Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 24, 2020
Brazilian researchers develop an optical fiber made of gel derived from marine algae
Edible, biocompatible and biodegradable, these fibers have potential for various medical applications.

Alaska is getting wetter. That's bad news for permafrost and the climate.
Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85% of the state, and the consequences for Earth's global climate.

Coronavirus makes changes that cause cells not to recognize it
The novel coronavirus changes the appearance of its messenger RNA cap to trick the host cell into not recognizing it is foreign, according to a study reported by researchers from UT Health San Antonio.

Serendipity broadens the scope for making graphite
Curtin University researchers have unexpectedly discovered a new way to make crystalline graphite, an essential material used in the making of lithium ion batteries.

High-protein distillers dried grains with solubles provide high quality pig nutrition
With more ethanol in production and a greater ability to upcycle co-products into animal feed ingredients, companies are creating custom products and partnering with University of Illinois researchers to test for quality and digestibility.

Elevated levels of a specific protein found to correlate with inflammatory symptom severity in COVID
A new study found raised levels of transforming growth factor beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) in blood sampled from roughly 100 people hospitalized for COVID-19, and further found that elevated levels of

Photochromic bismuth complexes show great promise for optical memory elements
Russian chemists obtained a new photochromic complex composed of bismuth (III) and viologen cations and used the new compound to create optical memory elements that were shown to be highly efficient and stable.

Health, well-being and food security of families deteriorating under COVID-19 stress
The ongoing disruptive changes from efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are having a substantial negative impact on the physical and mental well-being of parents and their children across the country, according to a new national survey published today in Pediatrics.

Proposed framework for integrating chatbots into health care
While chatbots are becoming more widespread in health care, it's important to implement them thoughtfully and constantly evaluate them in a variety of ways, Penn authors argue.

In cell studies, seaweed extract outperforms remdesivir in blocking COVID-19 virus
In a test of antiviral effectiveness against the virus that causes COVID-19, an extract from edible seaweeds substantially outperformed remdesivir, the current standard antiviral used to combat the disease.

EMA adopts positive opinion on monthly vaginal ring to reduce HIV risk
IPM today welcomed a positive opinion from the EMA on the dapivirine vaginal ring for use by cisgender women ages 18 and older in developing countries to reduce their risk of HIV-1 infection.

China 2050: How the US should prepare for an ascendant China -- RAND Report
New RAND report says US should prepare for a triumphant or ascending People's Republic of China -- scenarios that not only align with current PRC national development trends but also represent the most challenging future scenarios for the US military.

SARS-CoV-2 infection of non-neuronal cells, not neurons, may drive loss of smell in patients with COVID-19
A new study of human olfactory cells has revealed that viral invasion of supportive cells in the nasal cavity might be driving the loss of smell seen in some patients with COVID-19.

Healthy international travelers not likely to acquire Candida auris
Researchers have shown that there is a low risk for healthy people to acquire Candida auris during travel.

USTC made breakthrough in the Sb2(S,Se)3 solar cell efficiency
USTC developed a hydrothermal deposition method for the synthesis of antimony selenosulfide for solar cell applications.

Rapid COVID-19 test developed to detect neutralising antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity
As the current COVID-19 pandemic continues to adversely impact communities and economies across the world, efficiency in testing for the infection and antibodies is vital.

Sci-fi foretold social media, Uber and Augmented Reality, offers insights into the future
Science fiction authors foresaw augmented reality video games, the rise of social media and trends of hyper-consumption, and can help predict future consumer patterns.

Look into the mirror
If the eyes are the mirror of the soul, then thanks to the translucent corneas, we can look deep into that soul.

Pandemic to accelerate adoption of electronic patient portal for epilepsy
The COVID-19 pandemic is a catalyst to accelerate the adoption of technology-enabled patient care for epilepsy, according to a new study published in Epilepsia.

Dartmouth-industry collaborations improve computer graphics
New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools.

Big brains and dexterous hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains.

T cells can shift from helping to harming in atherosclerosis
At La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) researchers are dedicated to finding a way to stop plaques from forming in the first place.

Plant-based diets shown to lower blood pressure even with limited meat and dairy
Consuming a plant-based diet can lower blood pressure even if small amounts of meat and dairy are consumed too, according to new research from the University of Warwick.

Genetic mutations predispose individuals to severe COVID-19
When two pairs of previously healthy young brothers from two families required mechanical ventilation at the intensive care unit in rapid succession, doctors and researchers at Radboud University Medical Center were inclined to consider that genetic factors had a key role in compromising their immune system.

NASA animation tracks Tropical Storm Hanna's progression
NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery as Tropical Storm Hanna formed in the Gulf of Mexico and continued to organize.

Solving the jigsaw puzzle of regional carbon budgets
Ciais and colleagues obtained the first bottom-up global land carbon budget from the sum of regional estimates, combining inventories with lateral transfers from the trade of wood and food products and the export of dissolved carbon by rivers to the oceans.

Citizen science at heart of new study showing COVID-19 seismic noise reduction
Research published in the journal Science, using a mix of professional and Raspberry Shake citizen seismic data, finds that lockdown measures to slow the spread of the virus COVID-19 reduced seismic noise by 50% worldwide.

Wrong number of fingers leads down wrong track
Have you ever wondered why our hands have five fingers while amphibians usually only have four?

Project creates more powerful, versatile ultrafast laser pulse
In Physical Review Letters, University of Rochester researchers describe a new device, the ''stretched-pulse soliton Kerr resonator,'' that creates an ultrafast laser pulse that is freed from the physical limits endemic to sources of laser light and the limits of the sources' wavelengths.

Livestock expansion is a factor in global pandemics
The growth of global livestock farming is a threat to our biodiversity and also increases the health risks to both humans and domesticated animals.

Antiviral method against herpes paves the way for combatting incurable viral infections
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new method to treat human herpes viruses.

Ocean features and changes in the past are explored to anticipate future climate
The Quaternary International journal has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Stratigraphy and Palaeontology describing, in detail, the climate changes taking place in the Bay of Biscay over the last 37,000 years.

Novel drug delivery particles use neurotransmitters as a 'passport' into the brain
Drug-carrying lipid nanoparticles were created that incorporate neurotranmitters to help them cross the blood-brain barrier in mice.

Discovery of a rare human gene mutation that causes MAIT cells to disappear
A collaboration between Monash Health, the Australian Genomics Health Alliance (AGHA) and researchers at the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute has led to the discovery of a rare single gene mutation in a patient that eliminates an immune cell population, namely MAIT cells.

Nature study identifies 21 existing drugs that could treat COVID-19
A Nature study authored by a global team of scientists and led by Sumit Chanda, Ph.D., professor at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, has identified 21 existing drugs that stop the replication of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

NASA Water vapor data reveals Tropical Storm Gonzalo's soaking capability
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Storm Gonzalo as tropical storm warnings, a tropical storm watch, and hurricane watch were posted.

Neurons are genetically programmed to have long lives
Most neurons are created during embryonic development and have no ''backup'' after birth.

New model by CHOP researchers identifies noncoding mutations across five pediatric cancers
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a new computational algorithm that has, for the first time, identified a spectrum of mutations in the noncoding portion of the human genome across five major pediatric cancers.

Mouse study shows spinal cord injury causes bone marrow failure syndrome
Research conducted at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found that spinal cord injuries in mice cause an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome that may contribute to chronic immune dysfunction.

High-deductible health plans and major cardiovascular outcomes
In the first study to examine the association between high out-of-pocket costs and adverse cardiovascular events, research led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds that individuals with cardiovascular disease risk factors who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) did not experience increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

An origin story for a family of oddball meteorites
Study suggests a family of rare meteorites likely came from an early planetesimal with a magnetic core.

Knowledge, concerns, behaviors of individuals during 1st week of COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
This is a survey study that examined the knowledge, concerns and behaviors of people living in different COVID-19 exposure zones during the first week of the pandemic in Italy.

Experimental optimal verification of entangled states using local measurements
USTC modified the original proposal to be robust to practical imperfections, and experimentally implement a scalable quantum state verification on two-qubit and four-qubit entangled states with nonadaptive local measurements.

Tandem catalytic system efficiently converts carbon dioxide to methanol
Boston College chemists have used a tandem catalytic system to efficiently convert carbon dioxide to methanol.

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections
Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found.

Why is obesity so common in COVID-19 patients?
A hormone that connects the body's metabolism and immune response system may explain why COVID-19 is so dangerous for people with obesity.

NASA's tracking Hawaii-bound Major Hurricane Douglas
Hurricane Douglas is a major hurricane tracking through the Central Pacific Ocean on a forecast track to Hawaii.

High levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found on equipment in communal gyms
Research presented at ASM Microbe Online found that 43% of Staphylococcus bacteria found on exercise equipment in university gyms were ampicillin-resistant, with 73% of those isolates being resistant to multiple additional drugs.

Researchers use cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand cancer progression
Using a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling, a team of researchers from the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Science and the Fralin Life Sciences Institute are beginning to unravel the mechanisms that lie behind tetraploidy - a chromosomal abnormality that is often found in malignant tumors.

Genetic mutations help MRSA to become highly resistant to antibiotics
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that genetic mutations in MRSA allow it to evolve and become more resistant to antibiotics such as penicillin.

Manipulating non-magnetic atoms in a chromium halide enables tuning of magnetic properties
The magnetic properties of a chromium halide can be tuned by manipulating the non-magnetic atoms in the material, a team, led by Boston College researchers, reports in the most recent edition of ScienceAdvances.

Sputum testing provides higher rate of COVID-19 detection
The team found that sputum testing detected the RNA of the virus that causes COVID-19 at significantly higher rates while oropharyngeal swab testing had lower rates.

Artificial intelligence can help predict the bacteria responsible for pneumonia in emergency rooms
A team of researchers showed that artificial intelligence (AI) could help predict the type of bacteria that caused the infection in patients with pneumonia.

Pizza study shows body copes surprisingly well with one-off calorie indulgence
Young men can eat twice as much food as they need to feel 'full', research shows.

New study explains 'miracle' of how the Warsaw Ghetto beat Typhus
Through state-of-the-art mathematical modelling and historical documents, a new study points to community health programs and social distancing practices as the most likely explanations for the epidemic's sudden and mysterious collapse, which was hailed by survivors at the time as a miracle.

Discovery of disordered nanolayers in intermetallic alloys
A research team led by scientists of City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has recently discovered the disordered nanoscale layers at grain boundaries in the ordered intermetallic alloys.

Heart transplants declined sharply during pandemic
Heart transplants, donor hearts, and transplant waitlists all fell sharply at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, Columbia University researchers have found.

AsEH enzyme: A new pharmacological target against Alzheimer's disease
A UB study published in the journal Neurotherapeutics has validated a new pharmacological target for Alzheimer's disease.

COVID-19 medical leave among EMS responders, firefighters in New York
The use of medical leave among emergency medical service responders and firefighters in New York during the COVID-19 pandemic is compared with earlier periods.

How COVID-19 causes smell loss
Loss of smell, or anosmia, is one of the earliest and most commonly reported symptoms of COVID-19.

Machine learning reveals recipe for building artificial proteins
A team lead by Pritzker Molecular Engineering researchers has developed an artificial intelligence-led process that uses big data to design new proteins.

Another mRNA-based vaccine candidate protects animals against SARS-CoV-2
An experimental messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) elicits protective immune responses in mice and non-human primates, researchers report on July 23rd in the journal Cell.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.