Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 05, 2020
Fabrication advance: Spray-on clear coatings for cheaper smart windows
Researchers have developed a spray-on method for making conductive clear coatings, or transparent electrodes.

NASA data helps uncover our solar system's shape
Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.

Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ''Beltway bubble.'' Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ''microbubbles,'' says a recent study.

Career-readiness through cross-disciplinary project-based learning
Faculty members at Washington State University Everett recently developed and implemented an interdisciplinary project-based learning approach to provide students with real-world professional experience.

Real-time imaging can help prevent deadly dust explosions
Researchers at Purdue University have developed an image- and video-based application using OpenCV algorithms that detect explosible suspended dust concentration.

Practice patterns, responsiveness to common ocular complaints among ophthalmology centers during COVID-19
Practice patterns for common ocular complaints during the initial stage of the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study among comprehensive U.S. ophthalmology practices.

IKBFU researchers study the Curonian Spit plants adaptation mechanism
IKBFU Institute of Living Systems biology scientists study protective mechanisms of the Curonian Spit wild plants.

Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
Scientists at the lab of Professor Hilal Lashuel at EPFL have identified a new enzyme called ''TBK1'' who plays a central role in regulating the degradation and clearance of the huntingtin protein and introduces chemical modifications that block its aggregation.

Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level
University of Pittsburgh Associate Professor John A. Keith is using new quantum chemistry computing procedures to categorize hypothetical electrocatalysts that are ''too slow'' or ''too expensive'', far more thoroughly and quickly than was considered possible a few years ago.

Life at its limits
A new study led by James Bradley of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and Queen Mary University of London finds that microbes in the seabed survive on far less energy than has been shown ever before.

Cannabis use shows substantial risks, no benefits for cardiovascular health; Pachowicz identifying gaps and opportunities in space research
Observational studies have found no cardiovascular benefits associated with cannabis use.

COVID-19 a perfect storm for conspiracy theories
As COVID-19 spreads rapidly around the globe, the pandemic has given conspiracy groups a bigger platform than ever before.

Trajectories of antidepressant medication use during pregnancy
In an analysis of women who started pregnancy when taking antidepressant medications, investigators identified three trajectories of antidepressant dispensing during pregnancy: more than half stopped their treatment, a quarter maintained their treatment throughout pregnancy, and one-fifth discontinued it for a minimum of three months and then resumed it during the postpartum period.

The role of Chinese cultural values in illegal wildlife trade interventions
A new study by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) suggests that utilising Confucianist, Daoist, and Buddhist belief messaging in targeted campaigns could effectively change the behaviour of end consumers in the East Asia illegal wildlife trade chain.

CUNY ISPH study sheds new light on how ovarian cancer grows and evolves
In a paper published in the journal Cancer Research, professor Levi Waldron, post-doctoral fellow Ludwig Geistlinger, and colleagues at the Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH) at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) provide new insights into how ovarian cancer grows and evolves within a person.

Online 'booster' improves attitudes toward hearing health among farm youths
Researchers at the University of Michigan are interested in changing the behavior of some 2 million farm youths affected by hazardous noise exposure and hearing loss in the United States.

Save black lives
The Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University and the Black Public Defender Association today released ''Save Black Lives: A Call for Racially-responsive Strategies and Resources for the Black Community during the COVID-19 Pandemic,'' a comprehensive report that details why public health responses and strategies to address COVID-19 must be centered around race and the criminal legal system.

New method to help spot gastric cancer cells
Researchers from the Shenyang Institute of Automation (SIA) of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) and City University of Hong Kong (CityU), in cooperation with doctors from the First Hospital of China Medical University, jointly proposed an optically induced electrokinetics (OEK) microfluidic method for label-free separation and characterization of gastric cancer cells.

Body weight has surprising, alarming impact on brain function
Amsterdam and Costa Mesa, CA, August 5, 2020 - As a person's weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

New strategy against osteoporosis
An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.

Lava tubes on Mars and the Moon are so wide they can host planetary bases
Researchers at the Universities of Bologna and Padua studied the subsurface cavities that lava created underground on Mars and the Moon.

NAU biologist part of international team to sequence genome of rare 'living fossil'
Northern Arizona University assistant professor Marc Tollis is one of a dozen collaborators sequencing the genome of the tuatara, a lizard-like creature that lives on the islands of New Zealand.

Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials
IBS research team found a way to measure the quantum distance of Bloch states in solids by applying magnetic field.

Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
Their work could boost the malodorous - yet delicious - characteristics that garlic-lovers the world over savor.

Organoids help bridge gap between laboratory study and animal modeling of disease
A new study from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is the first to replicate observations of native tumor tissue in a laboratory model and validate it in the context of the whole-body physiology.

Autism: How a gene alteration modifies social behavior
A team of researchers at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered a new connection between a genetic alteration and social difficulties related to autism: A mutation in the neuroligin-3 gene reduces the effect of the hormone oxytocin.

Bone drug may be beneficial for knee osteoarthritis
Bisphosphonates (a class of drugs that prevent the loss of bone density and used to treat osteoporosis and similar diseases) appear to be safe and beneficial for osteoarthritis patients.

Interpreting the human genome's instruction manual
Berkeley Lab bioscientists are part of a nationwide research project, called ENCODE, that has generated a detailed atlas of the molecular elements that regulate our genes.

Neuroendocrine markers of grief
Researchers have examined what's currently known about the neuroendocrine effects of grief and whether biological factors can predict complicated or prolonged grief after the death of a loved one.

Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S.

Move over Akita: Introducing 'Kuma mutant' mice for islet transplantation research
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have used a gene editing technique to establish a novel mouse model of permanent neonatal diabetes--the immune-deficient Kuma mutant mice with a specific deletion in the Insulin2 (Ins2) gene.

Antibiotics linked to higher heart disease risk in individuals with type 1 diabetes
Results from a study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine suggest that bacterial infections may elevate the risk of coronary heart disease in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

Heart disease medications underused among Hispanic/Latino populations with PAD
Recommended heart medications are underused among Hispanic/Latino people with peripheral artery disease (PAD).

Inappropriate prescriptions sending hospitalized seniors back to the ER
Two in three hospitalized seniors are prescribed drugs that should be avoided by older adults, increasing the risk of injury and adverse drug reactions.

Characteristics, treatment of radiation-induced hair loss in cancer patients
Characteristics and response to treatment of persistent radiation-induced hair loss in patients with primary central nervous system tumors or head and neck cancer were examined in this observational study.

How cells keep growing even when under attack
Biochemists at UMass Amherst report that a damage-containment system in stressed bacteria can become overrun and blocked, but that this leads to cells responding by turning on different pathways to make sure that normal growth continues.

Drivers from poor cities can be exposed to 80% more air pollution
Car users from the world's least affluent cities are exposed to a disproportionate amount of in-car air pollution because they rely heavily on opening their windows for ventilation, finds a first of its kind study from the University of Surrey.

To bond with nature, kids need solitary activities outdoors
A new study found solitary activities like fishing, hunting or exploring outside are key to building strong bonds between children and nature.

The three strategic priorities of marketing excellence
Investors value marketing excellence more highly than they value strategies based on market orientation and marketing capabilities.

The curious genome of the tuatara, an ancient reptile in peril
International scientists and Ngātiwai, a Māori tribe, teamed up to sequence the genome of a rare reptile, the tuatara, uncovering some unique aspects of the tuatara's evolution.

Absorbed plant MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication.

Though concerned about COVID-19, cigar smokers are smoking more, survey finds
An online survey of cigar smokers found while the majority responded they intended to quit smoking due to concerns about elevated health risks if they contracted COVID-19, more than twice as many reported they increased rather than decreased their tobacco use since the pandemic's onset.

Researchers capture X-ray images with unprecedented speed and resolution
Researchers have demonstrated a new high-resolution x-ray imaging technique that can capture the motion of rapidly moving objects and quickly changing dynamics.

Tiniest secrets of integrated circuits revealed with new imaging technique
The secrets of the tiniest active structures in integrated circuits can be revealed using a non-destructive imaging technique, shows an international team of scientists from JKU and Keysight Technologies (Austria), ETH/EPFL/PSI and IBM Research - Europe (Switzerland) and from UCL (UK).

Implanted neural stem cell grafts show functionality in spinal cord injuries
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report successfully implanting specialized grafts of neural stem cells directly into spinal cord injuries in mice, then documenting how the grafts grew and filled the injury sites, mimicking the animals' existing neuronal network.

Herbivorous vertebrates may face most daunting extinction risk
Herbivores -- not predators -- may face a higher risk of extinction among mammals, birds, and reptiles, according to a new study of more than 44,000 living and extinct species.

Ammonia sparks unexpected, exotic lightning on Jupiter
NASA's Juno spacecraft -- orbiting and closely observing the planet Jupiter -- has unexpectedly discovered lightning in the planet's upper atmosphere, according to a multi-institutional study led by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

Turning carbon dioxide into liquid fuel
A team led by Argonne in collaboration with Northern Illinois University reports a new electrocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide and water into ethanol with very high energy efficiency, high selectivity for the desired final product and low cost.

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds
Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical.

Promising new research identifies novel approach for controlling defects in 3D printing
Argonne scientists use temperature data to tune -- and fix -- defects in 3D-printed metallic parts.

Ammonia-rich hail sheds new light on Jupiter's weather
New Juno results suggest that the violent thunderstorms taking place in Jupiter's atmosphere may form ammonia-rich hail, or 'mushballs', that play a key role in the planet's atmospheric dynamics.

Drivers respond to pre-crash warnings with levels of attentive 'gaze'
Engineers at the University of Missouri conducted open road testing of three collision avoidance systems and demonstrated that a drivers' visual behavior in response to an alert generated from a collision avoidance system can be divided into one of four different behavioral categories: active gaze, self-conscious gaze, attentive gaze and ignored gaze.

Lottery for ventilators
In times of acute shortages, the orthodoxy in healthcare is for scarce resources to be allocated based on who has the best chance of survival.

Initiative to promote a culture of mobility in hospitals yields encouraging results
A paper published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society reported results of an initiative designed to enhance implementation of hospital mobility programs aimed at improving quality of care and outcomes for older patients.

Massey scientist suggests COVID-19 should be treated as an acute inflammatory disease
The COVID-19 pandemic has had detrimental effects on global infrastructure sectors, including economic, political, health care, education and research systems, and there is still no definitive treatment strategy for the disease.

Epigenetic changes in ADNP syndrome, a cause of autism, do not indicate profound presentation of the disorder
Study Finds Epigenetic Signatures Show Little Correlation to Severity of Symptoms

Optical seismometer survives "hellish" summit of Caribbean volcano
The heights of La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano can be hellish, sweltering at more than 48 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit) and swathed in billows of acidic gas.

Warming climate may trigger more West Nile outbreaks in Southern California
A new study of captured mosquitoes in Los Angeles finds that West Nile infection is strongly associated with average temperature, and that temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit are highly favorable for West Nile transmission.

Medicare Part D favors generic prescription drugs over branded counterparts, study finds
Published this week in Health Affairs, the study led by Stacie Dusetzina, PhD, Ingram Associate Professor of Cancer Research and associate professor of Health Policy, compared Medicare Part D coverage of more than 1,360 pairs of generic and brand-name drugs.

Consumption of a blueberry enriched diet by women for six weeks alters determinants of human muscle progenitor cell function
A new research study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, investigated how serum from subjects consuming a diet enriched with blueberries would affect the cells responsible for muscle growth and repair.

Elliott Fisher proposes "single system solution" for US healthcare system
To improve care, lower costs, and heal the wounds caused by a system that delegates many Americans to the separate and unequal ''safety net,'' policy makers should establish a single system of universal coverage and payment models where all are entitled to the same benefits and care, where comprehensive information supports improvement, and where transparency empowers the market to improve quality and lower costs through informed choices of population health organizations, providers, and treatments.

Study suggests drug overdose linked to PTSD
Drug overdoses are psychologically traumatic events that can lead to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

NIH-Moderna investigational COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in mouse studies
The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 protected mice from infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to research published today in Nature.

Men scoring higher on 'man box' scale are prone to violence, mental illness
Study finds that men who harbor more harmful attitudes about masculinity -- including beliefs about aggression and homophobia -- also tend toward bullying, sexual harassment, depression and suicidal thoughts.

Climate change may melt the "freezers" of pygmy owls and reduce their overwinter survival
Ecologists at the University of Turku, Finland, have discovered that the food hoards pygmy owls collect in nest-boxes (''freezers'') for winter rot due to high precipitation caused by heavy autumn rains and if the hoarding has been initiated early in the autumn.

Rheumatoid arthritis linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes
A recent analysis of a US commercial insurance database found that adults with rheumatoid arthritis had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than other individuals, including those with other types of arthritis.

Researchers discover predictor of laser treatment success in patients with glaucoma
More than 70 million people worldwide suffer from glaucoma. Treatment options have traditionally included eye drops to reduce the fluid the eye produces or surgery to unclog the eye's drainage.

Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature.

COVID-19 rates higher among minority, socioeconomically disadvantaged children
Minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged children have significantly higher rates of COVID-19 infection, a new study led by Children's National Hospital researchers shows.

How microbes in 'starter cultures' make fermented sausage tasty
Microbes in ''starter cultures'' impart a distinctive tang and longer shelf life to food like sourdough bread, yogurt and kimchi through the process of fermentation.

Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
Researchers at Nagoya University have found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae.

Culling cancer before it stems: A novel, rapid carcinogen detection method
Testing chemical compounds for their ability to cause cancer is one way in which scientists can identify hazardous chemicals and thereby protect public health.

Bird nests attract flying insects and parasites due to higher levels of carbon dioxide
Researchers in Spain have examined bird nests in order to understand how flying insects and parasites detect gases as a way to locate their hosts.

Many states lack election flexibility needed to address pandemic safety concerns
The coronavirus pandemic poses unprecedented safety challenges to the nation's elections and significantly disrupted elections held this spring.

Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools
Scientists use a smartphone camera to easily measure soil density -- a key metric for analyzing our soils

Rock debris protects glaciers from climate change more than previously known
A new study which provides a global estimate of rock cover on the Earth's glaciers has revealed that the expanse of rock debris on glaciers, a factor that has been ignored in models of glacier melt and sea level rise, could be significant.

A one-step diagnostic may bring faster, cheaper cancer testing to remote settings
Scientists have created a rapid and affordable test for breast cancer that is designed for use in developing regions, where patients often face delayed diagnoses that worsen their outcomes.

The yin and yang of inflammation controlled by a single molecule
Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections

Rice researchers use InSight for deep Mars measurements
Using data from NASA's InSight Lander on Mars, Rice University seismologists have made the first direct measurements of three subsurface boundaries from the crust to the core of the red planet.

Trifluoroacetic acid acts as trifluoromethylating agent in arene C-H functionalization
Researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a catalytic system that directly installs the trifluoromethyl group onto arenes.

Gout diagnoses rising worldwide
The prevalence of gout -- a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints--increased across the world at an alarming rate from 1990 to 2017, according to an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.

Did the election of Donald Trump affect Europeans' support for US trade agreement?
A survey conducted immediately before and after the 2016 US presidential election reveals that the election of Donald Trump had a negative effect on Europeans' image of the United States, but it did not seem to affect the willingness of Europeans to sign a trade and investment agreement with the country.

Understanding why some children enjoy TV more than others
New research shows that children's own temperament could be driving the amount of TV they watch.

Projecting early molecular signatures of AD through the convergence study of Omics and AI
Dr. Cheon Mookyung of KBRI published the research results in an international academic journal of computational biology.

Quality suffers for audit offices with clients from different industries, study shows
If an audit office has a diversified client portfolio, it is more difficult to audit a particular type of client, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

Rethink needed for treatment of Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa
Concerns over ineffective traditional treatments have prompted calls to better understand the complex processes underpinning Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa (SE-AN).

Dinosaur relative's genome linked to mammals
Scientists from the University of Adelaide and South Australian Museum have collaborated with Otago University, New Zealand and a global team to sequence the genome of the tuatara - a rare reptile whose ancestors once roamed the earth with dinosaurs.

Lung-specific risk factors may increase hip fracture risk in individuals who smoke
Smoking has been linked to a higher risk of bone fractures.

Astronomers sink their teeth into special supernova
Astronomers using several telescopes at NOIRLab, including the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, have obtained critical data on a particular type of exploding star that produces copious amounts of calcium.

Silk scaffolds and magnetism to generate bone tissue and be able to use it in implants
Researchers from the UPV/EHU, BCMaterials and various centres in Portugal have shown that the combination of biocompatible scaffolds formed from silk components, and stimulation of cells by means of magnetism is valid for generating bone tissue.

Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species.

How climate change affects allergies, immune response and autism
Climate change and disruption of the ecosystem have the potential to profoundly impact the human body.

HDAC6 can control tumor growth and halt metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer
Genetic modifier HDAC6 was found to control tumor growth and halt metastasis in triple-negative breast cancer in vivo, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer Research by investigators at the GW Cancer Center.

Heart regeneration using stem cells: Why irregular heartbeats occur after transplantation
Increased predominance of the matured ventricular subtype in embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo elucidated why arrhythmia occurs post-transplant of hESC-CMs.

Computational modeling enables heart valve visualizations
Computational modeling has provided new insights into the heart's vascular system, a complex and mechanically demanding system that remains poorly understood.

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants
An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus.

Scientists discover novel drug target for pancreatic cancer
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have uncovered a novel drug target, a protein called PPP1R1B, that stops the deadly spread of pancreatic cancer, called metastasis, when inhibited in mice.

Waning attention to climate change amid pandemic could have lasting effects
With COVID-19 dominating the headlines, searches for climate change are on the decline.

Study suggests pregnancy and ovarian function are risk factors for coronary artery disease
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death in both men and women.

Local food
The COVID-19 pandemic exposes weaknesses in the supply chain when countries go into lockdown.

Osteopontin, a protein not always as bad as it is made out to be
In an article published in the prestigious journal Aging Cell, the UPV/EHU's Lipids & Liver research group shows that contrary to expectations, physiological levels in the liver of osteopontin, a multifunctional protein linked to various serious diseases, need to be maintained during ageing to prevent the progression of ageing-related, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs.

Incorporating solar harvesting into the side of buildings could enhance energy sustainability
If builders could incorporate solar harvesting into the siding of a building, the amount of energy from the grid that a structure would need may significantly decrease.

Will automated vehicles cut parking revenue?
Benjamin Clark and Anne Brown of the University of Oregon used Seattle as a case study to find the association between TNC trips and on-street parking occupancy.

Joint ASU-Hawaii state study reveals long-term human impacts on reef fish
In a new study investigating human impacts on resource fish biomass on the Island of Hawai?i, researchers from the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) and Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) observed an alarming 45% decrease in fish biomass over a decade of surveys.

Study clarifies kinship of important plant group
Asterids comprise around 100,000 flowering plants, from heather to tomatoes.

Native American stone tool technology found in Arabia
Stone fluted points dating back some 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, were discovered on archaeological sites in Manayzah, Yemen and Ad-Dahariz, Oman.

New study may refine predicted survival outcomes and treatment in younger adults with acute leukemia
The findings of a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G.

Three-quarters of migrants traveling to US through Mexico experience food insecurity
A survey of Central American migrants traveling through Mexico on their way to the United States found that 74 percent of them experienced a degree of food insecurity, ranging from having only one meal to no food at all for one day or longer.

Gut microbes shape our antibodies before we are infected by pathogens
Because the microbiota is so complex, containing hundreds of different bacterial species, it is not known how the presence of microbes in the intestine shaped the antibodies that are present even before we are challenged by an infection.

A 'Devonian' aquarium: Modern mutant fishes replicate creatures of ancient oceans
A single-gene mutation in common aquarium fish produced a surprising lookalike of ancient species extinct for 400 million years.

No air, no problem: How parasites switch to life without oxygen inside host
The discovery of unique molecular mechanics allowing parasitic worms to thrive in the guts of one billion people opens the door to new treatments that are safe for the host.

Study examines skin diseases in older adults
In a study of 552 adults aged 70 to 93 years old, 80% of participants had at least one skin disease that required treatment, and the most common conditions were fungal skin infections, rosacea, actinic keratosis, and eczema.

Virtual reality improves game-based navigational efficiency
Individuals playing a virtual reality (VR)-based game showed a higher navigational efficiency and less disorientation than those playing a non-VR immersive desktop version.

High-sensitivity atomic force microscopy opens up for photosensitive materials
Research at Kanazawa University as reported in Scientific Reports demonstrates atomic force microscopy imaging that gets around the challenges of exciting very small cantilevers at their high megahertz resonance frequencies.

Plate tectonics goes global
A research team led by Dr. WAN Bo from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics (IGG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has revealed that plate tectonics went global 2 billion years ago.

Tracking humanity's latest toxins in stranded whales and dolphins
As humanity develops new types of plastics and chemicals, researchers are constantly trying to keep up with understanding how these contaminants affect the environment and wildlife.

Skin findings described in patients with severe COVID-19
In this case series with four patients, the skin findings of livedo racemosa (skin discoloration) and retiform purpura are described in patients with severe COVID-19.

TLK protein inhibition activates the innate immune system
These proteins are a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the effect of some cancer treatments.

Locking down shape-shifting spike protein aids development of COVID-19 vaccine
Publishing in the journal Nature, researchers from the Univ. of Texas at Austin, Moderna and the NIH explain how they developed the COVID-19 vaccine candidate mRNA-1273 and report strong positive results on its effectiveness in mice.

New findings on enzymes with important role in SARS-CoV-2 infection
Researchers at Uppsala University have described the presence, throughout the human body, of the enzyme ACE2.

Can community members deliver naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses?
Equipped with naloxone and a smartphone app, community members can save lives in the fight against America's opioid crisis, according to a paper from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health and colleagues published this week in The Lancet journal EClinicalMedicine.

Calcium-rich supernova examined with x-rays for first time
X-ray images give unprecedented view of extremely rare type of supernova.

Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
Experiments with DNA molecules show that their mechanical properties are completely different from what those of macroscopic objects - and this has important consequences for biology and medicine.

Calcium-rich supernova examined with X-rays for first time
New findings reveal that a calcium-rich supernova is a compact star that sheds an outer layer of gas during the final stages of its life.

HPV vaccination linked to lower risk of precancerous condition
Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) reduces the risk of a condition that often leads to cervical cancer, according to an analysis of Danish health registry data.

May the force be with you: Detecting ultrafast light by its force
A McGill research team has developed a new technique to detect nano-sized imperfections in materials.

Increase in immigration has little impact on the wages of US citizens
A new study in Review of Economic Studies suggests that a large increase in the stock of immigrants to the United States would have little impact on the wages of native US citizens.

Influenza A virus directly modulates eosinophil responses
Eosinophils residing in the airways of mice respond to influenza A virus (IAV) infection through alterations in surface expression of various markers necessary for migration and cellular immunity responses, according to research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology by researchers from Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Herbivores, not predators, most at risk of extinction
One million years ago, the extinction of large-bodied plant-eaters changed the trajectory of life on Earth.

How tumor cells evade the immune defense
Scientists are increasingly trying to use the body's own immune system to fight cancer.

Alcoholism treatment is potentially effective against COVID-19
A team of chemists from HSE University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry used molecular modelling to find out that two medications that have been known for a long time can be used to fight SARS-CoV-2.

Carbon footprinting and pricing under climate concerns
Marketers can lead how their companies can use the cost and demand effects of reducing the carbon footprint of their products to determine the profit-maximizing design.

Surgery during pregnancy for gallbladder infections may be safer than postponing
Although surgery during pregnancy is often feared, in the case of cholecystitis or acute gallbladder disease, surgery may lead to better outcomes for mom and baby.

Ocean heatwaves dramatically shift habitats
Marine heatwaves across the world's oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers.

Building dementia friendly churches
A project to help church communities become more 'dementia friendly' has had a significant impact across the country.

Scientists discover the switch that makes human brown fat burn energy
The receptor responsible for activating the energy-burning property of brown fat in humans has been identified.

New acid mine drainage treatment turns waste into valuable critical minerals
A new way to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) could help transform the environmental pollution problem into an important domestic source of the critical rare earth elements needed to produce technology ranging from smart phones to fighter jets, according to Penn State scientists.

Taste bud cells might not be a target of SARS-CoV-2
An intriguing early symptom among some COVID-19 patients is the loss of the sense of smell and/or taste, which has led to the suspicion that the virus that causes the illness, SARS-CoV-2, could be targeting taste buds.

An inventory providing information on more than 200 viruses that infect plants in Brazil
The largest database of plant viruses in Brazil serves as a tool for researchers, growers and policymakers.

New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
New Guinea is the most floristically diverse island in the world, an international collaboration led by the University of Zurich has shown.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.