Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 23, 2020
Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs
The immune systems of mammals - including humans - might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests.

CIC nanoGUNE reaches new depths in infrared nanospectroscopy
Researchers from the Nanooptics Group at CIC nanoGUNE (San Sebastian) demonstrate that nanoscale infrared imaging - which is established as a surface-sensitive technique - can be employed for chemical nanoidentification of materials that are located up to 100 nm below the surface.

Dual role discovered for molecule involved in autoimmune eye disease
The inflammatory molecule interleukin-17A (IL-17A) triggers immune cells that in turn reduce IL-17A's pro-inflammatory activity, according to a study by National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers.

Hot or cold, venomous vipers still quick to strike
Most reptiles move slower when temperatures drop, but venomous rattlesnakes appear to be an exception.

Study of US mass shootings, firearms homicides suggests two-pronged policy approach
A new study examined the impact of household gun ownership and concealed carry legislation on annual counts of mass shootings and homicides from firearms in the United States over the last 25 years.

A new method to significantly increase the range and stability of optical tweezers
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with a team of the V.E.

When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?
Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being.

Small-farm tech reduces deforestation, climate change
Small farms in Zambia that use the latest hybrid seed for maize, help reduce deforestation and tackle climate change in a new Cornell University study.

An international study analyzes five hundred years of floods in Europe
An international research project coordinated by the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), with participation from researchers of the University of Barcelona, shows for the first time that flood pattern over the last decades in Europe have changed compared to past centuries.

Peer mentorship can be more effective, accessible than traditional mentorship in academic medicine
Peer mentorship is a critical and more accessible option for professional and personal growth than traditional mentor-mentee relationships, according to a new paper from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Some "inactive" drug ingredients may not be inert
The inactive ingredients that make up a major component of drug formulations may not be as inactive as previously thought, researchers report.

Plastic flow into ocean expected to triple by 2040, action could stem tide more than 80%
New analysis by The Pew Charitable Trusts and SYSTEMIQ finds that without immediate and sustained action, the annual flow of plastic into the ocean could nearly triple by 2040.

Excellent research results for CAR-T Cell therapy against Hodgkin lymphoma
Results from an early-phase clinical trial found CAR-T cell therapy, which attacks cancer cells using a person's reprogrammed immune cells, was highly active in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

UMD addresses African vulture poisoning with global disease and biodiversity implications
In a new paper published in Global Ecology and Conservation, University of Maryland researchers collaborated with international leaders in wildlife conservation to produce recommendations for vulture poisoning control in Southern Africa.

Where are arctic mosquitoes most abundant in Greenland and why?
Bzz! It's mosquito season in Greenland. June and July is when Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) are in peak abundance, buzzing about the tundra.

Gene in fat plays key role in insulin resistance
DALLAS - July 23, 2020 - Deleting a key gene in mice in just their fat made tissues throughout these animals insulin resistant, in addition to other effects, a new study by UT Southwestern researchers shows.

A world drowning in plastic pollution
Almost one billion tonnes of plastic will be dumped on land and in the oceans over the period from 2016 to 2040 unless the world acts, say a team of 17 global experts who have developed a computer model to track the stocks and flows of plastic around the world.

Seismic background noise drastically reduced due to COVID-19 lockdown measures
Global COVID-19 ''lockdown'' measures - the quarantines, physical isolation, travel restrictions and widespread closures of services and industry that countries around the world have implemented in 2020 - resulted in a months-long reduction in global seismic noise by up to 50%, representing the longest and most prominent global seismic noise reduction in recorded history.

Study identifies spread of bee disease via flowers
One in 11 flowers carries disease-causing parasites known to contribute to bee declines, according to a Cornell University study that identifies how flowers act as hubs for transmitting diseases to bees and other pollinators.

Study finds decline in emergent hospitalizations during early phase of COVID-19
Researchers from BIDMC report on the decline of emergent medical, surgical and obstetric hospitalizations at the medical center during the six-week period following the week of the declaration of the COVID-19 public health emergency in Boston in mid-March 2020.

Plant-based diets high in carbs improve type 1 diabetes, according to new case studies
Plant-based diets rich in whole carbohydrates can improve insulin sensitivity and other health markers in individuals with type 1 diabetes, according to two case studies published by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in the Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism.

Cells react differently to genomic imprinting
We inherit half of our genes from each parent. For their function of most genes, it doesn't matter which parent a gene comes from.

Social distancing, population density, temperature and reproduction number of SARS-CoV-2
The association of county-level factors with variation in the instantaneous reproduction number of SARS-CoV-2 in the United States is examined.

New cell profiling method could speed TB drug discovery
A new cell profiling technology combines high throughput imaging and machine learning to provide a rapid, cost-effective way to determine how specific compounds act to destroy the bacterium that causes tuberculosis.

Meet Cosmo, a bull calf designed to produce 75% male offspring
Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have successfully produced a bull calf, named Cosmo, who was genome-edited as an embryo so that he'll produce more male offspring.

Novel theory of climate dynamics: Three-pattern decomposition of global atmospheric circulation
Due to the lack of a complete theoretical system for climate prediction, the forecasting of drought and flood in summer of China has always been a major scientific problem for meteorologists.

New CRISPR C-to-G DNA base editor expands the landscape of precision genome editing
The new base editing platform may help researchers understand and correct genetic diseases by selective editing of single DNA 'letters' across nucleobase classes.

Genetic testing for heart diseases may help patients and families identify risks
Some cardiovascular diseases may be inherited, including cardiomyopathies, arrhythmic disorders, aneurysms and certain types of lipid disorders.

Mercury remains a persistent poison in Connecticut's still river
Researchers are beginning to unravel how century-old mercury pollution impacts local food web.

A conversation game may reduce disparity in end-of-life care for African Americans
A Penn State College of Medicine research team found that playing a simple conversation game may encourage African Americans to make plans for their end of life care.

Correct dosage of methane-inhibiting additive in dairy cow feed shown in study
The optimum amount of a methane-inhibiting supplement in dairy cattle feed has been determined by an international team of researchers, indicating that widespread use of the compound could be an affordable climate change-battling strategy, if farmers embrace it.

Lone Star ticks in Illinois can carry, transmit Heartland virus
Researchers have confirmed that Heartland virus, an emerging pathogen with potentially dire consequences for those infected, is present in Lone Star ticks in two Illinois counties hundreds of miles apart.

Comparing hyperthyroidism treatments with risk of cancer death
Researchers compared long-term risk of death from a solid cancer in patients treated with radioactive iodine, anti-thyroid drugs or surgery for hyperthyroidism.

A never-before-seen cell state may explain cancer's ability to resist drugs
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute, the Koch Institute at MIT, and the Klarman Cell Observatory at the Broad Institute have identified an unusual cell state that emerges early in tumor evolution and supports a cancer's ability to outwit chemotherapy.

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Mothers unlikely to pass COVID-19 to their newborn babies if precautions are taken, small study suggests
Mothers with COVID-19 infection are unlikely to pass the virus to their newborn babies, if correct hygiene precautions are observed, according to a small observational study published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

Men 'less supportive' in more egalitarian nations
A new 42-country study has found that the more gender egalitarian the country, the less likely men are to support women's causes.

Lightning strikes more than 100 million times per year in the tropics
Tropical storms often begin with an impressive display of pyrotechnics, but researchers have largely overlooked the role of lightning strikes in tropical ecosystems.

A new approach to aiding black male trauma survivors
Many Black men suffer symptoms of traumatic stress in the aftermath of traumatic injury, and they also often carry social concerns, including experiences of discrimination and stigma.

Preventing the next pandemic
A Policy Forum article published today in Science shows that an annual investment of $30 billion should be enough to offset the costs of preventing another global pandemic such as COVID-19.

Reexamining the history of slavery through 23andMe African ancestry data
In a paper appearing July 23 in the American Journal of Human Genetics, researchers have compiled genetic data from consenting 23andMe research participants to paint a more complete picture of African ancestry in the New World.

Remember the first time you...? Mysterious brain structure sheds light on addiction
Do you remember where you were when you first heard that two planes had crashed into New York's Twin Towers?

Complex developmental patterns are under the control of surprisingly simple signals
Princeton University researchers explored how patterns of protein activity direct fly embryonic development by using 'optogenetic' techniques to rapidly and precisely turn Ras/Erk signaling on and off.

The genetic basis of bats' superpowers revealed
First six reference-quality bat genomes released and analysed

Getting a grip on near-field light
Harvard researchers have developed a system to mold near-field light -- opening the door to unprecedented control over this powerful, largely unexplored type of light.

A mouse model was used to determine the personalized treatment for a cancer patient
A team from IDIBELL and ICO, using a mouse orthotopic model, conducted a real-time personalized oncology study to test the best therapeutic option to treat a type of relapse sarcoma.

COVID-19 vaccine innovation could dramatically speed up worldwide production
A new modified version of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein has a 10-fold higher expression rate in cell cultures than an earlier version that forms the basis of vaccine candidates currently in clinical trials from Moderna and Novavax.

Researchers find evidence of smallpox in the viking age
The fatal disease smallpox is older and more widespread than scientists so far have proved.

New native Hawaiian land snail species discovered, first in 60 years
Auriculella gagneorum, a small candy-striped snail from Oahu's Waianae Mountains, represents the first new species of a living Hawaiian land snail described in 60 years.

Increasing rates of preventable hospitalizations among adults with dementia
A team of investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that in recent years, increasing numbers of these hospitalizations were for conditions for which hospitalization can often be avoided with improvements in outpatient care.

New platform enables long-term tracking of stem cell-derived tissues after transplantation
A new platform reported on in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM) will enable long-term tracking of cardiomyocytes produced from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) after implantation into the heart.

UMD researcher highlights trends in consolidation of US agriculture with 35 years of data
In a new paper published in Applied Economics Perspectives and Policies, University of Maryland researcher Jim MacDonald presents a detailed history of the consolidation of agriculture in the US based on 35 years of data, with implications for all sectors of agriculture moving forward.

Lung ultrasound shows duration, severity of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
According to an open-access article published in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), lung ultrasound was highly sensitive for detecting abnormalities in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with B-lines, a thickened pleural line, and pulmonary consolidation the most commonly observed features.

Scientists chart SARS-CoV-2 origin and transmission in Brazil, harboring one of fastest growing COVID-19 epidemics in the world
A team of Brazilian and European scientists has determined the transmission rates and out-of-country origins of predominant SARS-CoV-2 strains currently circulating in Brazil, which harbors one of the fastest growing COVID-19 epidemics in the world.

ASCRS issues updated guidelines on surgery for Crohn's disease
Although rates of surgery for Crohn's disease have decreased over the years, many patients still require surgical treatment - due to inadequate responses to medical therapy, severe attacks of acute colitis, and many other situations.

Developing neural circuits linked to hunting behavior
Researchers demonstrated the relationship between improvements in zebrafish's hunting skills and the development of sensory coding in a part of the brain which responds to visual stimuli.

Wide awake: Light pollution keeps magpies and pigeons tossing and turning
La Trobe University and University of Melbourne researchers find light comparable in intensity to street lighting can disrupt the length, structure and intensity of sleep in magpies and pigeons

Neandertals may have had a lower threshold for pain
Pain is mediated through specialized nerve cells that are activated when potentially harmful things affect various parts of our bodies.

Gene-controlling mechanisms play key role in cancer progression
MIT researchers have analyzed how epigenomic modifications change as tumors evolve.

IUDs successfully manage menstrual pain in adolescents with disabilities
Adolescents and young women with disabilities can stop periods and get relief from distressing menstrual symptoms with IUDs, in the largest study in this population to date.

Shifts seen in breeding times and duration for 73 boreal bird species over 40 years
In a new study out this week, a team including forest ecologist Malcolm Itter at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports finding ''clear evidence of a contraction of the breeding period'' among boreal birds in Finland over a 43-year span for which good quality data were available.

Young dolphins pick their friends wisely
Strategic networking is key to career success, and not just for humans.

Distancing without isolating: Connection in COVID-19 era
The problem of social isolation and distress experienced by patients with cancer during the era of COVID-19 is discussed in this Viewpoint, as well as strategies for clinicians to support patients through the pandemic.

Vikings had smallpox and may have helped spread the world's deadliest virus
Scientists have discovered extinct strains of smallpox in the teeth of Viking skeletons - proving for the first time that the killer disease plagued humanity for at least 1400 years.

Two distinct circuits drive inhibition in the sensory thalamus of the brain
The thalamus is a 'Grand Central Station' for sensory information coming to our brains.

NASA finds strength in new Gulf Tropical Depression 8
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify the strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Tropical Depression 8, spinning in the Gulf of Mexico.

The spatial consistency of summer rainfall variability between the Mongolian Plateau and North China
The regional differences and similarities of precipitation variability are hotspots in climate change research.

MDI biological laboratory scientist develops new imaging method
The development of a new imaging technique by Prayag Murawala, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, and a team of collaborators in Austria enables unprecedented insight subcellular structures, tissues, organs and even whole organisms, and -- because of its wide applicability -- broadens the range of animal models that can be studied, processes that can be explored and biological questions that can be addressed.

UCalgary study finds global trends in women's breast cancer show cause for concern
Breast cancer rates among women globally are on the rise, but new research is uncovering trends related to age and where you live that could help target prevention measures to improve the situation.

Nasal saline irrigations in a pandemic
The overall safety and benefits of using nasal saline irrigations on viral upper respiratory infections during a pandemic, such as COVID-19, are discussed in this Viewpoint.

NASA sees compact Douglas strengthening to a major hurricane
Although a compact storm, hurricane Douglas in the Eastern Pacific is mighty, as it has become the season's first major hurricane.

Silicon core fishbone waveguide extends frequency comb
It is difficult to make very wide frequency combs from silicon waveguides, but clever waveguide engineering may be about to make that task a bit easier.

Simple urine test could significantly improve detection of adrenal cancer
Using a simple urine test alongside routine imaging for patients with adrenal masses could speed up adrenal cancer diagnosis, improving patient's prognosis and reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures, a new multi-centre study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found.

Researchers capture cell-level details of curved cornea
Researchers have, for the first time, acquired optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the curved layers of a person's cornea with cell-level detail and a large viewing area.

Immune system -- Knocked off balance
Instead of protecting us, the immune system can sometimes go awry, as in the case of autoimmune diseases and allergies.

How mosquitoes got their taste for human blood and what it means for the future
To predict and help control the spread of mosquito-borne illnesses, it's important to know where and why certain mosquitoes got their taste for biting humans in the first place.

Software of autonomous driving systems
Researchers at TU Graz and AVL focus on software systems of autonomous driving systems.

Tracking antibody profiles for influenza exposures across the lifespan
Immune responses to influenza exposures increase early in life, then decline in middle age, according to a study published July 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bingyi Yang of the University of Florida, Steven Riley of Imperial College London, Derek Cummings of the University of Florida, and colleagues.

Reef sharks in decline
Though many people find them intimidating, menacing or just plain scary, sharks are vital to the health of the world's oceans.

A new MXene material shows extraordinary electromagnetic interference shielding ability
Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have discovered a MXene material that presents exceptional electromagnetic interference shielding abilities.

New technique to capture carbon dioxide could greatly reduce power plant greenhouse gases
Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is ever more urgent to limit the damage from climate change.

Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study finds
Fertility is likely to decline in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, a new Bocconi University study finds

The best players are passionate about football
Sogndal football/soccer teams from Vestland county in Norway have now been studied by specialists.

Engineered SARS-CoV-2 protein offers better stability and yields for vaccine researchers
A team of scientists has engineered the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus - a critical component of potential COVID-19 vaccines - to be more environmentally stable and generate larger yields in the lab.

Hubble sees summertime on Saturn
Saturn is truly the lord of the rings in this latest snapshot from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, taken on July 4, 2020, when the opulent giant world was 839 million miles from Earth.

Ancient viral DNA suggests smallpox widespread in Viking Age Northern Europe
Viral DNA isolated from ancient human remains reveals the presence of smallpox in 7th century northern Europe, increasing the definitive antiquity of the disease in humans by nearly 1,000 years, according to a new study.

If relaxed too soon, physical distancing measures might have been all for naught
If physical distancing measures in the United States are relaxed while there is still no COVID-19 vaccine or treatment and while personal protective equipment remains in short supply, the number of resulting infections could be about the same as if distancing had never been implemented to begin with, reports a UCLA-led team of mathematicians and scientists.

New CT scan method lowers radiation exposure
A CT scan technique that splits a full X-ray beam into thin beamlets can deliver the same quality of image at a much reduced radiation dose, according to a new UCL study.

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections
Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research.

Humanizing hotel brands during COVID-19 could encourage tourists to return
Hotels should build an emotional attachment with tourists when communicating during crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic if they are to encourage them to return, according to new research.

Electrons obey social distancing in 'strange' metals
A Cornell University-led collaboration has used state-of-the-art computational tools to model the chaotic behavior of Planckian, or ''strange,'' metals.

Even immediate, significant efforts to reduce plastic pollution could leave Earth with 710 million metric tons by 2040, modeling suggests
Immediate and globally coordinated action to limit plastic consumption and waste could reduce the rate of plastic pollution by nearly 80% over the next two decades, according to a new modeling report.

Research breakthrough in fight against chytrid fungus
For frogs dying of the invasive chytridiomycosis disease, the leading cause of amphibian deaths worldwide, the genes responsible for protecting them may actually be leading to their demise, according to a new study published today in the journal Molecular Ecology by University of Central Florida and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) researchers.

Driving immunometabolism to control lung infection
When drugs to kill microbes are ineffective, host-directed therapy uses the body's own immune system to deal with the infection.

Home-made face masks likely need at least 2 layers to curb COVID-19 spread
Home-made cloth face masks likely need a minimum of two layers, and preferably three, to prevent the dispersal of viral droplets from the nose and mouth that are associated with the spread of COVID-19, indicates a video case study published online in the journal Thorax.

Teen museum educators increase engagement, learning, in tween visitors
A new study finds that youth docents have an overall positive effect on visitors' experiences, learning and information retention at informal learning sites -- like museums.

New approach simultaneously measures EEG and fMRI connectomes
Researchers have developed a new approach to compare changes in neural communication using electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging simultaneously.

Closing the gap: finding undiagnosed hepatitis C infections after blood transfusions
What is the incidence of viral hepatitis caused by blood transfusions before and after Sweden introduced screening of blood in the early 1990s?

The first mouse model of human pancreas cancer subtypes
Organoids power the first mouse model of two pancreas cancer subtypes, identifying genes influencing a lethal transformation of one subtype to the other.

Battling harmful algae blooms
In two separate studies, the University of Delaware's Kathryn Coyne is looking at why one species of algae has some strains that can cause fish kills and others that are non-toxic, while examining an algicidal bacterium found in Delaware's Inland Bays that could provide an environmentally-friendly approach to combatting algae blooms.

Do bicycles slow down cars on low speed, low traffic roads? Latest research says 'no'
The new article Evidence from Urban Roads without Bicycle Lanes on the Impact of Bicycle Traffic on Passenger Car Travel Speeds published in Transportation Research Record, the Journal of the Transportation Research Board, demonstrates that bicycles do not significantly reduce passenger car travel speeds on low speed, low volume urban roads without bicycle lanes.

Highly stable amyloid protein aggregates may help plant seeds last longer
Highly stable polymeric ''amyloid'' proteins, best known for their role in Alzheimer's disease, have been mostly studied in animals.

Different from a computer: Why the brain never processes the same input in the same way
The brain never processes the same information in the same way.

Spectacular ultraviolet flash may finally explain how white dwarfs explode
For just the second time ever, astrophysicists have spotted a spectacular flash of ultraviolet (UV) light accompanying a white dwarf explosion.

Seeing the light: Researchers combine technologies for better light control
A new technology that can allow for better light control without requiring large, difficult-to-integrate materials and structures has been developed by Penn State researchers.

Lego-inspired bone and soft tissue repair with tiny, 3D-printed bricks
A new, 3D-printed technology that was inspired by Lego block toys is designed to help heal broken bones, and could one day even lead to lab-made organs for human transplant.

Big wheel ruts, big economic losses
Research suggests the economic loss from wheel-traffic compaction for farmers in North Dakota and Minnesota could exceed 1 billion USD.

COVID-19 lockdown caused 50% global reduction in human-linked Earth vibrations
The lack of human activity during lockdown caused human-linked vibrations in the Earth to drop by an average of 50% between March and May 2020.

Online tools can improve autism diagnosis
Online tools and assessments can help speed up diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the first comprehensive survey of research in the field has concluded.

'Self-eating' process of stem cells may be the key to new regenerative therapies
The self-eating process in embryonic stem cells known as chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and a related metabolite may serve as promising new therapeutic targets to repair or regenerate damaged cells and organs, Penn Medicine researchers show in a new study published online in Science.

Palaeontology: Ancient African skull sheds light on American crocodile origins
The extinct African crocodile species Crocodylus checchiai may be closely related to American crocodile species alive today, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

Rely on gut feeling? New research identifies how second brain in gut communicates
You're faced with a big decision so your second brain provides what's normally referred to as 'gut instinct', but how did this sensation reach you before it was too late?

Coral reefs show resilience to rising temperatures
Rising ocean temperatures have devastated coral reefs all over the world, but a recent study in Global Change Biology has found that reefs in the Eastern Tropical Pacific region may prove to be an exception.

PolyA-miner assesses the effect of alternative polyadenylation on gene expression
Meet PolyA-miner, a new computational tool that enables scientists to evaluate the contribution of alternative polyadenylation to gene regulation in health and disease.

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events
Researchers combined avalanche physics with ecosystem data to create a computational method for predicting extreme ecological events.

2 immunotherapies merged into single, more effective treatment
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have combined two immunotherapy strategies into a single therapy and found, in studies in human cells and in mice, that the two together are more effective than either alone in treating certain blood cancers, such as leukemia.

Quantum physicists crack mystery of 'strange metals,' a new state of matter
Strange metals are just plain odd. They are related to high-temperature superconductors and have surprising connections to the properties of black holes.

Genome-mapping reveals 'supermutation' resulting in cryptic coloration in stick insects
In a paper published July 23, 2020 in 'Science,' a multi-institution team discusses findings from an investigation of genetic mutations in seven species of North American stick insects (Timema) resulting in cryptic coloration.

Study: Factors linked to structural racism put latino communities at risk for COVID-19
WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 23, 2020) -- Factors linked to structural racism put Latino communities in the U.S. at high risk of COVID-19, a study published today says.

New technology makes homes more energy independent, helps divert power during blackouts
In a new study, researchers from Texas A&M University and industry have designed a smart technology that can help utility companies better serve communities affected by blackouts.

Kidney transplantation between people with HIV is safe, NIH study finds
Kidney transplantation from deceased donors with HIV to people living with both HIV and end-stage kidney disease is feasible and safe, investigators supported by the National Institutes of Health have found.

FSU biologists shed light on how cells move resources
Florida State University researchers have new insight into the tiny packages that cells use to move molecules, a structure that is key to cellular metabolism, drug delivery and more.

Frequent social media use influences depressive symptoms over time among LGBTQ youth
Frequent social media use can impact depressive symptoms over time for LGBTQ youth, according to research from a Washington State University communication professor.

NASA examines Tropical Storm Gonzalo's structural changes
Visible and microwave imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite indicated Tropical Storm Gonzalo was slightly less organized than it was on the previous day.

SARS-CoV-2 virus isolated from mastoid, middle ear
How common SARS-CoV-2 colonization was in the middle ear and mastoid in a sample of three patients was examined in this cadaver study.

Boats and ships leave baby reef fish vulnerable to predators
Scientists say the noise from boats and ships slows down the activity of baby fish on coral reefs, which leaves them more vulnerable to their predators.

Managing grief, loss, connection in oncology: What COVID-19 has taken
In this essay, an experienced oncologist mourns the loss of personal connection with patients and their families that has resulted from the social distancing of the COVID-19 era.

Some 'inert' drug ingredients may be biologically active
Some supposedly inert ingredients in common drugs -- such as dyes and preservatives -- may potentially be biologically active and could lead to unanticipated side effects, according to a preliminary new study by researchers from the UC San Francisco School of Pharmacy and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR).

A novel tissue imaging system accelerates cancer diagnosis
Researchers from Osaka University developed a novel three-dimensional imaging system to diagnose cervical cancer in a faster, non-invasive and more efficient way than the conventional approach.

How does cooperation evolve?
In nature, organisms often support each other in order to gain an advantage.

Desert mosses use quartz rocks as sun shades
Desert conditions are harsh, and mosses often spend much of the year in a dormant condition, desiccated and brown, until rain comes.

L-type calcium channel blockers may contribute to heart failure, study finds
Researchers found that in rats and human cells in vitro, LCCBs cause changes in blood vessels -- known as vascular remodeling -- that reduce blood flow and increase pressure.
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