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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | July 27, 2020


Safe work protocols can increase the likelihood the business will fail
There are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organization survival.
Soft robot actuators heal themselves
Repeated activity wears on soft robotic actuators, but these machine's moving parts need to be reliable and easily fixed.
Study seeks to explain decline in hip fracture rates
In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today, researchers showed how analysis of data from the multigenerational Framingham Osteoporosis Study may in part explain why the incidence of hip fracture in the US has declined during the last two decades.
Deep learning algorithm identifies tumor subtypes based on routine histological images
Researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center, working with colleagues in Europe, created a deep learning algorithm that can infer molecular alterations directly from routine histology images across multiple common tumor types.
Outcomes of cardiovascular MRI in patients recovered from COVID-19
The presence of myocardial injury in patients recently recovered from COVID-19 are evaluated in this observational study.
Video camera in a public place knows the density of people or vehicle more accurately
Deep learning applied for image/video processing opened the door for the practical deployment for object detection and identification with acceptable accuracy.
Medical journals' commercial publishing contracts may lead to biased articles
Scientists have long been concerned that the common practice of medical journals accepting commercial payments from pharmaceutical companies may lead to pro-industry bias in published articles.
Stopping listeria reproduction 'in its tracks'
Listeria contaminations can send food processing facilities into full crisis mode with mass product recalls, federal warnings and even hospitalization or death for people who consume the contaminated products.
A new way to target cancers using 'synthetic lethality'
Researchers at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that inhibiting a key enzyme caused human cancer cells associated with two major types of breast and ovarian cancer to die and in mouse studies reduced tumor growth.
Characteristics, strength of evidence of COVID-19 studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov
The characteristics and expected strength of evidence of COVID-19 studies registered on ClinicalTrials.gov are evaluated in this observational study.
Ferried across: Figuring out unconventional spin transport in quantum spin liquids
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Yokohama National University uncover the peculiar mechanism by which spin perturbations travel through a seemingly unpassable region of a quantum spin liquid system.
Leaving money on the table to stay in the game
Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt -- there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction.
Ultra-low power brain implants find meaningful signal in grey matter noise
By tuning into a subset of brain waves, University of Michigan researchers have dramatically reduced the power requirements of neural interfaces while improving their accuracy--a discovery that could lead to long-lasting brain implants that can both treat neurological diseases and enable mind-controlled prosthetics and machines.
Immune system variation can predict severe COVID-19 outcomes
The differing immune system responses of patients with COVID-19 can help predict who will experience moderate and severe consequences of disease, according to a new study by Yale researchers published July 27 in the journal Nature.
Association of cardiac infection with SARS-CoV-2 in confirmed COVID-19 autopsy cases
The presence of SARS-CoV-2 in myocardial tissue from autopsy cases is evaluated in this observational study.
UCalgary researchers unlock new insights that could help with vaccine development
Researchers at the University of Calgary have unlocked new insights that may help with vaccine development for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, malaria, and tuberculosis.
Invisible barriers cut down on cheating
Both see-through and pretend partitions promoted honesty in taking tests, psychology experiments show, suggesting simple environmental cues can nudge children to do the right thing.
Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care workers in Houston
Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection among asymptomatic health care workers and community residents in Texas are examined in this observational study.
Unparalleled inventory of the human gut ecosystem
Scientists gathered and published over 200 000 genomes from the human gut microbiome.
Work absences in April highest on record, suggesting under-count of COVID cases: New study
In April, more than 2 million jobholders were out sick from work, the highest number since at least 1976, and more than double the rate from mid-April 2019, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.
New approach refines the Hubble's constant and age of universe
Using known distances of 50 galaxies from Earth to refine calculations in Hubble's constant, a research team led by a University of Oregon astronomer estimates the age of the universe at 12.6 billion years.
New depth map of the Arctic Ocean
An international team of researchers has published the most detailed submarine map of the Artic Ocean.
MU School of Nursing programs help nursing homes respond to COVID-19
As the coronavirus pandemic continues to put a strain on health care systems, nursing homes have become overburdened with the challenge of keeping both patients and staff safe and healthy.
Maternal depression increases odds of depression in offspring, study shows
Depression in mothers during and after pregnancy increased the odds of depression in offspring during adolescence and adulthood by 70%.
Study shows three medications currently on the market may have unexpected effects
A new study of 1,443 medications found that three prescription drugs currently on the market caused unexpected changes in worms that could point to potential, unrecognized effects in humans.
University of Hawaii and iconic watercress farm collaborate on sustainability research
University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers and Sumida Farm farmers published a study this week detailing their collaboration to study the past, present and future of the multigenerational farm which produces 70 percent of Hawai'i's watercress.
Link between education, income inequality has existed for a century
Income is inextricably linked to access to education in America and it has been for a century, according to a new study from researchers at Stanford University and Rice University.
Study examines stimulant use in context of state medical cannabis laws
Medical and non-medical prescription stimulant use is higher in states without medical cannabis laws (MCLs) than in states with MCLs among heterosexuals and among certain lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) subpopulations.
Is spanking of children by parents less common?
Changes over 25 years in how common spanking of children was by parents in the United States are examined in this study.
New review on management of osteoporosis in premenopausal women
An IOF and ECTS Working Group have published an updated review of literature published after 2017 on premenopausal osteoporosis.
European and American maize: Same same, but different
German researchers decoded the European maize genome. In comparison to North American maize lines, they discovered variations that underlie phenotypic differences and may also contribute to the heterosis effect.
Viral hepatitis: Europe needs to close the testing gap
Approximately four in five people living with hepatitis B and three out of four people with hepatitis C infection across the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) and the UK have not yet been diagnosed.
Pristine environments offer a window to our cloudy past
A new study uses satellite data over the Southern Hemisphere to understand global cloud composition during the industrial revolution.
NASA tracks Hanna's soaking path into Mexico
NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on Tropical Depression Hanna while imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite was used to create an animation showing its movement from Texas to Mexico.
Not just light: The sensitivity of photoreceptors to mechanical stimuli is unveiled
''We thought we knew almost everything about photoreceptors, but we have proved that is not the case''.
Rethinking women's mental health following partner abuse
When one in six Australian women report experiencing physical and/or sexual violence - and one in four report emotional abuse - by a current or previous cohabiting partner since the age of 15, you know there is a problem.
Protecting beta cells against stress may guard against type 1 diabetes
Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have found an unusual strategy that eventually may help to guard transplanted beta cells or to slow the original onset of type 1 diabetes.
New study provides valuable historical dataset for Yellow River water management
Researchers led by Prof. LIU Yu from the Institute of Earth Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reconstructed natural runoff history for the middle reach of the YR from 1492 to 2013 CE to assess the effects of human activities.
Pathological regression of lymph nodes better predicts esophageal cancer survival
A team of researchers led by Osaka University established a new pathological grading system to evaluate the therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) removed in esophageal cancer (EC) surgery, demonstrating that the system predicts recurrence and prognosis in EC patients better than conventional systems.
Make your own greenhouse gas logger
Researchers at Linköping University's Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Change, have developed a simple logger for greenhouse gas flows.
RNA biology provides the key to cell identity and health
Two papers in Genome Research by the FANTOM Consortium have provided new insights into the core regulatory networks governing cell types in different vertebrate species, and the role of RNA as regulators of cell function and identity.
'Selfish and loveless' society in Uganda really is not
A mountain people in Uganda -- branded as selfish and loveless by an renowned anthropologist half a century ago -- really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist.
Antibiotics alone successfully treat uncomplicated appendicitis in children
Of 1,068 patients from 10 health centers enrolled in the study, 67.1% of those who elected to initially manage their care through antibiotics alone experienced no harmful side effects and did not later require an appendectomy by their one-year follow-up appointment.
Overweight and obesity are associated with a low sperm quality
Researchers from the Rovira i Virgili University in collaboration with researchers from the University of Utah have carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the association between adiposity (normal weight, overweight, obesity, and low weight) and the sperm quality.
NIST expands database that helps identify unknown compounds in milk
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have recently doubled the size of a reference library that includes examples of a certain type of carbohydrate found in milk from humans and several other animals.
How a pandemic could advance science of early adversity
Recent advancements across disciplines relevant to early child development can be used to understand the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and to develop and scale empirically supported interventions for adversity-exposed children and families.
NASA sees hurricane Douglas brush Hawaii
Imagery from NASA's Terra satellite was used to create an animation showing Douglas' movement past the Hawaiian Islands.
COVID-19 increased anxiety, depression for already stressed college students
College students were more anxious, depressed and sedentary during the initial outbreak of COVID-19 than they were during similar academic terms in other years, according to a multiyear study using mobile sensing.
Which bacteria truly qualify as probiotics?
Today, the word probiotic is used to describe all kinds of 'good' microorganisms in foods and supplements.
Molecular cause underlying rare genetic disorder revealed
Scientists identify how a nonfunctioning CASK gene creates chaos in the brain.
Researchers offer unprecedented look into 'central engine' powering a solar flare
In a study published in Nature Astronomy, an international team of researchers has presented a new, detailed look inside the ''central engine'' of a large solar flare accompanied by a powerful eruption by the Owens Valley Solar Array -- a solar radio telescope facility operated by New Jersey Institute of Technology's Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research.
Link confirmed between a healthy diet and prostate cancer prevention
Using data from a study conducted in Montreal between 2005 and 2012, a research team led by Professor Marie-Élise Parent of Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has shown a link between diet and prostate cancer in the article ''Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Population-Based Case-Control Study in Montreal, Canada'', published in Nutrients in June.
Difference in a single gene may boost stress on heart from e-cigarettes in people of East Asian descent
A genetic difference in one gene common in people of East Asian descent may make them more susceptible to rapid heart rates and chemical toxicity if they use e-cigarettes.
Drug-induced interstitial lung disease in breast cancer patients
Drug-induced Interstitial Lung Disease in Breast Cancer Patients: A Lesson We Should Learn from Multi-Disciplinary Integration Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.
Pesticides can protect crops from hydrophobic pollutants
Researchers have revealed that commercial pesticides can be applied to crops in the Cucurbitaceae family to decrease their accumulation of hydrophobic pollutants, thereby improving crop safety.
Flu, pneumonia vaccinations tied to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia
Flu (influenza) and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2020.
Researchers develop new cytosine base editors with high specificity and precision
Recently, GAO Caixia's group from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences created two new CBEs based on a truncated human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminase (A3Bctd) and developed a high-throughput assay for assessing sgRNA-independent deamination changes in plant CBEs.
Heat smarter, not harder -- How microwaves make catalytic reactions more efficient
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and International Christian University (ICU) demonstrate a synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy-based method by which the local temperatures of metal nanoparticles can be measured under microwaves.
Army project turns to nature for help with self-healing material
An Army-funded project developed a self-healing material patterned after squid ring teeth protein.
Model links patterns in sediment to rain, uplift and sea level change
In a recent study, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin show that a natural record - sediments packed together at basin margins - offers scientists a powerful tool for understanding the forces that shaped our planet over millions of years, with implications on present day understanding.
Higher end of normal blood platelet count could indicate cancer
Blood platelet counts at the higher end of normal suggest a high risk of cancer in men aged 60 or over, and should be investigated, according to new University of Exeter research.
Massive seagrass die-off leads to widespread erosion in a California estuary
The large-scale loss of eelgrass in a major California estuary -- Morro Bay -- may be causing widespread erosion.
Novel label-free imaging technique brings out the inner light within T cells
A new imaging method developed by the Skala lab uses the natural autofluorescence within cells to assess T cell activity.
Recent advances in 2D, 3D and higher-order topological photonics
A research team from South Korea and the USA has provided a comprehensive review covering the recent progress in topological photonics, a recently emerging branch of photonics.
Remote, real-time monitoring of post-operative lung transplant patients significantly decreases hospital stays
Remote, real-time monitoring of post-operative lung transplant patients significantly decreases hospital readmissions and resulted in shorter hospital stays when patients were readmitted
Glacial stream insect may tolerate warmer waters
An endangered aquatic insect that lives in icy streams fed by glaciers might not mind if the water grows warmer due to climate change.
Study reveals how different mosquitoes respond to light and ti
In a new study, researchers found that night- versus day-biting species of mosquitoes are behaviorally attracted and repelled by different colors of light at different times of day.
Scientists record rapid carbon loss from warming peatlands
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a direct relationship between climate warming and carbon loss in a peatland ecosystem.
Life in the pits: Scientists identify the key enzyme behind BO
Researchers at the University of York have discovered a unique ''BO enzyme'' responsible for armpit odour.
How to stack graphene up to four layers
IBS research team reports a novel method to grow multi-layered, single-crystalline graphene with a selected stacking order in a wafer scale.
Origami metamaterials show reversible auxeticity combined with deformation recoverability
New research by Northwestern Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology expands the understanding of origami structures, opening possibilities for mechanical metamaterials to be used in soft robotics and medical devices.
SMART finds new and safe method that enhances dengue vaccination -- Paving way to wide use
Researchers at SMART have discovered a practical way to induce strong and broad immunity to the dengue virus.
The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses
A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host's immune system.
Tendency to select targeted retirement fund ending in zero may impact wealth
New research shows that selecting a targeted retirement fund that ends in a zero could negatively impact your retirement savings.
Deadly genetic synergy in cancer cells could be exploited for therapy
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has identified a new instance in which the simultaneous mutation of two nonessential genes -- neither of which is on its own vital to cell survival -- can cause cancer cell death.
Lead white pigments on Andean drinking vessels provide new historical context
Researchers studying lead white pigments on Andean ceremonial drinking vessels known as qeros have found new similarities among these artifacts that could help museums, conservators, historians and scholars better understand the timeline and production of these culturally significant items during the colonial period (1532-1821).
"Inchworm" pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic "boom"
A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia.
NSAIDs increase cardiovascular, bleeding risk in Korean heart attack patients
Use of NSAIDs to treat first-time heart attack patients significantly increased the risk for cardiovascular and bleeding events post-heart attack in a nationwide Korean study, published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Offshore wind power now so cheap it could pay money back to consumers
The latest round of offshore wind farms to be built in the UK could reduce household energy bills by producing electricity very cheaply.
Rising temps put desert shrubs in high-efficiency mode
Research from the University of Utah shows that one shrub, the brittlebush, is adapting, and showing a remarkable ability to respond to increased temperature and aridity.
X-rays recount origin of oddball meteorites
X-ray experiments at Berkeley Lab played a key role in resolving the origin of rare, odd meteorites that have puzzled scientists since their discovery a half-century ago.
Epstein-Barr virus rewires host epigenomes to drive stomach cancer
Researchers in Japan and Singapore have discovered a molecular mechanism that explains how Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection alters a host's epigenome to promote tumorigenesis (the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells) in certain types of stomach cancer.
Identified a new regulatory mechanism of response to metabolic stress
The Chromatin Biology group, led by Dr. Alex Vaquero has identified a new enzymatic activity in SIRT7, involved in stress response, aging and hematopoiesis, which plays a key role in metabolic stress and aging.
New genome mapper is like "upgrading from dial-up to fibre-optic"
Researchers describe the first technology able to visualize hundreds to potentially thousands of genomes at the same time under the microscope.
Water molecules are gold for nanocatalysis
Nanocatalysts made of gold nanoparticles dispersed on metal oxides are very promising for the industrial, selective oxidation of compounds, including alcohols, into valuable chemicals.
Grape pips reveal collapse of ancient economy in the grip of plague and climate change
A team of archaeologists from Bar-Ilan University and the University of Haifa has discovered new and compelling evidence for a significant economic downturn on the fringe of the Byzantine Empire in the aftermath of a major pandemic in the mid-6th century CE.
New affinity purification technique for therapeutic proteins
Professor Kimoon Kim's research group at POSTECH has developed a highly pure and efficient technique for purifying antiviral and anti-cancer protein therapeutics using molecular affinity interaction.
'SoundWear' a heads-up sound augmentation gadget helps expand children's play experience
KAIST researchers designed a wearable bracelet using sound augmentation to leverage play benefits by employing digital technology.
Brain cell types identified that may push males to fight and have sex
Two groups of nerve cells may serve as ''on-off switches'' for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents.
Men are more likely than women to endorse COVID-19 conspiracy theories
A new study found men are more likely than women to endorse conspiracy theories connected to COVID-19.
Fewer hip fractures may be associated with reductions in smoking, heavy drinking
A new study, which analyzed 40 years of Framingham Heart Study data, found an association between lowered rates of hip fractures and decreases in smoking and heavy drinking.
How the zebrafish got its stripes
Animal patterns are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have worked out how zebrafish develop their stripes.
What are the properties of the cryptocurrency market?
In terms of its structure and organization, the cryptocurrency market is a rather young and a very specific financial market.
Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates
Naturally occurring lithium in public drinking water may have an anti-suicidal effect - according to a new study from Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London.
Study finds increase in number, severity of suicide-related calls to US Poison Control
Researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed the 549,807 calls made to Poison Control Centers (PCCs) in the U.S. for suicide-related cases involving OTC analgesics from 2000 through 2018 and found that both the overall number and rate of these cases increased significantly by 57% and 34%, respectively, during this period.
Fostering a sustainable use of phosphorus
Phosphorus is critical to food security, ecosystem functioning and human activities.
Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles
Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals.
Researchers build first AI tool capable of identifying individual birds
New research demonstrates for the first time that artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to train computers to recognise individual birds, a task humans are unable to do.
Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure
Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can't handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates.
Insulin cost-sharing caps may help kids, young adults with type 1 diabetes
Although additional policies are needed to relieve insulin's financial burden, researchers find a national cost-sharing cap helps privately insured children and young adults with type 1 diabetes pay less out-of-pocket.
Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability
Hokkaido University researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain.
Studying COVID-19's envelope protein
A likeness between genes of the SARS and COVID-19 viruses could inform research into potential treatments.
Artificial Intelligence to identify individual birds of a same species
Humans have a hard time identifying individual birds just by looking at the patterns on their plumage.
Double surgery improves chances for heart transplant in patients with obesity
Pairing bariatric surgery with LVAD heart surgery may be an effective bridge to heart transplant for obese patients.
GMMIP simulations on global monsoon interannual variability show higher skill than historical simulations
GMMIP simulations on global monsoon interannual variability show higher skill than historical simulations.
Population genetic screening shown to efficiently identify increased risk for inherited disease
In a new study published today in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers behind the Healthy Nevada Project® suggest that community-based genetic screening has the potential to efficiently identify individuals who may be at increased risk for three common inherited (CDC Tier 1) genetic conditions known to cause several forms of cancer and increased risk for heart disease or stroke.
Flu vaccine may reduce risk of Alzheimer's disease, new study shows
People who received at least one flu vaccination were 17% less likely to get Alzheimer's disease over the course of a lifetime, according to researchers at UTHealth.
Return of the zombie cicadas: WVU team unearths manipulative qualities of fungal-infected flyers
Cicadas infected with the parasitic fungus Massospora unknowingly engage in trickery with their fellow insects, resulting in effective disease transmission, according to West Virginia University-led research.
Changes in brain cartilage may explain why sleep helps you learn
The morphing structure of the brain's ''cartilage cells'' may regulate how memories change while you snooze, according to new research in eNeuro.
Artificial intelligence identifies prostate cancer with near-perfect accuracy
Study reports 98% sensitivity and 97% specificity in recognizing and characterizing prostate cancer using an artificial intelligence (AI) program.
Mars 2020 mission to be guided by USGS astrogeology maps
When NASA's Perseverance rover lands on Mars next year, it will be equipped with some of the most precise maps of Mars ever created, courtesy of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center.
Yale to lead trial of potential COVID-19 treatment
Yale School of Medicine and the biopharmaceutical firm AI Therapeutics have launched a multi-institutional clinical trial of a drug for treating COVID-19.
Temporary salt crystals may provide a permanent solution to Alzheimer's
Researchers at Osaka University have demonstrated that precipitation of a salt crystal occurs even at concentrations much lower than its solubility due to local density fluctuation and this repeated precipitation-dissolution of salt crystals significantly accelerates the production of neurotoxic aggregates of amyloid-β peptides.
Photonic amorphous topological insulator
The current understanding of topological insulators and their classical wave analogues, such as photonic topological insulators, is mainly based on topological band theory.
Randomness theory could hold key to internet security
In a new paper, Cornell Tech researchers identified a problem that holds the key to whether all encryption can be broken -- as well as a surprising connection to a mathematical concept that aims to define and measure randomness.
Duke-NUS: Cancer mutations caused by bacterial toxin preventable
Reports show that cancer is the second leading cause of death globally.
Top Science Tip Sheet on heart failure, heart muscle cells, heart attack and atrial fibrillation results
Newly discovered pathway may have potential for treating heart failure - New research model helps predict heart muscle cells' impact on heart function after injury - New mass spectrometry approach generates libraries of glycans in human heart tissue - Understanding heart damage after heart attack and treatment may provide clues for prevention - Understanding atrial fibrillation's effects on heart cells may help find treatments - New research may lead to therapy for heart failure caused by ICI cancer medication
Highly invasive lung cancer cells have longer 'fingers'
Tiny finger-like projections called filopodia drive invasive behavior in a rare subset of lung cancer cells.
Estimation of aerosol emissions from simulated individuals with asymptomatic to moderate COVID-19
Viral aerosol emissions from simulated individuals with asymptomatic to moderate COVID-19 are estimated in this mathematical modeling study.
How airway cells work together in regeneration and aging
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have identified the process by which stem cells in the airways of the lungs switch between two distinct phases -- creating more of themselves and producing mature airway cells -- to regenerate lung tissue after an injury.
Alcohol abuse may raise risk of death in patients with abnormal heart rhythms
Among patients hospitalized with abnormal heart rhythms, those with alcohol abuse were 72% more likely to die before being discharged.
Weight loss not always best strategy to enhance athletic fitness in young women
In women under 30, thinner and leaner, particularly at the extremes of low body size, does not necessarily equate with better cardiorespiratory fitness.
Alternative amplification technique could speed up SARS-CoV-2 testing
An alternative amplification technique to detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA could offer a way to rapidly test large numbers of people for COVID-19, although the technique is not as sensitive as quantitative RT-PCR, the current standard method for COVID-19 testing.
Nationwide trends show fewer cancer patients seeking care since start of pandemic
Researchers observe significant decreases nationwide in the number of patients being seen for cancer-related care as the COVID-19 pandemic progressed during the few first months of 2020.
Despite debate, even the world's oldest trees are not immortal
The oldest trees on Earth have stood for nearly five millennia, and researchers have long wondered to what extent these ancient organisms undergo senescence, physically deteriorating as they age.
Same-day IUD placements hard to come by in Ohio, study finds
Though same-day access to IUDs increases the likelihood a woman will get the reproductive health care she wants and decreases the chance she'll become pregnant when she doesn't plan to, most providers in Ohio don't offer the service, a new study has found.
Hedonism leads to happiness
Relaxing on the sofa or savoring a delicious meal: Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research from the University of Zurich and Radboud University in the Netherlands.
Government urgently needs to gauge public perception of new track and trace app
One of the earliest studies to look at mass acceptance of tracing apps, undertaken by international researchers, including Lancaster University, suggests that privacy (which is generally prioritised by governments in terms of app design) is only the top consideration for a certain group of people.
Study challenges idea that lower BMI shields smokers from fat-associated health risks
Some smokers might rationalize continuing to smoke because of lower body weight often associated with the habit.
Researchers identify microRNA that shows promise for hair regrowth
Researchers from North Carolina State University have identified a microRNA (miRNA) that could promote hair regeneration.
European maize highlights the hidden differences within a species
Maize is one of our major staple foods and is cultivated around the world, showcasing a broad range of genetic adaptations to different environmental conditions.
Flu vaccine could protect against serious heart and stroke complications
The rate of seasonal flu vaccinations among people over age 50 and nursing home residents is extremely low, and those who do get the flu vaccine can significantly lower their risk of heart attack, TIA (transient ischemic attack), death and cardiac arrest.
Controlling streams of liquid metal at room temperature
Researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows them to produce streams of liquid metal at room temperature.
Artificial intelligence finds patterns of mutations and survival in tumour images
Scientists have used artificial intelligence to search for patterns of molecular abnormalities in tumour tissue sections across 28 cancer types.
Laser inversion enables multi-materials 3D printing
Selective laser sintering is one of the most widely used processes in additive manufacturing, but it is limited to printing with a single material at a time.
Study: Mapping crystal shapes could fast-track 2D materials
Materials scientists at Rice University and the University of Pennsylvania are calling for a collective, global effort to fast-track the mass production of 2D materials like graphene and molybdenum disulfide.
Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients Have Low Risk of Stroke
A new paper from Penn Medicine shows a low risk of stroke in patients hospitalized for COVID-19.

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