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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 25, 2020


AI dual-stain approach improved accuracy, efficiency of cervical cancer screening
In a new study, a computer algorithm improved the accuracy and efficiency of cervical cancer screening compared with cytology (Pap test), the current standard for follow-up of women who test positive with primary human papillomavirus (HPV) screening.
Study uses RNA sequencing as alternative to immunohistochemistry in cancer diagnostics
For the first time, researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues have succeeded in using RNA sequencing as an alternative to immunohistochemistry for cancer diagnostics.
Early childhood vaccinations might protect children from COVID-19
A group of Lithuanian and Kurdish scientists have raised a hypothesis that the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine could protect children from COVID-19.
New strategy for Canada's National Emergency Stockpile System
To manage Canada's emergency stockpile of medical supplies and personal protective equipement (PPE), the government could consider several approaches, including a ''prime-vendor'' model selling directly to health care organizations to minimize financial and equipment waste, according to an article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200946
Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins can learn new skills from their fellow dolphins. That's the conclusion of a new study reported in the journal Current Biology on June 25.
Study looks at the impact of gendar bias in helmet regulations for lacrosse players
According to a new study, high school girls' lacrosse players who may, but are not required to, wear flexible headgear are at a higher risk of getting a concussion from a stick or ball impact than boys' lacrosse players, who are required to wear a hard shell helmet with a full face mask.
Papers concludes that incentives to afforestation can be harmful to the environment
'Through a counterfactual analysis, we showed that between 1986 and 2011 the incentives to afforestation in Chile caused an increase in forest plantations, but reduced the extent of native forests', explains the main conclusions of the paper Impacts of Chilean forest subsidies on forest cover, carbon and biodiversity, published by the journal Nature Sustainability.
External ultrasound therapy of calcific aortic stenosis -- First-in-man
Cardiawave (France) has developed a Non-Invasive Ultrasound Therapy (NIUT) for the treatment of cardio-valvular diseases such as aortic stenosis.
Global pollution estimates reveal surprises, opportunity
Using recent satellite observations, ground monitoring and computational modeling, researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.
Comparing 13 different CRISPR-Cas9 DNA scissors
IBS scientists have achieved the most extensive high-throughput analysis of CRISPR-Cas9 activities.
Racial disparities in surgery rates for esophageal cancer
Black patients with esophageal cancer are less likely to receive life-saving surgery for early-stage disease than white patients.
Climate extremes will cause forest changes
No year has been as hot and dry as 2018 since climate records began.
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found.
COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed unique worldwide wave of anti-semitism
The Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry at Tel Aviv University has published a special report, a summary of worldwide anti-Semitic phenomena associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.
America's political future will be shaped by aging, journal indicates
The latest issue of the journal Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR) from The Gerontological Society of America shows how aging is reshaping politics today in unprecedented ways, and how it will continue to do so for years to come.
Merits of revascularisation and medical treatment for chronic coronary syndromes
There are two treatment goals for patients with chronic coronary syndromes: reducing the risk of hard outcomes (i.e., death, myocardial infarction) and improving health outcomes (i.e. angina symptoms, quality of life).
Mountain meadow restoration can bring birds back
In a new study led by scientists at Point Blue Conservation Science and in collaboration with The Institute for Bird Populations, authors evaluated the successes of mountain meadow restorations by analyzing eight years of bird data collected by field biologists.
Most American women haven't heard of breast implant-related lymphoma
Only about 1 out 7 American women have heard about breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) -- an immune system cancer occurring in a small percentage of women with breast implants, according to a new survey.
Better sleep with a partner
Do couples that share a bed sleep better, worse, or just different?
Routine revascularization vs. medical therapy: Meta-analysis and review
Revascularization is often performed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD).
Hubble sees cosmic flapping 'bat shadow'
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope observed a young star's unseen, planet-forming disk casting a huge shadow across a more distant cloud in a star-forming region - like a fly wandering into a flashlight beam shining on a wall.
A mechanism to obtain metal "nanoscrews"unveiled at CIC biomaGUNE is published in Science
Gold atoms are deposited by means of chemical reduction onto previously formed gold nanorods to produce a quiral structure.
NRL telescope onboard ESA, NASA SOHO discovers 4000th comet
NRL's Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) instrument identified the 4000th comet discovered by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), a joint mission between the European Space Agency and NASA on June 15.
Airborne chemicals could become less hazardous, thanks to a missing math formula
Purdue researchers have figured out a way to calculate surface viscosity just by looking at a stretched droplet as it starts to break.
AI could help improve performance of lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells
Imperial College London researchers have demonstrated how machine learning could help design lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells with better performance.
PCR State-of-the-art lecture on 'The resurgence of renal denervation'
Renal denervation (RDN) represents a device-based hypertension treatment intended to lower sympathetic activity.
Effect of ultrasound renal denervation after crossover from sham in RADIANCE-HTN SOLO
Control of hypertension represents an unmet need globally, and RDN is an 'adherence-independent' adjunctive therapy to medications.
Researchers find best way to treat children with sickle cell anemia in sub-Saharan Africa
A team of international researchers has learned that dose escalation of hydroxyurea treatment for children in Uganda with sickle cell anemia is more effective and has similar side effects than a lower fixed dose of the same drug.
Researchers discover improved treatment for children with sickle cell anemia
A team of international researchers has learned that dose escalation of hydroxyurea treatment for children in Uganda with sickle cell anemia is more effective and has similar side effects than a lower fixed dose of the same drug.
Quantum entanglement demonstrated aboard orbiting CubeSat
In a critical step toward creating a global quantum communications network, researchers have generated and detected quantum entanglement onboard a CubeSat nanosatellite weighing less than 2.6 kilograms and orbiting the Earth.
Smart phones are empowering women worldwide
By giving women access to information they otherwise wouldn't have, mobile phones are transforming lives.
Scientists found out how nanoparticles kill cancer cells
Because of their unique properties, magnetic nanoparticles can be used for therapeutic diagnostics and personalized treatment of cancer diseases, as well as be an effective contrast agent for MRI examination and imaging of tumors.
Selling something? Tap into consumer arrogance
In today's world of consumption, likes and shares, a new study shows that that leveraging consumer arrogance might be marketers' most effective strategy for promoting their brands and products.
University of Minnesota Medical School finds promising treatment to slow kidney disease doesn't prove out in clinical trial
A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School found that allopurinol, an inexpensive generic drug that reduces uric acid levels, did not show benefits in protecting from loss of filtering function in the kidney.
The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: First Europe-wide study of children confirms COVID-19 predominately causes mild disease in children and fatalities are very rare
Children with COVID-19 generally experience a mild disease and fatalities are very rare, according to a study of 582 patients from across Europe published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.
Dynamics of DNA replication revealed at the nanoscale
Using super-resolution technology a University of Technology Sydney led team has directly visualised the process of DNA replication in single human cells.
Bioactive natural compounds for the fight against cancer
Phytoalexins are bioactive phytochemicals that have attracted much attention in recent years due to their health-promoting effects in humans and their vital role in plant health.
When two are better than one: Why some gene duplicates are retained while others perish
Most duplicated gene copies either evolve new roles or lose their ability to code for proteins.
New Cochrane review assesses how accurate antibody tests are for detecting COVID-19
Today Cochrane, a global independent organization that reviews evidence from research to inform health decision-making, publishes a review of studies looking at the accuracy of COVID-19 antibody tests.
Managing abnormal results on cervical cancer screening: ASCCP issues updated guidelines
Replacing guidelines for managing women with abnormal results on cervical cancer screening test from 2012, new recommendations from ASCCP emphasize more precise management based on estimates of the patient's risk - enabling more personalized recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.
Race, rurality play prominently in Georgia areas hardest hit by COVID-19
While counties in populous metropolitan Atlanta had the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the initial weeks following Georgia's first reported case, it was rural Southwest Georgia counties, with a higher number of black residents and lower number of ICU beds, experiencing the highest rates of infection and death per capita, investigators report.
Study reveals key finding about microbiome of anticancer compound-producing marine invertebrate
Could the cure for melanoma - the most dangerous type of skin cancer -- be a compound derived from a marine invertebrate that lives at the bottom of the ocean?
Looking for better customer engagement value? Be more strategic on social media
According to a new study from the University of Vaasa and University of Cyprus, the mere use of social media alone does not generate customer value, but rather, the connections and interactions between the firm and its customers -- as well as among customers themselves -- can be used strategically for resource transformation and exchanges between the interacting parties.
Receptor makes mice strong and slim
Increasing abdominal girth and shrinking muscles are two common side effects of aging.
Study is first to identify potential therapeutic targets for COVID-19
A team from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are the first in the world to profile the body's immune response to COVID-19.
Carbon cycling in wet soils
Testing microbial activity in soil columns helps researchers understand how carbon is stored in soils that are periodically waterlogged.
Electricity price more volatile during uncertainty periods in renewable energy regulation
Incorporating renewable energies into the electricity system entails a certain degree of volatility in the electricity price owing to the intermittent nature of generation by plants of this type.
Common food additive causes adverse health effects in mice
A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the US and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to research led by a University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist.
3D printed insoles offers new hope for patients with diabetes
Scientists from Staffordshire University claim that new 3D printed insoles can significantly improve the foot health of people suffering with diabetes.
Twitter data research reveals more about what patients think about statins
More than one in seven people taking statins -- prescribed to lower cholesterol levels -- believed that meant they could still eat unhealthy foods, a new study shows.
Cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, finds first study on the topic
A new George Mason University study led by Dr. Hong Xue found that cancer survivors overestimate the quality of their diets, with older participants, those with higher incomes or levels of education, and Hispanic participants more likely to overestimate the quality of their diet.
Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress
Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study co-written by a trio of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being.
The Lancet Psychiatry: First UK-wide study describes brain complications in some patients with severe COVID-19
A study of 153 patients treated in UK hospitals during the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic describes a range of neurological and psychiatric complications that may be linked to the disease and is published today in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.
Researchers identify N95 respirator decontamination method using microwave-generated steam
N95 respirators are recommended by the CDC as the ideal protection method from COVID-19 and, although traditionally single-use, PPE shortages have necessitated the need for reuse.
Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain
A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia.
Comprehensive evaluation of mitral valve-in-valve and valve-in-ring
Mitral valve-in-valve (ViV) and valve-in-ring (ViR) are alternatives to surgical reoperation in patients with recurrent mitral valve failure after previous surgical valve repair or replacement.
New study looks at post-COVID-19 emerging disease in children
In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association with prior exposure or infection to SARS-CoV-2.
Marine training may take more mental than physical grit
Keck Medicine of USC study identifies psychological measures that may predict who is more likely to complete - or quit - a demanding marine training course
Superbug impact on the gut
Monash University researchers have discovered that the devastating bacterial superbug Clostridioides difficile hijacks the human wound healing system in order to cause serious and persistent disease, opening up the development of new therapies to treat the disease.
X-ray vision and eavesdropping ensure quality
With an X-ray experiment at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble (France), Empa researchers were able to demonstrate how well their real-time acoustic monitoring of laser weld seams works.
Universal right to health could inspire people, organizations to make real change
Acknowledging health as a universal human right could galvanize people and organizations to make major improvements in health worldwide, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
Super-Earths discovered orbiting nearby red dwarf
The nearest exoplanets to us provide the best opportunities for study, including searching for evidence of life outside the Solar System.
How conspiracy theories emerge -- and how their storylines fall apart
A new study in the journal PLOS One, by UCLA professors of engineering and folklore, uses machine learning to visualize how unrelated facts and false information can connect into a narrative framework that would quickly fall apart if some of elements are taken out of the mix.
Rapid EUnetHTA assessment on coronavirus diagnostics supported by IQWiG
Rapid EUnetHTA assessment on coronavirus diagnostics supported by IQWiG. Antibody tests can detect a past infection with SARS Corona virus.
Unorthodox desalination method could transform global water management
Over the past year, Columbia Engineering researchers have been refining their unconventional desalination approach for hypersaline brines -- temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE) -- that shows great promise for widespread use.
Monster black hole found in the early universe
Astronomers have discovered the second-most distant quasar ever found using three Maunakea Observatories in Hawai'i.
The tug-of-war at the heart of cellular symmetry
Researchers develop an artificial cell that brings to light the dynamics that govern each cell's internal symmetry.
New insights into the energy levels in quantum dots
Researchers from Basel, Bochum and Copenhagen have gained new insights into the energy states of quantum dots.
New study unveils ultrathin boron nitride films for next-generation electronics
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel material that could enable major leaps in the miniaturization of electronic devices.
Wavy surfaces for better light control
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method for the production of wavy surfaces with nanometre precision.
Hubble watches the "flapping" of cosmic bat shadow
The young star HBC 672 is known by its nickname of Bat Shadow because of its wing-like shadow feature.
Two-year outcomes after revascularisation deferral based on FFR or iFR measurements
Revascularisation deferral (i.e. decision to treat medically) is a key aspect of physiology-based coronary revascularisation.
Examining association between older age, risk of complications after colonoscopy
This observational study looked at the risk of complications after an outpatient colonoscopy among patients age 75 and older compared to younger patients.
Uganda's Ik are not unbelievably selfish and mean
The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study.
Shelling out for dinner -- Dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Dolphins use empty gastropod shells to trap prey. A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn this foraging technique outside the mother-calf bond - showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes.
Novel radiotracer advantageous for imaging of neuroendocrine tumor patients
For neuroendocrine cancer patients with liver metastases, a new radiopharmaceutical, 68Ga-DOTA-JR11, has shown excellent imaging performance in tumor detection, staging and restaging, providing important information to guide treatment.
Nationwide EMS calls have dropped 26% since the start of the pandemic
Since early March and the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US, 911 calls for emergency medical services have dropped by 26.1 % compared to the past two years.
Novel function of platelets in tumor blood vessels found
Scientists at Uppsala University have discovered a hitherto unknown function of blood platelets in cancer.
Randomization of provisional vs two-stent techniques in complex bifurcation lesions
Aim: The present study aimed to assess the benefits of two-stent techniques for patients with DEFINITION criteria-defined complex coronary bifurcation lesions.
Patient page: Laryngectomy care in COVID-19 era
The particular risks the COVID-19 pandemic presents for patients with a laryngectomy and how best to mitigate risk are described in this Patient Page.
Researchers discover critical new allergy pathway
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified the sequence of molecular events by which tiny, tick-like creatures called house dust mites trigger asthma and allergic rhinitis.
Long-term outcomes after TAVI in failed bioprosthetic valves in the VIVID Registry
Due to bioprosthetic valve degeneration, aortic valve-in-valve (ViV) procedures are increasingly performed.
Children of academics exhibit more stress
If the parents have a degree, their children also believe that they have to get one.
Study finds Oregon workplace safety monitoring needs to be more timely to help workers
A recent study evaluating the effectiveness of Oregon's occupational health monitoring system concludes that the state needs to collect and share data about workplace dangers in a more timely, relevant fashion to allow for rapid intervention.
Managing personal protective equipment in health care settings
An article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides an overview on personal protective equipment (PPE) in health care settings, including evidence on effectiveness of N95 masks, as well as the importance of including health care worker perspectives on usage of this equipment. http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200575
International study discovers three potential new targets for treating epilepsy
A major international study has uncovered three molecules that have the potential to be developed into new drugs to treat epilepsy.
Smile! Photos converted into 3D from any mobile device
In this new work from Facebook researchers, users are now able to turn the photos they take on their devices into 3D images within seconds.
Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves from predators
New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colours throughout their lives to avoid predators.
Disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on socially vulnerable communities
Authors found that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected socially vulnerable communities, especially minority and non-English speaking ones.
ASPS predicts new industry trends amidst COVID-19 reopenings
As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed how plastic surgeons will care for patients and how they operate their practices, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) recently conducted a member survey to understand what procedures were top of mind among patients to gauge whether the public's mindset on preferred treatments has shifted.
First successful delivery of mitochondria to liver cells in animals
This experiment marks the first time researchers have ever successfully introduced mitochondria into specific cells in living animals.
For children with cleft lip and palate, no major psychological impact of repeated surgeries
Children born with cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) commonly undergo multiple surgical procedures between infancy and adolescence.
Indirect adverse effects of COVID-19 on children and youth's mental, physical health
Despite reports that children and young people may be less likely to get coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) than older adults, there may be substantial indirect adverse effects of the disease on their physical and mental health, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201008
Those with IDD living in group homes more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
A new study published recently in the Disability and Health Journal by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in residential group homes are more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 and die from the virus than those without IDD.
Gold nanoparticles to save neurons from cell death
An international research team coordinated by Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Lecce (Italy) has developed gold nanoparticles able to reduce the cell death of neurons exposed to overexcitement.
Trapping the Sun: New thin-film technology uses sustainable components for solar panels
Most common thin-film solar panels consist of expensive rare-earth elements like indium and gallium, or highly toxic metals like cadmium.
Alternative to nitrogen: Oxygen plasma can improve the properties of electrode materials
A group of scientists from Skoltech and Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU) showed that nitrogen is not the only element that can help enhance the specific capacitance of supercapacitors.
Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought.
Black hole collision may have exploded with light
Astronomers have seen what appears to the first light ever detected from a black hole merger.
Dangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey
There's some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium.
New automotive radar spots hazards around corners
Using radar commonly deployed to track speeders and fastballs, researchers have developed an automated system that will allow cars to peer around corners and spot oncoming traffic and pedestrians.
The burden of non-COVID patients: Caring for the left-behind
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has exposed gaps in health care systems.
Researchers discover new boron-lanthanide nanostructure
A newly discovered nanocluster has a geometry that ''has not been observed in chemistry heretofore,'' the researchers say.
MicroCT reveals detailed head morphology of arthropod, Leanchoilia illecebrosa
An international collaboration between researchers at Harvard University and Yunnan University in China uses microCT to study and restudy arthropod fossils from the early Cambrian in the Chengjiang biota in the Yunnan Province of China.
Science study: Chemists achieve breakthrough in the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons
Graphene Nanoribbons might soon be much easier to produce. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the U.S. has succeeded in producing this versatile material for the first time directly on the surface of semiconductors.
Spider baby boom in a warmer Arctic
Climate change leads to longer growing seasons in the Arctic.
Palaeontology: Big-boned marsupial unearths evolution of wombat burrowing behavior
The discovery of a new species of ancient marsupial, named Mukupirna nambensis, is reported this week in Scientific Reports.
Acute acral lesions in a case series of kids, teens during COVID-19 pandemic
This case series describes 20 children and adolescents who presented with new-onset acral inflammatory lesions during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Helping consumers in a crisis
A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn -- a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy.
Research shows COVID-19 is an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke
COVID-19 infection is significantly associated with strokes, and patients with COVID-19 should undergo more aggressive monitoring for stroke.
Why bacterial toxins are 'fascinating machines of death'
Bacterial toxins causing different illnesses share similar molecular mechanisms in a finding that could help treatment development as well as explain the emergence of new diseases.
Motions in the Sun reveal inner workings of sunspot cycle
The Sun's convection zone plays a key role in the generation and evolution of the Sun's magnetic field.
Identified genes that predispose to cancer by impairing the immune system
The study shows that the involvement of certain genes that predispose to cancer also affects the immune system, which could facilitate tumor growth.
Chilblains, an indirect dermatological consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic
The possible association between chilblains and COVID-19 was investigated in this case series that included 31 patients.
Promising treatment to slow kidney disease doesn't prove out in clinical trial
Progression of kidney disease in type 1 diabetes is correlated with increased amounts of uric acid.
Women underrepresented in academic hospital medicine leadership roles, study finds
Of academic hospital medicine programs, 79% are run by men, Johns Hopkins researchers report in a new paper published March 3 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and male hospitalist leaders are more likely to have attained the rank of full professor than women leaders.
Decades old mystery in leukaemia treatment solved
A research team led by the University of Kent and Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, has solved an almost 40-year old mystery in leukaemia therapy and the drug nelarabine, thanks to studying levels of enzyme SAMHD1.
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers measure motions in the Sun to explain the solar cycle
In a newly-published study, researchers from the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) and colleagues used helioseismology and analyzed several data sources to find that the Sun's meridional flow is a single cell in each hemisphere that carries plasma toward the Sun's equator 200 thousand km below the surface.
X-rays size up protein structure at the 'heart' of COVID-19 virus
Researchers have performed the first room temperature X-ray measurements on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease -- the enzyme that enables the virus to reproduce.
Self-compacting concrete becomes more sustainable thanks to using granite residue
A UCO study proves the feasibility of substituting up to 40% of conventional aggregates of self-compacting mortar for granite sludge, thus reducing the construction sector's environmental impact
'Where are my keys?' and other memory-based choices probed in the brain
Researchers from Caltech and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center visualize how memories are selectively retrieved in the brain.
New DNA sequencing technique may help unravel genetic diversity of cancer tumors
Understanding the genetic diversity of individual cells within a cancer tumor and how that might impact the disease progression has remained a challenge, due to the current limitations of genomic sequencing.
Illinois professor proposes guide for developing common data science approaches
University of Illinois information sciences professor Victoria Stodden proposes a way to develop recognized data science processes for research.
Survey: Alternative medicine is widespread among people with MS
A new survey of more than 1,000 people with multiple sclerosis finds that an overwhelming majority use complementary and alternative medicine, with many using cannabis.
DynamX Bioadaptor, a novel 'uncaging' platform for coronary artery revascularisation
Drug Eluting Stents (DES) are the mainstay of coronary artery disease treatment.
Physicists obtain molecular 'fingerprints' using plasmons
Scientists from the Center for Photonics and 2D Materials of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the University of Oviedo, Donostia International Physics Center, and CIC nanoGUNE have proposed a new way to study the properties of individual organic molecules and nanolayers of molecules.
From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier
We all know that there are ''good'' and ''bad'' bacteria, but scientists have little insight into how bacteria become ''bad'' or ''pathogenic'' and cause disease.
Maternal obesity increases the chance of liver cancer in offspring for generations
Scientists recognize the connection between maternal obesity and liver cancer in the offspring of obese mothers, however, the mechanism is not well understood.
Scientists devise new 'bar code' method to identify critical cell types in the brain
A discovery by researchers at Brown's Center for Translational Neuroscience could pave the way for future studies aimed at developing solutions to ALS and other vexing neuromuscular diseases.
Key signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of Paget's disease identified
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, in collaboration with their colleagues from Beijing, China, have gained new insights into the development of malignant skin cancers collectively known as Paget's disease.
Tiny brains, big surprise: Eavesdropping wasps gain insights about fighting abilities of potential rivals
Paper wasps eavesdrop on fighting rivals to rapidly assess potential opponents without personal risk.
New approach drives bacteria to produce potential antibiotic, antiparasitic compounds
Researchers have developed a method to spur the production of new antibiotic or antiparasitic compounds hiding in the genomes of actinobacteria, which are the source of the drugs actinomycin and streptomycin and are known to harbor other untapped chemical riches.
Confrontation may reduce white prejudices, Rutgers study finds
Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, Rutgers researchers find.
Montana State researcher publishes paper examining COVID-19 spread
The work examines trends in visits to outpatient clinics for influenza-like illnesses in March 2020 as compared to previous years.

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