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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 24, 2020


Artificial intelligence classifies colorectal cancer using IR imaging
Infrared microscopy can automatically detect the type of intestinal tumour within only 30 minutes.
Should diabetes treatment lessen for older adults approaching the end of life?
Researchers published one of the first national studies to examine overtreatment and deintensification of diabetes management in nursing home residents with limited life expectancy or dementia.
Entry point for curbing the evolution of antibiotic resistance discovered
Medications work better when bacteria have a genetic defect / publication in 'Nature Communications'.
Researchers use electric fields to herd cells like flocks of sheep
Princeton researchers have created a device that can herd groups of cells like sheep, precisely directing the cells' movements by manipulating electric fields to mimic those found in the body during healing.
Jellyfish contain no calories, so why do they still attract predators?
New study shows that jellyfish are an important food source for many animals.
Bacterial predator could help reduce COVID-19 deaths
A type of virus that preys on bacteria could be harnessed to combat bacterial infections in patients whose immune systems have been weakened by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the COVID-19 disease, according to an expert at the University of Birmingham and the Cancer Registry of Norway.
Environmental DNA detection could cut pathogens in pet trade
As the SARS-CoV-2 puts new focus on zoonotic pathogens, a Washington State University researcher has developed a method to use environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect disease in the vast international trade of aquatic animals.
Asymptomatic COVID-19 patients also contaminate the environment
Both symptomatic and asymptomatic COVID-19 patients have the capability of contaminating their surroundings, according to a new study published in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
Scientists develop new tool to design better fusion devices
One way that scientists seek to bring to Earth the fusion process that powers the stars is trapping plasma within a twisting magnetic coil device shaped like a breakfast cruller.
COVID-19: Bacteriophage could decrease mortality
Bacteriophage can reduce bacterial growth in the lungs, limiting fluid build-up.
Virtually screening antiviral compounds against SARS-CoV-2 structure may speed up drug and vaccine D
Virtually screening antiviral compounds to model their interactions with the SARS-CoV-2 virus may enable scientists to more easily identify antiviral drugs that work against the virus while informing the search for viable vaccine candidates, according to a new study.
Management of patients with severe mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic
How to best treat patients with severe mental illness during the COVID-19 pandemic is detailed in this article.
Economic alien plants more likely to go wild
An international team of researchers led by University of Konstanz ecologist Mark van Kleunen has compiled a global overview of the naturalization success of economic plants, showing that economic use in general, as well as the number and nature of economic uses, are crucial to their establishment in the wild.
Examining media coverage of protests worldwide
As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance.
UM researcher helps reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic
Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide.
Exotic mixtures
An international research team led by HZDR has now presented a new, very precise method of evaluating the behavior of mixtures of different elements under high pressure with the help of X-ray scattering.
Resident parasites influence appearance, evolution of barn swallows
Researchers think that local parasites are influencing why barn swallows in Europe, the Middle East and Colorado are choosing their mates differently.
New data reveals even low levels of air pollution triggers gene expression
New data from a landmark study by Monash University researchers raises concerns that even short-term exposure to low level air pollution can affect gene expression, leaving us at risk of diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.
Researchers sharply reduce time needed for glass and ceramic 3D printing
The fabrication of complex ceramic or glass structures via stereolithography, a type of 3D printing, has long been held back by how much time it takes at the back-end of the process, which can take up to two days.
New treatment method for Alport Syndrome uses antisense oligonucleotides
A multi-institutional research group including Kobe University researchers has succeeded in developing an exon-skipping therapy using nucleic-acid therapeutics for Alport syndrome, an incurable kidney disease that can progress to renal failure.
Nutrition a key ingredient for cognitive health of midlife and older Canadians
A new study, investigating factors associated with verbal fluency among a large sample of anglophone Canadians aged 45-85, found that individuals who consumed more vegetables and fruits and more nuts and pulses (such as lentils and beans) scored higher on tests of verbal fluency.
'Ironing' out the differences: Understanding superconductivity in ultrathin FeSe
Scientists at Tokyo Tech elucidate the underlying cause behind the different critical transition temperatures reported for ultrathin iron selenide (FeSe) superconductors.
Invasive fire ants limiting spread of meat allergy -- but pose their own dangers
Invasive fire ants with a nasty bite are limiting the spread of a dangerous meat allergy, new research suggests.
Genetic malfunction of brain astrocytes triggers migraine
Neuroscientists of the University of Zurich shed a new light on the mechanisms responsible for familial migraine: They show that a genetic dysfunction in specific brain cells of the cingulate cortex area strongly influences head pain occurrence.
New research reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
In a new study, published in the journal Nature, an international team of scientists provide the first conclusive evidence directly linking deep Earth's water cycle and its expressions with magmatic productivity and earthquake activity.
NASA's TESS, Spitzer missions discover a world orbiting a unique young star
Astronomers using data from NASA's TESS and retired Spitzer Space Telescope have discovered a planet as large as Neptune circling the young star orbiting AU Microscopii.
Self-powered alarm fights forest fires, monitors environment
Scientists designed and fabricated a remote forest fire detection and alarm system powered by nothing but the movement of the trees in the wind.
Undergrad-led study suggests light environment modifications could maximize productivity
Crops form canopies with overlapping leaves. Typically, the sun leaves at the top of the canopy photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at high light, while shade leaves at the bottom photosynthesize at maximum efficiency at low light.
On the frontlines of the COVID-19 crisis
This essay describes observations of the qualities developed by hospital staff members during the COVID-19 pandemic.
New research advances Army's quest for quantum networking
Two U.S. Army research projects advance quantum networking, which will likely play a key role in future battlefield operations.
New drug pathway linked with tuberous sclerosis
Researchers in the Translational Neuroscience Center have discovered that the heat shock protein cascade may represent druggable targets for tuberous sclerosis
Nature-imitating coating makes batteries more durable and efficient
Aalto University's researchers were the first in the world to make use of carbon dioxide in the production of a battery protective coating.
New explanation found for the extreme complexity of mutations in tumor genomes
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh have been studying the evolution of tumors following chemical damage.
Inherited mutation found among Brazilians increases cancer risk
Genomic research helps explain why some people with a common TP53 mutation widespread in Brazil get cancer while others do not.
OSU research suggests a better way to keep birds from hitting power lines
Suspended, rotating devices known as ''flappers'' may be the key to fewer birds flying into power lines, a new study suggests.
'Infant' planet discovered by UH astronomers, Maunakea telescope
The discovery could help astronomers understand how planets like Earth form and evolve.
Adirondack boreal peatlands near southern range limit likely threatened by warmer climate
A study published in the journal Wetlands documents an invasion happening in the Adirondacks: the black spruce, tamarack, and other boreal species are being overcome by trees normally found in warmer, more temperate forests.
Every moment of ultrafast chemical bonding now captured on film
IBS scientists report the direct observation of the birthing moment of chemical bonds by tracking real-time atomic positions in the molecule.
Growing polymers with different lengths
ETH researchers have developed a new method for producing polymers with different lengths.
Childhood obesity linked to multiple environmental factors in first-of-its-kind study
Childhood obesity is a health threat that is becoming more and more common worldwide.
Study confirms "classic" symptoms of COVID-19
A persistent cough and fever have been confirmed as the most prevalent symptoms associated with COVID-19, according to a major review of the scientific literature.    Other major symptoms include fatigue, losing the ability to smell and difficulty in breathing.   The study ratifies the list of symptoms listed by the World Health Organisation at the start of the pandemic. 
Neptune-sized planet discovered orbiting young, nearby star
Research published today in Nature reports the discovery of a planet about the size of Neptune orbiting an especially young, nearby star.
Imaging magnetic instabilities using laser accelerated protons
An international team of researchers is the first to experimentally demonstrate the 'Weibel' instabilities predicted by theory about 50 years ago, in the prestigious journal Nature Physics.
New model helps to describe defects and errors in quantum computers
A summer internship in Bilbao, Spain, has led to a paper in the journal Physical Review Letters for Jack Mayo, a Master's student at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality.
Towards an AI diagnosis like the doctor's
Artificial intelligence is an important innovation in diagnostics, because it can learn to recognize abnormalities that a doctor would also label as a disease.
'Very low' risk of unknown health hazards from exposure to 5G wireless networks
Experts weigh in on recent online reports that warn of frightening health consequences from new fifth generation (5G) wireless networks.
Molecular simulations show how drugs block key receptors
Many pharmaceuticals work by targeting what are known as ''G-protein-coupled receptors''.
Consumers can distinguish between bitter tastes in beer -- doesn't alter liking
Although most beer consumers can distinguish between different bitter tastes in beer, this does not appear to influence which beer they like.
Dynamical and allosteric regulation of photoprotection in light harvesting complex II
Thermal/acidity triggered formation of a pair of local α-helices from 310-helix E/loop and the C-terminal coil connecting helix D in the neighboring monomer induces a scissoring motion of transmembrane helix A and B, shifting the conformational equilibrium to a more open state as a protein switch.
Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging
An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter.
COVID-19 outbreak and mental health
The use of online platforms to guide effective consumption of information, facilitate social support and continue mental health care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic is discussed in this Viewpoint.
Neurons thrive even when malnourished
When animal, insect or human embryos grow in a malnourished environment, their developing nervous systems get first pick of any available nutrients so that new neurons can be made.
Wildfire smoke has immediate harmful health effects: UBC study
Exposure to wildfire smoke affects the body's respiratory and cardiovascular systems almost immediately, according to new research from the University of British Columbia's School of Population and Public Health.
In the wild, chimpanzees are more motivated to cooperate than bonobos
Scientists investigated cooperation dynamics in wild chimpanzees (Tai, Ivory Coast) and bonobos (LuiKotale, DCR) using a snake model.
TB cases and deaths predicted to spike due to COVID-19
Study estimates at least 110,000 additional deaths from TB in China, India and South Africa unless health services maintained and strengthened.
World's first genetic and environmental risks identified for common form of childhood epilepsy
A new study of childhood epilepsy has identified the world's first environmental risk factor for the disease - maternal smoking in pregnancy, and discovered a new genetic association with the condition, pointing to potential new treatments for the disease.
Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice
Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea-ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot.
Use of continuous combined oral contraceptives demonstrates bone health benefits
Women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) become estrogen deficient at an early age, which makes them more vulnerable to the loss of bone mineral density.
Movers and stayers: Surviving a range shift due to climate change
New research using data from long term surveys of tropical fishes indicates that traditional studies of this range shift phenomenon largely ignore the sequential nature of species movement.
An innovative catalyst with Pt, Re and SnO2 nanoparticles as anode material in ethanol fuel cells
Scientists working at the Department for Functional Nanomaterials at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences designed and synthesized a functional ternary Pt/Re/SnO2/C catalyst as an anode material in a direct ethanol fuel cell.
A shorter IQ test for children with special needs
For decades, neuropsychologists have used the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children test as the gold-standard intelligence quotient (IQ) test to determine the intellectual abilities of children with special needs.
Pulse pressure: A game changer in the fight against dementia
Researchers unravel a pulse-pressure-induced pathway of dementia providing a new understanding on the pathogenesis of dementia.
Study quantifies socioeconomic benefits of satellites for harmful algal bloom detection
A Resources for the Future (RFF) and NASA VALUABLES Consortium study published in GeoHealth examines the benefits of using satellite data to detect harmful algal blooms and manage recreational advisories in Utah Lake.
Puget Sound eelgrass beds create a 'halo' with fewer harmful algae, new method shows
DNA clues show that eelgrass growing underwater along Washington state shorelines is associated with fewer of the single-celled algae that produce harmful toxins in shellfish.
A metabolic enzyme drives lymphoma and is a potential drug target
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have found that increased activity of a normal metabolic enzyme can lead to cancer.
Scientists uncover new genetic mutations linked to autism spectrum disorder
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands have identified mutations in a gene called CNOT1 that affect brain development and impair memory and learning.
Sunnier but riskier
Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study.
Voter ID laws discriminate against racial and ethnic minorities, new study reveals
Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year.
Blocking a 'jamming signal' can unleash immune system to fight tumors
Yale researchers have discovered a ''jamming signal'' that blocks a powerful immune system stimulant called interleukin-18 (IL-18) from reaching tumors, including in cancers that are resistant to conventional immunotherapy treatments, they report June 24 in the journal Nature.
Levitating droplets allow scientists to perform 'touchless' chemical reactions
Levitation has long been a staple of magic tricks and movies.
Evergreen idea turns biomass DNA into degradable materials
A Cornell-led collaboration is turning DNA from organic matter -- such as onions, fish and algae -- into biodegradable gels and plastics.
School nurses key to safe school reopening
Sudden school closures in the United States were undertaken to reduce COVID-19 transmission this spring.
Increased caseloads may explain why reducing resident physicians' work hours doesn't always improve patient safety
When researchers launched a study comparing traditional, extended work shifts for resident physicians (24 hours+) with a new schedule that eliminated extended shifts, they expected the new schedule would reduce serious medical errors.
Effect of colchicine on biomarkers and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19
This randomized clinical trial evaluates the effect of treatment with colchicine on cardiac and inflammatory biomarkers and clinical outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.
Cowbirds change their eggs' sex ratio based on breeding time
Brown-headed cowbirds show a bias in the sex ratio of their offspring depending on the time of the breeding season, researchers report in a new study.
Simulations reveal how saltwater behaves in Earth's mantle
Giulia Galli's complex computer simulations reveal how saltwater behaves in the Earth's mantle, affecting everything from magma production to the carbon cycle.
Biomedical researchers get closer to why eczema happens
A new study from researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York may help to peel back the layers of unhealthy skin -- at least metaphorically speaking -- and get closer to a cure.
New process could safeguard water quality, environment and health
Swansea University researchers have developed a new way to quickly find and remove wastewater pollutants, which can reduce their impact on the environment.
Tel Aviv University researchers destroy cancer cells with ultrasound treatment
An international research team has developed a noninvasive technology platform for gene delivery into breast cancer cells.
Columbia and NewYork-Presbyterian study gets to heart of norms for elite female athletes
A new study from Columbia University and NewYork-Presbyterian provides physicians with valuable information on how the heart adapts to intense physical training for elite female athletes in the WNBA.
Drug used to slow kidney disease found to be ineffective
In a major clinical trial, clinicians have found the drug allopurinol does not prevent worsening of kidney disease, despite up to 20 per cent of kidney disease patients being prescribed the medication.
Air pollution, smoking and built environment are associated with an increase risk of childhood obesity
173 exposures analysed in first major study to assess risk of obesity in childhood using an exposome-wide approach.
New microscopy under ambient achieves less than 10 nm spatial resolution on surface potential measurement
A new nanomaterials microscopy approach called Pulsed Force Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (PF-KPFM), allows for less than 10 nanometer measurements of work function and surface potential in a single-pass AFM scan.
KIST develops eco-friendly, flame-retardant carbon plastic ideal for recycling
A flame-retardant carbon-fiber-reinforced composite material has been developed. Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team from its Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, headed by Dr.
Turning alcohol into key ingredients for new medicines
Chemists have found a way to turn alcohol into amino acids, the building blocks of life.
Blood cell mutations linked to leukemias are inevitable as we age
A new study by researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan reports differences in blood cell mutations between Japanese and European populations.
Discovering an exoplanet the size of Neptune
Astrophysicists detect the orb hidden in the dust and gas debris around the young star AU Microscopii.
Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use
Farmers can now grow this superfood with environmental and health benefits.
Researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances.
Scientists discover cellular structure of poorly understood visual brain region
The brain's ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (vLGN) receives signals from the eye, but it is not associated with classical image-forming.
MSK researchers find that common cancer treatments don't worsen coronavirus infection
A team of researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) reported on the epidemiology of COVID-19 illness experienced at an NCI-designated cancer center during the height of pandemic in New York City.
Bringing burnt bones back to life using 3D technology
Forensic scientists at the University of Portsmouth have discovered a new way of presenting fragile evidence, by reconstructing a 'jigsaw' of human bone fragments using 3D printing.
Genomes front and center of rare disease diagnosis
Hundreds of patients have been diagnosed and many new genetic causes of disease discovered in a UK National Health Service programme pioneering the use of whole genome sequencing.
Digital breast cancer detection technology does not improve outcomes
A new study in JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that breast cancer screening using digital mammography technology is not associated with improved health outcomes when compared to older film detection technology.
USC-led study: Protein in mitochondria appears to regulate health and longevity
A new study led by researchers at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology is the first to demonstrate that a tiny protein, humanin, has a big impact on health and longevity in both animals and humans
Unexpected mental illnesses found in a spectrum of a rare genetic disorder
UC Davis MIND Institute researchers found an unexpected spectrum of mental illnesses in patients with a rare gene mutation.
Order out of disorder in ice
We revealed a multiple-step transformation mechanism using state-of-the-art time-resolved in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction.
Far-UVC light safely kills airborne coronaviruses
A type of ultraviolet light called far-UVC -- which is safe to use around people -- kills more than 99.9% of airborne coronaviruses, a new study at Columbia University Irving Medical Center has found.
Steep NYC traffic toll would reduce gridlock, pollution
Cornell University and the City College of New York research shows that by creating steep tolls for cars to enter Manhattan, traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced.
Quantifying the building blocks of DNA is now easier thanks to a novel technique
A highly sensitive and easy-to-use technique applicable for tissue samples can be useful, for example, to researchers specialised in mitochondrial diseases and cancer.
University of Cincinnati research uncovers clues in use of immunotherapy for breast cancer
UC researchers have found a potential new combination therapy for breast cancer that would integrate use of the body's immune system with targeted treatment for a particular protein that advances cancer.
Plug-and-play lens simplifies adaptive optics for microscopy
Researchers have developed a new plug-and-play device that can add adaptive optics correction to commercial optical microscopes.
New research highlights potential cardiovascular risk of novel anti-osteoporotic drug
Research presents new evidence which strengthens the plausibility that treatment with the novel anti-osteoporotic medicine, romosozumab, may lead to excess cardiovascular complications.
One-time treatment generates new neurons, eliminates Parkinson's disease in mice
UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine.
Should nursing home residents nearing the end of life continue taking statins?
A team of researchers conducted a study to learn more about statin use among older adults, especially those nearing the end of their lives.
'Stay at home but don't stay still,' researchers recommend
In a review article published in the American Journal of Physiology, Brazilian researchers present scientific evidence on the impact of short periods of inactivity on the cardiovascular system and recommend exercise to stay fit at home during the pandemic.
Transgenic rice lowers blood pressure of hypertensive rats
In the future, taking your blood pressure medication could be as simple as eating a spoonful of rice.
Statin use is linked to lower death rate in hospitalized COVID-19 patients
The use of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins is associated with a lower death rate and a lower incidence of mechanical ventilation in patients hospitalized with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report June 24 in Cell Metabolism.
Humans navigate with stereo olfaction
A new study conducted by graduate student WU Yuli and his colleagues at the Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences indicates that humans have a stereo sense of smell that subconsciously guides navigation.
Treating leukaemia more effectively
Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common kind of cancer in children.
A vital game of hide-and-seek elucidated by novel single-molecule microscopy
Life depends on an intricate game of hide-and-seek taking place inside the cell.
Feed additive reduces enteric methane emissions in dairy cows
The enteric methane mitigation potential of 3-nitrooxypropanol (3-NOP) has been confirmed in previous studies.
Rogue's gallery of dusty star systems reveals exoplanet nurseries
The Gemini Planet Imager on the Gemini South telescope looked at 104 young, nearby stars, 10-100 million years old, in search of debris disks.
Medicinal cannabis may reduce behavioral problems in kids with intellectual disabilities
Cannabidiol, a type of medicinal cannabis, may reduce severe behavioural problems in children and adolescents with an intellectual disability a new study has found.
NASA finds post-Tropical Cyclone Dolly exiting the tropical stage
NASA's Terra satellite provided a night-time look at what is now Post-Tropical Storm Dolly in the Northern Atlantic Ocean.
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA.
Clinicopathologic aspects of a papulovesicular eruption in a patient with COVID-19
A man in his 60s presented with numerous pseudovesicular papules on the trunk 12 hours after the initiation of treatment for COVID-19.
Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19
The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the US Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found.
COVID-19 from food safety and biosecurity perspective
Most recently emerged pneumonia of unknown cause named COVID-19 has a devastating impact on public health and economy surpassing its counterparts in morbidity and mortality.
Removing toxic chemicals from water -- New environmentally-friendly method
Researchers from Swansea University have developed a new environmentally friendly method for removing toxic chemicals from water.
Beneath the surface of our galaxy's water worlds
Scientists have simulated conditions on water-rich exoplanets to learn more about their geological composition, and found a new transition state between rock and water.
Ion conducting polymer crucial to improving neuromorphic devices
''Neuromorphic'' refers to mimicking the behavior of brain neural cells.
Measure squeezing in a novel way
Scientists at the University of Konstanz have developed a completely new method of measuring ''squeezing'' - a potential starting point for high-precision sensor technology
Countries with early adoption of face masks showed modest COVID-19 infection rates
Regions with an early interest in face masks had milder COVID-19 epidemics, according to a new letter-to-the-editor published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Meet the superusers who hold together health social media
New research looks at characteristics of superusers who are actively engaged in the Asthma UK online community and Facebook group to help healthcare professionals better understand the role they play in supporting the management of long-term conditions.
Newly discovered planet zips around baby star in a week
Scientists have discovered a Neptune-sized planet with an 8-day orbit around a young star called AU Mic that is still surrounded by a disk of dust and gas left over from its formation.
Effects from low-level concentrations of harmful chemicals preserved in three generations of fish
Fish exposed to very low levels of chemicals commonly found in waterways can pass the impacts on to future generations that were never directly exposed to the chemicals, according to Oregon State University researchers.
Blood vessels can make you fat, and yet fit
IBS scientists have reported Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) as a key driver that inhibits the accumulation of potbellies by enabling the proper transport of fatty acid into general circulation in blood vessels, thus preventing insulin resistance.
Study shows better option for treatment of inoperable anal cancer
People with inoperable anal cancer treated with carboplatin-paclitaxel had fewer complications and lived longer than those who received another chemotherapy that has been more often administered.
Four new species of giant single-celled organisms discovered on Pacific seafloor
Two new genera and four new species of giant, single-celled xenophyophores (protozoans belonging to a group called the foraminifera) were discovered in the deep Pacific Ocean during a joint project between scientists at the National Oceanography Centre, UK; the University of Hawai'i and the University of Geneva.
Cancer study shows how chemicals cause complex cell mutations
Fresh insights into why some harmful substances are so efficient at causing cancer could aid the quest for better treatments.
Bristol innovation challenges regular touchscreens with new spray-on technique
A team at Bristol has challenged the idea that touchscreens are limited to 2D and rectangular shapes by developing an interactive display that can be sprayed in any shape.
Linking hospital and other records can predict both fatal and nonfatal opioid overdoses, study suggests
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the odds of a fatal opioid overdose were 1.5 times higher for individuals with one to two visits to the emergency department for any medical issue than for people with no hospital visits.
Subtypes in Alzheimer's disease may be linked to tau protein modifications
A new study reveals a possible biological reason that Alzheimer's Disease (AD) progresses at different rates in different patients.

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