Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 13, 2020
Partnerships with health systems can provide support to nursing homes during pandemic
Meaningful partnerships between hospitals and nursing facilities can support better quality of care for people who live in the facilities.

Mothers' paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds early evidence that the pandemic has exacerbated -- not improved -- the gender gap in work hours, which could have enduring consequences for working mothers.

For next-generation semiconductors, 2D tops 3D
POSTECH research team designs a halide perovskite material for the next-generation memory device.

Merging solar cell and liquid battery produces long-lasting solar storage
Combining liquid chemical battery technology with perovskite solar cells has led to a new record in solar energy conversion within a single device.

Delirium may cause long term cognitive decline
A new meta-analysis of 24 observational studies from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons found that delirium may cause significant long-term cognitive decline.

Bird droppings carry risk of antibiotic resistance
Rice University engineers analyze the droppings of urban birds and show persistent levels of antibiotic-resistant genes and bacteria that may be transferred to humans through the environment.

Most 50+ adults say they've experienced ageism; most still hold positive aging attitudes
Everyday ageism is common in the lives of Americans over 50, a new poll finds, with more than 80% saying they often experience at least one form of ageism in their day-to-day lives.

Burrowing crabs reshaping salt marshes, with climate change to blame
Given higher sea levels and softer soil in the wake of a shifting climate, Sesarma crabs, which have already decimated salt marshes in the Northeast, are now rising to prominence in southeastern marshes, a new study finds.

Researcher develops method for mapping brain cell change, development in mice
Penn State researchers have developed a new method for studying key moments in brain development.

Astrophysicists suggest carbon found in comet ATLAS help to reveal age of other comets
Astrophysicists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU, Russia), South Korea, and the USA appear in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, suggesting carbon indicates time comets have spent in the Solar System -- the less carbon, the longer they have been in the proximity of the Sun.

Researchers find the worst reason to give a gift
Here's a good way to make sure a friend hates a gift from you: Say it will save him money.

Novel radiotracer measures synaptic activity after stroke
A new radiotracer, 18F-SynVesT-2, can directly assess synaptic density changes in the brain, providing an objective and quantitative measure of disease progression after stroke.

Social media inspired models show winter warming hits fish stocks
Mathematical modelling inspired by social media is identifying the significant impacts of warming seas on the world's fisheries.

About nine family members to suffer grief from every COVID-19 fatality
Deaths from COVID-19 will have a ripple effect causing impacts on the mental health and health of surviving family members.

Plant-based diets promote healthful aging, according to new editorial
Adopting a plant-based diet can help promote healthful aging and mitigate the global burden of disease, according to an editorial published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

Apathy not depression helps to predict dementia
Apathy offers an important early warning sign of dementia in individuals with cerebrovascular disease, but depression does not, new research led by the University of Cambridge suggests.

Autoclaving, alcohol not the best options for disinfecting, reusing face masks
Two widely available sterilization methods to clean disposable surgical masks and N95 respirators may not be the best options for hospitals needing to extend the life of personal protective equipment.

Uncovering the architecture of natural photosynthetic machinery
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have uncovered the molecular architecture and organisational landscape of thylakoid membranes from a model cyanobacterium in unprecedented detail.

Research: Crop plants are taking up microplastics
Scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) recently found that microplastics are indeed contaminating edible plants, including vegetables we eat.

Insights into climate change during origin of dinosaurs
An international team reveals discoveries about an unusual time called the 'Carnian Pluvial Episode,' a time around the origin of the dinosaurs.

Gut microbiota provide clues for treating diabetes
The individual mix of microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract provides vital clues as to how any future incidence of type 2 diabetes can be predicted, prevented and treated.

International recommendations for nontuberculous mycobacteria
After 13 years, international Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Medicine societies have jointly issued new recommendations for the treatment of patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).

Hypoglycemic mechanism of Cyclocarya paliurus polysaccharide in type 2 diabetic rats
This research aimed at investigating the hypoglycemic mechanism for CP.

The Lancet Global Health: Modelling study predicts surge in HIV, TB, and malaria deaths due to COVID-19 pandemic
Some low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) could see HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria deaths increase by as much as 10%, 20%, and 36% respectively over the next 5 years due to the disruption of health services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and its response, according new modelling research published in The Lancet Global Health journal.

Significantly less addictive opioid may slow progression of osteoarthritis while easing pain
A Keck Medicine of USC study reveals that kappa opioids, a significantly less addictive opioid, may preserve cartilage in joints and ease pain

Racial disparities in COVID-19 are clear; better data, more targeted action needed
Marked racial disparities exist in confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths, investigators say, and highlight urgent needs to ensure adequate testing and treatment are available to African Americans and safer working and living conditions are in place so they can better protect themselves.

Experiment confirms liquids show properties of solid bodies at microscopic scales
The collaborators are Kazan Federal University, Vereschagin Institute of High Pressure Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences), Queen Mary University of London, Imperial College London, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Wuhan University of Technology, and Sichuan University.

Review of progress towards advanced Lithium-sulfur batteries
How should one design porous carbon materials for advanced Li-S batteries cathodes?

Engineered llama antibodies neutralize COVID-19 virus
Antibodies derived from llamas have been shown to neutralise the SARS-CoV-2 virus in lab tests, UK researchers announced today.

Vascular development may be at risk in autism
A Canadian collaboration led by Dr. Baptiste Lacoste has undertaken the first ever in-depth study of vasculature in the autistic brain.

UTMB researchers have discovered a new antiviral mechanism for dengue therapeutics
A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a new mechanism for designing antiviral drugs for dengue virus.

Association of plant, animal protein with long-term mortality
Dietary information from more than 400,000 U.S. adults was used to look at the association between consuming plant and animal protein and the risk of death over 16 years.

Chemical offers new hope of finding treatments for neglected tropical diseases
Scientists say they are a step closer to developing a drug to kill the trypanosome parasite that causes human African trypanosomiasis, otherwise known as sleeping sickness, paving the way for a potential cure.

Pickled capers activate proteins important for human brain and heart health
A compound commonly found in pickled capers has been shown to activate proteins required for normal human brain and heart activity, and may even lead to future therapies for the treatment of epilepsy and abnormal heart rhythms.

How to strengthen New Zealand's proposed cannabis legalization and control bill
In advance of a widely-watched national referendum vote to be held this September, two drug policy experts from Massey University have identified gaps and challenges in New Zealand's proposal for legalizing recreational cannabis.

Total-body dynamic PET successfully detects metastatic cancer; first patient results
Results from the first study using uEXPLORER to conduct total-body dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans in cancer patients show that it can be used to generate high-quality images of metastatic cancer.

Is delirium associated with long-term cognitive decline?
The results of 23 studies were combined to examine whether an episode of delirium is a risk factor for long-term cognitive decline.

'Lab in a suitcase' could hold the key to safer water and sanitation for millions
Using smaller and less expensive versions of the same specialist equipment found in state-of-the-art microbiology laboratories, a new 'lab in a suitcase' developed by academics at Newcastle University,UK, and believed to be a world first, enables screening of millions of bacteria in a single water sample.

University research and the private sector
Food additives get a bad rap, but a natural ingredient from orange peels and apple skins, pectin, is a thickener safely added to many food products, most notably jellies.

Study finds cancer mortality rate disparity based on hospital ratings
A new paper in the JNCI Cancer Spectrum, published by Oxford University Press, finds that the mortality rates for complex cancer procedures differ greatly between one-star hospitals (10.4%) and five-star hospitals (6.4%).

A dual antenatal therapy benefits extreme preterm babies better than either alone or none
Researchers, led by Samuel Gentle, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, report that antenatal treatment with both magnesium sulfate and corticosteroids together yields an increased benefit for children born at 22 to 26 weeks of gestation, compared to no antenatal treatment or with either therapy alone.

Drug linked to 45% lower risk of dying among COVID-19 patients on ventilators
Critically ill COVID-19 patients who received a single dose of a drug that calms an overreacting immune system were 45% less likely to die overall, and more likely to be out of the hospital or off a ventilator one month after treatment, compared with those who didn't receive the drug, a new study finds.

Single-dose flu drug can reduce spread within households, study finds
Only 1.9% of uninfected household members who took a single dose of baloxavir marboxil came down with the flu.

1 in 3 young adults may face severe COVID-19, UCSF study shows
As the number of young adults infected with the coronavirus surges throughout the nation, a new study by researchers at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals indicates that youth may not shield people from serious disease.

Studying nearly 300 recently identified antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 reveals a common theme
An analysis of nearly 300 recently identified human SARS-CoV-2 antibodies uncovered a gene frequently used in antibodies that most effectively target the virus.

5,000 years of history of domestic cats in Central Europe
The history of human and cat relationships began 10,000 years ago.

Green is more than skin-deep for hundreds of frog species
The through-and-through greenness of hundreds of frog species that can be found deep in their lymphatic fluid, soft tissues and even bones, comes from a clever biochemical workaround that combines a normally virus-fighting type of protein with a toxic byproduct of blood breakdown.

Cystic fibrosis: why so many respiratory complications?
Cystic fibrosis, one of the most common genetic diseases in Switzerland, causes severe respiratory and digestive disorders.

The new tattoo: Drawing electronics on skin
One day, people could monitor their own health conditions by simply picking up a pencil and drawing a bioelectronic device on their skin.

Black women often ignored by social justice movements
Black women are often less likely to be associated with the concept of a 'typical woman' and are viewed as more similar to Black men than to white women, which may lead to some anti-racist and feminist movements failing to advocate for the rights of Black women, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

New materials for extra thin computer chips
In order to create more compact electronic devices, new materials are being used - especially 2D-materials, which only consist of a single atomic layer.

POSTECH solves the durability issue of hydrogen cars
Professor Yong-Tae Kim's research team improves the durability of automotive fuel cells through selective electro-catalysis.

In recurrent prostate cancer, PSMA PET/CT changes management in two-thirds of cases
New research confirms the high impact of PSMA PET/CT in the detection and management of recurrent disease in prostate cancer patients.

COVID-19 and Brexit can help with the recovery of UK fish stocks
The United Kingdom has a unique opportunity to start rebuilding its fish stocks by taking advantage of the slowdown in commercial fishing caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing Brexit negotiations, new research has shown.

McLean hospital study examines the cost-effectiveness of esketamine
A paper authored by researchers from McLean Hospital has determined that esketamine, a nasal spray to treat severe depression, is currently too expensive for widespread use.

UMass Amherst team makes artificial energy source for muscle
Muscle physiologist Ned Debold and colleagues at UMass Amherst sought an alternative energy source to replace the body's usual one, adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Large Lot Program shows the power of private land stewardship in addressing urban vacancy
Researchers propose a practical monitoring tool, the condition-care scale, and detail how it can be implemented by planners to assess the progress of vacant lot repurposing programs.

People with coronavirus symptoms more likely to have psychiatric disorders and loneliness
People who have or had COVID-19 symptoms are more likely to develop general psychiatric disorders and are lonelier, with women and young people more at risk, says a just-published study co-authored at Cambridge Judge Business School.

Well-off countries need trade to cut environmental woes
A first analysis of its kind shows a common problem between haves and have-nots.

Meditation linked to lower cardiovascular risk
Meditation was linked to lower cardiovascular risk in a large database study by Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues.

Comparing health in middle-aged adults in US, England by income
Various health outcomes were compared among high- and low-income adults age 55 to 64 in the US and England in this observational study.

Researchers present concept for a new technique to study superheavy elements
Merging methodologies from physics and chemistry for the optical spectroscopy of superheavy elements.

Immune analysis in fifty patients uncovers 'hallmark' of severe COVID-19
By studying fifty COVID-19 patients, researchers in France identified a unique signature - a combination of deficiency in a response of a particular interferon, as well as exacerbated inflammation - in the most critically ill.

Caring for older adults with diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
The challenges faced by older adults with diabetes and ways to care for them during the COVID-19 pandemic are discussed in this Viewpoint.

A micro-lab on a chip detects blood type within minutes
The need to first zero in on a blood group can delay blood transfusions in emergency situations, and this in turn can prove fatal.

COVID-19: Pandemic behavior change, financial support and better data collection needed
New research and guidance in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, focus on critical topics pertaining to community and individual health during the COVID-19 epidemic.

Association of state-level opioid-reduction policies with opioid poisonings in kids
Researchers compared the rate of opioid poisonings in children and teens before and after implementation of state-level policies intended to decrease the amount of opioid medications prescribed and distributed.

Mental health units in correctional facilities: Scarce data but promising outcomes
Specialized mental health units (MHUs) may be critical to managing the high rates of serious mental illness in incarcerated populations.

For every COVID-19 death, 9 close family members are left to grieve
A new USC/Penn State analysis finds more than one million Americans have already lost a close family member to COVID-19.

Janggu makes deep learning a breeze
Researchers from the MDC have developed a new tool that makes it easier to maximize the power of deep learning for studying genomics.

Cardiac scar tissue: A factor which regulates its size
As recently published in the journal Cell, a collaborative group including Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D. and Samad Ahadian, Ph.D., of the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI), has identified collagen V as an important factor in the scarring process and observed that large quantities of collagen V were found in cardiac injury scars.

Why are memories attached to emotions so strong?
Multiple neurons in the brain must fire in synchrony to create persistent memories tied to intense emotions, new research from Columbia neuroscientists has found.

Parasite infestations revealed by tiny chicken backpacks
Blood-feeding livestock mites can be detected with wearable sensor technology nicknamed ''Fitbits for chickens.'' To help farmers detect mite infestations, a team of entomologists, computer scientists, and biologists led by UC Riverside entomologist Amy Murillo has created a new insect detection system.

Scientists demonstrate a new experiment in the search for theorized 'neutrinoless' proc
Nuclear physicists affiliated with Berkeley Lab played a leading role in analyzing data for a demonstration experiment in France that has achieved record precision for a specialized detector material.

Gigantic, red and full of spots
Starspots are more common among red giant stars than previously thought.

Mind the gap: Even the richest Americans lag the English on health, study finds
A new study shows that middle-aged people living in the U.S. today have worse health than their English counterparts - and that the difference in health between rich and poor is much larger on the American side of the Atlantic.

Study finds that special filters in glasses can help the color blind see colors better
A new UC Davis Eye Center study, conducted in collaboration with France's INSERM Stem Cell and Brain Research Institute, found that special patented glasses engineered with technically advanced spectral notch filters enhance color vision for those with the most common types of red-green color vision deficiency ('anomalous trichromacy').

Family caregiving may not harm health of caregivers after all
For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help.

Chemists advance solar energy storage aimed at global challenges
Multi-university effort develops solar energy storage to enable decentralized electrification systems in remote areas.

Study shows humans are optimists for most of life
Researchers from Michigan State University led the largest study of its kind to determine how optimistic people are in life and when as well as how major life events affect how optimistic they are about the future.

Better vaccines are in our blood
Red blood cells don't just shuttle oxygen from our lungs to our organs: they also help the body fight off infections by capturing pathogens in the blood and presenting them to immune cells in the spleen.

Perceiving the flavor of fat: A Monell Center twins study
Most people would agree that the pleasure of some foods stems in part from its fat content.

Hidden in our genes: Discovering the fate of cell development
Scientists at the University of Sydney have developed a powerful new tool to analyse the fate of cell development by examining individual cells and genetic development within them.

Domestic violence increased in the great recession
Researchers found that physical abuse in adults increased substantially, with Black and Native American people being disproportionately affected.

Tiny bubbles make a quantum leap
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Montana State University have found that placing sufficient strain in a 2D material creates localized states that can yield single-photon emitters.

Deep learning enables early detection and classification of live bacteria using holography
Rapid identification of the presence of pathogenic bacteria in food, water, or bodily fluid samples is very important and yet extremely challenging.

Antibiotic resistance and the need for personalized treatments
Scientists have discovered that the microbiota of each individual determines the maintenance of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the gut: whereas in some individuals resistant bacteria are quickly eliminated, in others they are not.

Breakthrough in deciphering birth of supermassive black holes
A research team led by Cardiff University scientists say they are closer to understanding how a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is born thanks to a new technique that has enabled them to zoom in on one of these enigmatic cosmic objects in unprecedented detail.

More lonely deaths in hospitals and nursing homes from COVID
Patients who died from COVID in 2020 were almost 12 times more likely to die in a medical facility than patients who died from any cause in 2018, reports a new study.

Breast cancer deadlier in heart attack survivors
Breast Cancer patients are 60 percent more likely to die of cancer after surviving a heart attack, a new study finds.

Invisible defence against adenoviruses
An adenovirus infection can be potentially life-threatening, especially for children after a stem cell transplant.

Simultaneous, reinforcing policy failures led to Flint water crisis, providing lessons during pandemic
Concurrent failures of federal drinking water standards and Michigan's emergency manager law reinforced and magnified each other, leading to the Flint water crisis, according to a University of Michigan environmental policy expert.

New PET/MRI approach pinpoints chronic pain location, alters management
A new molecular imaging approach utilizing 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can precisely identify the location of pain generators in chronic pain sufferers, often precipitating a new management plan for patients.

New PET radiotracer proven safe and effective in imaging malignant brain tumors
A first-in-human study presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 Annual Meeting has demonstrated the safety, favorable pharmacokinetic and dosimetry profile of 64Cu-EBRGD, a new, relatively long-lived PET tracer, in patients with glioblastomas.

Women taking beta blockers for hypertension may have higher risk of heart failure with acute coronary syndrome
Women have historically been underrepresented in past clinical research, raising concerns about their use of beta blockers as a treatment for hypertension.

KIST identified cause of external pressure-induced performance deterioration in solar cells
A team, led by Dr. Jung-hoon Lee of the Computational Science Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), recently collaborated with a team, led by Professor Jeffrey B.

Human lungs rejected for transplant recovered using novel technique
A multidisciplinary team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and Columbia University has demonstrated that injured human donor lungs declined for transplant can be recovered by cross-circulation between the human lung and a xenogeneic host.

ITMO University researchers develop new technique for production of plasmonics devices
Researchers from ITMO University have improved on the technique of local processing of composites based on nanoporous glass with addition of silver and copper.

Study finds weight loss surgery cost disparity
A new study from the University of Georgia finds that users of public insurance are paying more for bariatric weight loss surgery compared to private insurance patients.

New solar material could clean drinking water
Providing clean water to Soldiers in the field and citizens around the world is essential, and yet one of the world's greatest challenges.

Airplane noise appears to negatively impact fetal health
For the first time, researchers have provided a causal estimate linking high-level noise exposure to another key health challenge: low birth weight (< 2,500 grams or approximately 5.5 pounds).

Electronic surveillance in couple relationships
Impaired intimacy, satisfaction, and infidelity in a romantic relationship can fuel Interpersonal Electronic Surveillance (IES).

Study links attraction to 'tyrannical' leaders to dysfunctional family dynamics
An SF State Assistant Professor of Management found a link between dysfunctional family conflict and the types of leaders people follows as adults.

Lasers etch an efficient way to address global water crisis
University of Rochester researchers use sunlight and a laser-etched metal surface to evaporate and purify water for safe drinking at greater than 100 percent efficiency, as described in a paper in Nature Sustainability.

Characteristics of RCTs for COVID-19 launched during pandemic
Current randomized clinical trials of therapeutic agents to treat COVID-19 are examined in this review.

When calling loudly, echolocation is costly for small bats
Calling in the ultrasonic range enables small bats to orient themselves in the dark and track down insects.

Listeria protein provides a CRISPR 'kill switch'
A single protein derived from a common strain of bacteria found in the soil will offer scientists a more precise way to edit RNA.

New theranostic agents show efficacy in prostate cancer treatment in preclinical studies
Researchers have developed a new pair of agents that show exceptional effectiveness for precision diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in preclinical studies.

Scientists discover key element of strong antibody response to COVID-19
A team led by scientists at Scripps Research has discovered a common molecular feature found in many of the human antibodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Merging solar cell and liquid battery produces efficient, long-lasting solar storage
Chemists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and their collaborators have created a highly efficient and long-lasting solar flow battery, a way to generate, store and redeliver renewable electricity from the sun in one device.

New bioink for cell bioprinting in 3D
A research group led by Daniel Aili, associate professor at Linköping University, has developed a bioink to print tissue-mimicking material in 3D printers.

Electron cryo-microscopy: Using inexpensive technology to produce high-resolution images
Biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have used a standard electron cryo-microscope to achieve surprisingly good images that are on par with those taken by far more sophisticated equipment.

Cost prevents one in five US women from using their preferred contraception
Recent Supreme Court Ruling Will Increase Birth Control Costs for Many Women, Make it Less Likely They Will Use the Birth Control They Want

Severely damaged human lungs can now be successfully recovered
A multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering and Vanderbilt University has now demonstrated that severely injured donor lungs that have been declined for transplant can be recovered outside the body by a system that uses cross-circulation of whole blood between the donor lung and an animal host.

The colorful history of plastids
Emerging genome data provides new insight into plastid evolution.

Bat research critical to preventing next pandemic
The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has a likely connection to bats, and the next viral outbreak probably will too.

Study calls for action to protect BAME and migrant groups from economic impact of COVID-19
The COVID-19 lockdown has had a disproportionate economic impact on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) migrants in the UK, new research, which also calls for racial justice, reveals today.

Examine narratives to end policy deadlock, boost agricultural development in Africa, economists say
Impasse over dominant and counter approaches-- state-led or market-led policy-- to promote agricultural development in Africa could be solved by analyzing the one-sided narratives that shape this dichotomy.

Molecular imaging identifies link between heart and kidney inflammation after heart attack
Whole body positron emission tomography (PET) has, for the first time, illustrated the existence of inter-organ communication between the heart and kidneys via the immune system following acute myocardial infarction.

Russian scientists have discovered a new physical paradox
Researchers from the Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) discovered and theoretically explained a new physical effect: amplitude of mechanical vibrations can grow without external influence.

Rats' brain activity reveals their alcohol preference
The brain's response to alcohol varies based on individual preferences, according to new research in rats published in eNeuro.

Scientists evaluated the perspectives of zinc intake for COVID-19 prevention
Researchers from Sechenov University in collaboration with colleagues from Germany, Greece and Russia reviewed scientific articles on the role of zinc in the prevention and treatment of viral infections and pneumonia, with projections on those caused by SARS-CoV-2.

Long-studied protein could be a measure of traumatic brain injury
WRAIR scientists have recently demonstrated that cathepsin B, a well-studied protein important to brain development and function, can be used as biomarker, or indicator of severity, for TBI.

COVID-19: Back to the future
How the COVID-19 pandemic is forcing health care systems to implement new adaptations in delivering services is described in this essay.

COVID-19: Considering meditation and yoga as adjunctive treatment
The anti-inflammatory and other beneficial effects of meditation and yoga practices make them potential adjunctive treatments of COVID-19

Study links stress hormone with higher blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine documents a clear link between the stress hormone cortisol and higher blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Biomedical Sciences researchers discover first-in-class broad-inhibitor of paramyxovirus polymerases
A new antiviral drug that is effective against a broad range of human pathogens in the paramyxovirus family, such as the human parainfluenzaviruses and measles virus, has been discovered by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

New substance library to accelerate the search for active compounds
The MX team at HZB and a Group at the University of Marburg have established a new substance library.

Climate change will cause more extreme wet and dry seasons, researchers find
The world can expect more rainfall as the climate changes, but it can also expect more water to evaporate, complicating efforts to manage reservoirs and irrigate crops in a growing world, according to a Clemson researcher whose latest work has been published in the journal Nature Communications.

BU researcher outlines coronavirus media failures, harms, and recommendations
In a new JAMA editorial, a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher and a health research journalist outline common ways that media, governments, and industry and academic public relations press releases have incompletely and misleadingly reported coronavirus research, and how they can do better.

Military personnel at risk of suicide store firearms unsafely
Military personnel who are at a greater risk of suicide are more likely to unsafely store firearms in unlocked cabinets where they can access them easily, according to a Rutgers researcher.

Novel bone imaging approach provides insights into the progression of knee osteoarthritis
A new approach to functional bone imaging has established that bone metabolism is abnormally elevated in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Mothers, newborns, young children and adolescents lose 20% of health and social services to COVID-19
Health systems worldwide are massively struggling and services for mothers, newborns, young children and adolescents are crumbling, warns the UN Secretary-General's Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent reviewing the impact of COVID-19.

Dream on
Daydreaming can be a significant asset to employees in a workplace, depending upon certain attributes of the wanderer -- specifically, if they identify with their profession or organization.

Consumer-created social media visuals capture consumer brand perceptions
CATONSVILLE, MD, July 13, 2020 - New research has found that there is a strong link between the visual portrayal of a brand in online imagery created by consumers and the larger brand perceptions.
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