Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 29, 2020
Smaller habitats worse than expected for biodiversity
Biodiversity's ongoing global decline has prompted policies to protect and restore habitats to minimize animal and plant extinctions.

Biphilic surfaces reduce defrosting times in heat exchangers
Miljkovic, along with researchers in his group, have discovered a way to significantly improve the defrosting of ice and frost on heat exchangers.

How a crystalline sponge sheds water molecules
How does water leave a sponge? In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks -- specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4'-bipyridine.

New insights into wound healing
Research from a multidisciplinary team led by Washington University may provide new insights into wound healing, scarring and how cancer spreads

Characteristics of nursing homes with residents infected with COVID-19
Characteristics of nursing homes that reported COVID-19 cases in 23 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.

Potential preterm births in high risk women predicted to 73% accuracy, by new technique
A new technique that can spot a potential preterm birth in asymptomatic high-risk women, with up to 73% accuracy months before delivery, has been developed by scientists at the University of Warwick.

Exposure to environmental chemicals may disrupt sleep during menopause
For menopausal women who have difficulty sleeping, it might be because of chemicals in the environment.

How to mix old tires and building rubble to make sustainable roads
A recycled blend developed by Australian researchers brings together construction and tyre waste, to deliver both environmental and engineering benefits.

Pimavanserin reduced symptoms of dementia-related psychosis in phase 3 trial
New data presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference indicates that pimavanserin leads to a robust reduction in the severity of psychosis symptoms during the 12 week open-label phase of the study, regardless of the underlying dementia subtype or the severity of participants' dementia.

Electrochemical doping: researchers improve carbon nanotube transparent conductors
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Aalto University have discovered that electrochemical doping with ionic liquid can significantly enhance the optical and electrical properties of transparent conductors made of single-walled carbon nanotube films.

New fabric could help keep you cool in the summer, even without A/C (video)
Air conditioning and other space cooling methods account for about 10% of all electricity consumption in the U.S., according to the U.S.

Rapid antibody development yields possible treatment for yellow fever
Researchers have developed a potential treatment for yellow fever. The drug, a purified antibody that targets the virus, has shown success in early-stage clinical trials in Singapore.

New drug targets for lethal brain cancer discovered
More than 200 genes with novel and known roles in glioblastoma - the most aggressive type of brain cancer - offer promising new drug targets.

Should you really be behind the wheel after concussion?
Even after all of their symptoms are gone, people who have had a concussion take longer to regain complex reaction times, the kind you need in most real-life driving situations on the road, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Virtual Conference from July 31 to August 1, 2020.

High time to open up ecological research
Share code and data behind the research please. It's easy, but it will have a major positive impact on progress and trust in science.

Subsidies, weather, and financial education promote agricultural insurance adoption
A University of Maryland-led study shows that subsidies can help people continually purchase insurance, but only if they have the financial literacy to understand the benefits and have the experience of seeing the policy in action.

Keep safe and cool in the pool: Novel chip sensor makes swimming pools safer
A new microchip that enables continuous monitoring of pH and chlorine levels in swimming pools will vastly improve water safety and hygiene for more than 2.7 million Australians as new research shows it can deliver consistent and accurate pool chemistry for reliable pool management.

Americans are consuming less sugar but more nonnutritive sweeteners
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that between 2002 and 2018 purchases by US households of foods and beverages containing caloric sweetener (CS, i.e., sugar) declined while purchases of products containing both caloric sugars and nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS, i.e., sugar substitutes) increased.

Influx of electric vehicles accelerates need for grid planning
A new PNNL report says the western US bulk power system can reliably support projected growth of up to 24 million electric vehicles through 2028, but challenges will arise as EV adoption grows beyond that threshold.

Discovered: Remnant of ancient globular cluster that's "the last of its kind"
A team of astronomers discovered a stellar stream composed of the remnants of an ancient globular cluster that was torn apart by the Milky Way's gravity 2 billion years ago, when Earth's most-complex lifeforms were single-celled organisms.

Is the Earth's transition zone deforming like the upper mantle?
In a recently published paper in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, researchers from the Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University and the University of Lille combine numerical modeling of dislocation glide and results from diffusion experiments to revisit the rheology of wadsleyite, ringwoodite and majorite garnet under geological strain rates across the transition zone of the Earth's mantle based on theoretical plasticity modeling.

Talbot helps ID muscle gene that, when altered, causes joint disease
Jared Talbot is part of a 32-member international research team that identified a gene that, when altered, can cause bent fingers and toes, clubfoot, scoliosis, and short stature. The team discovered that partial loss of the protein coding gene MYLPF (myosin light chain, phosphorylatable, fast skeletal muscle) results in a disorder called distal arthrogryposis (DA) that's present at birth.

Nondestructive positron beams probe damage, support safety advances in radiation environments
A multi-institution team has used positron beams to probe the nature of radiation effects, providing new insight into how damage is produced in iron films.

Adjusting planter parameters to match field conditions can maximize emergence and yield
Planter performance is a critical component when laying the foundation for a successful crop season.

A new method is developed to extract antibiotic residue in food from animal sources
The procedure simplifies and cheapens the process to extract coccidiostats, medicine used to treat an intestinal illness in animals but that can cause health risks for humans at high doses

Tailored light inspired by nature
An international research team with Prof. Cornelia Denz from the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Münster (Germany) develop for the first time light fields using caustics that do not change during propagation.

Alaskan seismometers record the northern lights
Aaron Lojewski, who leads aurora sightseeing tours in Alaska, was lucky enough to photograph a ''eruption'' of brilliant pink light in the night skies one night in February.

New current that transports water to major 'waterfall' discovered in deep ocean
An international team discovered a previously unrecognized ocean current that transports water to one of the world's largest 'waterfalls' in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Bank Channel Overflow into the deep North Atlantic

Newer PFAS compound detected for first time in Arctic seawater
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), found in many household products and food packages, have raised concerns because of their persistence and possible toxicity to people and wildlife.

Pre/postnatal lead exposure affects neurodevelopment in Japanese children
A study conducted over the past 18 years has found differences between lead exposure effects in young Japanese boys versus girls.

Exercise and PRP promising for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
''Conservative treatments that provide alternatives to surgery are needed for wheelchair users with spinal cord injury who have recalcitrant shoulder pain.

Pediatric experts offer tips for children's mental health in transition back to school
In a recent survey of school-aged parents conducted by Nationwide Children's Hospital, 2 out of 5 parents said that they had concerns about their child's social and emotional wellbeing as they head back to school.

COVID-19 research: Anti-viral strategy with double effect
When the SARS-CoV-2 virus penetrates human cells, it lets the human host cell produce proteins for it.

Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal
A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same.

Underwater robots reveal daily habits of endangered whales
Research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has revealed the daily habits of the endangered Mediterranean sperm whale.

Decreased iron levels in seawater make mussels loosen their grip
Mussels secrete sticky plaques that help them attach to wet surfaces, such as rocks on the beach.

Phillips group exactly solves experimental puzzle in high temperature superconductivity
A team of theoretical physicists at the Institute for Condensed Matter Theory (ICMT) in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, led by Illinois Physics Professor Philip Phillips, has for the first time exactly solved a representative model of the cuprate problem, the 1992 Hatsugai-Kohmoto (HK) model of a doped Mott insulator.

Reopening K-12 schools during COVID-19 pandemic
This article summarizes recommendations made in a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report about how to safely reopen and operate elementary and secondary schools for the 2020-2021 school year, which emphasizes the need for partnerships with public health officials and community leaders, and for transparent communication of risks and rewards that will result from every policy decision.

Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter
Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves.

Decline in US cardiac deaths slowing, while county-level disparities grow
Steady progress in reducing the rates of premature cardiac death in the US began slowing in 2011, largely due to rising rates of out-of-hospital premature cardiac deaths, especially among younger adults.

Bringing RNA into genomics
By studying RNA-binding proteins, a research consortium known as ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) has identified genomic sites that appear to code for RNA molecules that influence gene expression.

Tailored meta-grid of nanoparticles boosting performance of light-emitting diodes
Increase in light extraction efficiency will benefit energy savings amid overwhelming usage of LEDs in today's world.

Trying to listen to the signal from neurons
Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a coaxial cable-inspired needle-electrode.

Could prior exposure to common cold viruses affect the severity of SARS-CoV-2 symptoms?
A study led by Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) shows that some healthy individuals possess immune cells capable of recognizing the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.

Night-time exposure to blue light associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer
New study uses satellite images of outdoor lighting in Barcelona and Madrid.

Scientists at the CNIC and IIS Princesa decipher a key mechanism in hypoxia
The findings represent an important advance in the understanding of cell physiology and could be exploited in the future to treat diseases in which hypoxia plays a role

Best place on Earth to see stars is at remote site in Antarctica, study shows
Stars viewed from a place called Dome A in Antarctica can finally be seen without their twinkle -- which means in much greater detail.

Post-pandemic brave new world of agriculture
Recent events have shown how vulnerable the meat processing industry is to COVID-19.

'Quantum negativity' can power ultra-precise measurements
Scientists have found that a physical property called 'quantum negativity' can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances to gravitational waves.

Researchers pinpoint how sorbent materials catch and release carbon
A key component of ambient direct air capture systems that remove carbon dioxide from the air is the sorbent material that is used to first capture the carbon and then to release it.

Simulating quantum 'time travel' disproves butterfly effect in quantum realm
Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated that, in the quantum realm, there is no 'butterfly effect.' In the research, information--qubits, or quantum bits--'time travel' into the simulated past.

Researchers outline need for evaluation of gene expression profiling in melanoma
A consensus statement published today in JAMA Dermatology cautions against routine use of currently available GEP tests for patients with cutaneous melanoma.

Reviews find children not major source of COVID-19, but family stress is high
The review found among children who were infected, transmission was traced back to community and home settings or adults, rather than amongst children within daycares or schools even in jurisdictions where schools remained open or have since reopened.

Indigenous people vital for understanding environmental change
Grassroots knowledge from indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to Rutgers-led research.

New maps of chemical marks on DNA pinpoint regions relevant to many developmental diseases
In research that aims to illuminate the causes of human developmental disorders, Salk scientists have generated 168 new maps of chemical marks on strands of DNA -- called methylation -- in developing mice.

Cosmic tango between the very small and the very large
A new study using the theory of quantum loop cosmology accounts for two major mysteries about the large-scale structure of our universe.

COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems
Researchers at Stanford and other institutions hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic's unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our understanding of humans' impact on the environment Watch related video: https://youtu.be/jd9Jb6OInlM

Fracture risk associated with bisphosphonate drug holidays
Bisphosphonates have been shown to reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

Genetically similar fungi cause severe infections in different hospitals
Present in the human digestive tract, species of Candida can cause bloodstream infections in patients treated in hospital intensive care units.

Adverse effects from cancer drug trials explained
Certain type of cancer drugs that promote the death of cells can actually be harmful if combined with other treatments that damage our DNA, RNA or proteins, researchers have found.

Hot urban temperatures and tree transpiration
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

'Good' virus for common infection
Australian researchers have shown how viruses can be used to save lives, developing the potential use of bacteriophages in bandages to treat life-threatening golden staph infections which may not respond to traditional antibiotics.

Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation
When couples argue, mediation improves the outcome of the confrontation.

Put down that cup of earl gray tea!
Cancer mutations are not necessarily bad actors, in and of themselves.

FSU biologist uses genome database to investigate cancer cells
Florida State University Professor of Biological Science David Gilbert is using the latest information about the human genome as a guide to better understand cancer.

Mood homeostasis before, during COVID-19 lockdown
Mood homeostasis (the ability to stabilize your mood with mood-modifying activities) before and during the COVID-19 lockdown among Dutch students was investigated in this observational study.

Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon.

How plantains and carbon nanotubes can improve cars
Researchers from the University of Johannesburg have shown that plantain, a starchy type of banana, is a promising renewable source for an emerging type of lighter, rust-free composite materials for the automotive industry.

Amazonian Indigenous territories are crucial for conservation
A new study from the University of Helsinki shows that Indigenous territories represent around 45% of all the remaining wilderness areas in the Amazon, comprising an area of three times the surface of Germany.

'Giant atoms' enable quantum processing and communication in one
MIT researchers have introduced a quantum computing architecture that can perform low-error quantum computations while also rapidly sharing quantum information between processors.

Cholesterol-lowering drug improved function of heart's arteries
In a pilot study of people living with HIV or high levels of cholesterol, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that a six-week course of a cholesterol-lowering medication improved the function of the coronary arteries that provide oxygen to the heart.

Curtin research finds first African carder bees to reach Western Australia
Curtin research has recorded the first known appearance of Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum, the African carder bee, in Western Australia and has highlighted the need to closely monitor the impacts of such introduced species on the ecosystem.

UMMS scientists lead effort to annotate human genome
UMass Medical School scientists Jill Moore, PhD, Zhiping Weng, PhD, and MD/PhD students Michael Purcaro and Henry Pratt are lead authors on the latest publication of data from the ambitious ENCODE project to annotate the human genome.

Researchers find therapeutic targets to fight SARS-CoV-2
Researchers from HSE University have developed new approaches for regulating the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 enzymes, which play a crucial role in cell infection with SARS-CoV-2.

First results of an upgraded device highlight lithium's value for producing fusion
Initial results of the LTX-β at PPPL show that the enhancements significantly improve performance of the plasma that will fuel future fusion reactors.

NASA follows potential tropical cyclone 9 into eastern Caribbean
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Potential Tropical Cyclone 9 after it moved into the Eastern Caribbean Sea and continued bringing heavy rainfall and gusty winds to the Leeward Islands, the US and British Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

Astronomers pinpoint the best place on Earth for a telescope: High on a frigid Antarctic plateau
Dome A, the highest ice dome on the Antarctic Plateau, could offer the clearest view on Earth of the stars at night, according to new research by an international team from China, Australia and the University of British Columbia (UBC).

How stony-iron meteorites form
Meteorites give us insight into the early development of the solar system.

A snapshot of melting Arctic sea ice during the summer of 2018
A study appearing July 29 in the journal Heliyon details the changes that occurred in the Arctic in September of 2018, a year when nearly 10 million kilometers of sea ice were lost throughout the summer.

Breakthrough method for predicting solar storms
Extensive power outages and satellite blackouts that affect air travel and the internet are some of the potential consequences of massive solar storms.

Slowing down a 'helper' cell may someday make vaccines more effective for seniors
Suppressing IL-10 production from 'Tfh 10' cells within the immune systems of older people could make influenza vaccines more effective, according to new research led by experts from Cincinnati Children's.

In HEPA we trust: making the indoors safer during COVID
As schools and offices prepare to reopen, Syracuse University Professor Jianshun 'Jensen' Zhang offers a three-step plan to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) and help prevent the spread of COVID indoors.

COVID-19 may cause deadly blood clots
COVID-19 may increase the risk of blot cots in women who are pregnant or taking estrogen with birth control or hormone replacement therapy, according to a new manuscript published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology.

ENCODE3: Interpreting the human and mouse genomes
An international consortium of approximately 500 scientists, led in part by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, reports on the completion of Phase 3 of the ENCODE project, providing a resource for scientists to understand how genetic variation shapes human health and disease.

Monash scientists expose fascinating 'compartments' in bacteria
A review paper by Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI), published in the high-impact journal Nature Reviews Microbiology, casts light on organelles, the internal compartments in bacterial cells that house and support functions essential for their survival and growth.

A safer cell therapy harnesses patient T cells to fight multiple myeloma
A treatment for multiple myeloma that harnesses the body's cancer-fighting T cells was safe in humans and showed preliminary signs of effectiveness, according to a clinical trial involving 23 patients with relapsed or treatment-resistant disease.

Lead released in Notre Dame Cathedral fire detected in Parisian honey
Elevated levels of lead have been found in samples of honey from hives downwind of the Notre Dame Cathedral fire, collected three months after the April 2019 blaze.

COVID-19: Social media users more likely to believe false information
A new study led by researchers at McGill University finds that people who get their news from social media are more likely to have misperceptions about COVID-19.

Stem cell 'therapy' injuries more widespread than we knew
Grotesque side effects from unproven 'stem cell' therapies are more common than we realized, reports a team of researchers led by UConn Health in Annals of Neurology on July 29.

NASA's Terra Satellite finds no strong storms left in Tropical Storm Douglas  
Strong wind shear has been the undoing of Tropical Storm Douglas.

Owl discovered that hunted like a hawk 55 million years ago
Paleontologists have described in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology a large owl that killed medium-sized mammals with its feet and claws some 55 million years ago.

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
Scientists have discovered a new way of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), using a toxin produced by the germ itself.

Aerobic exercise could have the final say on fatty livers
Trinity College Dublin study is the first to demonstrate significant improvements in biopsy-measured liver outcomes in a metabolic associated fat liver disease (MAFLD) cohort following an exercise-only intervention, without clinically significant weight loss.

The stars that time forgot
Scientists led by astronomers at the University of Sydney and Carnegie Observatories have found the remnant of strange dismembered globular cluster at the edge of the Milky Way, upending theories about how heavy elements formed in early stars.

Major climate initiative in the Northeastern US benefits children's health
A new study by researchers from the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reports that the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has been successful in reducing fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions and substantially improving children's health, both major co-benefits of this climate policy.

Healing an Achilles' heel of quantum entanglement
Louisiana State University Associate Professor of Physics Mark M. Wilde and his collaborator have solved a 20-year-old problem in quantum information theory on how to calculate entanglement cost--a way to measure entanglement--in a manner that's efficiently computable, useful, and broadly applicable in several quantum research areas.

Association between statewide school closure, COVID-19 incidence, mortality in US
This population epidemiology study estimates associations of school closures in the U.S. and the timing of those closures in March with change in daily COVID-19 incidence and mortality through the first week of May, accounting for other existing public health interventions.

US should consider 'stay-at-home' cooling options during pandemic
A new study from Australian scientists at the forefront of climate and health modelling suggests electric fans and water dousing could be a viable stay-at-home cooling strategy as the United States (US) anticipates extreme heat.

Scientists make quantum technology smaller
A way of shrinking the devices used in quantum sensing systems has been developed by researchers at the UK Quantum Technology Hub Sensors and Timing, which is led by the University of Birmingham.

Social distancing varies by income in US
Wealthier communities went from being the most mobile before the COVID-19 pandemic to the least mobile, while poorer areas have gone from the least mobile to the most mobile, according to a UC Davis study.

Whale 'snot' reveals likely poor health during migration
UNSW researchers have linked the burden of humpback whales' annual migration to depleted microbial diversity in their airways - an indicator of overall health.

Gender gaps in surgical specialties may take decades to close
Among the largest resident specialties in the US, little progress has been made in closing the gender gap, with most of the largest residencies demonstrating a less than 1 percent increase in women trainees per year.

COVID-19 risk model uses hospital data to guide decisions on social distancing
With communities throughout the United States combating surges in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Northwestern University have created a framework that helps policymakers determine which data to track and when to take action to protect their communities.

Face-touching behaviors before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Videos recorded in public transportation stations, streets and parks among the general population in China, Japan, South Korea, Western Europe and in the United States were used to analyze mask-wearing and face-touching behavior in public areas before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Butterfly genomics: Monarchs migrate and fly differently, but meet up and mate
A new study confirms that while the eastern and western butterflies fly differently, they are genetically the same.

Study sheds light on the evolution of the earliest dinosaurs
Geological evidence suggests the known dinosaur groups diverged early on, supporting the traditional dinosaur family tree.

New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material.

Vaping linked with heart problems
In adolescents the use of e-cigarettes doubles the risk of starting to smoke traditional cigarettes, states a position paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

Studying interactions between ground-nesting bees and soils
Research gives possible answers to increase pollinator populations on farms.

NIH-funded project details the inner workings of the human and mouse genome
The ENCODE project is an NHGRI-led international effort to learn how all of the genome functions, not just genes.

Sense of normalcy bounces back fast: New study
Forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology, a study of subjects during the outset of the COVID-19 crisis shows that psychological recovery can take place even while a person is still in the throes of a stressful experience.

Peering into the secrets of phages to see how they kill bacterial superbugs
A research collaboration involving Monash University has made an exciting discovery that may eventually lead to targeted treatments to combat drug-resistant bacterial infections, one of the greatest threats to global health.

Researchers map mechanisms in the largest CRISPR system
The largest and most complex CRISPR system has been visualized by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study.

Sea slugs: discovering other inhabitants in the Barcelona coasts
A study on marine biodiversity has identified seventy-three species of sea slugs in the coasts of Barcelona, an anthropized environment due to the urban metropolis.

New survey finds large racial divide in concern over ability to pay for COVID-19 treatment
People of color are far more likely to worry about their ability to pay for healthcare if diagnosed with COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to a new survey from nonprofit West Health and Gallup.

Study provides new insight on colorectal cancer growth
A new study by researchers at the University of Kentucky identifies a novel function of the enzyme spermine synthase to facilitate colorectal cancer growth.

Room temperature superconductivity creeping toward possibility
The possibility of achieving room temperature superconductivity took a tiny step forward with a recent discovery by a team of Penn State physicists and materials scientists.

UC San Diego scientists part of special package of studies describing human genome
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine are among the contributors to a package of 10 studies in the journal Nature, describing the latest results from the ongoing Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project, a worldwide effort led by the NIH to understand how the human genome functions.

Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture
A new USDA report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country.

Telemedicine can help safety net providers expand access to medical specialists
The use of telemedicine has grown rapidly during the coronavirus pandemic, but it's unclear whether those gains will ge permanent.

How women and men forgive infidelity
Men and women react differently to different types of infidelity.

Most of Stonehenge's large boulders share origin in west woods, Wiltshire
Most of the hulking sandstone boulders -- called sarsens - that make up the United Kingdom's famous Stonehenge monument appear to share a common origin 25 kilometers away in West Woods, Wiltshire, according to an analysis of the stones' chemical composition.

Gender gap in surgical residencies
Researchers identified surgical specialties with the lowest percentage of female resident physicians and looked at the changes over a decade in the percentage of women in different specialties.

C&EN names top 50 chemical companies
After being dethroned last year, German chemical giant BASF is once again number one in C&EN's annual Global Top 50 list of chemical companies for 2019.

Research brief: 'Fool's gold' may be valuable after all
In a breakthrough new study, scientists and engineers at the University of Minnesota have electrically transformed the abundant and low-cost non-magnetic material iron sulfide, also known as 'fool's gold' or pyrite, into a magnetic material.

How the brain senses smell
An Italian-American research conducted by researchers at the IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) in Rovereto (Italy) and Harvard University in Boston (Usa) explains for the first time the mechanisms used by our brain to recognize specific smells.

CNIC scientists discover the mechanism of competition between mitochondrial genomes coexisting
The study, published in Science Advances, reveals that cells can detect the presence of different mitochondrial genomes and select among them according to their effect on metabolic status

Pregnant Black and Hispanic women five times more likely to be exposed to coronavirus
Black and Hispanic pregnant women in Philadelphia are five times as likely as white and Asian women to have been exposed to the novel coronavirus, according to a new study led by Scott Hensley, Ph.D., an associate professor of Microbiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Karen Marie Puopolo, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Pediatrics and neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Estimating bisphenol exposures in the Australian population
Once found in bottles, food containers, cash register receipts and electronics, bisphenol A (BPA) has been phased out of many products because of health concerns and government regulations.

Bees' buzz is more powerful for pollination, than for defence or flight
Buzzing by bees during flower pollination is significantly more powerful than that used for defense or flight, according to a new study from experts at the University of Stirling.

Eyckian Lamb of God reveals her secrets
Two non-invasive chemical imaging modalities were employed to help understand the changes made over time to the Lamb of God, the focal point of the Ghent Altarpiece (1432) by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study reveals where first cases of COVID-19 outside China may have originated based on case travel histories
''Our findings suggest that travel from just a few countries with substantial SARS-CoV-2 transmission may have seeded additional outbreaks around the world before the characterisation of COVID-19 as a pandemic on March 11, 2020'', says Dr Fatimah Dawood from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA, who co-led the research.
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