Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 10, 2020
Nepal lockdown halved health facility births and increased stillbirths and newborn deaths
COVID-19 response has resulted in major reductions in health facility births in Nepal and widened inequalities, with significantly increased institutional stillbirth and neonatal mortality, according to a new study in the Lancet Global Health.

COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells
A new study from the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia is the first to suggest that COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells.

Assessing training in health disparities
This survey study described and compared the curriculum on health disparities from the perspective of program directors and perceptions of training among internal medicine residents.

What the rest of the world can learn from South Korea's COVID-19 response
As the world continues to closely monitor the newest coronavirus outbreak, the government of South Korea has been able to keep the disease under control without paralyzing the national health and economic systems.

Countering anti-vaccination influences from social media - with conversation
What effect, if any, do anti-vaccination social media messages have on actual vaccination behavior?

NASA's Aqua Satellite shows extent of Apple Fire's burn scar
On Aug. 9, 2020 NASA's Aqua satellite imaged the Apple Fire near Big Bear Lake in California using its false-color bands in order to be able to distinguish burn scars from the surrounding area more easily.

Restaurant customers frown on automatic gratuities, particularly after good service
Automatic gratuities leave restaurant patrons with a bad taste, even when the meal and the service were excellent, new research from Washington State University indicates.

Study pinpoints five most likely causes of post-traumatic stress in police officers
A combination of genetic and emotional differences may lead to post-traumatic stress (PTS) in police officers, a new study finds.

How building features impact veterans with PTSD
The built environment, where someone lives (private) or works (public), influences a person's daily life and can help, or hinder, their mental health.

Third breakthrough demonstrates photosynthetic hacks can boost yield, conserve water
Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide--but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery.

New study documents increasing frequency, cost, and severity of gunshot wounds
The rise in firearm violence has coincided with an increase in the severity of injuries firearms inflict as well as the cost of operations.

Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials
Researchers at the University of Houston are reporting the invention of a new class of porous catalysts that will speed up reactions, breaking the molecular traffic jam that can slow them down.

Standardized care may help equalize health outcomes among patients with testicular cancer
New research suggests that although sociodemographic factors have been associated with poor outcomes for patients treated for testicular cancer, guideline-directed, expert care can help to address this issue.

Math shows how brain stays stable amid internal noise and a widely varying world
A new theoretical framework shows that many properties of neural connections help biological circuits produce consistent computations.

Air pollution impacts the health of wild pollinators
We have almost no idea how air pollution affects other organisms who breathe the same air as we do.

Most close relatives of birds neared the potential for powered flight but few crossed its thresholds
An international study led by HKU Research Assistant Professor Dr.

New approach to treating osteoarthritis advances
Injections of a natural 'energy' molecule prompted regrowth of almost half of the cartilage lost with aging in knees, a new study in rodents shows.

How to boost tips and donations with the dueling preference approach
The dueling preferences approach can be more effective than traditional approaches at increasing tips and small prosocial gifts.

Stronger rains in warmer climate could lessen heat damage to crops, says study
Intensified rainstorms predicted for many parts of the United States as a result of warming climate may have a modest silver lining: they could more efficiently water some major crops, and this would at least partially offset the far larger projected yield declines caused by the rising heat itself.

Analysis of Ugandan cervical carcinomas, an aid for understudied sub-Saharan women
Cervical cancer kills more than 300,000 middle-aged women a year, and 19 of the 20 nations with the highest death rates are sub-Saharan countries.

Researchers find new potential treatment for prion diseases
A new study in Nucleic Acids Research suggests a possible effective treatment strategy for patients suffering from prion disease.

Fragmented forests: Tree cover, urban sprawl both increased in Southeast Michigan over the past 30 years
The extent of Southeast Michigan's tree canopy and its urban sprawl both increased between 1985 and 2015, according to a new University of Michigan study that used aerial photos and satellite images to map individual buildings and small patches of street trees.

Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line
Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land.

Algal blue light switch control of electrical excitation in plants
What is the role and molecular basis of electrical signaling in higher plants?

Wheat and couch grass can extract toxic metals from contaminated soils
Irina Shtangeeva is a researcher at the Department of Soil Science and Soil Ecology, St Petersburg University.

Prenatal depression alters child's brain connectivity, affects behavior
Altered brain connectivity may be one way prenatal depression influences child behavior, according to new research in JNeurosci.

Breakthrough technology purifies water using the power of sunlight
A research team, led by Australia's Monash University, has been able to transform brackish water and seawater into safe, clean drinking water in less than 30 minutes using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and sunlight.

KIST finds clue to improve artificial vision for patients with retinitis pigmentosa
A Korean research team has reported important findings that could potentially improve the performance of retinal prostheses creating artificial vision for blind individuals.

Knowledge is power: Learning more about COVID-19 can reduce your pandemic stress
A new study finds that the more people know about COVID-19, the less pandemic-related stress they have.

NASA sees compact Tropical Storm Jangmi exiting East China Sea
Tropical Storm Jangmi was exiting the East China Sea and moving toward the Sea of Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite measured the strength of the system.

Confused by whole grain labels on food packaging? Study finds you're not alone
Whole grain labels are confusing to consumers, according to a new study that found many made the wrong choice when asked to pick the healthier option based on product labels.

Theoretical study shows that matter tends to be ordered at low temperatures
Scientists found that in actual materials, there's no such thing as a critical point at which a quantum phase transition occurs in a genuine zero field because of the persistence of the residual magnetic field created by the many-body interaction.

Adaptive mutations repeat themselves in tiny crustaceans of Lake Baikal
Researchers showed that parallel evolution driven by adaptations can be detected at the whole-genome level.

New machine learning tool predicts devastating intestinal disease in premature infants
Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a sensitive and specific early warning system for predicting necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants before the life-threatening intestinal disease occurs.

Berkeley Lab science snapshots
Subtropical weather phenomenon likely to bring greater rainfall - and drought - by 2100.

Grasshopper jumping on Bloch sphere finds new quantum insights
New research at the University of Warwick has (pardon the pun) put a new spin on a mathematical analogy involving a jumping grasshopper and its ideal lawn shape.

Discovery of massless electrons in phase-change materials provides next step for future electronics
Researchers have found electrons that behave as if they have no mass, called Dirac electrons, in a compound used in rewritable discs, such as CDs and DVDs.

Patient experiences in medical imaging and radiation therapy: The importance of skilled patient care professionals
I went into the MRI bracing for the wave of panic I knew would come as soon as I was strapped down and inside the machine.'' In ''A Tale of Two MRIs'' by patient Lelainia Lloyd, her experiences--good and bad--are shared as part of an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published by Elsevier.

The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows.

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus, QUT study
Modelling the predicted movements of pervasive sap-sucking tiny insects before they infest banana crops has the potential to become a key tactic in the fight against a devastating virus, according to QUT research.

New model shows how voting behavior can drive political parties apart
If voters gravitate toward the center of the political spectrum, why are the parties drifting farther apart?

The CNIO pave the way for a future gene therapy to reverse pulmonary fibrosis associated with ageing
''Our results indicate that a new therapy may be developed to prevent the development of pulmonary fibrosis associated with ageing,'' says CNIO's Maria Blasco, principal investigator of the study * Lung tissue of patients with pulmonary fibrosis does not regenerate because the cells involved in lung generation have damaged telomeres, the ends of the chromosomes.

Army advances learning capabilities of drone swarms
Army researchers developed a reinforcement learning approach that will allow swarms of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles to optimally accomplish various missions while minimizing performance uncertainty.

Using air to amplify light
In a promising breakthrough for the future of communications, EPFL researchers have developed a technology that can amplify light in the latest hollow-core optical fibers.

Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea-ice by 2035
A new study, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035.

New USask-led research reveals previously hidden features of plant genomes
An international team led by the Plant Phenotyping and Imaging Research Centre (P2IRC) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has decoded the full genome for the black mustard plant--research that will advance breeding of oilseed mustard crops and provides a foundation for improved breeding of wheat, canola and lentils.

An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica
Associate Professor SUETSUGU Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) presents evidence of the apparently unusual seed dispersal system by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae.

Seeing chemical reactions with music
Audible sound enables chemical coloring and the coexistence of different chemical reactions in a solution.

Retesting for COVID-19: UPMC shares its experience
In the first large, multicenter analysis of its kind, the 40-hospital UPMC health system today reported its findings on clinician-directed retesting of patients for presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

Non-fasting blood test can help screen youth for prediabetes and diabetes
A simple blood test that does not require overnight fasting has been found to be an accurate screening tool for identifying youth at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk later in life.

Scientists develop first quantum algorithm to characterize noise across large systems
Quantum systems are notoriously prone to errors and noise. In order to overcome this and build a functional quantum computer, physicists should ideally understand the noise across an entire system.

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur in the environment
New research identifies fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands as the largest source of sulfur in the environment -- up to 10 times higher than the peak sulfur load seen in the second half of the 20th century, during the days of acid rain.

New study confirms the power of Deinosuchus and its 'teeth the size of bananas'
A new study, revisiting fossil specimens from the enormous crocodylian, Deinosuchus, has confirmed that the beast had teeth ''the size of bananas'', capable to take down even the very largest of dinosaurs.

Genomic sequencing as a standalone newborn screening tool falls short
With the rise of genomic sequencing, health technology companies are promising parents they can detect rare metabolic disorders in newborns who, despite a healthy appearance, may need immediate treatment.

Gene therapy targets inner retina to combat blindness
Batten disease is a group of fatal, inherited lysosomal storage disorders that predominantly affect children.

Reducing urinary protein for patients with rare kidney disease slows kidney decline
New findings show that reducing the amount of protein in the urine of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis can significantly slow declines in kidney function and extend time before patients' kidneys fail.

Poverty alleviation efforts are shaping the success of environmental targets
Social protection programs can facilitate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but can also create trade-offs across divergent social and environmental goals that can undermine their effectiveness, say the authors of new research published in the journal PNAS.

Cannabis use in pregnancy linked to a greater risk of autism
In the largest study of its kind, researchers found that children whose mothers reported using cannabis during pregnancy were at greater risk of autism.

Landmarks facing climate threats could 'transform,' expert says
Researchers asked in a viewpoint published in Climatic Change whether heritage sites threatened by climate change should be allowed to adapt and 'transform.'

Detailed molecular workings of a key system in learning and memory formation
UMass Amherst biochemist Margaret Strattob and colleagues report how they used advanced sequencing technology to clear up uncertainty and determine all variants of a single protein/enzyme known as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampus, the brain's memory center.

Biology blurs line between sexes, behaviors
Biological sex is typically understood in binary terms: male and female.

Study: Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles
It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy -- but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles.

Explosive nuclear astrophysics
An international team has made a key discovery related to 'presolar grains' found in some meteorites.

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, PSU study finds
A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates.

NASA infrared data confirms depression became Tropical Storm Elida
After Tropical Depression 09E formed near the coast of southwestern Mexico, infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm its transition to a tropical storm.

UT southwestern levels the playing field for testicular cancer patients
DALLAS - Aug. 10, 2020 - By offering the same level of care and expertise to two very different populations, UT Southwestern physicians were able to eliminate the sociodemographic disparities in survival and cancer recurrence rates typically seen nationally in testicular cancer patients.

Globally, only half of women get treatment for preventable killer of newborns
Only half of pregnant women worldwide who need a 50-year-old treatment that prevents an often-fatal disease in fetuses and newborns receive it, Columbia researchers have found.

Aquatic robots can remove contaminant particles from water
Scientists from WMG at the University of Warwick, led by Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, developed a 1cm by 1cm wireless artificial aquatic polyp, which can remove contaminants from water.

Nutritional screening a potential tool for determining heart attack, angina prognosis
In a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology of more than 5,000 acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients, 71.8% were considered malnourished by at least one nutrition screening test, and worsening malnutrition status was associated with higher mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), such as another heart attack or stroke.

HPV strains may impact cervical cancer prognosis
An analysis of cervical cancers in Ugandan women has uncovered significant genomic differences between tumours caused by different strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), signifying HPV type may impact cervical cancer characteristics and prognosis.

Schooling is critical for cognitive health throughout life
New research suggests that education provides little to no protection against the onset of cognitive declines later in life.

Researchers characterize important regulators of tissue inflammation, fibrosis and regeneration
Although macrophages (cells involved in the detection and destruction of bacteria and other harmful organisms as well as dead cells) are classified as immune cells functioning in the activation and resolution of tissue inflammation, it is now clear that they are critically involved in a variety of disease processes, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, tumor growth and metastasis and tissue fibrosis.

Pasteurization inactivates COVID-19 virus in human milk: new research
A new study has confirmed what researchers already suspected to be the case: heat inactivates SARS-CoV-2 in human milk.

Study: Increased presence of law enforcement officers in schools does not improve safety
A new longitudinal study sought to learn more about the impact of school resource officers (SROs).

How fish stocks will change in warming seas
New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries.

Agtech to the rescue in a pandemic: adapting plant labs for human testing
Just as redeploying a fleet of small British fishing boats helped during the Battle of Dunkirk, marshalling the research equipment and expertise of the many agtech labs around the world could help combat pandemics, say the authors of a just-published article in Nature Biotechnology.

Gulf war illness, chronic fatigue syndrome distinct illnesses, Georgetown study suggests
A brain imaging study of veterans with Gulf War illness (GWI) and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (sometimes called myalgic encephalomyelitis), has shown that the two illnesses produce distinctly different, abnormal patterns of brain activity after moderate exercise.

Miscarriage risk increases each week alcohol is used in early pregnancy
Each week a woman consumes alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers.

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur to the environment
Historically, coal-fired power plants were the largest source of reactive sulfur, a component of acid rain, to the biosphere.

AI-enhanced precision medicine identifies novel autism subtype
A novel precision medicine approach enhanced by artificial intelligence has laid the groundwork for what could be the first biomedical screening and intervention tool for a subtype of autism, reports a new study.

NASA finds strong storms in developing Tropical Storm Mekkhala
After Tropical Depression 07W formed close to the western Philippines, it moved away and strengthened into a tropical storm in the South China Sea.

Tel Aviv University scientists reduce metastatic spread following tumor removal surgery
A research group from Tel Aviv University (TAU) successfully reduced metastatic spread following tumor removal surgery in colorectal cancer patients.

Individual differences in the brain
If selection reinforces a behavior, brain activities soon change as well.

Breast cancer cells use message-carrying vesicles to send oncogenic stimuli to normal cells
According to a Wistar study, breast cancer cells starved for oxygen send out messages that induce oncogenic changes in surrounding normal epithelial cells.

Dietary control of the healing of injury-induced inflammation
The purpose of this review is to describe the molecular components of the Resolution Response and how different dietary factors can either optimize or inhibit their actions.

UBC helps Arc'teryx stay green and dry with next-generation water-repellent fabrics
A sustainable, non-toxic and high-performance water-repellent fabric has long been the holy grail of outdoor enthusiasts and clothing companies alike.

Emergency visits for thunderstorm-related respiratory illnesses
Researchers used atmospheric and lightning data for all counties in the continental United States from 1999 through 2012 to see if increases in emergency department visits for respiratory illnesses among older adults happen in the days surrounding thunderstorms because vulnerable groups and those with common chronic respiratory diseases may be susceptible to the atmospheric changes caused by these storms.

Fighting like cats and dogs?
We are all familiar with the old adage ''fighting like cat and dog'', but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend.

Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest
One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest - and help in the global fight against climate change - is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands.

Land-use change disrupts wild plant pollination on a global scale
Human changes to the environment have been linked to widespread pollinator declines.

NIST's SAMURAI measures 5G communications channels precisely
Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a flexible, portable measurement system to support design and repeatable laboratory testing of fifth-generation (5G) wireless communications devices with unprecedented accuracy across a wide range of signal frequencies and scenarios.

Imaging method highlights new role for cellular "skeleton" protein
While your skeleton helps your body to move, fine skeleton-like filaments within your cells likewise help cellular structures to move.

GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children, especially those with autism
A new UC Davis Health study found that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubling sleep problems, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children.

Space invaders as MOFs act as liquids
Modified metal organic frameworks that can behave as porous liquids offer new possibilities for gas separation technologies.

Aspirin may accelerate progression of advanced cancers in older adults
For older adults with advanced cancer, initiating aspirin may increase their risk of disease progression and early death.

New research may help identify sex trafficking networks
Characterizing traits of online activity may help to rescue victims of sex trafficking.

Quality of care at rural hospitals may not differ as much as reported, study suggests
A Brown University School of Public Health research team found that differences in diagnosis coding practices has resulted in artificially inflated mortality rate comparisons to other hospitals.

Study finds ATV-related head and neck injuries among youth continue to remain high
A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data regarding ATV-related head and neck injuries treated in U.S. emergency departments from 1990 through 2014 involving patients younger than 18 years of age.

Successful school instruction is digital - but not exclusively
Secondary school students perform better in natural sciences and mathematics and are more motivated when digital tools are used in instruction.

From nanocellulose to gold
When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties.

A new way to fabricate MXene films that block electromagnetic interference
A multi-institution research team led by Andre ? D. Taylor, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering demonstrated a novel approach to MXene fabrication that could lead to methods for at-scale production of MXene freestanding films: drop-casting onto prepatterned hydrophobic substrates.

Clarifying consequences of COVID-19 in pregnant women, newborns, children
This Viewpoint describes the need to understand the outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnant women, newborns and children.

Light swirls provide insights into the quantum world
A new method uses swirls of light to observe previously invisible quantum states of electrons.

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumour.

Coronavirus transmission risk increases along wildlife supply chains
Coronaviruses were detected in a high proportion of bats and rodents in Viet Nam from 2013 to 2014, with an increasing proportion of positive samples found along the wildlife supply chain from traders to large markets to restaurants, according to a study published August 10, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Amanda Fine of the Wildlife Conservation Society and colleagues.

Previously undescribed lineage of Archaea illuminates microbial evolution
In a publication in Nature Communications last Friday, NIOZ scientists Nina Dombrowski and Anja Spang and their collaboration partners describe a previously unknown phylum of aquatic Archaea that are likely dependent on partner organisms for growth while potentially being able to conserve some energy by fermentation.

TB vaccine research could benefit the elderly and diabetics
A study of older mice with type 2 diabetes has yielded highly promising results for researchers investigating potential new vaccines for tuberculosis (TB).

Youth's risks from first-time opioid prescriptions may not be as high as once thought
Young adults and adolescents who are prescribed opioids for the first time may be at a slightly greater risk of developing a substance-related problem later in life, according to a new study co-authored by Indiana University researchers.

Evolutionary assimilation of foreign DNA in a new host
Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego used genetic engineering and laboratory evolution to test the functionality of DNA placed into a new species and study how it can mutate to become functional if given sufficient evolutionary time.

Electronic components join forces to take up 10 times less space on computer chips
Electronic filters are essential to the inner workings of our phones and other wireless devices.

Oxytocin can help prevent osteoporosis
In a laboratory experiment with rats, Brazilian researchers succeeded in reversing natural processes associated with aging that lead to loss of bone density and strength.

How boundaries become bridges in evolution
The mechanisms that make organisms locally fit and those responsible for change are distinct and occur sequentially in evolution.

New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease
Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on Huanglongbing, a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe.

Exact climate data from the past
Corals and cave carbonates can reveal the temperatures that prevailed at the Earth's surface at the time they formed.

Personal connections key to climate adaptation
Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods.

Magnesium alloy with eddy-thermal effect for novel tumor magnetic hyperthermia therapy
Magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) as a noninvasive local treatment strategy is able to ablate tumors.

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances
Perturbations in the environment are common, and communities consisting of several species seem to find their way around the crisis.

Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria
By making mice bioluminescent, EPFL scientists have found a way to monitor the activity of mitochondria in living organisms.

McKee CTE staging scheme accurate in diagnosing severity, location of disease
Since 2008, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and VA Boston Healthcare System have studied Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive brain disease associated with repetitive head impacts that has been diagnosed after death in the brains of American football players and other contact sport athletes as well as members of the armed services

New treatment targets found for blinding retinal disease
When the eye isn't getting enough oxygen in the face of common conditions like premature birth or diabetes, it sets in motion a state of frenzied energy production that can ultimately result in blindness, and now scientists have identified new points where they may be able to calm the frenzy and instead enable recovery.

Inside the ice giants of space
A new theoretical method paves the way to modelling the interior of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, thanks to computer simulations on the water contained within them.

Brain activity during psychological stress may predict chest pain in people with heart disease
The brain's reaction to stress could be an important indicator of angina (chest pain) among people with known heart disease.

Mouthwashes could reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission
Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be inactivated using certain commercially available mouthwashes.

New global study shows 'best of the last' tropical forests urgently need protection
The world's 'best of the last' tropical forests are at significant risk of being lost, according to a paper released today in Nature Ecology and Evolution.
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