Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 07, 2020
Milk lipids follow the evolution of mammals
Skoltech scientists conducted a study of milk lipids and described the unique features of human breast milk as compared to bovids, pigs, and closely related primates.

Artificial tones in perception experiments could be missing the mark, research
Researchers at McMaster University who study how the brain processes sound have discovered the common practice of using artificial tones in perception experiments could mean scientists are overlooking important and interesting discoveries in the field of brain research.

Circular RNA makes fruit flies live longer
The molecule influences the insulin signalling pathway and thus prolongs life

Cooling mechanism increases solar energy harvesting for self-powered outdoor sensors
Thermoelectric devices, which use the temperature difference between the top and bottom of the device to generate power, offer some promise for harnessing naturally occurring energy.

Breakthrough machine learning approach quickly produces higher-resolution climate data
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a novel machine learning approach to quickly enhance the resolution of wind velocity data by 50 times and solar irradiance data by 25 times--an enhancement that has never been achieved before with climate data.

The complex relationship between deforestation and diet diversity in the Amazon
As increasing areas of the Amazonian rainforest are converted into agricultural land, scientists are examining how this is linked with local communities' food access.

Increase in delirium, rare brain inflammation and stroke linked to COVID-19
Neurological complications of Covid-19 can include delirium, brain inflammation, stroke and nerve damage, finds a new UCL and UCLH-led study, published in the journal Brain.

Iodine exposure in the NICU may lead to decrease in thyroid function, NIH study suggests
Exposure to iodine used for medical procedures in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may increase an infant's risk for congenital hypothyroidism (loss of thyroid function), suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

Agriculture - a climate villain? Maybe not!
The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) claims that agriculture is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases, and is thus by many observers considered as a climate villain.

Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
People who work in jobs that require less physical activity - typically office and desk-based jobs - are at a lower risk of subsequent poor cognition than those whose work is more physically active, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.

Higher manganese levels in early pregnancy linked to lower preeclampsia risk
An analysis of data from more than 1,300 women followed prospectively through pregnancy found that women with lower levels of the essential mineral manganese in early pregnancy were more likely to develop the serious high blood pressure syndrome called preeclampsia in late pregnancy.

Conservation agriculture increases carbon sequestration in extensive crops
A study performed by UCO (University of Cordoba) and IFAPA (Institute of Agricultural Research and Training) analyzed the potential of no-till farming in order to achieve the aims of the 4perMille initiative, that seeks to increase the amount of organic carbon in soil.

Study: Troubling connection between workplace pregnancy discrimination and health of mothers, babies
Perceived pregnancy discrimination indirectly relates to increased levels of postpartum depressive symptoms for mothers and lower birth weights, lower gestational ages and increased numbers of doctor visits for babies, according to a management study led by Baylor University.

Early childhood education centers can boost parents' engagement at home
When early childhood education centers communicate well with parents, those parents are more likely to engage in educational activities with their children at home, a new University of Arizona study finds.

Engineers use electricity to clean up toxic water
Powerful electrochemical process destroys water contaminants, such as pesticides. Wastewater is a significant environment issue.

Engineered killer immune cells target tumours and their immunosuppressive allies
Scientists have engineered natural killer immune cells that not only kill head and neck tumour cells in mice but also reduce the immune-suppressing myeloid cells that allow tumours to evade the immune response, according to a new study in eLife.

Brain structural elements in psychiatric disorders
While researchers have previously identified brain structural signatures associated with individual neurological diseases using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a team of scientists based in Germany, in a new study, has compared data from multiple studies to find brain structural abnormalities shared between four different neuropsychiatric conditions.

Oncotarget: Clonality and antigen-specific responses shape prognostic effects
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 reported that to delineate the complexity of anti-tumor T-cell responses, the author's utilized a computational method for de novo assembly of sequences from CDR3 regions of 369 high-grade serous ovarian cancers from TCGA, and then applied deep TCR-sequencing for analyses of paired tumor and peripheral blood specimens from an independent cohort of 99 ovarian cancer patients.

New link between calcium and cardiolipin in heart defects
To function properly, the heart needs energy from cells' powerhouses, the mitochondria.

Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds
Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound.

Making a list of all creatures, great and small
A paper published July 7, 2020 in the open access journal PLOS Biology outlines a roadmap for creating, for the first time, an agreed list of all the world's species, from mammals and birds to plants, fungi and microbes.

Long-acting injectable form of HIV prevention outperforms daily pill in NIH study
A pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) regimen containing an investigational long-acting form of the HIV drug cabotegravir injected once every 8 weeks was more effective than daily oral Truvada at preventing HIV acquisition among cisgender men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men in a clinical trial sponsored by NIH.

Insufficient sleep harms children's mental health
Poor sleep harms children's mental health and emotional stability according to a new study published by University of Houston professor of psychology and director of the Sleep and Anxiety Center of Houston, Candice Alfano.

Colleges that emphasize activism have more civically engaged students
Students tend to be more engaged in activism if the school that they attend emphasizes social and political issues, according to new research featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Machine learning helps grow artificial organs
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Ivannikov Institute for System Programming, and the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Schepens Eye Research Institute have developed a neural network capable of recognizing retinal tissues during the process of their differentiation in a dish.

Survey: 7 in 10 respondents worry poor health will limit their life experiences
Seven in 10 US adults worry poor health will prevent them from doing all the things they'd like to do in life, according to a new survey[1] from the American Heart Association and American Diabetes Association.

Researchers create air filter that can kill the coronavirus
Researchers from the University of Houston, in collaboration with others, have designed a ''catch and kill'' air filter that can trap the virus responsible for COVID-19, killing it instantly.

Study: Surgical delay associated with increased risk in some gastrointestinal malignancies
Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, widespread cancellations of electively-scheduled or ''non-emergency'' operations were implemented to free up hospital beds and conserve protective equipment for health care workers.

Oncotarget: Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning can drive resistance to EMT
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 published ''Epigenetic feedback and stochastic partitioning during cell division can drive resistance to EMT'' by Jia et al. which reported that Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse process mesenchymal-epithelial transition are central to metastatic aggressiveness and therapy resistance in solid tumors.

Repurposing public health systems to decode COVID-19
Research published in the journal Microbial Genomics describes how national surveillance systems can be linked with the UK Biobank.

Boron nitride destroys PFAS 'forever' chemicals PFOA, GenX
Rice University chemical engineers have discovered a photocatalyst that can destroy 99% of the 'forever' chemical PFOA in laboratory tests on polluted water.

Climate change may cause extreme waves in Arctic
Extreme ocean surface waves with a devastating impact on coastal communities and infrastructure in the Arctic may become larger due to climate change, according to a new study.

Contest between superconductivity and insulating states in Magic Angle Graphene
A team of ICFO researchers, in collaboration with scientists from MIT, NIMS (Japan), and Imperial College London, develop a set of entirely novel knobs to control correlated electrons and demonstrate that superconductivity can exist without insulating phases in Magic Angle Twisted Bi-layer Graphene.

A 3D biofabricated cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma tissue model
The cover for issue 27 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''(A) Bimodal imaging examples of control and treated tumors (red) before and after the treatment period,'' by Browning, et al. and reported that the authors developed a 3-dimensional bioprinted skin model of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) tumors together with a microscopy assay to test chemotherapeutic effects in tissue.

Scientists use nanoparticle-delivered gene therapy to inhibit blinding eye disease in rodents
In experiments in rats and mice, two Johns Hopkins scientists -- an engineer and an ophthalmologist -- report the successful use of nanoparticles to deliver gene therapy for blinding eye disease.

For cleaner air, water, and soil
The air around us is still getting more and more polluted.

Tree rings show unprecedented rise in extreme weather in South America
A new South American Drought Atlas reveals that unprecedented widespread, intense droughts and unusually wet periods have been on the rise since the mid-20th century.

COVID-19 in patients who have received kidney transplants or are undergoing dialysis
A recent study found that most kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19 do not need to be hospitalized.

A chemical cocktail of air pollution in Beijing, China during COVID-19 outbreak
Air pollution during the COVID-19 lockdown in Beijing was mainly due to different chemical responses of primary and secondary aerosols to changes in anthropogenic emissions.

Antioxidants in corn line could aid human IBD protection, therapy
Flavonoids from a specific line of corn act as anti-inflammatory agents in the guts of mice with an inflammatory-bowel-disease-like condition, according to a team of researchers who said flavonoid-rich corn should be studied to determine its potential to provide a protective effect on human health.

JNCCN study explores if insurance is keeping pace with trends in targeted cancer therapy
New research from the University of California, San Francisco (USCF) and City of Hope in the July 2020 issue of JNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network examines coverage trends for circulating tumor DNA testing, also known as gene sequencing of ctDNA or 'liquid biopsies.' The researchers found coverage rate rose from 0% to 38% in three years.

A key gene modifies regulatory T cells to fine-tune the immune response
The human immune system is a finely-tuned machine, balancing when to release a cellular army to deal with pathogens, with when to rein in that army, stopping an onslaught from attacking the body itself.

As teens delay driver licensing, they miss key safety instruction
Teens are getting licensed to drive later than they used to and missing critical safety training as a result, according to Yale researchers.

Enzymes as double agents: New mechanism discovered in protein modification
Proteins take on an important function in photosynthesis. In order to be able to work purposefully, they change their chemical form after they have been produced in a cell.

1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains
Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions.

Princeton chemists resolve origin of perovskite instability
Researchers in the Cava Group at the Princeton University Department of Chemistry have demystified the reasons for instability in an inorganic perovskite.

Quantum classifiers with tailored quantum kernel?
Quantum information scientists have introduced a new method for machine learning classifications in quantum computing.

Oncotarget: Australian experience of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 published ''Australian experience of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in lung neuroendocrine tumours'' by Lim et al. which reported peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an approved treatment modality for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, although Phase III randomised clinical trial data is not available for NETs of other site of origin, in practice, PRRT is used more widely in clinical practice, based on its mechanism of targeting the somatostatin receptor.

Curtin study could rewrite Earth's history
Curtin University-led research has found new evidence to suggest that the Earth's first continents were not formed by subduction in a modern-like plate tectonics environment as previously thought, and instead may have been created by an entirely different process.

Excitation of robust materials
So-called topological materials have special electronic properties, which are very robust against external perturbations.

Social media can identify fathers at risk of postpartum depression
Fathers' social media posts were evaluated for changes in behavior (engagement with the platform), emotions, linguistic style, and discussion topics following the birth of their child.

Old X-rays, new vision: A nano-focused X-ray laser
Researchers at Osaka University, in collaboration with RIKEN and Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), have focused the beam of an X-ray free-electron laser to 6 nanometers, closer to the diameter of a typical atom than obtained in prior work.

Study: Interplay of impact, moral goals influences charitable giving to different causes
With the rise of globalization, geographic borders are becoming less relevant for making charitable donations, which means nonprofits and charities can make more effective pitches to donors by emphasizing higher-level concepts such as morality and idealistic values, said Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F.

Mental health benefits of parks dimmed by safety concerns
No matter how close parks are to home, perceptions of park-centered crime may keep New Yorkers from using them.

Scientists offer roadmap for studying link between climate and armed conflict
Climate change--from rising temperatures and more severe heavy rain, to drought--is increasing risks for economies, human security, and conflict globally.

Electrons in the fast lane
Microscopic structures could further improve perovskite solar cells

The collective power of the solar system's dark, icy bodies
Two new studies by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder may help to solve one of the biggest mysteries about the dark, icy bodies of the outer solar system: why so many of them don't circle the sun the way they should.

TARA biosystems demonstrates in vitro cardiac biology model mimics human drug response
TARA Biosystems today reported study results demonstrating the ability of TARA's in vitro human cardiac models to reproduce drug responses similar to those observed in humans.

A new understanding of protein movement
A team of UD engineers has uncovered the role of surface diffusion in protein transport, which could aid biopharmaceutical processing.

Future Texas hurricanes: Fast like Ike or slow like Harvey?
Climate change will intensify winds that steer hurricanes north over Texas in the final 25 years of this century, increasing the odds for fast-moving storms like 2008's Ike compared to slow-movers like 2017's Harvey, according to new research.

Algae species discovered infesting NW Hawaiian waters has been identified
A newly-identified, fast-growing species of algae poses a major threat to coral reefs and the ocean ecosystem in the northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

The risk of cerebral palsy linked to IVF has more than halved in the past two decades
Fifteen years ago a large population study from Denmark found a significantly increased risk of cerebral palsy in infants born as a result of assisted reproduction.

The study of lysosomal function during cell division and chromosomal instability
By studying the role of lysosomes in mitosis, an IDIBELL and UB group discovers that alterations in the separation of chromosomes cause a detectable nucleus morphology once mitosis has finished.

Targeting bacterial biofilm lynchpin prevents, treats recalcitrant biofilm-mediated infections
A new study highlights two approaches with substantive efficacy and potential for broad application to combat biofilm-mediated diseases.

Targeted taxes and school lunch policies benefit low-income populations
Targeted taxes on sweetened beverages and policies that strengthen nutritional standards for meals and beverages at schools may be effective tools for decreasing the purchase of sweetened drinks and reducing obesity among children living in poverty, according to two studies led by researchers from Harvard T.H.

Study reveals many great lakes state parks impacted by record-high water levels
UToledo student Eric Kostecky zeroed in on how coastal flooding and erosion in 2019 damaged park facilities, boat launches and roads and interrupted visitor experiences.

Portable system boosts laser precision, at room temperature
Physicists at MIT have designed a quantum ''light squeezer'' that reduces quantum noise in an incoming laser beam by 15 percent.

Host cell fusion in bacteria infection alarms immune system, causing host cell destruction
NUS Medicine researchers have identified a new trigger for our immune system--abnormal fusion of host cells to form giant cells after infection by pathogens such as the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei.

Edouard now post-tropical in NASA-NOAA satellite imagery
When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean on July 6, it provided forecasters with a visible image of Edouard after it transitioned into a post-tropical cyclone.

Men and younger adults less active in lockdown
New research published in the journal BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine indicates that men and younger adults have been less physically active during the COVID-19 lockdown.

Towards improved wound healing -- Chemical synthesis of a trefoil factor peptide
The family of trefoil factor peptides brings hope to both research and industry to improve the treatment of chronic disorders.

FEFU astrophysicists revealed ten-microne silicate feature in large dust particles
Astrophysicists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with colleagues from Russia and oversea have revealed that large and dense particles with irregular shapes possess a 10 nm silicate feature introduced in lots of comets and protoplanetary discs.

A novel therapeutic target for recovery after stroke
IBS researchers have discovered a new mechanism to explain the effects of subcortical strokes and a new possible therapeutic approach.

New collection of stars, not born in our galaxy, discovered in Milky Way
Astrophysicists announced the discovery of Nyx, a new collection of 250 stars that they believe are the remnant of a dwarf galaxy that merged with the Milky Way eons ago.

On-chip spin-Hall nanograting for simultaneously detecting phase and polarization singularities
A plasmonic spin-Hall nanograting structure that simultaneously detects both the polarization and phase singularities of the incident beam is reported.

Limitations of super-resolution microscopy overcome
The smallest cell structures can now be imaged even better: The combination of two microscopy methods makes fluorescence imaging with molecular resolution possible for the first time.

Protein linked to cancer acts as a viscous glue in cell division
The protein PRC1, a telltale sign in many cancer types including prostate, ovarian, and breast cancer, act as a ''viscous glue'' during cell division, precisely controlling the speed at which two sets of DNA are separated as a single cell divides.

Sensory neurons outside the brain drive autistic social behaviors, Penn study suggests
A new study from Penn Medicine lends further evidence that the social behaviors tied to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) emerge from abnormal function of sensory neurons outside the brain.

Rheumatoid arthritis patients under treatment with methotrexate
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often suffer from what is referred to as interstitial lung disease (ILD).

Dopamine neurons mull over your options
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have found that dopamine neurons in the brain can represent the decision-making process when making economic choices.

Among older adults, statin use tied to decreased risk of death
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the VA Boston Healthcare System leverages national data from the U.S.

Metabolomics meets genomics to improve patient diagnosis
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have improved their ability to identify the genetic cause of undiagnosed conditions.

A novel active photonic wireless system to power medical implants
Medical implants, such as pacemakers, serve various functions in patients and help to improve their quality of life.

How to tackle climate change, food security and land degradation
How can some of world's biggest problems -- climate change, food security and land degradation -- be tackled simultaneously?

New study sparks fresh call for seagrass preservation
An increase in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 5 million cars a year has been caused by the loss of seagrass meadows around the Australian coastline since the 1950s.

Newer solar power equipment ages better than older units
Utility-scale photovoltaics are the largest sector of the overall solar market within the US and the fastest-growing form of renewable power generation, and this fleet of utility-scale photovoltaic projects is relatively young and hasn't been operating long enough to establish a lengthy history of operational field service.

Fighting E. coli with E. coli
According to findings published this week in mBio, Nissle, a strain of Escherichia coli, is harmless to intestinal tissue and may protect the gut from enterohemorrhagic E. coli, a pathogen that produces Shiga toxin.

Strange bedfellows
Advanced X-ray MicroCT technology offers unparalleled insights into the functional morphology of specialized organs that mediate interactions between butterfly caterpillars and their ant hosts.

'Growing' active sites on quantum dots for robust H2 photogeneration
Chinese researchers had achieved site- and spatial- selective integration of earth-abundant metal ions in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for efficient and robust photocatalytic H2 evolution from water.

COVID-related discrimination disproportionately impacts racial minorities, study shows
USC Dornsife's ''Understanding Coronavirus in America'' tracking survey reveals that discrimination against people who are perceived to have COVID-19, regardless of their true infection status, increased from March to April 2020.

Soy and wheat proteins helpful for building aging muscles, but not as potent as animal protein
On a gram for gram basis, animal proteins are more effective than plant proteins in supporting the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass with advancing age, shows research presented this week at The Physiological Society's virtual early career conference Future Physiology 2020.

Blocking cholesterol storage could stop growth of pancreatic tumors
Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found they can stop the growth of pancreatic cancer cells by interfering with the way the cells store cholesterol.

Restructuring a general surgery residency program in epicenter of COVID-19 pandemic
A New York hospital's restructuring of general surgery resident teams and educational infrastructure in response to the COVID-19 pandemic is detailed in this article.

RNA key in helping stem cells know what to become
If every cell has the same genetic blueprint, why does an eye cell look and act so differently than a brain cell or skin cell?

Famous 'Jurassic Park' dinosaur is less lizard, more bird
From movies to museum exhibits, the dinosaur Dilophosaurus is no stranger to pop culture.

Microplastic pollution harms lobster larvae, study finds
Microplastic fiber pollution in the ocean impacts larval lobsters at each stage of their development, according to new research.

Medicare's race, ethnic data often undercounts minority populations, study finds
The information critical to a nationwide priority of reducing health care disparities among minorities is incomplete and inaccurate, according to a new Rutgers study.

Remdesivir can save more lives where ICUs are overwhelmed: BU study
Amid news that the United States has bought up virtually the entire global supply of remdesivir, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study outlines how the drug could save lives in countries with less hospital capacity, such as South Africa, where COVID-19 is beginning to overwhelm intensive care units (ICUs).

The cosmic commute towards star and planet formation
Interconnected gas flows reveal how star-forming gas is assembled in galaxies.

Flu in early life determines our susceptibility to future infections
Early infections of influenza A can help predict how the virus will affect people across different ages in the future and could impact the effectiveness of flu vaccines, says a new study published today in eLife.

Custom nanoparticle regresses tumors when exposed to light
A unique nanoparticle to deliver a localized cancer treatment inhibits tumor growth in mice, according to a team of Penn State researchers.

Scientists create new device to light up the way for quantum technologies
Researchers at CRANN and the School of Physics at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, have created an innovative new device that will emit single particles of light, or photons, from quantum dots that are the key to practical quantum computers, quantum communications, and other quantum devices.

Shock-dissipating fractal cubes could forge high-tech armor
3D printed cubes,with intricate fractal voids efficiently dissipate shockwaves, potentially leading to new types of lightweight armor and materials to better withstand explosions and impacts.

Women's egg quality dependent on metabolic factors
Increasing the levels of a chemical found in all human cells could boost a woman's fertility and help select the best eggs for IVF, according to University of Queensland research.

Childhood obesity linked to poor heart health signs at 11-12 years
Toddlers who were obese or overweight show concerning signs of cardiovascular disease at 11-12 years of age, according to a new study.

Research reveals regulatory features of maize genome during early reproductive development
A team of researchers led by Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, has mapped out the non-coding, 'functional' genome in maize during an early developmental window critical to formation of pollen-bearing tassels and grain-bearing ears.

Nutrients in microalgae: An environmentally friendly alternative to fish
Microalgae could provide an alternative source of healthy omega-3 fatty acids for humans while also being more environmentally friendly to produce than popular fish species.

Oncotarget: Correction of NSE concentration improves diagnostic accuracy in lung cancer
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 27 published ''Correction of the NSE concentration in hemolyzed serum samples improves its diagnostic accuracy in small-cell lung cancer'' by Genet et al. which reported that this study aimed to develop a hemolysis correction equation and evaluate its role in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) diagnostics.

Study reveals science behind traditional mezcal-making technique
Researchers reveal for the first time why bubbles are a good gauge of alcohol content in mezcal, a traditional Mexican spirit.

Neurons show distinct styles as they interact with the same muscle partner
A study in the Journal of Neuroscience shows a newfound diversity in how cells talk to the muscle they innervate, revealing that the subclasses of neurons have distinct propensities for change, or 'plasticity'.

Measuring tape is a critical tool for following Zika virus-exposed children
A simple measuring tape could be the key to identifying which children could develop neurological and developmental abnormalities from Zika virus exposure during gestation.

Gut Piezo1 regulates gut and bone homeostasis via RNA sensing.
Gut enterochromaffin cells regulate gut and bone homeostasis via serotonin production.

Atmospheric turbulence affects new particle formation: Common finding on three continents
New particle formation (NPF) over three countries is investigated using aerosol physicochemical quantities and turbulence information.

Bad E. coli we know, but good E. coli?
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine say E. coli Nissle may protect human cells against other more pathogenic strains of E. coli such as E. coli 0157:H7, which is commonly associated with contaminated hamburger meat.

Great expectations: Patients overestimate success in IVF
Couples embarking on IVF to treat their infertility tend to overestimate their chance of success, according to a prospective study of 69 couples having at least their second treatment attempt.

NASA finds powerful storm's around Tropical Storm Cristina's center
A low-pressure area strengthened quickly and became Tropical Storm Cristina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and infrared imagery from NASA revealed the powerful thunderstorms fueling that intensification.

New study detects ringing of the global atmosphere
A ringing bell vibrates simultaneously at a low-pitched fundamental tone and at many higher-pitched overtones, producing a pleasant musical sound. A recent study, just published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences by scientists at Kyoto University and the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, shows that the Earth's entire atmosphere vibrates in an analogous manner, in a striking confirmation of theories developed by physicists over the last two centuries.

HPTN 083 study demonstrates superiority of cabotegravir for the prevention of HIV
The HPTN 083 clinical trial showed that a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) regimen containing long-acting cabotegravir (CAB LA) injected once every 8 weeks was superior to daily oral tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) for HIV prevention among cisgender men and transgender women who have sex with men.

BIO Integration Journal, volume 1, issue number 1, publishes
New journal BIO Integration (BIOI) has been launched with the publication of volume 1, issue 1.
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