks
A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki used novel and powerful methods to disentangle the patterns of parallel evolution of freshwater three-spined sticklebacks at different geographic scales across their distribution range.
Adult-born neurons grow more than their infancy-born counterparts
Adult-born neurons keep growing and contributing to brain flexibility long after neurogenesis declines, according to research in rats published in JNeurosci.
Biomarker test highly accurate in detecting early kidney cancer
A novel liquid biopsy method can detect kidney cancers with high accuracy, including small, localized tumors which are often curable but for which no early detection method exists, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
Human-derived mercury shown to pollute the world's deepest ocean trenches
Scientists have found that man-made mercury pollution has reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean -- the Marianas Trench.
World's fastest Bose-Einstein condensate
New research published in Nature Communications can make elusive state of matter in record time
Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes
The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise.
Black cancer patients better represented in publicly-funded clinical trials
Black patients are better represented in taxpayer-funded clinical trials testing new cancer treatments compared to trials run by pharmaceutical companies - although black patients are not fully represented in cancer clinical trials, regardless of sponsor.
Decline in green energy spending might offset COVID-era emissions benefits
Researchers have documented short-term environmental benefits during the COVID-19-related lockdown, but that silver lining could be far outweighed by a long-term decline on clean energy investments, a new Yale-led study finds.
Click... Resistant bacteria caught in the act!
As humanity fights against the coronavirus, the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria continues.
Quantifying creativity to expand it? Better art begins with better understanding
Do different painting materials affect the creation of children's paintings?
COVID-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife
An international team of scientists is investigating how animals are responding to reduced levels of human activity during the Covid-19 pandemic.
A fresh twist in chiral topology
Electrons in ''chiral crystals'', solid-state materials with definite ''handedness'', can behave in unexpected ways.
Super-strong surgical tape detaches on demand
Engineers have designed a super-strong, detachable adhesive that may someday replace surgical sutures.
Researchers study myxobacteria's ability to distinguish self from non-self
The new research addresses the mechanism of how myxobacteria discriminate and how highly related strains recently diverged, or evolved, into distinct social groups.
Mouse model identified to study common form of heart failure linked to age-related obesity
A research team led by the USF Health Heart Institute, University of South Florida, identified a mouse model that thoroughly mimics HFpEF syndrome in humans.
Study finds HCV-positive livers safe for transplantation; Patients cured afterward
UC researchers find similar results for positive outcomes when comparing patients receiving livers infected with hepatitis C to patients who receive livers without infection.
SARS-CoV-2: New insights on antibody testing and RNA testing
Two types of tests are used to track SARS-CoV-2. Reverse transcriptase PCR (rt-PCR) tests for current infection.
Microbubbles controlled by acoustical tweezers for highly localized drug release
Microbubbles are used every day as contrast agents in medical sonography, and are the subject of intense research for the delivery of therapeutic agents.
Artificial night sky poses serious threat to coastal species
A study by Bangor University and the University of Plymouth shows the presence of artificial light originating from cities several kilometres away (also known as artificial skyglow) disrupts the lunar compass species use when covering long distances.
Being 'mind-blind' may make remembering, dreaming and imagining harder, study finds
Aphantasia - being blind in the mind's eye - may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.
Studies examine association between recreational marijuana legalization, changes in traffic fatality rates
These studies looked at changes in the rate of traffic fatalities in states that have legalized the use of recreational cannabis.
Get your hands dirty for health
The #HealthyRecovery initiative, signed by more than 4500 health professionals from 90 countries, urges G20 Presidents and Prime Ministers to legislate and fund projects to enable ecological restoration for better human health as part of their stimulus packages in the aftermath of COVID-19.
Smokers good at math are more likely to want to quit
For smokers who are better at math, the decision to quit just adds up, a new study suggests.
Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs
Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery.
Eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano linked to period of extreme cold in ancient Rome
An international team of scientists and historians has found evidence connecting an unexplained period of extreme cold in ancient Rome with an unlikely source: a massive eruption of Alaska's Okmok volcano, located on the opposite side of the Earth.
TGen, Ashion and HonorHealth: Organoids can help pinpoint the right therapies for cancer patients
A new program called PATRIOT, developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, is using organoids -- laboratory cultures derived from samples of patient tumors -- to provide a new level of accuracy in prescribing anti-cancer treatments.
Brazilian scientists develop COVID-19 accelerometer
Online application shows in real time whether the disease is spreading faster or slower in over 200 countries and helps evaluate the effectiveness of public policies aimed at containing the pandemic .
Better measure of 'good cholesterol' can gauge heart attack and stroke risk in some populations
For decades, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol has been dubbed 'good cholesterol' because of its role in moving fats and other cholesterol molecules out of artery walls.
US beekeepers reported lower winter losses but abnormally high summer losses
2019-2020 was an odd year for US Beekeepers, and scientists are starting to piece together the puzzle behind the cyclical nature of honey bee colony survival.
Geometry of intricately fabricated glass makes light trap itself
Laser light traveling through ornately microfabricated glass has been shown to interact with itself to form self-sustaining wave patterns called solitons.
Simple interventions can help people spot false headlines
A team of researchers found that after being exposed to Facebook's tips on how to spot misinformation, people in the United States and India were less likely to say a false headline was true.
Researchers forecast COVID-19 pandemic could delay clean energy transition
Traveling restraints and shelter-in-place orders that grounded planes and emptied streets during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic brought greenhouse gas emissions down and air quality up.
Immune cells infiltrating tumors may play bigger cancer role than previously thought
UC San Diego researchers uncovered in mice how IRE1α, a molecule involved in cells' response to stress, determines whether macrophages promote inflammation in the tumor microenvironment.
Scientists provide new explanation for the far side of the Moon's strange asymmetry
The Earth-Moon system's history remains mysterious. Scientists believe the two formed when a Mars-sized body collided with the proto-Earth.
SLAC and Stanford scientists home in on pairs of atoms that boost a catalyst's activity
A study identified which pairs of atoms in a catalyst nanoparticle are most active in a reaction that breaks down a harmful exhaust gas in catalytic converters.
JHU: A man who can't see numbers provides new insight into awareness
By studying an individual with an extremely rare brain anomaly that prevents him from seeing certain numbers, Johns Hopkins University researchers provided new evidence that a robust brain response to something like a face or a word does not mean a person is aware of it.
Biologists unravel tangled mystery of plant cell growth
When cells don't divide into proper copies of themselves, living things fail to grow as they should.
Study led by City of Hope, TGen shows new way of ID'ing tumor response to immunotherapy
Scientists at City of Hope, working in collaboration with researchers at Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), have found that the actions of circulating immune cells -- namely how they differentiate and signal -- at the start of immunotherapy treatment for cancer can inform how a patient will respond to the therapy.
EMBL survey studies effects of COVID-19 pandemic on life scientists
Scientists all over the world experience drawbacks due to the ongoing pandemic -- but there are also advantages.
The injury rate of dominant leg of soccer players is identical with the non-dominant one
The severity of knee joints damage in soccer players depends on their age and career duration, and the condition of articular cartilage and meniscus of the dominant and the non-dominant leg does not differ.
Life in the galaxy: maybe this is as good as it gets?
Researchers have found that rocky exoplanets which formed early in the life of the galaxy seem to have had a greater chance of developing a magnetic field and plate tectonics than planets which formed later.
Tsetse flytraps: Biotechnology for Africa's rural population
Because the tsetse fly can transmit sleeping sickness, it is commonly combatted with insecticides or caught in traps.
Direct reprogramming: Defying the contemporary limitations in cardiac regeneration
Repair and regeneration of myocardium are the best possible therapy for the end-stage heart failure patients because the current therapies that can help restore the lost cardiomyocytes are limited to heart transplantation only.
Scientists support the use of ultraviolet light to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission indoors
An international team of researchers advocates the use of UV-C light in indoor spaces as a way to reduce the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 viruses.
CHOP study finds remote monitoring effectively detects seizures in at-risk newborns
A team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has demonstrated how to easily and effectively monitor for seizures in newborn infants, catching more instances than typical methods and improving the quality of care for infants in hospitals that lack the on-site resources to detect these seizures.
Influenza-like illness surveillance reveals spike in undetected COVID-19 cases in March
A surge in flu-like infections in the US in March of 2020 suggests that the likely number of COVID-19 cases was far larger than official estimates, according to a new study of existing surveillance networks for influenza-like infections (ILIs).
UTEP professor collaborates on LGBTQ+ COVID-19 Texas study
Preliminary results from this first-of-its-kind survey found that gender diverse people and queer people of color are experiencing a number of disparities.
Otago research reveals how mating influences females' life history and ageing
New University of Otago research provides insight into how males influence their mates' health, growth and fertility.
Recovery from airline delays works best with future disruptions in mind
Instead of responding to each flight delay as if it were an isolated event, airlines should consider the likelihood of potential disruptions ahead, researchers report in the journal Transportation Science.
Mysterious climate change
New research findings underline the crucial role that sea ice throughout the Southern Ocean played for atmospheric CO2 in times of rapid climate change in the past.
Are protected areas effective at maintaining large carnivore populations?
A recent study, led by the University of Helsinki, used a novel combination of statistical methods and an exceptional data set collected by hunters to assess the role of protected areas for carnivore conservation in Finland.
A Metal-like Quantum Gas: A pathbreaking platform for quantum simulation
Coherent and ultrafast laser excitation creates an exotic matter phase with spatially overlapping electronic wave-functions under nanometric control in an artificial micro-crystal of ultracold atoms.
Diagnosing brain tumors with a blood test
A simple but highly sensitive blood test has been found to accurately diagnose and classify different types of brain tumours, resulting in more accurate diagnosis, less invasive methods and better treatment planning in the future for the patients.
Design flaws in Universal Credit for couples revealed as claims soar
As the numbers of new claims for Universal Credit reach three million, in the context of COVID-19, a new report reveals the complex issues couples experience with this new benefit.
Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation
A study, led by the University of York, has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees.
Enhanced secondary haze by emission reduction during COVID-19 lockdown in China
The research, led by Nanjing University and Tsinghua University, investigated China's emission change due to the sharp drop of anthropogenic activities.
Nuclear softening allows cells to move into dense tissue, encouraging injury repair
Using an enzyme inhibitor in meniscus cells, a Penn team was able to soften their nucleus and promote access to previously impassible areas.
When planting trees threatens the forest
The first-of-its-kind study reveals that subsidies for the planting of commercially valuable tree plantations in Chile resulted in the loss of biologically valuable natural forests and little, if any, additional carbon sequestration.
Capital funding of health care in Canada is critical, yet declined in last 20 years
Capital funding of health care, used to build new hospitals, redesign or upgrade existing facilities and invest in new technologies, has declined in Canada over the last 20 years, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191126.
Fish farming alters microbial communities, and reduces nitrate levels in pond ecosystems
The N and P fractions and water environmental factors influenced the microbial community structure and diversity in pond ecosystems.
Experimentally identifying effective theories in many-body systems
One goal of science is to find physical descriptions of nature by studying how basic system components interact with one another.
New design for 'optical ruler' could revolutionize clocks, telescopes, telecommunications
The newest version of these chip-based ''microcombs,'' created by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), is poised to further advance time and frequency measurements by improving and extending the capabilities of these tiny devices.
Researchers say genetics may determine wound infection and healing
In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have determined that genetics may play a role in how wounds heal.
Critically ill COVID-19 patients are 10 times more likely to develop cardiac arrhythmias
Patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to an intensive care unit were 10 times more likely than other hospitalized COVID-19 patients to suffer cardiac arrest or heart rhythm disorders, according to a new study.
Preventing lithium loss for high-capacity lithium-ion batteries
A team of Korean researchers has developed a processing technology for maximizing energy densities of high-capacity batteries.
New battery electrolyte developed at Stanford may boost the performance of electric vehicles
Stanford researchers have designed a new electrolyte for lithium metal batteries that could increase the driving range of electric cars.
Slow release of two chemicals protects the heart after experimental heart attacks
A novel treatment reduces heart damage after serious heart attacks in two animal models.
New tools will enhance the specificity of imaging in the mouse brain
It's a big question in neuroscience: How does structure and activity in the brain relate to function?

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