Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 28, 2020


Report points to intergroup tensions from different interpretations of social distancing
Ambiguity over social distancing as lockdown eases over the coming months could lead to tensions between groups warn researchers.
Improved medical imaging improves cancer staging
Prof. TIAN Chao's group improved the imaging quality and 3D construction of the photoacoustic imaging, and applied them to in vivo sentinel lymph node imaging.
The magnetic history of ice
The history of our planet has been written, among other things, in the periodic reversal of its magnetic poles.
Researchers employ antennas for angstrom displacement sensing
Micro -- nano Optics and Technology Research Group led by Prof.
3D magnetotelluric imaging reveals magma recharging beneath Weishan volcano
Researches have succeeded in obtaining a high-resolution 3D resistivity model of approximately 20 km depth beneath the Weishan volcano in the Wudalianchi volcanic field (WVF) for the first time.
Red Sea's coral reefs help protect the KSA coast
Modeling shows that coral reefs off the east coast of Saudi Arabia have a vital role in protecting the coastal zone.
'Spear and shield' inspire high toughness microstructure
Researchers designed a discontinuous fibrous Bouligand (DFB) architecture and tested the 3D-printed single-edge notched specimens with such architecture for optimization parameter.
MRI scan used for heart disease could also pick out aggressive cancers
A type of smart MRI scan used in people with heart disease could help assess whether children's cancers are especially aggressive and spot early signs that targeted treatments are working, a new study suggests.
Excessive sugar intake linked with unhealthy fat deposits
Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health.
Spraying ethanol to nanofiber masks makes them reusable
A joint research team from POSTECH and Japan's Shinshu University evaluates the filtration efficiency of nanofiber and melt-blown filters when cleaned with ethanol.
New solar forecasting model performs best
A new mathematical model for predicting variations in solar irradiance has been developed at Uppsala University.
Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light
Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new UCL-led study, the first of its kind in humans.
Researchers discover algorithms and neural circuit mechanisms of escape responses
Prof. WEN Quan from School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has proposed the algorithms and circuit mechanisms for the robust and flexible motor states of nematodes during escape responses.
New research paves way for developing therapies that could slow down Alzheimer's
Neuroscientists and stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a research model that allows studying human hippocampal neurons, the brain cells primarily affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology.
Ladder falls have long-lasting consequences for older blokes
In the world's first study of long-term impacts from ladder falls, Queensland researchers have found half of fallers experience a deterioration in their psychological wellbeing for at least six months after the incident.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.