Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 22, 2020
Fear of COVID-2019: Emerging cardiac risk
Fear of COVID-19 is an issue stopping patients from accessing needed cardiac care and methods to ameliorate negative outcomes.

Raising legal age for handgun sales to 21 linked to fewer adolescent suicides
Restricting the sale of handguns to those aged 21 or older is associated with a reduction in suicide rates among adolescents in the United States, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

NASA infrared confirms Douglas still a tropical storm
Infrared data from NASA's Terra satellite showed that dry air around Tropical Storm Douglas has been inhibiting it from strengthening into a hurricane.

Association of interleukin 7 immunotherapy with lymphocyte counts among patients with severe COVID-1
This case series examines whether interleukin 7 (IL-7) is associated with restored host protective immunity in patients with severe COVID-19 and immunosuppression.

Atomic force microscopy reveals nanoscale dental erosion from beverages
KAIST researchers used atomic force microscopy to quantitatively evaluate how acidic and sugary drinks affect human tooth enamel at the nanoscale level.

Instantaneous color holography system for sensing fluorescence and white light
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Toin University of Yokohama, and Chiba University have succeeded in developing a color-multiplexed holography system by which 3D information of objects illuminated by a white-light lamp and self-luminous specimens are recorded as a single multicolor hologram by a specially designed and developed monochrome image sensor.

Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper
Researchers from MIT and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have mapped the thalamic reticular nucleus in unprecedented detail, revealing that the region contains two distinct subnetworks of neurons with different functions.

Genomic signature explains FDG-avidity of PSMA-suppressed prostate tumors
Scientists have uncovered the genomic signature to explain why 18F-FDG imaging performs better than PSMA-targeted imaging for prostate cancer patients with low or no expression of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA).

Le Bonheur Children's Hospital trial: Intravenous indomethacin more effective for hsPDAs
Le Bonheur and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center neonatologists, led by Jennifer M.

Early menstruation linked to increased menopause symptoms
Early menstruation increases the likelihood of hot flushes and nights sweats decades later at menopause, according to a University of Queensland study.

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound
Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound.

Sharks almost gone from many reefs
A massive global study of the world's reefs has found sharks are 'functionally extinct' on nearly one in five of the reefs surveyed.

Shrinking (ultra)violet
Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

New drug targets clots: A potential treatment for heart attack and stroke prevention
Monash researchers have developed a drug that can be potentially given as a preventative against heart attack.

Photonic crystal light converter
Spectroscopy is the use of light to analyze physical objects and biological samples.

Primary care physicians during the COVID-19 epidemic
Scientists from the University of Geneva has analysed clinical data from more than 1,500 ambulatory patients tested for COVID-19.

A new device provides added protection against COVID-19 during endoscopic procedures
The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown up unimaginable challenges for healthcare workers.

Buckwheat enhances the production of a protein that supports the longevity
A healthy low-calorie diet that contains plant products can help us improve the level of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein production that is known to increase life expectancy.

Brain builds and uses maps of social networks, physical space, in the same way
Even in these social-distanced days, we keep in our heads a map of our relationships with other people: family, friends, coworkers and how they relate to each other.

Climate predictions several years into the future?
In five years, will the winter be mild, and will the following summer be rainy?

UAlberta researchers make real-time tumor tracking in radiation therapy 5 times faster
A team of University of Alberta researchers has developed a faster way of tracking the movement of tumors in the body during radiation therapy, which could significantly improve outcomes for cancer patients.

NIH leadership details unprecedented effort to ramp up testing technologies for COVID-19
In a paper in NEJM, scientific leaders from the National Institutes of Health set forth a framework to increase significantly the number, quality and type of daily tests for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and help reduce inequities for underserved populations that have been disproportionally affected by the disease.

What happens in Vegas, may come from the Arctic?
Ancient climate records from Leviathan Cave, located in the southern Great Basin, show that Nevada was even hotter and drier in the past than it is today, and that one 4,000-year period in particular may represent a true, ''worst-case'' scenario picture for the Southwest and the Colorado River Basin -- and the millions of people who rely on its water supply.

Novel technology extends battery life, increases upload speed, and reduces data corruption
Researchers from the University of Southern California have created a memory device with improved material and structure and which promises to increase data upload speed, extend smartphone battery life, and reduce data corruption.

More flowers and pollinator diversity could help protect bees from parasites
Having more flowers and maintaining diverse bee communities could help reduce the spread of bee parasites, according to a new study.

Antibiotics disrupt development of the 'social brain' in mice
Antibiotic treatment in early life impedes brain signalling pathways that function in social behaviour and pain regulation in mice, a new study by Dr Katerina Johnson and Dr Philip Burnet has found.

AJTMH July updates
Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH).

Discovery of novel autoantibody that is a major risk factor for recurrent pregnancy loss
A Kobe University led study has revealed for the first time in the world the high frequency of a novel autoantibody in women suffering from recurrent pregnancy loss.

Flood data from 500 years: Rivers and climate change in Europe
Studying historical documents from 5 centuries, scientists were able to compare flood events from the past with recent flood events in Europe.

Visual working memory is hierarchically structured
Researchers from HSE University and the University of California San Diego, Igor Utochkin and Timothy Brady, have found new evidence of hierarchical encoding of images in visual working memory.

Racial and LGBT bias persists in ridesharing drivers despite mitigation efforts
Despite efforts by ridesharing companies to eliminate or reduce discrimination, research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that racial and LGBT bias persists among drivers.

Biotelemetry provides unique glimpse into whitespotted eagle rays' behavior
Researchers are the first to characterize the ecology and fine-scale habitat use of 'near threatened' whitespotted eagle rays in Florida while also identifying areas of potential interactions between this species and multiple environmental threats.

Lahontan Cutthroat Trout thrive at Paiute's Summit Lake in far northern Nevada
Summit Lake in remote northwest Nevada is home to the only self-sustaining, robust, lake population of Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, North America's largest freshwater native trout species.

Novel 'on-off' switch discovered in plant defenses
Researchers investigating the ways that plants protect themselves--from insects to pathogens--have discovered an ''on-off'' switch that controls plant defensive mechanisms.

Researchers simulate, assess damage to brain cells caused by bubbles during head trauma
Researchers led by Nicole Hashemi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University, are using their expertise with the manufacture of microstructures to study how the collapse of microbubbles within the skull can damage brain cells.

Research shows ibuprofen does not hinder bone fracture healing in children
Doctors have traditionally avoided prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen to patients with fractures.

Chocolate is good for the heart
Eating chocolate at least once a week is linked with a reduced risk of heart disease, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 ''Our study suggests that chocolate helps keep the heart's blood vessels healthy,'' said study author Dr.

What happens around an Alzheimer plaque?
A research team led by Bart De Strooper and Mark Fiers at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research in Leuven, Belgium used pioneering technologies to study in detail what happens in brain cells in the direct vicinity of plaques.

Junk DNA might be really, really useful for biocomputing
When you don't understand how things work, it's not unusual to think of them as just plain old junk.

Concussions associated with cognitive, behavioral, and emotional consequences for students
Concussions can have a compounding effect on children, leading to long-term cognitive, behavioral, and emotional health consequences, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), who published their findings in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

Wireless, optical cochlear implant uses LED lights to restore hearing in rodents
Scientists have created an optical cochlear implant based on LED lights that can safely and partially restore the sensation of hearing in deaf rats and gerbils.

Calcium channel subunits play a major role in autistic disorders
Neurobiologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have found new evidence that specific calcium channel subunits play a crucial role in the development of excitatory and inhibitory synapses.

New study finds access to food stamps reduces visits to the physicians
In a new study, University of Colorado Denver researchers found when people have access to the food stamp program, they are less likely to frequent a physician for medical care.

'Seeing' and 'manipulating' functions of living cells
Toyohashi University of Technology has given greater functionalities to atomic force microscopy (AFM).

Chemists make tough plastics recyclable
MIT chemists have developed a way to modify thermoset plastics with a chemical linker that makes it much easier to recycle them, but still allows them to retain their mechanical strength.

Climate change is impacting the spread of invasive animal species
What factors influence the spread of invasive animal species in our oceans?

City of Hope scientists leverage interference between signaling pathways for cancer treatment
In order for cancer to form in the human body, normal cells must acquire multiple mutations before they develop toward the disease.

How a few negative online reviews early on can hurt a restaurant
Just a few negative online restaurant reviews can determine early on how many reviews a restaurant receives long-term, a new study has found.

Loyola researchers identify common characteristics of rare pediatric brain tumors
In a new study, researchers at Loyola University Medical Center and Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine found that pediatric acoustic neuroma patients had similar symptoms to those of adult patients; however, tumor size was typically larger in the pediatric patients at the time of diagnosis, symptoms of mass effect (secondary effects caused by the tumor) were more common, and the pediatric patients had a higher rate of tumor regrowth.

Oncotarget: Therapeutic efficacy of liposomal Grb2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (L-Grb2)
The cover for issue 29 of Oncotarget features Figure 5, ''In vivo effects of treatment with L-Grb2 in combination with anti-angiogenic therapy in an ovarian tumor model,'' by Lara, et al. which reported that adaptor proteins such as growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 play important roles in cancer cell signaling.

Corporate social responsibility practices often lack 'on the ground' change -- SFU research
Companies that practice corporate social responsibility (CSR) could ensure more positive outcomes by tackling ''real change on the ground'' rather than focusing on single projects and budgets, according to Simon Fraser University political science professor Andy Hira.

Changes in US heart transplant waitlist activity, volume during COVID-19 pandemic
National and regional changes in waitlist inactivations and additions, donor recovery and heart transplant volume during the COVID-19 pandemic are described in this observational study.

Discovery of first active seep in Antarctica provides new understanding of methane cycle
The discovery of the first active methane seep in Antarctica is providing scientists new understanding of the methane cycle and the role methane found in this region may play in warming the planet.

Immune system treatment to reduce stress prevents cancer metastases
Tel Aviv University researchers have found that the short time period around tumor removal surgery (the weeks before and after surgery) is critical for the prevention of metastases development, which develop when the body is under stress.

Tracking misinformation campaigns in real-time is possible, study shows
A research team led by Princeton University has developed a technique for tracking online foreign misinformation campaigns in real time, which could help mitigate outside interference in the 2020 American election.

Digitizing chemistry with a smart stir bar
Miniaturized computer systems and wireless technology are offering scientists new ways to keep tabs on reactions without the need for larger, cumbersome equipment.

Getting under the skin of psoriasis
Psoriasis afflicts millions of people worldwide, but treatments are limited to small molecules like steroids, which can cause skin thinning and lose their effectiveness over time.

New research finds graphene can act as surfactant
New research into graphene flakes has discovered that the material can act as a surfactant, for the first time demonstrating how it can be a versatile 2D stabiliser ideal for many industrial applications from oil extraction to paper processing.

Is it a bird, a plane? Not superman, but a flapping wing drone
A drone prototype that mimics the aerobatic manoeuvres of one of the world's fastest birds, the swift, is being developed by an international team of engineers in the latest example of biologically inspired flight.

Princeton scientists discover a topological magnet that exhibits exotic quantum effects
An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has uncovered a new class of magnet that exhibits novel quantum effects that extend to room temperature.

New study shows retreat of East Antarctic ice sheet during previous warm periods
Questions about the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet are a major source of uncertainty in estimates of how much sea level will rise as the Earth continues to warm.

Antioxidant-rich powders from blueberry, persimmon waste could be good for gut microbiota
Feeding the world's growing population in a sustainable way is no easy task.

Risk factors associated with mortality among residents with COVID-19 in long-term care facilities
Risk factors associated with COVID-19 death in long-term care facilities in Ontario, Canada, are examined in this observational study.

New study: Brain tumors may be seeded from distant site
A mouse model of glioblastoma, an aggressive type of cancer that can occur in the brain, suggests that this recalcitrant cancer originates from a pool of stem cells that can be a significant distance away from the resulting tumors.

City of Hope, TGen looking to create personalized roadmaps for treatment of kidney cancer
Experts at City of Hope and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) are using one of the world's most comprehensive genomic analysis tools to map out personalized treatment plans for metastatic kidney cancer patients.

Scientists discover how immune cells mobilize to fight infection
New research from the University of York is an important step forward in understanding how our immune system works and also why it fails.

We are mutating SARS-CoV-2, but it is evolving back
Scientists at the Milner Centre for Evolution looked at the evolution of the virus that causes Covid19; their findings could help the design of a new vaccine.

Kazan University chemists offer a new look at polymers for space industry
Employees of the Department of Physical Chemistry of Kazan Federal University have found out that the mechanisms of polymerization of aryl cyanates in the solid state and in the melt differ in the number of broken multiple bonds of the monomer at the stage that determines the rate of the process.

Non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose infant urinary tract obstruction
One in every 500 babies is born with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO), an obstruction of the ureter that prevents urine from flowing from one or both of the kidneys into the bladder.

New CCC19 data offer insights on COVID treatments for people with cancer
Newly released data on treatment outcomes of people with cancer diagnosed with COVID-19 reveal a racial disparity in access to Remdesivir, an antiviral drug that has been shown to shorten hospital stays, and increased mortality associated with dexamethasone, a steroid that has had the opposite effect in the general patient population.

Stone tools move back the arrival of humans in America thousands of years
Findings of stone tools move back the first immigration of humans to America at least 15,000 years.

For-profit long-term care homes have COVID-19 outbreaks with more cases, deaths
For-profit status is associated with the extent of an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in long-term care (LTC) homes and the number of resident deaths from COVID-19, but not the likelihood of an outbreak, which was related to the infection rate in the surrounding local public health unit and the total number of beds in the home, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/07/22/cmaj.201197.1.

The most important task for a PTSD service dog for veterans is disrupting anxiety
Science has shown that service dogs can benefit some veterans with PTSD.

Popular hypertension drugs don't increase risk of COVID-19 severity, fatality
A new study in mice found a widely used class of drugs to treat patients with hypertension, cardiovascular disease and diabetic kidney disease - many of whom are elderly -- does not increase the risk of developing a severe and potentially fatal COVID-19 infection, as previously feared.

Solar-driven membrane distillation technology that can double drinking water production
A joint research team from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), led by Dr.

Invention offers new option for monitoring heart health
A team from Purdue University developed self-powered wearable triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based contact layers for monitoring cardiovascular health.

Plastics found in sea-bed sharks
Microplastics have been found in the guts of sharks that live near the seabed off the UK coast.

How neurons reshape inside body fat to boost its calorie-burning capacity
Scientists have found that a hormone tells the brain to dramatically restructure neurons embedded in fat tissue.

New 'super light source' should allow fascinating insights into atoms
The 'Gamma Factory initiative' -- an international team of scientists -- is currently exploring a novel research tool: They propose to develop a source of high-intensity gamma rays using the existing accelerator facilities at CERN.

Cellular cleanup! Atg40 folds the endoplasmic reticulum to facilitate its autophagy
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Institute of Microbial Chemistry investigated 'ER-phagy,' the degradation mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an important organelle with multiple biologically necessary functions like the synthesis of proteins and lipids.

Erectile dysfunction drugs can help cells destroy misfolded proteins
PDE5 inhibitors -- which include the erectile dysfunction drugs sildenafil and tadalafil -- can activate the cell's protein quality-control systems and improve its ability to dispose of misfolded proteins.

Narcissists don't learn from their mistakes because they don't think they make any
When most people find that their actions have resulted in an undesirable outcome, they tend to rethink their decisions and ask, ''What should I have done differently to avoid this outcome?'' When narcissists face the same situation, however, their refrain is, ''No one could have seen this coming!'' In refusing to acknowledge that they have made a mistake, narcissists fail to learn from those mistakes, a recent study from Oregon State University - Cascades found.

Dragonflies reveal mercury pollution levels across US national parks
Research confirms dragonfly larvae as ''biosentinels'' to indicate mercury pollution and presents the first-ever survey of mercury pollution in the U.S.

Putting the spring-cam back into stroke patients steps
A research group has developed a new, lightweight and motor-less device that can be easily attached to an ankle support device - otherwise known as an ankle foot orthosis (AFO).

Patients who lived longer with cancer at greater risk of severe COVID-19 infection
Cancer patients diagnosed more than 24 months ago are more likely to have a severe COVID-19 infection, research has found.

Expanded access to treatment in prisons can reduce overdose deaths by 31.6%, study finds
Using a microsimulation model, researchers at Brown predicted the number of opioid-related overdose deaths related to three different treatment options over the course of 8 years.

Care for veterans with substance use and mental health disorders needs improvement
While the availability of services for veterans has expanded in recent years, many post-9/11 veterans do not receive appropriate care for their co-occurring substance use and mental health problems, according to a new study.

2,000 years of storms in the Caribbean
The hurricanes in the Caribbean became more frequent and their force varied noticeably around the same time that classical Mayan culture in Central America suffered its final demise: We can gain these and other insights by looking at the climate archive created under the leadership of geoscientists from Goethe University and now presented in an article in ''Nature'' journal's 'Scientific Reports' on 16 July.

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa
Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa.

Comparing unsupervised midnasal swabs collected at home with clinician-collected nasopharyngeal swab
Unsupervised home self-collected midnasal swabs are compared with clinician-collected nasopharyngeal swabs for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in this diagnostic study.

Flourishing mental health delays mortality by five months in 18 year prospective study
We have known for decades that mental health plays an important role in one's quality of life, but a study released this week suggests it is also an important factor in one's quantity of life.

Mix and match: New 3D cell culture model replicates fibrotic elements of pancreatic cancer
Pancreatic cancer is a deadly cancer characterized by prominent fibrosis, which plays a crucial role in disease progression and therapeutic resistance.

Siblings can also differ from one another in bacteria
A research team from the University of Tübingen and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) is investigating how pathogens influence the immune response of their host with genetic variation.

NASA sees record-breaking new Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthening
The seventh named tropical cyclone of the North Atlantic Ocean has formed, and like some others this season, it has broken a record.

Earliest humans stayed at the Americas 'oldest hotel' in Mexican cave
A cave in a remote part of Mexico was visited by humans around 30,000 years ago - 15,000 years earlier than people were previously thought to have reached the Americas.

Machine learning system can detect foreign social media influence campaigns using content alone
Researchers have developed an automated machine learning system they say can detect social media posts involved in coordinated political influence campaigns -- such as Russia's alleged efforts to sway the results of the 2016 elections in the United States -- regardless of platform and based only on the content of the posts.

Genomic basis of bat superpowers revealed: Like how they survive deadly viruses
The genetic material that codes for bat adaptations and superpowers - such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move effortlessly in complete darkness, to tolerate and survive potentially deadly viruses, and to resist aging and cancer - has been revealed and published in Nature.

Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, linked to lower risk of death
Diets high in protein, particularly plant protein, are associated with a lower risk of death from any cause, finds an analysis of the latest evidence published by The BMJ today.

Scientists develop new material for longer-lasting fuel cells
New research suggests that graphene -- made in a specific way -- could be used to make more durable hydrogen fuel cells for cars

New role for white blood cells in the developing brain
Whether white blood cells can be found in the brain has been controversial, and their role there a complete mystery.

Study: Novel PFAS comprise 24% of those measured in blood of Wilmington, N.C. residents
Researchers detected novel per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) called ''fluoroethers'' in blood from residents of Wilmington, North Carolina.

Science sweetens native honey health claims
Examination of honey from five different stingless bee species across Neotropical and Indo-Australian regions has enabled for the first time the identification of the unusual disaccharide trehalulose as a major component representing between 13 and 44 g per 100 g of each of these honeys.

Keeping pinto beans away from the dark side
New slow-darkening pinto bean varieties show benefits for farmers and consumers

First ever image of a multi-planet system around a sun-like star captured by ESO telescope
The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) has taken the first ever image of a young, Sun-like star accompanied by two giant exoplanets.

Sweet coolers a gateway to increased alcohol consumption
Sweetened alcoholic beverages can promote harmful alcohol consumption among teens, new University of Guelph research finds.

Proteins -- and labs -- coming together to prevent Rett syndrome
Two labs investigated whether the disruption of one protein's condensate-forming ability contributes to Rett syndrome.

Dragonfly larvae collected by citizen-scientists as sentinels for mercury bioaccumulation
Various forms of mercury are released naturally by volcanoes and weathering of rocks and soil.

Mitigation of greenhouse gases in dairy cattle through genetic selection
Researchers in Spain propose mitigating methane production by dairy cattle through breeding.

New UBC study reveals older adults coped with pandemic best
Adults aged 60 and up have fared better emotionally compared to younger adults (18-39) and middle-aged adults (40-59) amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new UBC research published recently in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences.

Fine-tuning adoptive cell therapy for advanced cancers
Researchers identified a discordant phenomenon in which a subset of patients displayed profoundly decreased expression of the transgenic TCR over time, despite the transgenic TCR being present at the DNA level.

International analysis narrows range of climate's sensitivity to CO2
The most advanced and comprehensive analysis of climate sensitivity yet undertaken has revealed with more confidence than ever before how sensitive the Earth's climate is to carbon dioxide.

Climate shift, forest loss and fires -- Scientists explain how Amazon forest is trapped in a vicious circle
A new study, published in Global Change Biology, showed how the fire expansion is attributed to climate regime shift and forest loss.

Perceived "whiteness" of Middle Eastern Americans correlates with discrimination
The perceived ''whiteness'' of Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent is indirectly tied to discrimination against them, and may feed a ''negative cycle'' in which public awareness of discrimination leads to more discrimination, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Giant, fruit-gulping pigeon eaten into extinction on Pacific islands
A large fruit-eating bird from Tonga joins the dodo in the lineup of giant island pigeons hunted to extinction.

Health and happiness depend on each other, Psychological Science says
New research adds to the growing body of evidence that happiness not only feels good, it is good for your physical health, too.

Study finds clothing-based racist stereotypes persist against Black men
Hardworking or lazy; trustworthy or dangerous: People often make assumptions about someone's character and personality based solely on how they're dressed.

Malaria drug chloroquine does not inhibit SARS-CoV-2
Study shows that chloroquine does not block SARS-CoV-2 infection of lung cells.

UNH researchers discover new pathways that could help treat RNA viruses
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have identified new pathways in an RNA-based virus where inhibitors, like medical treatments, unbind.

Triple negative breast cancer meets its match
One member of a larger family of oxygen sensing enzymes could offer a viable target for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), UTSW researchers report in a new study.

Diamonds shine a light on hidden currents in graphene
A new diamond-based quantum sensing technique gives researchers a map of the intricate movement of electricity on a microscopic scale.

Older adults feel stressed, yet resilient in the time of COVID-19
America's oldest citizens say they've been through worse, but many older adults are feeling the stress of COVID-19 and prolonged social distancing measures, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Neutralizing antibodies isolated from COVID-19 patients may suppress virus
Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center have isolated antibodies from several COVID-19 patients that, to date, are among the most potent in neutralizing the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Study suggests increased risks for COVID-19 patients who smoke, vape
TTUHSC's Luca Cucullo, Ph.D., has for years studied the effects smoking and vaping have on the cerebrovascular and neurological systems.

UVA pioneers study of genetic diseases with quantum computing
Scientists are harnessing the mind-bending potential of quantum computers to help us understand genetic diseases - even before quantum computers are a thing.

Common blood test identifies benefits and risks of steroid treatment in COVID-19 patients
A new study led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System (www.montefiore.org) confirms the findings of the large scale British trial of steroid use for COVID-19 patients and advances the research by answering several key questions: Which patients are most likely to benefit from steroid therapy?

No honor among cyber thieves
A backstabbing crime boss and thousands of people looking for free tutorials on hacking and identity theft were two of the more interesting findings of a study examining user activity on two online 'carding forums,' illegal sites that specialize in stolen credit card information.

Optimizing neural networks on a brain-inspired computer
Neural networks in both biological settings and artificial intelligence distribute computation across their neurons to solve complex tasks.
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