Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 08, 2020
Does early access to pension funds improve health?
In a recent study from Singapore, early access to pension wealth was associated with improved health status.

Soil studies can be helpful for border control
Underground tunnels have been used by warriors and smugglers for thousands of years to infiltrate battlegrounds and cross borders.

NASA analyzes Tropical Cyclone Damien's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Storm Cristina in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on July 8, it gathered water vapor data that provided information about the intensity of the storm.

Blood-based biomarker can detect, predict severity of traumatic brain injury
A study from the National Institutes of Health confirms that neurofilament light chain as a blood biomarker can detect brain injury and predict recovery in multiple groups, including professional hockey players with acute or chronic concussions and clinic-based patients with mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury.

5G networks have few health impacts, Oregon State study using zebrafish model finds
Findings from an Oregon State University study into the effects of radiofrequency radiation generated by the wireless technology that will soon be the standard for cell phones suggest few health impacts.

HKUST researchers discover a novel mechanism regulating planar cell polarity
Researchers of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) recently uncovered novel molecular mechanisms that regulate delivery of a planar cell polarity protein, Frizzled-6, to the cell surface.

Where did the Asian longhorned ticks in the US come from?
The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study.

How to precisely edit mitochondrial DNA
A gene editing tool based on a bacterial toxin can make precise changes to mitochondrial DNA inside cells.

Researchers propose novel approach to limit organ damage for patients with severe COVID-19
In a paper published in Cancer and Metastasis Reviews, a team of researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Brigham and Women's Hospital propose that controlling the local and systemic inflammatory response in COVID-19 may be as important as anti-viral and other therapies.

Deconstructing glioblastoma complexity reveals its pattern of development
Brain cancers have long been thought of as being resistant to treatments because of the presence of multiple types of cancer cells within each tumor.

Clinical characteristics, symptoms of patients with COVID-19 receiving emergency medical services
Clinical characteristics and symptoms of patients with COVID-19 in Seattle and greater King County, Washington, who required 911 emergency medical services response are described in this study.

New biomaterial could shield against harmful radiation
Northwestern University researchers have synthesized a new form of melanin enriched with selenium.

Community and law enforcement partnerships best help kids who witness home violence
The Child Trauma Response Team, an innovative police and community-based organization partnership, demonstrated success at screening and treating children for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) immediately following incidents of intimate partner violence, according to a Rutgers-led study published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Lung, immune function in kids could protect from severe COVID-19
Differences in lung physiology and immune function in children could be why they are more often spared from severe illness associated with COVID-19 than adults.

CRISPR enables one-step hybrid seed production in crops
Crop hybrid technologies have contributed to the significant yield improvement worldwide in the past decades.

Liverpool researchers build robot scientist that has already discovered a new catalyst
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have built an intelligent mobile robot scientist that can work 24-7, carrying out experiments by itself.

How colliding neutron stars could shed light on universal mysteries
Researchers have discovered an unusual pulsar - one of deep space's magnetized spinning neutron-star 'lighthouses' that emits highly focused radio waves from its magnetic poles.

Polynesians, Native Americans made contact before European arrival, genetic study finds
Through deep genetic analyses, Stanford Medicine scientists and their collaborators have found conclusive scientific evidence of contact between ancient Polynesians and Native Americans from the region that is now Colombia -- something that's been hotly contested in the historic and archaeological world for decades.

Research advances understanding of how the brain focuses while ignoring distractions
When trying to complete a task we are constantly bombarded by distracting stimuli.

Purifying water with the help of wood, bacteria and the sun
According to the United Nations, about one-fifth of the world's population lives in areas where water is scarce.

Glowing worms provide live-action movies of the body's internal scaffolding
Duke researchers have made the first time-lapse movies of the sheet-like mesh that surrounds and supports most animal tissues.

Neutralizing antibodies in the battle against COVID-19
An important line of defense against SARS-CoV-2 is the formation of neutralizing antibodies.

Enforcing gender quotas increases boardroom diversity and quality
An organisation that is required by national law to have significant female representation on its board of directors sees higher diversity and skills than those in countries that simply advise on quotas, according to research from City, University of London Business School.

UChicago study shows 'Bystander Effect' not exclusive to humans
A rat is less likely to help a trapped companion if it is with other rats that aren't helping, according to new research from the University of Chicago that showed the social psychological theory of the ''bystander effect'' in humans is present in these long-tailed rodents.

Researchers work to better measure delirium severity in older patients
In a study published in Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorder, researchers reported on their effort to improve and validate tools used to assess the severity of a condition called delirium, an acute confusional state often experienced by older hospitalized patients.

Self-isolation may increase susceptibility to COVID-19
Previous research points to the effect of social stressors on developing upper respiratory infections, holding clues to COVID-19 risk.

Fluorescent peptide nanoparticles, in every color of the rainbow
The discovery of green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is made by a jellyfish, transformed cell biology.

Researchers find safeguards for quantum communications
Army researchers developed a new way to protect and safeguard quantum information, moving quantum networks a step closer to reality.

Hearing and visual impairments linked to elevated dementia risk
Older adults with both hearing and visual impairments--or dual sensory impairment--had a significantly higher risk for dementia in a recent study published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring.

Value-based payments disproportionately impact safety-net hospitals
A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, in collaboration with Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, shows that value-based incentive programs aimed at reducing health care-associated infections did not improve infection rates in either safety-net or non-safety-net hospitals.

UBC research shows hearing persists at end of life
Hearing is widely thought to be the last sense to go in the dying process.

Bespoke catalysts for power-to-X
Suitable catalysts are of great importance for efficient power-to-X applications -- but the molecular processes occurring during their use have not yet been fully understood.

Biosynthetic sustainable hierarchical solar steam generator
Nowadays, a team led by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report an efficient and sustainable biomimetic hierarchical solar steam generator (HSSG) based on bacterial cellulose (BC) nanocomposites.

Examining association of COVID-19 public health campaign with improving personal hygiene, physical distancing
This survey study examined whether a nationwide COVID-19 public health campaign in the Netherlands about personal hygiene and physical distancing was associated with improvement in these behaviors.

Therapy delivered electronically more effective than face to face: Hamilton researchers
In this evidence review, researchers identified 17 randomized control trials comparing therapist-supported cognitive behavioural therapy delivered electronically to face to face cognitive behavioural therapy.

Links between parents' and children's asthma and allergies
New research published in Clinical & Experimental Allergy found that, compared with a father's traits related to allergies and asthma, a mother's traits create a higher risk that a child will develop these same traits in early childhood.

Hepatitis C management at federally qualified health centers proves cost-effective
BOSTON- New research from Boston Medical Center shows that routine Hepatitis C (HCV) testing at federally qualified health centers (FQHC) improves diagnosis rates and health outcomes for people with HCV infections in the United States, and is cost-effective.

STRIDE study results on fall injury prevention in older adults: PCORI Media Availability
As reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, the STRIDE Study found that a personalized approach to delivering proven falls risk reduction strategies to high-risk older adults in typical care settings resulted in an 8% to 10% reduction in serious fall injuries, but this effect was not statistically significant.

Preliminary study suggests tuberculosis vaccine may be limiting COVID-19 deaths
While a direct correlation between BCG vaccinations and a reduction in coronavirus mortalities still needs to be understood more fully, researchers hold hope that the BCG vaccine might be able to provide at least short-term protections against severe COVID-19, particularly for front-line medical workers or high-risk patients.

Endometrial scratch of no value to first-time IVF patients in a large randomized trial
An add-on treatment commonly offered to patients in preparation for IVF has proved ineffective in a large-scale randomized trial of more than 1000 women.

Graphene: It is all about the toppings
The way graphene interacts with other materials depends on how these materials are brought into contact with the graphene.

Does a child's height affect their future risk of obesity?
Children who are relatively tall for their age have a higher risk of developing obesity, according to a new study published in Obesity.

Life and death, hope and despair in era of COVID-19
The response of a physician to the fear and despair associated with COVID-19 is described in this article.

Ben-Gurion University researchers determine how to accurately pinpoint malicious drone operators
When tested in simulated drone paths, the model was able to predict the operator location with 78% accuracy.

Columbia professor confronts healthcare inequality in time of COVID-19
Columbia's Kai Ruggeri uses data science to design interventions and recommend policies that help the most vulnerable populations overcome inequalities.

New trial results question standard treatment plan for rheumatoid arthritis
In a clinical trial of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treatment with a drug called upadacitinib provided greater benefits than methotrexate, the most commonly used initial therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

Regulating the properties of MAPbBr3 single crystal via voltage and application
Defect density is one of the most significant characteristics of perovskite single crystals (PSCs) that determines their optical and electrical properties, but few strategies are available to tune this property.

Physical activity of older people requires tailored monitoring
The ability to move about may deteriorate when ageing, a phenomenon which needs to be considered when assessing physical activity in older people.

Supergenes play a larger role in evolution than previously thought
Large blocks of 'plug and play' genes play a super-sized role in adaption-and may help fill lingering gaps in Darwin's theories

Late coronary stent thrombosis in patient with COVID-19
This case report describes a patient with COVID-19 who developed late drug-eluting stent thrombosis.

COVID-19 brain complications found across the globe
Cases of brain complications linked to COVID-19 are occurring across the globe, a new review by University of Liverpool researchers has shown.

A helping hand for cancer immunotherapy
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of PRMT5 inhibitors to sensitize unresponsive melanoma to immune checkpoint therapy.

Numerous jobs linked to increased risk of knee reconstruction
A major review of knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to knee surgery, pain and loss of mobility, reveals widespread risk of OA, demonstrating a need for prevention outside of traditional workplaces.

A bioartificial system acts as 'dialysis' for failing livers in pigs
A bioartificial system that incorporates enhanced liver cells can act as an analogous form of dialysis for the liver in pigs, effectively carrying out the organ's detoxifying roles and preventing further liver damage in animals with acute liver failure.

The story behind a uniquely dark, wetland soil
Areas where landslides are common make hydric soil identification tricky.

Study reveals how bacteria build essential carbon-fixing machinery
Scientists from the University of Liverpool have revealed new insight into how cyanobacteria construct the organelles that are essential for their ability to photosynthesise.

Spectroscopy approach poised to improve treatment for serious heart arrhythmia
Researchers have demonstrated that a new mapping approach based on near infrared spectroscopy can distinguish between fat and muscle tissue in the heart.

Healthier school food and physical activity environments matter for childhood obesity
Students at elementary and secondary schools that offer healthier food offerings and more opportunities for physical activities have a healthier body mass index, according to Rutgers researchers.

The CNIO creates a collaborative platform to streamline brain metastasis research
The Brain Metastasis Cell Lines Panel (BrMPanel) is the first to compile information on +60 cell lines related to brain metastasis research It was spearheaded by CNIO researcher Manuel Valiente, who coordinated its 19 constituent international laboratories and seeks to turn it into a 'white paper' for research in this area The goal is to streamline brain metastasis research for the development of therapies and to encourage new scientific teams to participate in studying this area

New method estimates risks of hormone-disrupting substances in drinking water
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new method that can make it easier for public authorities to assess the health risks of hormone-disrupting chemicals in the environment.

Tackling coral reefs' thorny problem
Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have revealed the evolutionary history of the crown-of-thorns starfish -- a predator of coral that can devastate coral reefs.

Towards climate resilient urban energy systems
Nik and colleagues evaluated the progress achieved in the energy sector to adapt to climate change, focusing on the climate resilience of urban energy systems.

When is someone old?
Populations around the world are living longer lives than was the norm just a few decades ago, presenting governments with significant challenges in terms of caring for their growing elderly populations.

New study reveals people more likely to donate when reminded of own mortality
New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that people are 30 per cent more likely to donate their assets when faced with their own mortality.

New clues from fruit flies about the critical role of sex hormones in stem cell control
In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones' impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone, ecdysone, drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ.

New model of breast cancer's causes developed by UCSF-led team
A new model of the causes of breast cancer, created by a team led by researchers at UC San Francisco, Genentech and Stanford University, is designed to capture the complex interrelationships between dozens of primary and secondary breast cancer causes and stimulate further research.

UCLA-led team develops ways to keep buildings cool with improved super white paints
A research team led by UCLA materials scientists has demonstrated ways to make super white paint that reflects as much as 98% of incoming heat from the sun.

Monitoring for breast cancer after childhood chest radiation: When and how?
Girls who receive chest radiation for cancer are at risk for future breast cancers.

CHOP-pioneered spatial mapping method pinpoints potential new therapeutic targets in lupus
A team of researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used a new method of pinpointing potential disease-causing changes in the genome to identify two new potential therapeutic targets for lupus, while also paving the way for more accurately identifying disease-causing variations in other autoimmune disorders.

Nurses and midwives take the lead in providing HIV services in Eastern and Southern Africa
''Nurse-initiated and managed antiretroviral therapy'' (NIMART) is an innovative approach to making effective medications more accessible to people living with HIV (PLWH) in low-resource countries.

Adipose-derived stem cells considerably improve fat graft retention in breast augmentation
Results of a clinical trial released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicates that breast augmentation in patients treated with fat grafts enriched with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) had significantly superior results compared to those treated with non-enriched grafts.

Enhancing chemotherapy by RNA interference - BIO Integration
Enhancing Chemotherapy by RNA Interference - BIO Integration https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0003 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.

HKU study reveals the hidden fight within corals
Researchers from the School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science at the University of Hong Kong are working to understand how the coral symbiosis may respond to global warming through changes in their microbiome, specifically their symbiotic algae.

Rock 'n' control
The goal of ''Femtochemistry'' is to film and control chemical reactions with short flashes of light.

UBCO kindness researcher challenges the notion of mean teens
A UBC Okanagan researcher is hoping to flip the switch on the pre-convinced stereotype that teens are mean.

Study: 'Anti-vaxxers' gain traction against HPV vaccine on Facebook
One of the biggest social media sites -- Facebook -- has allowed ''anti-vaxxers'' to gain a stronger voice against the use of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine, according to a new study from a media expert at the University of Missouri.

How good gut bacteria help reduce the risk for heart disease
Scientists have discovered that one of the good bacteria found in the human gut has a benefit that has remained unrecognized until now: the potential to reduce the risk for heart disease.

Scaling up the quantum chip
MIT researchers have developed a process to manufacture and integrate 'artificial atoms,' created by atomic-scale defects in microscopically thin slices of diamond, with photonic circuitry, producing the largest quantum chip of its type.

Learning more about particle collisions with machine learning
A team of Argonne scientists has devised a machine learning algorithm that calculates, with low computational time, how the ATLAS detector in the Large Hadron Collider would respond to the ten times more data expected with a planned upgrade in 2027.

Bacteria in infants' first stool may indicate their risk of obesity
Meconium--the earliest stool of an infant -- is composed of materials ingested during the time the infant spends in the uterus.

Simple blood test may predict concussion severity just as well as spinal tap
A blood biomarker in people who have had concussions may be just as accurate at predicting the severity of the injury and how long it will last as biomarkers that are obtained through more expensive and invasive tests, according to a study published in the July 8, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

New method for simulating yarn-cloth patterns to be unveiled at ACM SIGGRAPH
A global team of computer scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria and Indian institute of Technology Delhi (IITD) has developed a method for specifically animating yarn-level cloth effects, accurately capturing the physics of the material, including the stretching and bending response.

Evolutionary biologists find several fish adapt in the same way to toxic water
Several species of fish have adapted to harsh environments using the same mechanism, which brings to question evolutionary chance, according to a study by Kansas State University and Washington State University.

Protein involved in corn's water stress response discovered
The protein could help develop drought-resistant plant varieties and products that reduce losses related to climate change.

NFL outperforms other blood tests to predict and diagnose traumatic brain injury
A study from the National Institutes of Health showed that neurofilament light chain (NfL) delivered superior diagnostic and prognostic performance as a blood biomarker for mild, moderate, and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) when compared to blood proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau, and ubiquitin c-terminal hydrolase-L1.

Brigham investigators develop sterilizable, alternative N95 mask
Early results from modeling and a feasibility study for fit testing suggest that the iMASC system, a N95mask alternative, could fit faces of different sizes and shapes and be sterilized for reuse.

Non-invasive diagnostic procedures for suspected CHD: search reveals informative evidence
Non-invasive diagnostic procedures for suspected CHD: search reveals informative evidence Informative study results are available on diagnostic procedures using computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for suspected coronary heart disease (CHD).

COVID-19: Yin and yang and herd immunity
With no guarantee that a vaccine will be available soon, and even if one is developed it will take considerable time to administer to large numbers of people before the virus is eliminated.

"Protect 30% of the planet for nature," scientists urge in new report
A new report entitled, ''Protecting 30% of the planet for nature: costs, benefits, and economic implications,'' represents the first multi-sector analysis that assesses the global impacts of terrestrial and marine protected areas across the nature conservation, agriculture, forestry, and fisheries sectors.

Stress testing 'coral in a box'
Save the corals: Mobile rapid test to assess coral thermotolerance developed in an international collaboration with the University of Konstanz

TGen-led study identifies unique cells that may drive lung fibrosis
This is one of the first comprehensive looks at lung cells using a technology called single-cell RNA sequencing.

Spider silk made by photosynthetic bacteria
A research team in Japan reported that they succeeded in producing the spider silk -- ultra-lightweight, though, biodegradable and biocompatible material -- using photosynthetic bacteria.

Reducing radioactive waste in processes to dismantle nuclear facilities
Margarita Herranz, professor of nuclear engineering at the UPV/EHU, leads one of the working groups in the Europe H2020 INSIDER project.

Abnormal cells in early-stage embryos might not preclude IVF success
The presence of an abnormal number of chromosomes in the genetic profile of early-stage embryos may be far more common - and potentially less threatening - during normal human development than is currently appreciated, according to new research from Johns Hopkins University biologists.

Study finds decreased rates of high-cost care after a community development initiative
More than a decade into the community development initiative called Healthy Neighborhoods Healthy Families, the 30-block Southern Orchards neighborhood on Columbus, Ohio's South Side had clear, notable improvement.

Restructuring of Medicaid reimbursement model reduces imaging, to the benefit of patients
New research reveals a Medicaid payment model in Oregon leads to fewer traditional primary care services for patients, with the decrease focused entirely on imaging.

Technique fishes valuable nutrients out of shrimp processing water
The seafood industry requires large amounts of water for food processing.

Milking algae mechanically: Progress to succeed petroleum derived chemicals
A method to extract carbohydrates and phycobiliproteins from algae was developed that does not kill the algae during harvest or rely on solvents for extraction and purification.

Drug treatment could improve effectiveness of immunotherapy for cancer patients
The MDM2 gene promotes tumor growth and interferes with immunotherapy in some cancer patients -- a new study from a Brown University research team suggests that an MDM2-inhibiting drug could help address this problem.

Does genomics perpetuate inequality?
A new Hastings Center special report takes a critical look at the role of genomics in perpetuating racism and inequality.

Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds
Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are.

Researchers find promising therapy to fight epidemic of liver disease
In an effort to combat a growing worldwide epidemic of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), scientists have discovered a new target and a new therapy that has shown promising results in preclinical mouse models, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Lefties and righties: Asymmetry in fish genitalia
Evolutionary biologists from the University of Konstanz resolve a century-old question regarding the asymmetric genitals of internally fertilizing fishes of the family Anablepidae.

New study shows colliding neutron stars may unlock mysteries of universe expansion
The National Science Foundation's Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico has proven itself instrumental in another major astronomical discovery.

Certain jobs linked to higher risk of knee osteoarthritis
Workers in jobs that typically involve heavy lifting, frequent climbing, prolonged kneeling, squatting, and standing face an increased risk of developing knee osteoarthritis.

Like humans, rats are less likely to help victims in the presence of unhelpful bystanders
A study in rats demonstrates that the bystander effect - a phenomenon in which individuals are less likely to help someone in need with other bystanders around - exists in a non-human species.

Experimental drug shows early promise against inherited form of ALS, trial indicates
A clinical trial conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Record efficiency for printed solar cells
A new study reports the highest efficiency ever recorded for full roll-to-roll printed perovskite solar cells.

Texas will face driest conditions of the last 1,000 years
Texas' future climate will feature drier summers and decreasing water supplies for much of the state for the remainder of the 21st century -- likely resulting in the driest conditions the state has endured in the last 1,000 years, according to a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University professor.

Individualized falls prevention plan found no better than usual care for reducing injury
Media Availability: Findings reported online July 8, 2020 in the New England Journal of Medicine suggest that a nurse-managed, individually tailored falls prevention plan administered for at least 20 months did not significantly reduce risk of serious fall injuries in older adults aged 70 and over who were at high risk for falls.

The effects of smartphone use on parenting
Parents may worry that spending time on their smartphones has a negative impact on their relationships with their children.

Hyperactive immune cells accelerate heart valve disease: Study
Aortic valve stenosis is the most common type of heart valve disease in the elderly and affects more than one in eight people aged over 75.

How are misfolded membrane proteins cleared from cells by "reubiquitinase"?
Chinese researchers recently discovered a protein quality control mechanism called ''reubiquitination'', which could promote the elimination of misfolded membrane proteins, minimize their dwell time in cells, and thereby reduce their probability to form toxic aggregates in human body.

American Cancer Society updates guideline for HPV vaccination
The American Cancer Society has updated its guideline for HPV vaccination, adapting a 2019 update from the Federal Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Mirror image tumor treatment
Our immune system ought to be able to recognize and kill tumor cells.

Researchers uncover a critical early step of the visual process
The key components of electrical connections between light receptors in the eye and the impact of these connections on the early steps of visual signal processing have been identified for the first time, according to research published today in Science Advances by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

GSA publishes articles on COVID-19 and aging; plus Spanish translations of infographics
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access.

Response to stimulation in IVF may predict longer term health risks
A follow-up study of almost 20,000 young women who had a first cycle of IVF in Denmark between 1995 and 2014 indicates that those who responded poorly to treatment, with few eggs collected, are at a significantly increased risk of later age-related diseases.

The best (and worst) materials for masks
It's intuitive and scientifically shown that wearing a face covering can help reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Early clinical trial tests treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis, and it often goes undetected until advanced stages.

Death rate dramatically less for young heart attack survivors who quit smoking
Among young people who have had a heart attack, quitting smoking is associated with a substantial benefit.

Outdoor light linked with teens' sleep and mental health
Research shows that adolescents who live in areas that have high levels of artificial light at night tend to get less sleep and are more likely to have a mood disorder relative to teens who live in areas with low levels of night-time light.

COVID-19 cases and deaths in federal and state prisons significantly higher than in US population
A new analysis led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the number of US prison residents who tested positive for COVID-19 was 5.5 times higher than the general US population.

Helping drug-delivering particles squeeze through a syringe
MIT engineers are using computing modeling to prevent microparticles from clogging during injections.

Certain factors during infancy may affect bone health in adulthood
In a recent study, breast feeding during infancy was associated with a lower risk of lower limb fractures when children reached young adulthood, while maternal smoking was associated with a higher risk of upper limb fractures.

Programmable balloons pave the way for new shape-morphing devices
A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has designed materials that can control and mold a balloon into pre-programmed shapes.

New clues to lung-scarring disease may aid treatment
Scientists at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix, Arizona, have discovered previously unreported genetic and cellular changes that occur in the lungs of people with pulmonary fibrosis (PF).

Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing
A team of physicists and chemists has produced the first porous graphene ribbons in which specific carbon atoms in the crystal lattice are replaced with nitrogen atoms.

Star-shaped brain cells shed light on the link between cannabis use and sociability
Cannabis use can lead to behavioral changes, including reduced social interactions in some individuals.

New molecular tool precisely edits mitochondrial DNA
The precision editing technologies that have revolutionized DNA editing in the cell nucleus have been unable to reach the mitochondrial genome.

First Alaskan juvenile predator fossil adds insight to dino migration
The discovery of the first juvenile dromaeosaurid lower jaw bone on the North Slope of Alaska supports a growing theory that some Cretaceous Arctic dinosaurs did not migrate with the seasons but were year-round residents, according to new research by SMU paleontologist Anthony Fiorillo.
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