Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 15, 2020
Study identifies patient-&hospital-level risk factors for death in critically ill COVID-19 patients
The team studied over 2,000 critically ill adults with COVID-19, and found that 35 percent of patients died in the 28 days after ICU admission.

Researchers identify genetic factors that may influence COVID-19 susceptibility
A new Cleveland Clinic study has identified genetic factors that may influence susceptibility to COVID-19.

Monitoring groundwater changes more precisely
A new method could help to track groundwater changes better than before.

New NMR method enables monitoring of chemical reactions in metal containers
Scientists have developed a new method of observing chemical reactions in metal containers.

New material mimics strength, toughness of mother of pearl
In the summer, many people enjoy walks along the beach looking for seashells.

Extinction Rebellion's activists more likely to be new to protesting, study shows
Extinction Rebellion supporters are more likely to be new to protesting than other environmental activists, a new study shows.

Tree planting does not always boost ecosystem carbon stocks, study finds
Planting huge numbers of trees to mitigate climate change is 'not always the best strategy' - with some experimental sites in Scotland failing to increase carbon stocks, a new study has found.

NUS researchers gives robots intelligent sensing abilities to carry out complex tasks
The novel system developed by National University Singapore computer scientists and materials engineers combines an artificial brain system with human-like electronic skin, and vision sensors, to make robots smarter.

Elderly Alzheimer's patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection
It is the first study to highlight the vulnerability of Alzheimer's patients to the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and is expected to be applied to infection diagnosis and prevention

HKBU research reveals greater flood risks in the coastal region of China
A research led by the Department of Geography at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has revealed that the observed average moving speed (or translation speed) of tropical cyclones making landfall over the coast of China dropped by 11% between 1961 and 2017.

Shaking light with sound
Combining integrated photonics and MEMS technology, scientists from EPFL and Purdue University demonstrate monolithic piezoelectric control of integrated optical frequency combs with bulk acoustic waves.

Coumarin compounds from oak barrels could contribute to bitter taste in wine and spirits
Wine and spirits are complex mixtures of flavor and aroma compounds, some of which arise during aging in wooden barrels.

Early life stress is associated with youth-onset depression for some types of stress but not others
Examining the association between eight different types of early life stress (ELS) and youth-onset depression, a study in JAACAP, published by Elsevier, reports that individuals exposed to ELS were more likely to develop a major depressive disorder (MDD) in childhood or adolescence than individuals who had not been exposed to ELS.

Move over, Siri! USC researchers develop improv-based Chatbot
USC ISI computer scientists Jonathan May and Justin Cho incorporate improv dialogues into chatbots to produce more grounded and engaging interactions.

Making balanced decisions
How decisions are made and how behavior is controlled is one of the most important questions in neuroscience.

Tulane scientists build high-performing hybrid solar energy converter
The project is the culmination of a U.S. Department of Energy ARPA-E project that began in 2014 with $3.3 million in funding and involved years of prototype development at Tulane and field testing in San Diego.

Social distancing and COVID-19: A law of diminishing returns
Modeling from the McKelvey School of Engineering shows how social distancing could have better been implemented.

Two new species of parasite discovered in crabs -- discovery will help prevent infection of other marine species
Two new species of parasite, previously unknown to science, have been discovered in crabs in Swansea Bay, Wales, during a study on disease in the Celtic and Irish Seas.

New cobalt-free lithium-ion battery reduces costs without sacrificing performance
Researchers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin say they've cracked the code to a cobalt-free high-energy lithium-ion battery, eliminating the cobalt and opening the door to reducing the costs of producing batteries while boosting performance in some ways.

Study funded by ADDF finds dopamine therapy improves cognitive function in Alzheimer's
A study supported by the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation and published today in JAMA Network Open provides the first evidence that rotigotine, a drug that acts on dopamine transmission in the brain, improves cognitive function in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

Higher-order topology found in 2D crystal
The research team took a new approach by using the Josephson junctions to spatially resolve the supercurrent flow and to show that WTe2 does indeed appear to have hinge states and be a higher-order topological insulator.

Space station motors make a robotic prosthetic leg more comfortable, extend battery life
A new robotic prosthetic leg prototype offers a more natural gait while also being quieter and more energy efficient than other designs.

Scientists open new window into the nanoworld
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have used ultra-fast extreme ultraviolet lasers to measure the properties of materials more than 100 times thinner than a human red blood cell.

Genetic editing milestone in mouse model of Rett Syndrome
A genomic error that causes Rett Syndrome, a serious lifelong neurological disorder, can be corrected in the brains of mice by rewriting the genetic instructions carried by the RNA.

Low-cost catalyst helps turn seawater into fuel at scale
The Navy's quest to power its ships by converting seawater into fuel is one step nearer fruition.

Using the past to predict the future: The case of Typhoon Hagibis
The past is often the window to our future, especially when it comes to natural disasters.

Experts strongly recommend varenicline over the patch for adult smokers hoping to quit
Smoking cessation initiatives notwithstanding, along with provocative public health campaigns and clinical guidance, quitting tobacco has remained elusive for many smokers.

After universal masking, health care worker COVID-19 rates drop at Mass General Brigham
A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and published in JAMA makes it clear: after universal masking was implemented at Mass General Brigham, the rate of COVID-19 infection among health care workers dropped significantly.

Precision trial highlights need for new approach to treating genomically complex cancers
A pioneering lung cancer study, led by the University of Birmingham's Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, has highlighted important factors that will need to be considered in the next wave of precision medicine studies particularly in treating genomically complicated cancers.

Boosting immune memory could reduce cancer recurrence
New study on how immune memory can be targeted and improve immunotherapy and prevennt cancer recurrence.

Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have constructed ''DNA droplets'' comprising designed DNA nanostructures.

Growing up trilobite
If you've ever held a trilobite fossil, seen one in a classroom, or walked by one in a store, chances are it was Elrathia kingii, one of the most common and well-recognized trilobites.

"Alexa, go to the kitchen and fetch me a snack"
New model helps robots understand their environment as humans do.

FSU news: Scientists discover heavy element chemistry can change at high pressures
An international team of researchers has demonstrated how curium -- element 96 in the periodic table and one of the last that can be seen with the naked eye -- responds to the application of high pressure created by squeezing a sample between two diamonds.

Flavored cigarette ban significantly reduced youth smoking, new study finds
Dr. Matthew Rossheim, assistant professor of global and community health in George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services, analyzed National Survey on Drug Use and Health data to test the effect of the 2009 U.S. flavored cigarette ban.

Data analytics can predict global warming trends, heat waves
New data analytics process evaluates how global energy consumption, as well as urban green infrastructure, can affect climate change.

Polycatenanes in mesoscale
An international research group led by Chiba University has succeeded in forming self-assembled molecule rings called ''polycatenanes'' without using additional molecular templates.

Rewriting history: New evidence challenges Euro-centric narrative of early colonization
ew research from Washington University in St. Louis provides evidence that Indigenous people continued to live in southeastern US and actively resist European influence for nearly 150 years after the arrival of Spanish explorers in the 1500s.

How flies flip around on take-off from an upside- down position
Flies are able to right themselves very quickly when taking off from an upside-down position.

HIV alone not a risk factor for cavities in children
Recent studies indicate HIV infection heightens the risk of dental cavities - but a Rutgers researcher has found evidence that the risk of cavities comes not from HIV itself but from a weakened immune system, which could be caused by other diseases.

Novel test method detects coronavirus in highly diluted gargle samples
Pharmacists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have succeeded in detecting small amounts of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 using mass spectrometry.

Biomedical instrument based on microvesicles
Researchers have proved that a microvesicle-based instrument can be effective in reducing inflammation and immune response.

'Bystander' Cs meet their match in gene-editing technique
Biomolecular engineers at Rice University have developed new tools to increase the accuracy of CRISPR single-base editing to treat genetic diseases.

New organic material unlocks faster and more flexible electronic devices
Mobile phones and other electronic devices made from an organic material that is thin, bendable and more powerful are now a step closer thanks to new research led by scientists at The Australian University (ANU).

The road to a battery-powered Europe
For the past century, the world has relied on combustion engines powered by fossil fuels for transportation, but now lithium-ion battery-powered vehicles are emerging as sustainable successors.

Smartphone accelerometers could help in resistance workouts and rehabilitation protocols
Smartphone accelerometers are effective tools to measure key time-under-tension indicators of muscle training -- and could help in resistance-based workouts and rehabilitation protocols.

Renewable energy transition makes dollars and sense
New UNSW research has disproved the claim that the transition to renewable electricity systems will harm the global economy.

Two studies suggest strategies to help students at community colleges and broad access institutions
A brief reading and writing exercise designed to alleviate worries about sense of belonging helped students at a midwestern broad-access public university with a high Hispanic population stay in school, raising continuous enrollment over 2 years by 9% among socially disadvantaged students, according to a new study.

States slow to implement stay-at-home orders saw higher rates of COVID-19 deaths
Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine have conducted one of the first studies to measure the efficacy of social distancing in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic.

New Mygatt-Moore quarry research leads to prehistoric climate finds
Top predators dinosaurs like the Allosaurus and Ceratosaurus devouring dinosaur remains isn't all that surprising, but the smaller creatures feasting on dinosaur remains may just give us a more complete picture of what life was like at Mygatt-Moore Quarry outside Fruita, Colorado 152 million years ago.

Invasive hedgehogs and ferrets habituate to and categorize smells
A new study published in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications examines how invasive mammalian predators both habituate to and generalize avian prey cues.

Study: Single drop of blood could help rapidly detect radiation sickness
A new proof-of-concept study reports evidence that a new testing method has the potential to rapidly identify radiation sickness based on biomarkers measured through a single drop of blood.

New study ranks performance of currently available COVID-19 antibody tests
Conducted by researchers at NSF International and Novateur Ventures, the peer-reviewed study finds significant variability in the accuracy of available COVID-19 antibody tests.

Pandemic disproportionately affects scientists with young children
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a disproportionate, negative impact on the careers of scientists with young children at home, a new survey finds.

Research raises concerns about firearm access for people with dementia
Today, new research released from faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus looked at how caregivers address the issues of firearm safety when taking care of someone who has Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) and has access to a gun.

Blueprint of oxytocin receptor facilitates development of new autism drugs
Oxytocin plays a role in various mental health and sexual reproduction disorders.

A rapid finger-stick blood test quickly estimates radiation exposure in mice
A new finger-stick test can use a single drop of blood to quickly estimate how much harmful radiation mice have been exposed to, according to a study.

Do campaign finance reforms truly help make elections more competitive?
A new study by two social scientists at the University of Missouri finds state campaign finance reforms actually have no beneficial effect on the competitiveness of state legislative elections.

University of Toronto scientists uncover key process in the manufacture of ribosomes and proteins
Researchers at the University of Toronto have shown that an enzyme called RNA polymerase (Pol) II drives generation of the building blocks of ribosomes, the molecular machines that manufacture all proteins in cells based on the genetic code.

Designed a new model to predict the life expectancy of a severe neurodegenerative disease
Researchers from IDIBELL, the University of Göttingen and the University of Münster, designed six tables, using data available at the time of diagnosis, where easily extrapolate patient's life expectancy.

SNMMI Image of the Year: Super-agers show resistance to tau and amyloid accumulation
Super-agers, or individuals whose cognitive skills are above the norm even at an advanced age, have been found to have increased resistance to tau and amyloid proteins, according to research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) 2020 Annual Meeting.

Running on empty: New affordable catalyst relies on nitrogen vacancies to produce ammonia
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a new catalyst for synthesizing ammonia that does not comprise rare metals.

New research highlights increased loneliness in over-70s during COVID-19 pandemic
A joint report from Trinity College Dublin researchers and age charity ALONE highlights effects of COVID-19 government measures on Ireland's older population.

How breast cancer cells sneak past local immune defenses
Breast cancer cells grow locally, then metastasize throughout the body.

Only a third of pediatricians fully follow guidelines on peanut allergy prevention
While 93 percent of U.S. pediatricians surveyed were aware of the national guidelines on peanut allergy prevention in infants, only 30 percent were fully implementing the recommended practices and 64 percent reported partial implementation, according to the study published in JAMA Network Open.

New promising treatment uses smart nanoparticles to target lung cancer
A new and promising approach for treatment of lung cancer has been developed by researchers at Lund University.

KIST develops "dielectrophoretic tweezer" technology for toxic nanoparticles
A Korean research team has developed a technology that enables the effective control of fine particulate matter and nanoplastics, which are major causes of human toxicity and ecosystem disturbances.

NASA finds limited water vapor as depression 06E becomes a trough
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Depression 06E that showed it had opened up into a trough.

The smallest micro-gripper, grown on optical fibers, is operated remotely with light
Researchers at the Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, used the liquid crystal elastomer technology to demonstrate a series of micro-tools grown on optical fibers.

Translating skeletal movements, joint by joint
A global team of computer scientists has developed a novel deep-learning framework that automates the precise translation of human motion, specifically accounting for the wide array of skeletal structures and joints.

COVID-19: Patients improve after immune-suppressant treatment
Most patients hospitalized with COVID-19 (coronavirus) pneumonia experienced improvement after receiving a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug normally given for rheumatoid arthritis, according to an observational study at Cedars-Sinai.

Study of natural gas flaring finds high risks to babies
Researchers from USC and UCLA have found that exposure to flaring -- the burning off of excess natural gas -- at oil and gas production sites is associated with 50% higher odds of preterm birth, compared with no exposure.

How long should you fast for weight loss?
Two daily fasting diets, also known as time-restricted feeding diets, are effective for weight loss, according to a new study.

Identifying sources of deadly air pollution in the United States
A new study from University of Minnesota researchers provides an unprecedented look at the causes of poor air quality in the United States and its effects on human health.

Scientists predict dramatic increase in flooding, drought in California
California may see a 54 percent increase in rainfall variability by the end of this century, according to research from a UC Davis atmospheric scientist.

A nanomaterial path forward for COVID-19 vaccine development
From mRNA vaccines entering clinical trials, to peptide-based vaccines and using molecular farming to scale vaccine production, the COVID-19 pandemic is pushing new and emerging nanotechnologies into the frontlines and the headlines.

Novel biomarker technology for cancer diagnostics
A new way of identifying cancer biomarkers has been developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden.

COVID-19 'price gouging' could be prevented
Excessive pricing or 'price gouging' of essential hygiene and medical products during the current global pandemic could be prevented, claims a new paper from the University of Portsmouth.

Consensus statement on doppler waveforms
The first consensus-based nomenclature for arterial and venous waveforms has been published online first today in Vascular Medicine (VMJ) and the Journal for Vascular Ultrasound (JVU).

How galaxies die: New insights into the quenching of star formation
Astronomers studying galaxy evolution have long struggled to understand what causes star formation to shut down in massive galaxies.

Learning the wiring diagram for autism spectrum disorders
A team led by UT Southwestern researchers has identified brain circuitry that plays a key role in the dysfunctional social, repetitive, and inflexible behavioral differences that characterize autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

Mystery about cause of genetic disease in horses
Warmblood fragile foal syndrome is a severe, usually fatal, genetic disease that manifests itself after birth in affected horses.

Children exposed to Deepwater Horizon oil spill suffered physical, mental health effects
A study recently published in Environmental Hazards has found that the Deepwater Horizon disaster was harmful to the mental and physical health of children in the area.

Expand school digital literacy lessons to cover health technologies used by young people
Young people need more support to navigate the growing number of digital technologies which track and manage their health, say researchers.

Slow growth the key to long term cold sensing
In this study which appears in Nature, researchers Yusheng Zhao and Rea Antoniou-Kourounioti in the groups of Professor Dame Caroline Dean and Professor Martin Howard at John Innes Centre show that slow growth is used as a signal to sense long-term changes in temperature.

Housing conditions affect cardiovascular health risks
Lack of stable housing or inadequate housing is related to high blood pressure, obesity and other risk factors for cardiovascular events such as heart attacks, strokes, heart failure and others.

Scientists identify new material with potential for brain-like computing
Chinedu E. Ekuma and his colleagues at the Sensor and Electrons Devices Directorate at the U.S.

Researchers outline strategy for testing ketone bodies against COVID-19
Given that many of the risk factors for COVID-19 are age-related, a compelling argument can be made that those infected are suffering from an aging-related disease, no matter how old they are.

Scientists discover way to stop spread of devastating childhood cancer
New research reveals a new way to stop the spread of bone cancer in children.

Bacteria with a metal diet discovered in dirty glassware
Newfound bacteria that oxidize manganese help explain the geochemistry of groundwater.

Moffitt researchers identify factors to predict severe toxicities in CAR T patients
In a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify possible factors that could help physicians know if patients are at higher risk for severe adverse events before they receive CAR T therapy.

Simple twist of DNA determines fate of placenta
The development of the mammalian placenta depends upon an unusual twist that separates DNA's classic double helix into a single-stranded form, Yale researchers report July 15 in the journal Nature.

UCalgary research study finds MRI effective in predicting major cardiac events
An international study led by Dr. James White, a clinician and researcher at the University of Calgary finds magnetic resonance imaging can be used to predict major cardiac events for people diagnosed dilated cardiomyopathy.

In a first, astronomers watch a black hole's corona disappear, then reappear
For the first time, astronomers have watched a black hole's corona disappear, then reappear.

Common FDA-approved drug may effectively neutralize virus that causes COVID-19
A common drug, already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), may also be a powerful tool in fighting COVID-19, according to research published this week in Antiviral Research.

New chemical analyzes: What did Danes and Italians in the Middle Ages have in common?
Chemists have analyzed bones from a Danish and an Italian cemetery, casting light on the lives of nobles and common people in the north and the south of Europe.

Love-hate relationship of solvent and water leads to better biomass breakup
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron scattering and supercomputing to better understand how an organic solvent and water work together to break down plant biomass, creating a pathway to significantly improve the production of renewable biofuels and bioproducts.

Detailed study of immune responses in COVID-19 patients reveals distinct 'immunotypes'
Expanding on observations made in smaller patient cohorts, researchers studying immune responses of 125 hospitalized COVID-19 patients identified distinct immune profiles -- ''Immunotypes'' -- and showed how these signatures correlated with disease severity.

Global sentiments towards COVID-19 shifts from fear to anger
The fear that people developed at the start of the COVID-19 outbreak has given way to anger over the course of the pandemic, a study of global sentiments led by NTU Singapore has found.

AI model to forecast complicated large-scale tropical instability waves in Pacific Ocean
Prof. LI Xiaofeng from the Institute of Oceanology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS) and his collaborators from Ministry of Natural Resources and Shanghai Ocean University studied this type of complex oceanic phenomena through artificial intelligence (AI) technologies.

Regular physical activity seems to enhance cognition in children who need it most
Researchers at the Universities of Tsukuba and Kobe re-analyzed data from three experiments that tested whether physical activity interventions lead to improved cognitive skills in children.

Research brief: Researchers 3D print a working heart pump with real human cells
In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota have 3D printed a functioning centimeter-scale human heart pump in the lab.

Tech to help autonomous vehicles better scan for nearby fast-moving objects
Researchers have built a way that lidar could achieve higher-resolution detection of nearby fast-moving objects through mechanical control and modulation of light on a silicon chip.

Unleashing the potential of tethered drones
Wire-connected drones may complement or replace the fixed base stations of cellular communications networks.

What COVID-19 can teach tourism about the climate crisis
The global coronavirus pandemic has hit the tourism industry hard worldwide.

Immunotherapy with CAR T cells results in exceptional patient recovery
In a clinical trial, a child with rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of muscle cancer, that had spread to the bone marrow, showed no detectable cancer following treatment with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that were engineered to target the HER2 protein on the surface of the cancer cells.

UBCO researchers create liquid-repelling substance that works on all surfaces
Acting like an invisible force field, a new liquid coating being developed by UBC Okanagan researchers may provide an extra layer of protection for front-line workers.

Multidisciplinary approach more effective for gut disorders: study
Researchers from the University of Melbourne and St Vincent's Hospital in Australia have conducted a trial involving 144 patients to compare the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary clinic - involving gastroenterologists, dieticians, psychiatrists and physiotherapists - with usual gastroenterology specialist-only care.

Setting up an alarm system in the Atlantic Ocean
Climate scientists Laura Jackson and Richard Wood from The Met Office, UK have identified metrics that may give us early warnings of abrupt changes to the European Climate.

Bed bugs modify microbiome of homes they infest
Bed bug infestations can modify the home microbiome, according to a new NC State study.

In one hour, surface coating inactivates virus that causes COVID-19
A chemical engineering professor at Virginia Tech has developed a surface coating that, when painted on common objects, inactivates SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Sylvester researchers identify protein target that might ease graft versus host disease
Researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine publish findings on how inhibiting the STING protein pathway can help protect against a complication from stem cell transplants.

Ideal way to screen for disease
In the pandemic age of telehealth and new technologies, remote site lab or point-of-care (POC) testing of biofluids is a potentially rapid and non-invasive way to test for most diseases - including COVID-19.

How much postmenopause weight gain can be blamed on weight-promoting medications?
Abdominal weight gain, which is common during the postmenopause period, is associated with an array of health problems, including diabetes and heart disease.

FSU researchers find sun, rain transform asphalt binder into potentially toxic compounds
A study by chemists at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory shows that asphalt binder, when exposed to sun and water, leaches thousands of potentially toxic compounds into the environment.

Reprogramming of immune cells enhances effects of radiotherapy in preclinical models of brain cancer
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has dissected how radiotherapy alters the behavior of immune cells known as macrophages found in glioblastoma (GBM) tumors and shown how these cells might be reprogrammed with an existing drug to suppress the invariable recurrence of the aggressive brain cancer

New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack
Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available.

In the sharing economy, consumers see themselves as helpers
Whether you use a taxi or a rideshare app like Uber, you're still going to get a driver who will take you to your destination.

Geoengineering's benefits limited for apple crops in India
Geoengineering - spraying sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere to combat global warming - would only temporarily and partially benefit apple production in northern India, according to a Rutgers co-authored study.

New study shows how plants regulate their growth-inhibiting hormones to survive
Scientists from Japan have, for the first time, observed one of the natural mechanisms underlying the regulation of the levels of growth inhibiting hormone in plants.

New hyperbaric oxygen therapy protocol can improve cognitive function of older adults
The Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research at Shamir Medical Center, together with the Sackler School of Medicine and Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University, announced today that a peer-reviewed study has demonstrated for the first time that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can significantly enhance the cognitive performance of healthy older adults.

Back to the operating room: Orthopedic surgeons issue guidelines on resuming elective surgery amid COVID-19 pandemic
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, thousands of Americans have had to delay recommended but elective orthopedic surgical procedures, such as joint replacement surgery or knee arthroscopy.

When should you neuter your dog to avoid health risks?
A new, 10-year study by researchers at the University of California, Davis, examined 35 dog breeds and found vulnerability from neutering, and the age at which they are neutered, varies greatly depending on the breed.

Obesity and metabolic syndrome are risk factors for severe influenza, COVID-19
Metabolic syndrome increases the risk of severe disease from viral infection, according to a review of the literature performed by a team of researchers from St.

Study suggests overall COVID-19 intensive care mortality has fallen by a third since the start of the pandemic
A systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies from three continents published in the journal Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that overall mortality of COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs) has fallen from almost 60% at the end of March to 42% at the end of May -- a relative decrease of almost one third.

Exploring how a scorpion toxin might help treat heart attacks
Scientists are discovering potential life-saving medicines from an unlikely source: the venom of creatures like snakes, spiders and scorpions.

Don't Let social isolation keep you from being active
Researchers from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil recently reported on the dangers of physical inactivity for older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Antarctica more widely impacted than previously thought
Researchers at Australia's Monash University, using a data set of 2.7 million human activity records, have shown just how extensive human use of Antarctica has been over the last 200 years.

Study first to show tiger sharks' travels and desired hangouts in the Gulf of Mexico
From 2010 to 2018, scientists tagged 56 tiger sharks of varying life stages to track their movements via satellite.

How much fluorine is too much fluorine?
Research investigates how fluorine levels affect beneficial soil microbes.

Penn researchers find three distinct immune responses for sicker COVID-19 patients
Researchers from the Penn Institute of Immunology discovered three distinct immune responses to the SARS-CoV2 infection that could help predict the trajectory of disease in severe COVID-19 patients and may ultimately inform how to best treat them.

Analysis of immune responses in COVID-19 patients identifies defining features of severe disease
An analysis of immune responses in 42 COVID-19 patients, both infected and recovered, identified immune signatures that distinguish severe COVID-19 cases.

Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others.
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