Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 03, 2020
A blood test could predict who benefits from immunotherapy
A test which detects changing levels of tumour fragments in the blood may be an easy, non-invasive and quick way to predict who will benefit from immunotherapy, a treatment option for advanced cancers.

Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning
A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old.

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue.

COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
New research from University of Sydney finds COVID-19 transmission rates in NSW schools and early childcare education and care settings were minimal, particularly between children and from children to adults.

Women skip medications more in the US than other countries
For patients, especially those living with chronic conditions, nonadherence to prescription medicines due to cost is a common problem.

Ancient part of immune system may underpin severe COVID
New genetic and patient analyses suggest severe COVID is linked to overactive complement, one of the immune system's oldest branches, and excess blood clotting.

Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness
A team from the University of Geneva has identified a new mechanism involved in the membrane synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus.

New method to defend against smart home cyber attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
According to their new study published in Computers & Security, the ability to launch massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks via a botnet of compromised devices is an exponentially growing risk in the Internet of Things (IoT).

Anatomy of an acne treatment
Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years.

Humans and flies employ very similar mechanisms for brain development and function
A new study led by researchers from King's College London has shown that humans, mice and flies share the same fundamental genetic mechanisms that regulate the formation and function of brain areas involved in attention and movement control.

Alteration of calcium channel signaling may explain mechanism of autism spectrum disorder
Based on altering calcium channel kinetics and gene activation exhibited by the Timothy mutant, these results provide insight into the cellular mechanism that allows predicting disease risk, and genetic diagnosis of individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders.

Mathematical modeling revealed how chitinase, a molecular monorail, obeys a one-way sign
A novel mathematical modeling method has been developed to estimate operation models of biomolecular motors from single-molecule imaging data of motion with the Bayesian inference framework.

Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies
Older male rhesus monkeys sire fewer offspring, even though they appear to be mating as much as younger monkeys with similarly high social status.

Stretches of repeating DNA predispose to systemic sclerosis
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that extended repeats of DNA in the gene FLI1 are associated with systemic sclerosis.

Darolutamide in prostate cancer: Indication of considerable added benefit
The advantages in the outcome categories of mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life are not accompanied by disadvantages.

New species of fungus sticking out of beetles named after the COVID-19 quarantine
A comprehensive study on a group of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods in Belgium and the Netherlands was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal MycoKeys.

Machine learning makes drug repurposing for psychiatric disorders more effective
Researchers have correlated information on drugs, genes and diseases to identify potential candidates for psychiatric and neurological treatment.

The effects of COVID-19 on emergency visits, hospitalizations
As COVID-19 swept into the U.S., hospitals across the country have reported that their emergency departments are emptying out.

Novel magnetic stirrer speaks to lab equipment
A small device, called ''Smart Stirrer'', performed a function of a conventional laboratory stir bar, has an integrated microprocessor and various sensors capable of wireless and autonomous report the conversion of properties of a solution.

Iron-rich meteorites show record of core crystallization in system's oldest planetesimals
New work uncovers new details about our Solar System's oldest planetary objects, which broke apart in long-ago collisions to form iron-rich meteorites.

Challenges in diagnosing hypersensitivity pneumonitis addressed in latest guidelines
More than 30 years after the last guidance on the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), the American Thoracic Society - in collaboration with the Asociación Latinoamericana de Tórax or ALAT and the Japanese Respiratory Society- has developed new guidelines for clinicians.

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes.

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that the bacterium C. perfringens modulates the structure of its biofilm at different temperatures by regulating the expression of the novel extracellular protein BsaA.

'Worst-case' CO2 emissions scenario is best for assessing climate risk and impacts to 2050
The RCP 8.5 carbon emissions pathway is the most appropriate for conducting assessments of climate change impacts by 2050, according to a new article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Fatty liver disease despite a normal weight
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found significant differences in the clinical presentation of non-obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on their sex and body mass index.

Study: Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster
Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Food menu fit for pandemic times
In the midst of the global COVID-19 pandemic, eating well in a sustainable way is more important now than ever, Flinders University experts say.

Analyzing pros and cons of two composite manufacturing methods
Airplane wings and wind turbine blades are typically created using bulk polymerization in composite manufacturing facilities.

Your hair knows what you eat and how much your haircut costs
University of Utah researchers find that stable isotopes in hair reveal a divergence in diet according to socioeconomic status (SES), with lower-SES areas displaying higher proportions of protein coming from cornfed animals.

'Deepfakes' ranked as most serious AI crime threat
Fake audio or video content has been ranked by experts as the most worrying use of artificial intelligence in terms of its potential applications for crime or terrorism, according to a new UCL report.

Immunotherapy biomarker discovery could benefit thousands with Type 1 diabetes
Scientists at UCL have discovered new biomarkers, which may identify those people with Type 1 diabetes who would benefit from the immunotherapy drug Abatacept, a finding which could eventually help thousands manage the disease more effectively.

Language may undermine women in science and tech
Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

Greater financial integration generally not associated with better healthcare quality
New findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, show that larger, more integrated healthcare systems do not generally deliver better quality care, and that there is significant variation in quality scores across hospitals and physician practices, regardless of whether they are independent or owned by larger systems.

Exploring the sustainability of the Indian sugar industry
Researchers analyzed the interconnected food, water and energy challenges that arise from the sugar industry in India - the second-largest producer of sugar worldwide - and how the political economy drives those challenges.

Emergency Department visits plunged as COVID-19 cases climbed, Yale study finds
A new study from researchers at Yale and the Mayo Clinic found that emergency department (ED) visits dropped significantly in March as the public responded to messages about staying home as a result of the pandemic.

Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth
A research team led by Prof. SHANG Zhaohui from National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) has proved that Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth.

The six strains of SARS-CoV-2
SARS-CoV-2 mutation rate remains low. Across Europe and Italy, the most widespread is strain G, while the L strain from Wuhan is gradually disappearing.

Evaluating the effectiveness of travel bans
With the reopening of flights during the summer holiday season in Europe, many countries have started to see an increase in COVID-19 infections.

Social networks can support academic success
Social networks have been found to influence academic performance: students tend to perform better with high-performers among their friends, as some people are capable of inspiring others to try harder, according to Sofia Dokuka, Dilara Valeyeva and Maria Yudkevich of the HSE University.

Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting
The tension in the membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes.

Drug discovery: First rational strategy to find molecular glue degraders
Targeted protein degradation (TPD) represents a novel paradigm in drug discovery that could lead to more efficient medicines to treat diseases such as cancer.

Light shines on chemical production method
A team of researchers from Japan has demonstrated a light-based reaction that yields high numbers of the base chemical component required to produce bioactive compounds used in common industry products.

Study reveals less connectivity between hey brain regions in people with FXTAS premutation
Investigators from the University of Kansas were able to identify brain processes specifically linked to sensorimotor issues in aging people with the FMR1 premutation.

Raising the bar on disability care
Encouraging paid workers to employ the 'right kind' of respectful personal relationship with young people with disability will lift standards in the sector, experts say.

Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors
An efficient in situ pathway to generate and attach oxygen functional groups to graphitic electrodes for supercapacitors by inducing hydrolysis of water molecules within the gel electrolyte.

Autism spectrum disorder can be predicted from health checkups at 18 months
An early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, a type of developmental disorder was found to be effective from routine health checkups of infants at 18 months of age.

Broad antivirals kill SARS-CoV-2, the MERS virus, and other coronaviruses in cells and mice
A team of scientists has engineered antiviral compounds that can kill several types of coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Researchers uncovered the Zika virus mutation responsible for quick spread, birth defects
A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a Zika virus mutation that may be responsible for the explosive viral transmission in 2015/2016 and for the cause of microcephaly (babies with small heads) born to infected pregnant women.

Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years - and pesticides might be to blame
The average size of a dingo is increasing, but only in areas where poison-baits are used, a collaborative study led by UNSW Sydney shows.

Why is stroke so deadly for people of African descent?
An international team of scientists has completed the largest analysis of stroke-risk genes ever undertaken in people of African descent.

Bargaining and the three-way transaction defines the daily deal market
If you've ever taken advantage of a nice discount thanks to a promotion from Groupon or LivingSocial, you've tapped the power of the daily deal market yourself.

Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots
Researchers have discovered why the tropics and a handful of other areas across the globe have become the most biodiverse places on the planet.

Most GP trainees willing to use mindfulness to tackle burnout: new study
Mindfulness could help trainee GPs to build their resilience and reduce burnout, helping to reduce the number of newly qualified GPs leaving the profession, according to University of Warwick researchers.

Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine
If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine.

Study: Oriole hybridization is a dead end
A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end.

Assessing telemedicine unreadiness among older adults during COVID-19 pandemic
This study uses 2018 data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study to assess how common it is for older adults in the United States to be unprepared to access video or telephone telemedicine because of disability or inexperience with technology.

Social bonds in adulthood don't mediate early life trauma
When baboons experience trauma in early life, they have higher levels of stress hormones in adulthood--a potential marker of poor health--than their peers who don't experience trauma, even if they have strong social relationships as adults, according to a study led by a University of Michigan researcher.

New study on development of Parkinson's disease is 'on the nose'
Scientists suggest that the initial impact of environmental toxins inhaled through the nose may induce inflammation in the brain, triggering the production of Lewy bodies that can then be spread to other brain regions.

Detection of COVID-19 viral material on environmental surfaces of an ophthalmology exam room
This study investigates the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on the environmental surfaces of an ophthalmology examination room after visits by patients who were asymptomatic and passed COVID-19 triage.

Pandemic drives telehealth boom, but older adults can't connect
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant increase in video visits between patients and their doctors, but for many older adults, the shift has cut them off from care, rather than connecting them.

AI & single-cell genomics
The study of cellular dynamics is crucial to understand how cells develop and how diseases progress.

Half of low-income communities have no ICU beds
A new Penn Medicine study sheds light on yet another reason why the coronavirus pandemic is disproportionately killing the poor: Residents in low-income neighborhoods lack access to intensive care unit (ICU) beds.

Boycotts or buycotts? The role of corporate activism
Sociopolitical activism may risk backlash, but it may also lead to tangible positive financial outcomes, particularly when aligned with key stakeholder values.

COVID-19: Lower incidence at high altitudes?
Despite recent reports of lower COVID-19 incidence among high-altitude populations, current data is insufficient to conclude that high altitude is protective against the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Surrey's simplified circuit design could revolutionise how wearables are manufactured
Researchers have demonstrated the use of a ground-breaking circuit design that could transform manufacturing processes for wearable technology.

Are we "Waiting for Godot"-- A metaphor for Covid-19
Since the discovery of COVID-19, a warlike analogy is frequently used to define our interaction with the virus, but in many ways we may be at war with ourselves.

Eye-tracking tech helps aged care assessment
Memory loss among older Australians is on the rise as the Baby Boomer generation enters retirement - but a new technique tested by Flinders University researchers that investigates cognitive skills through eye-tracking technology may be used to help incorporate all older people's preferences into aged care policy and practice.

The outlook is encouraging: Researchers evaluate a pipeline of clinical trials
Amsterdam, NL, August 3, 2020 - A review of currently registered clinical trials of agents targeting Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals that there is a broad pipeline of both symptomatic and potentially disease-modifying therapies currently being evaluated.

PLOS Special Collection: Successful approaches to HIV care
On July 27 2020, the US Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) launched a Special Collection of manuscripts across the open-access journals PLOS Medicine and PLOS ONE, highlighting Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program's (RWHAP) innovative approaches for data utilization and engagement of people with HIV who are not in care and not virally suppressed.

NASA puts visible and water vapor eyes on Tropical Storm Isaias
NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible and water vapor imagery as Tropical Storm Isaias continued moving along the east coast of Florida.

Unequal neutron-star mergers create unique "bang" in simulations
In a series of simulations, an international team of researchers determined that some neutron star collisions not only produce gravitational waves, but also electromagnetic radiation that should be detectable on Earth.

Properly-equipped laypersons can potentially reverse opioid overdose mortality
After tracking a cohort of community members equipped with naloxone and a smartphone application for more than a year, researchers showed that laypersons can effectively signal and respond to overdose incident to administer nasal naloxone in advance of emergency medical service (EMS) arrival.

Allelic imbalance of chromatin openness is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders
New study finds single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affect chromatin accessibility, which in turn affects whether or not a gene can be expressed

A framework for the future
As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing.

Scientists led by NTU Singapore identify new catalysts for more efficient water splitting
A team of scientists led by NTU Singapore have discovered the parameters that determine the efficiency of a class of low-cost catalysts called spinel oxides - a discovery that breaks a bottleneck in the extraction of hydrogen from water through electrolysis, the process of splitting water with electricity.

An averted glance gives a glimpse of the mind behind the eyes
Shakespeare once wrote that the ''eyes are the window to your soul.'' But scientists have found it challenging to peer into the brain to see how it derives meaning from a look into another's eyes.

Scientists reveal roles of wind stress and subsurface cold water in the second-year cooling of the 2017/18 La Niña event
Scientists diagnose the atmospheric and oceanic factors that could have been responsible for the second-year cooling in the 2017/18 La Niña event.

How rehabilitation impacts research and care of patients with cerebral palsy
Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common developmental movement disorders in children.

For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral
Cornell University engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

Speech processing hierarchy in the dog brain
Dog brains, just as human brains, process speech hierarchically: intonations at lower, word meanings at higher stages, according to a new study by Hungarian researchers.

Roadmap to reducing colorectal cancer deaths
The American Gastroenterological Association has outlined a strategy to increase the number of people screened via tests that are more convenient, accurate and less expensive and tailored to people's individual cancer risks.

Study calls for urgent plan to manage invasive weed which threatens livelihoods in Africa
Dr Arne Witt, lead author of the study published in the journal Bothalia, said that over half of farmers surveyed in the Karonga District of Malawi believe the weed, which more than 40 years ago had already been considered to be one of the 76 worst weeds in the world, believed the M. diplotricha to have reduced crop yields.

Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help.

Anti-bullying PEACE program packs a punch
Italian high schools have reported success with a South Australian program to help victims of bullying and aggression.

A simpler, high-accuracy method to detect rare circulating tumor cells in blood samples
Results from a recent study -- a collaboration between Lehigh University, Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute, and Pennsylvania State University -- demonstrates the potential for a new method of detecting circulating tumor cells.

Improving the accuracy of typhoon forecasts with radar data assimilation
After the adjustment and improvement of the typhoon structure, the accuracies of the 12-h track and accumulated precipitation forecasts were significantly improved.

Tackling the bioethics challenges raised by COVID-19
The diverse situations experienced by health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic often present serious ethical challenges.

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Effective testing and contact tracing is essential for schools to safely open during COVID-19 pandemic, two studies show
Effective contact tracing and epidemic control measures are essential for safe opening of schools during COVID-19 pandemic, according to two studies published simultaneously in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

The art of making tiny holes
It sounds like a magic trick: A highly charged ion penetrates several layers of a material.

Germany-wide rainfall measurements by utilizing the mobile network
Whether in flood early-warning systems or in agriculture - rainfall measurements are of great importance.

ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory
Planet-forming environments can be much more complex and chaotic than previously expected.

Identifying the blind spots of soil biodiversity
Soils harbour a substantial part of the world's biodiversity, yet data on the patterns and processes taking place below ground does not represent all relevant ecosystems and taxa.

Iron-mediated cancer cell activity: A new regulation mechanism
CNRS researchers at the Institut Curie have recently shown that cancer cells use a membrane protein that has been known for several decades to internalise iron.

Disposed PPE could be turned into biofuel, shows new COVID-19 study
Plastic from used personal protective equipment (PPE) can, and should, be transformed into renewable liquid fuels - according to a new study, published in the peer-reviewed Taylor & Francis journal Biofuels.

Strong relationships in adulthood won't 'fix' effects of early childhood adversity
Harsh conditions in early life are a fundamental cause of adult stress, and according to new research from the University of Notre Dame on wild baboons, this effect is not explained by a lack of social support in adulthood.

Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?
Now researchers at MIT and Caltech have shown that the weird, quantum effects of entanglement could theoretically give blackjack players even more of an edge, albeit a small one, when playing against the house.

Promises found to reduce cheating in large study of adolescents
New research has found that adolescents who promised to be truthful were less likely to 'cheat' than those who did not, even when they could not be found out.

Baby boomers show concerning decline in cognitive functioning
In a reversal of trends, American baby boomers scored lower on a test of cognitive functioning than did members of previous generations, according to a new nationwide study.

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers
A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience.

Recommendations to improve consensus of determining brain death, death by neurologic criteria
International professional societies developed recommendations for minimum clinical standards to determine brain death/death by neurologic criteria in adults and children to improve the consistency of these criteria within and among countries.

Plant size and habitat traits influence cycad susceptibility to invasive species
A long-term study on cycads in Guam has revealed how rapidly invasive species devastated the native Cycas micronesica species and the key factors that have influenced the plant's mortality.

Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance
A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report.

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system
Some prey species can escape from inside a predator after a successful attack.

Energy demands limit our brains' information processing capacity
Our brains have an upper limit on how much they can process at once due to a constant but limited energy supply, according to a new UCL study using a brain imaging method that measures cellular metabolism.

New published study from K-State virologists identifies potential COVID-19 treatment
Yunjeong Kim and Kyeong-Ok 'KC' Chang, virologists in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, have published a study showing a possible therapeutic treatment for COVID-19.

NASA finds an eye and a giant 'tail' in Typhoon Hagupit
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Typhoon Hagupit in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean that showed the development of an eye as it quickly intensified.

Cannabinoids may affect activity of other pharmaceuticals
Cannabinoid-containing products may alter the effects of some prescription drugs, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

LSU Health study suggests snap diagnoses may be more accurate
A pilot study conducted by a team of LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine faculty has found that Snapchat is an effective tool to teach residents emergency radiology.

ED visits, hospital admissions in health care systems in early months of COVID-19 pandemic
Changes in emergency department visits and hospitalizations as the COVID-19 pandemic intensified in the U.S. are examined in this observational study that included 24 emergency departments in five health care systems in Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and North Carolina.

Dana-Farber study advances understanding of rare sarcoma
In this study, scientists discover how abnormal protein disrupts gene expression in synovial sarcoma.

How COVID-19 changed the way patients responded to a heart attack
Early death rate for a common form of heart attack jumped after lockdown.

UArizona Health Sciences researcher seeks safer, more effective leukemia treatment
A potentially safer, more effective chemotherapy treatment for patients with blood-related cancers, such as leukemia, who need a particular bone marrow transplant procedure is under study at the University of Arizona Health Sciences.

Arrhythmia-free survival is indeed survival of the fittest
In a new study, investigators report that patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, who are physically fit before the procedure, have a much higher chance of benefiting from the procedure and remaining in normal sinus rhythm.

Survey finds Americans social media habits changing as national tensions rise
A new national survey commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms.

Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer
Four stranded DNA structures - known as G-quadruplexes - have been shown to play a role in certain types of breast cancer for the first time, providing a potential new target for personalised medicine, say scientists at the University of Cambridge.

NASA satellites show two views of California's Apple Fire
NASA's satellites were working overtime as they snapped pictures of the large Apple Fire in Banning Canyon near San Bernardino, California on Aug.

35-second scan could pick the next sporting champion
How hard is it to pick the next Usain Bolt, Ian Thorpe or Anna Meares?

Penn researchers identify new genetic cause of a form of inherited neuropathy
Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

Is less more? How consumers view sustainability claims
Communicating a product's reduced negative attribute might have unintended consequences if consumers approach it with the wrong mindset.

Green apple flavor in vapes enhances nicotine reward
A common green apple vape flavor enhances nicotine reward and is also rewarding itself, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro.

Large international study pinpoints impact of TP53 gene mutations on blood cancer severity
A large international study led by researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering has immediate clinical relevance for risk assessment and treatment of people with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

Transferrin identified as potential contributor to COVID-19 severity
The University of Kent's School of Biosciences and the Institute of Medical Virology at Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main, have identified that a glycoprotein known as transferrin may critically contribute to severe forms of COVID-19.

COPD underdiagnosed in older adults, but can be managed
''Recognizing and Treating COPD in Older Adults'' the latest issue of the What's Hot newsletter from The Gerontological Society of America, addresses what is known about the prevalence, incidence, and impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in older adults.

Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Nano a high-speed atomic-force microscopy study of the formation of protein fibrils (amyloids) associated with pathologies in collaborated research with Showa University.
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