Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 09, 2020
Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago
Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago.

Improved cochlear implant device allows safe MRI in children without discomfort
A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia.

Alzheimer-linked protein complex at super resolution
With the advent of super-resolution microscopy, scientists can study close protein associations better than ever before.

Challenges in evaluating SARS-CoV-2 vaccines
With more than 140 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in development, the race is on for a successful candidate to help prevent COVID-19.

Major cause of rare genetic mitochondrial disease identified
An international study led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute (MCRI) has given hope to families of children born with a fatal heart muscle disease caused by faulty cell machinery.

Looking at linkers helps to join the dots
Understanding the optimal process for fabricating coupled nanocrystal solids could help researchers to improve optoelectronics devices.

Examining association of major food sources of fructose-containing sugars with metabolic syndrome
This study combined the results of 13 studies with nearly 50,000 participants to look at the association of major food sources of fructose-containing sugars, such as sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup, with the risk of metabolic syndrome.

UQ researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unravelling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers.

Flaring, massively
Using Kyoto University's new 3.8M Seimei Telescope, in collaboration with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, astronomers succeeded in detecting 12 stellar flare phenomena on AD Leonis.

IU findings set new standard for blood-based biomarkers in prediction of cancer recurrence
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers Milan Radovich, PhD, and Bryan Schneider, MD, have discovered that the presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the plasma of women's blood who have undergone chemotherapy prior to surgery for the treatment of stage 1, 2 or 3 triple negative breast cancer are critical indicators for the prediction of disease recurrence and disease-free survival.

A complex gene program initiates brain changes in response to cocaine
Researchers used single-nucleus RNA sequencing to compare transcriptional responses to acute cocaine in 16 unique cell populations from the brain nucleus accumbens.

Desert island discs: Music listened to in younger years defines us forever, research finds
Researchers at the University of Westminster and City University of London analysing the music record choices of guests on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs programme has found that the music we listen to between the age of 10 and 30 define us for the rest of our lives.

Fine-tuning excited state of Ru(II)-photosensitizers for boosting CO2-to-CO conversion
How to substantially improve sensitizing ability of photosensitisers (PSs) through balancing its excited state lifetime and redox driving force represents a key role in promoting electron transfer efficiency and further enhancing photoconversion efficiency, however remains a great challenge.

15-foot-long skeleton of extinct dolphin suggests parallel evolution among whales
A report in the journal Current Biology on July 9 offers a detailed description of the first nearly complete skeleton of an extinct large dolphin, discovered in what is now South Carolina.

Living close to green space benefits gut bacteria of urban, formula-fed infants
Living close to natural green space can mitigate some of the changes in infant gut bacteria associated with formula feeding, according to new research published in the journal Environment International.

Contracting COVID-19, lifestyle and social connections may play a role
A new article published in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science explores how lifestyle, social, and psychological factors may increase the risk of contracting COVID-19.

Sensation seekers, risk-takers who experience more bitterness apt to drink IPAs
People who seek novel and powerful sensations and are more prone to taking risks -- and who perceive bitter tastes more intensely -- are more likely to prefer bitter, pale-ale-style beers and drink them more often, according to Penn State sensory researchers, who conducted a study that involved blind taste tests and personality assessments.

Argonne soil carbon research reduces uncertainty in predicting climate change impacts
DOE and USDA researchers use new global models to study how environmental controllers affect soil organic carbon, changes in which can alter atmospheric carbon concentrations and affect climate.

X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding
KAIST researchers have used an X-ray method to track how proteins fold, which could improve computer simulations of this process, with implications for understanding diseases and improving drug discovery.

Sodium found to regulate the biological clock of mice
A new study from McGill University shows that increases in the concentrations of blood sodium can have an influence on the biological clock of mice, opening new research avenues for potentially treating the negative effects associated with long distance travel or shift work.

Evolution makes the world less ragged
How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban.

Pasteurizing breast milk inactivates SARS-CoV-2
Pasteurizing breast milk using a common technique inactivates severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) making it safe for use, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). ttps://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2020/07/09/cmaj.201309.full.pdf

Liquid water is more than just H2O molecules
Skoltech scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Stuttgart showed that the concentration of short-lived ions (H3O+ and OH-) in pure liquid water is much higher than that assumed to evaluate the pH, hence significantly changing our understanding of the dynamical structure of water.

No NELL2, no sperm motility; novel protein is essential for male fertility
An international team of researchers has identified a chain of events that matures the sperm and triggers their motility.

Women who deliver by C-section are less likely to conceive subsequent children
Women who deliver their first child by cesarean section (C-section) are less likely to conceive a second child than those who deliver vaginally, despite being just as likely to plan a subsequent pregnancy, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Socio-economic, environmental impacts of COVID-19 quantified
How is COVID-19 impacting people and the planet and what are the implications for a post-pandemic world?

Chinook salmon declines related to changes in freshwater conditions
A new University of Alaska-led study provides the first evidence that declines in many of Alaska's chinook salmon populations can be attributed in part to climate-driven changes in their freshwater habitats.

Teva presents latest data on AJOVY® ▼ (fremanezumab) at EHF Congress
Teva Pharmaceutical Europe B.V. has presented results from a pooled analysis of three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 3 studies assessing AJOVY® ▼ (fremanezumab), indicated for the preventative treatment of migraine in adults, which demonstrate clinically significant reductions in headache and migraine-related disability in the majority of patients studied.

Scientists trace the origin of our teeth from the most primitive jawed fish
An international team of scientists led by Uppsala University (Sweden), in collaboration with the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (France), the brightest X-ray source, has digitally 'dissected', for the first time, the most primitive jawed fish fossils with teeth found near Prague more than 100 years ago.

Daytime aardvark sightings are a sign of troubled times
New research by the team from Wits, with collaborators from the University of Cape Town and University of Pretoria, reveals what a shift from night-time to daytime activity means for the well-being of aardvarks in a warming and drying world.

Breast cancer cells turn killer immune cells into allies
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body.

Born to be a cannibal: Genes for feeding behavior in mandarin fish identified
Some mandarin fish species (Sinipercidae) are pure fish-eaters, which feed exclusively on living juvenile fish - also of their own species.

The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material
The quantum spin liquid (QSL) state is an exotic state of matter where the spin of electrons, which generally exhibits order at low temperatures, remains disordered.

Scientists reveal comprehensive proteomic map of human lung adenocarcinoma
A team of Chinese scientists from Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, National Center for Protein Sciences (Beijing), National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and Shanghai Jiao Tong University, recently reported a comprehensive proteomic analysis based on 103 Chinese patients with lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), a leading cause of death among all types of cancer worldwide.

Water-saving alternative forage crops for Texas livestock
With increasing drought conditions in the Texas High Plains, researchers test sorghum and pearl millet as alternatives to corn.

Research shows child abuse and neglect results in increased hospitalizations over time
In a new study published in the leading international journal, Child Abuse and Neglect, University of South Australia researchers have found that by their mid-teens, children who were the subject of child protective services contact, are up to 52 per cent more likely to be hospitalised, for a range of problems, the most frequent being mental illness, toxic effects of drugs and physical injuries.

Parents' smartphone use does not harm parent/child relationships
Contrary to popular views, parental smartphone use is rarely associated with poor parenting, and more often than not, tends to be associated with warm and attached parenting.

A new nanoconjugate blocks acute myeloid leukemia tumor cells without harming healthy ones
The nanoparticle targets only leukemic cells and therefore would reduce the severe adverse effects of current treatments.

Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
In a perspective article published July 9 in Science, a team of wildlife biologists, infectious disease experts, and others propose a decentralized, global wildlife biosurveillance system to identify -- before the next pandemic emerges -- animal viruses that have the potential to cause human disease.

Rochester community initiative increases teenage use of effective contraception
Study finds that teenagers in Rochester utilize Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) at a rate five times higher than the United States as a whole.

Black individuals at higher risk for contracting COVID-19, according to new research
Results of an analysis published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that Black individuals were twice as likely as White individuals to test positive for COVID-19.

Amygdala changes in male patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
Researchers in Japan have revealed that DNA methylation occurs in the serotonin transporter gene that regulates neurotransmitter transmission in schizophrenia and bipolar patients.

Lung cancer in non-smokers likely to respond differently to treatment
Lung cancer in non-smokers is a biologically distinct disease from that in smokers, according to a new study.

Native bees also facing novel pandemic
There is growing evidence that another ''pandemic'' has been infecting bees around the world for the past two decades, and is spreading: a fungal pathogen known as Nosema.

Engineering: Reducing noise transmitted through an open window
A new device that can reduce the intensity of sound passing through open windows is presented in a proof-of-principle study in Scientific Reports.

Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses -- Possible link with Alzheimer's
Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University (Philadelphia, US) have demonstrated that a Salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals.

CT of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) versus CT of influenza virus pneumonia
An open-access American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) article investigating the differences in CT findings between coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia and influenza virus pneumonia found that most lesions from COVID-19 were located in the peripheral zone and close to the pleura, whereas influenza virus was more prone to show mucoid impaction and pleural effusion.

Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining
A new study, led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems.

Fishing for a theory of emergent behavior
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba quantified the collective action of small schools of fish using information theory.

CU researchers identify key role of immune cells in brain development
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified how specific brain cells interacting during development could be related to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, including some that occur later in life.

Access to nature requires attention when addressing community health needs
Nature is a tool to address deeply entrenched health disparities; health systems should work to increase nature access, as they have with other social determinants of health.

Is COVID-19 widening the gender gap in academic medicine?
A new study finds that fewer women were first authors on COVID-19-related research papers published in the first half of this year.

Advanced technology sheds new light on evolution of teeth
The evolution of our teeth began among ancient armoured fishes more than 400 million years ago.

What happens when food first touches your tongue
A new study might explain why humans register some tastes more quickly than others, potentially due to each flavor's molecular size.

Researchers explore new approaches to support work practices in homeless shelters
Researchers from Bentley University, in partnership with Pine Street Inn, New England's largest homeless shelter, have been exploring the ideas of process modeling to better understand and improve triage practices at homeless shelters.

New study supports remdesivir as COVID-19 treatment
The news about remdesivir, the investigational anti-viral drug that has shown early promise in the fight against COVID-19, keeps getting better.

Researchers call for worldwide biosurveillance network to protect from diseases
Given the importance for the health of a global population, a team of scientists recommend a 'decentralized' disease surveillance system, enabled by modern pathogen-detection methods, which builds in-country capacity for addressing challenges.

OPTN-ATG9 interaction accelerates autophagic degradation of ubiquitin-labeled mitochondria
Damaged mitochondria are selectively eliminated via autophagy (called mitophagy). Parkin and PINK1, proteins mutated in hereditary Parkinson's disease, amplify ubiquitin signals on damaged mitochondria with the subsequent activation of autophagic machinery.

Breakthrough with cancer vaccine
Scientists have developed a new cancer vaccine with the potential to activate the body's immune system to fight a range of cancers, including leukaemia, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancers.

Cleveland clinic researchers find rise in broken heart syndrome during COVID-19 pandemic
CLEVELAND: Cleveland Clinic researchers have found a significant increase in patients experiencing stress cardiomyopathy, also known as broken heart syndrome, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Revealing winners & losers in projected future climates
New research reveals how winners & losers from climate change can be identified based on their ability to adapt to rising future temperatures.

Magnetic memory states go exponential
Researchers showed that relatively simple structures can support exponential number of magnetic states - much greater than previously thought - and demonstrated switching between the states by generating spin currents.

New estimates highlight global economic and environmental impacts of COVID-19
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an estimated global consumption loss of $3.8 trillion, as well as significant job and income loss.

Study: More than half of US students experience summer learning losses five years in a row
Following U.S. students across five summers between grades 1 and 6, a little more than half (52 percent) experienced learning losses in all five summers, according to a large national study published today.

Study of supercooled liquids contributes to better understanding of phase change processes
The authors propose a new quantitative approach to better measure the crystal growth rate in supercooled liquids.

AI enables efficiencies in quantum information processing
A new machine learning framework could pave the way for small, mobile quantum networks.

Neonatal exposure to antigens of commensal bacteria promotes broader immune repertoire
Researchers have added fresh evidence that early exposure to vaccine-, bacterial- or microbiota-derived antigens has a dramatic effect on the diversity of antibodies an adult mammal will have to fight future infections by pathogens.

Researcher reconstructs skull of two million year-old giant dormouse
A researcher has digitally pieced together fossilised fragments from five giant dormouse skulls to reconstruct the first known complete skull of the species, which was roughly the size of a cat.

Comparing stress cardiomyopathy before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Patients with acute coronary syndrome presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared with patients presenting at times prior to the pandemic to investigate the incidence of stress cardiomyopathy during the pandemic in this observational study.

Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
Genetically speaking, the loaf of bread you stress-baked during the COVID-19 shutdown is more complex than you think.

Chatbots can ease medical providers' burden, offer guidance to those with COVID-19 symptoms
COVID-19 has placed tremendous pressure on health care systems, not only for critical care but also from an anxious public looking for answers.

New study outlines best practices for delivering care via telehealth
Researchers describe how the SAMHSA-developed principles of trauma-informed care can be used during telehealth encounters in primary care and other specialties to help mitigate the isolating, traumatic effects of COVID-19.

Discovery reveals how plants make cellulose for strength and growth
The discovery unveils the molecular machinery that plants use to weave cellulose chains into cable-like structures called 'microfibrils.'

Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes
In a recent study of genes involved in brain functioning, their previously unknown features have been uncovered by bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, RAS.

Bats offer clues to treating COVID-19
Bats carry many viruses, including COVID-19, without becoming ill. Biologists at the University of Rochester are studying the immune system of bats to find potential ways to ''mimic'' that system in humans.

Science education community should withdraw from international tests
The science community should withdraw from involvement in international tests such as PISA because they have forced schools to adopt 'narrow' curricula and pedagogies, a study says.

Gall fly outmaneuvers host plant in game of "Spy vs. Spy"
Over time goldenrod plants and the gall flies that feed on them have been one-upping each other in an ongoing competition for survival.

Arctic Ocean 'regime shift'
Stanford scientists find the growth of phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean has increased 57 percent over just two decades, enhancing its ability to soak up carbon dioxide.

New method solves old mystery: Hafnium isotopes clinch origin of high-quality Roman glass
Archaeological glass contains information about the movement of goods and ancient economies, yet the understanding of critical aspects of the ancient glass industry is fragmentary.

The restoration of forests with active rapid 'Ohi'a death infections may be possible
Positive news for 'ohi'a restoration in Hawai'i! A new USGS study indicates that 'ohi'a seedlings planted into sites with active Rapid 'Ohi'a Death (ROD) infections can survive for at least one year.

Study says inhalers ok to use amid COVID-19 concerns
University of Huddersfield researchers find that the benefits of inhalers for asthma sufferers outweigh the risks of contracting coronavirus, following concerns raised after WHO warned that steroids could reduce immunity.

Lead fallout from Notre Dame fire was likely overlooked
A new study, published today in GeoHealth, used soil samples collected from neighborhoods around the cathedral to estimate local amounts of lead fallout from the fire.

A new look at deep-sea microbes
Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy.

Expansion stress enhances growth and migration of breast cancer cells
Expansion stress can have an alarming impact on breast cancer cells by creating conditions that could lead to dangerous acceleration of the disease, an interdisciplinary team of University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers has found.

Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
According to the latest UN report, the number of displaced persons and refugees has surged, again, by several millions.

Our itch to share helps spread COVID-19 misinformation
A study co-authored by MIT scholars contains bad news and good news about Covid-19 misinformation -- and a new insight that may help reduce the problem.

Study finds less impact from wildfire smoke on climate
New research revealed that tiny, sunlight-absorbing particles in wildfire smoke may have less impact on climate than widely hypothesized because reactions as the plume mixes with clean air reduce its absorbing power and climate-warming effect.

Using electricity to break down pollutants left over after wastewater treatment
Pesticides, pharmaceutical products, and endocrine disruptors are some of the emerging contaminants often found in treated domestic wastewater, even after secondary treatment.

Distorted passage of time during the COVID-19 lockdown
A survey conducted in the U.K. suggests that social and physical distancing measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic significantly impacted people's perception of how quickly time passed compared to their pre-lockdown perceptions.

Study of giant ant heads using simple models may aid bio-inspired designs
Researchers have developed a simple model to study how ants balance their large heads relative to their body size.

Breast cancer cells can reprogram immune cells to assist in metastasis
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have uncovered a new mechanism by which invasive breast cancer cells evade the immune system to metastasize, or spread, to other areas of the body.

Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University researchers collaborated on tracking wild bats' foraging habits in their natural habitat.

New evidence of long-term volcanic, seismic risks in northern Europe
An ancient European volcanic region may pose both a greater long-term volcanic risk and seismic risk to northwestern Europe than scientists had realized, geophysicists report in a study in the Geophysical Journal International.

Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration
Cornell researchers including Fenghua Hu, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and member of the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, are taking a closer look at the factors that cause Alzheimer's, FTLD and similar diseases.

How fear transforms into anxiety
University of New Mexico researchers identify for the first time the brain-wide neural correlates of the transition from fear to anxiety.

Study sheds light on how cancer spreads in blood
A new study sheds light on proteins in particles called extracellular vesicles, which are released by tumor cells into the bloodstream and promote the spread of cancer.

NASA sees storms wrapping around Tropical Cyclone Cristina
The analysis of Tropical Cyclone Cristina's cloud top temperatures revealed some bands of thunderstorms were developing and wrapping around the center of the storm's circulation.

About half of health care workers positive for COVID-19 by serology have no symptoms
The IVY Research Network has completed initial studies evaluating the epidemiology of COVID-19 in health care workers and patients.

Hospital improves on-time administration of medication to Parkinson patients
Amsterdam, NL, July 9, 2020 - Timely administration of anti-Parkinson drugs is a significant issue for hospitalized patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with late or missed doses resulting in longer stays and worse outcomes.

Streamlining acute malnutrition treatment brings same recovery in children at lower cost
A new streamlined approach to treating acute malnutrition is as effective as standard treatment but will free up funds to reach more children with life-saving care, according to new research published in PLOS Medicine.

Psychological, ocular surface state of ophthalmologists, ophthalmic nurses working with patients with COVID-19
The mental state and ocular surface state of ophthalmologists and ophthalmic nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak in China in Wuhan and Jiangxi are analyzed in this survey study.

Trust me if you can
Each year, wind turbines are responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of airborne animals such as bats.

Otago researchers find link between rape and breathing problems
Rape and sexual trauma may have long-lasting consequences for physical health as well as mental health, University of Otago researchers have found.

Engineers design a reusable, silicone rubber face mask
Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have designed a new silicone rubber face mask that they believe could stop viral particles as effectively as N95 masks.

A new role for a tiny linker in transmembrane ion channels
In a study of large-conductance potassium (BK) channela, Jianhan Chen and colleagues UMass Amherst and Washington University report in eLife that their experiments have revealed 'the first direct example of how non-specific membrane interactions of a covalent linker can regulate the activation of a biological ion channel.'

Intimate partner violence, history of childhood abuse worsen trauma symptoms for new moms
New experiences of sexual, emotional and physical abuse at the hands of a romantic partner during the early months of parenthood are associated with increasing symptoms of trauma such as anxiety, depression, self-harm and sleep disorders, researchers report.

New in the Hastings Center Report: Health, race, and society during Covid-19
The latest issue is devoted to essays that examine how the pandemic has highlighted connections between health and social structures--concerning not just access to health care but also conditions of living that affect health, from inequality to political and environmental conditions.

Oil spill clean- up gets doggone hairy
A study investigating sustainable-origin sorbent materials to clean up oil spill disasters has made a surprising discovery.

Older, critically ill patients with COVID-19 may have increased risk of bradycardia with lopinavir and ritonavir
The combined use of antiretroviral medications lopinavir and ritonavir, previously used to treat SARS-Cov-1 and MERS-Cov patients, appeared to cause bradycardia in 22% of elderly, critically ill COVID-19 patients, in a small study in France.

Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.

Biologists trace plants' steady mitochondrial genomes to a gene found in viruses, bacteria
CSU biologists have traced the stability of plant mitochondrial genomes to a particular gene - MSH1 - that plants have but animals don't.

How can education researchers support education and public health and institutions during COVID-19?
As education researchers' ongoing work is interrupted by school closures, what can they do to support education and public health institutions dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic?

Feeling with the heart
A person's sensitivity to external stimuli depends not only on the state of their nervous system, but also on their cardiac cycle.

Cherned up to the maximum
In topological materials, electrons can display behaviour that is fundamentally different from that in 'conventional' matter, and the magnitude of many such 'exotic' phenomena is directly proportional to an entity known as the Chern number.

Food safety investments open new markets, boost revenue for small farmers
A new Cornell University study finds that when small-scale farmers are trained in food safety protocols and develop a farm food safety plan, new markets open up to them, leading to an overall gain in revenue.

No association found between exposure to mobile devices and brain volume alterations in adolescents
New study of 2,500 Dutch children is the first to explore the relationship between brain volume and different doses of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

How vaping companies are use Instagram to market to young people
Using artificial intelligence, researchers analysed hundreds of thousands of posts from a 6-month period last year, and found that a large portion of Instagram posts are promoting controversial flavoured e-liquids to young audiences

Mapping the immune landscape of haematological cancers may help to enhance therapies
Activating the immune system of the body is a promising form of treatment for cancer.

A memory game could help us understand brain injury
A Boston University team created a memory game for mice in order to examine the function of two different brain areas that process information about the sensation of touch and the memory of previous events.

Extreme rainfall events cause top-heavy aquatic food webs
In research recently outlined in Nature, scientists across seven different sites throughout Central and South America replicated the extreme rainfall events predicted by climate change science.

Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus.

Shining light into the dark
Curtin University researchers have discovered a new way to more accurately analyse microscopic samples by essentially making them 'glow in the dark', through the use of chemically luminescent molecules.

Fair justice systems need open data access
Northwestern University researchers are developing an A.I. platform that provides users with access to the information and insights hidden inside federal court records, regardless of their data and analytic skills.

Climate change: Heavy rain after drought may cause fish kills
Due to climate changes, many regions are experiencing increasingly warmer and dryer summers, followed by heavy rain.

Lightening data have more use than previously thought
The lightning data can serve as an indicator for hazardous weather phenomena and improve short-term forecasting,

COVID-19: Impetus for resident education reform?
How COVID-19 surgical precautions taken in medical centers might be reflected in resident education are detailed in this Viewpoint.

Dissecting fruit flies' varying responses to life-extension diet
Changes in a few small molecules in a cell's metabolism might indicate whether a calorie-restricted diet will extend, shorten, or not effect lifespan, a fruit fly study shows.

Novel "dual-resonant method" in 2D materials can spur advances in the field of photonics
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have developed a new process that provides an ultrafast process of photon generation in two-dimensional materials.

Cosmic cataclysm allows precise test of general relativity
In 2019, the MAGIC telescopes detected the first Gamma Ray Burst at very high energies.

Cycad stem cuttings need wound sealants for successful propagation
The need to cover an open wound on cycad stem cuttings has been confirmed by the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam in a study published in the Tropical Conservation Science journal on April 27.

Temple scientists identify key factor regulating abnormal heart growth
In new work, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University cast fresh light on a key molecular regulator in the heart known as FoxO1.
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