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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 03, 2020


New nano-engineering strategy shows potential for improved advanced energy storage
Renewable energy platforms such as wind and solar need large-scale energy storage systems.
Solar assisted heating networks reduce environmental impact and energy consumption
More than 40% of energy consumption in the European Union is by buildings and 63% of this figure is due to residential dwellings.
A new way towards super-fast motion of vortices in superconductors discovered
An international team of scientists from Austria, Germany and Ukraine has found a new superconducting system in which magnetic flux quanta can move at velocities of 10-15 km/s.
Scientists synthesize novel artificial molecules that mimic a cell membrane protein
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) recently developed an artificial transmembrane ligand-gated channel that can mimic the biological structure and function of its natural counterpart.
Children actively want to understand and express themselves regarding the coronavirus
To comprehend and process the social crisis and upheaval in everyday life that have resulted from the corona pandemic, we need research and new perspectives.
Novel biomarker discovery could lead to early diagnosis for deadly preeclampsia
Preeclampsia is a dangerous condition that worldwide kills over 70,000 women and 500,000 babies each year.
How reliable are the reconstructions and models for past temperature changes?
Understanding of climate changes during the past millennia is crucial for the scientific attribution of the current warming and the accurate prediction of the future climate change.
Did adaptive radiations shape reptile evolution?
A Harvard research team examined the largest data set of living and extinct major reptile groups to tackle the how adaptive radiations have shaped reptile evolution.
Closing the gap: Citizen science for monitoring sustainable development
Citizen science could help track progress towards all 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
Norovirus has two alternative capsid structures which change before infection
Researchers from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences have discovered that mouse noroviruses have two alternative capsid structures and change from one to the other before infection.
Scientific 'red flag' reveals new clues about our galaxy, Embry-Riddle researcher says
By determining how much energy permeates the center of the Milky Way, researchers have moved closer to understanding the power behind our galaxy.
Location, location, location -- Even gut immune response is site-specific
Researchers at Würzburg University are using mini-organs to model the digestive tract in the laboratory.
Growth of online sports betting poses significant public health challenge -- New study
The 'gamblification' of sports over recent years poses significant challenges for individuals, families and community wellbeing according to new research.
Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics
In a paper that made the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, an international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers.
How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack.
The sixth sense of animals
Continuously observing animals with motion sensors could improve earthquake prediction.
Heatwave trends accelerate worldwide
The first comprehensive worldwide assessment of heatwaves down to regional levels has revealed that in nearly every part of the world heatwaves have been increasing in frequency and duration since the 1950's.
Toxic air pollution nanoparticles found in heart cell 'powerhouses' of city dwellers
Toxic metallic air pollution nanoparticles are getting inside the crucial, energy-producing structures within the hearts of people living in polluted cities, causing cardiac stress -- a new study confirms.
Iron in the Greenland ice core relative to Asian loess records over the past 110,000 years
Xiao and colleagues examined ''iron hypothesis'' evidences in Greenland NEEM ice core.
Long-term consequences of river damming in the Panama Canal
Humans have manipulated and managed rivers with dams for millennia.
Getting a grasp on India's malaria burden
A new approach could illuminate a critical stage in the life cycle of one of the most common malaria parasites.
How does spatial multi-scaled chimera state produce the diversity of brain rhythms?
This work revealed that the real brain network has a new chimera state -- spatial multi-scaled chimera state, and its formation is closely related the local symmetry of connections.
Obese BME people at 'higher-risk' of contracting COVID-19
Obese people among black and minority ethnic communities (BME) are at around two times higher the risk of contracting COVID-19 than white Europeans, a study conducted by a team of Leicester researchers has found.
Protective antibodies identified for rare, polio-like disease in children
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have isolated human monoclonal antibodies that potentially can prevent a rare but devastating polio-like illness in children linked to a respiratory viral infection.
Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to count individual fish by measuring the concentration of environmental DNA in the water, which could be applied for quantitative monitoring of aquatic ecosystems.
'Fang'tastic: researchers report amphibians with snake-like dental glands
Utah State University biologist Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. and colleagues from Brazil's Butantan Institute describe oral glands in a family of terrestrial caecilians, serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders.
More ecosystem engineers create stability, preventing extinctions
Biological builders like beavers, elephants, and shipworms re-engineer their environments.
Principles for Modeling Earth's surface systems and their eco-environmental components
Extrinsic information, from satellite observations and the outputs of spatial models, and intrinsic information, from ground observations and spatial sampling, provide two different but complementary streams of information about the Earth's surface.
Optogenetic stimulation of the motor cortex successfully induced arm movements in monkeys
Optogenetics can control cellular functions by illuminating lights and revolutionized stimulation methods.
Skoltech researchers solve a 60-year-old puzzle about a superhard material
Skoltech researchers together with their industrial colleagues and academic partners have cracked a 1960s puzzle about the crystal structure of a superhard tungsten boride that can be extremely useful in various industrial applications, including drilling technology.
New breakthrough in 'spintronics' could boost high speed data technology
Scientists have made a pivotal breakthrough in the important, emerging field of spintronics -- which could lead to a new high speed energy efficient data technology.
Complications from COVID-19 may depend on von Willebrand factor in the blood
As the researcher suggests, the replication of the virus stimulates the development of microdamage on vessel walls.
First evidence of snake-like venom glands found in amphibians
Caecilians are limbless amphibians that can be easily mistaken for snakes.
Morning exercise is the key to a good night's sleep after heart bypass surgery
Trouble sleeping after heart bypass surgery? Morning walks are the solution, according to research presented today on ACNAP Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
Quantum physics: Realization of an anomalous Floquet topological system
An international team led by physicists from the Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich realized a novel genuine time-dependent topological system with ultracold atoms in periodically-driven optical honeycomb lattices.

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