Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 17, 2020
Global warming is changing our plant communities
In a comprehensive study of nearly 20,000 species, University of Miami research shows that plant communities are shifting to include more heat-loving species as a result of climate change.

Machine learning reveals role of culture in shaping meanings of words
What do we mean by the word beautiful? It depends not only on whom you ask, but in what language you ask them.

Experts question need to wait days between introducing new solid foods to infants
The current recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) call for introducing to infants one single-ingredient food at a time and waiting three to five days to observe for food allergy before introducing another new food.

Opioid use can trigger deafness
Opioid use, particularly in high doses, can cause deafness, according to Rutgers researchers.

Gender parity & heart failure research: Female authors could mean more female participants
Representation of women leading heart failure research remains limited, according to new research led by Penn Medicine.

Patients taking long-term opioids produce antibodies against the drugs
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have discovered that a majority of back-pain patients they tested who were taking opioid painkillers produced anti-opioid antibodies.

Future mental health care may include diagnosis via brain scan and computer algorithm
Most of modern medicine has physical tests or objective techniques to define much of what ails us.

Potential drug target revealed to help more children survive a lethal heart defect
Study in Cell Stem Cell led by experts at Cincinnati Children's reveals a potentially druggable target to treat hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS).

Bio-based communication networks could control cells in the body to treat conditions
Electronic devices and biological cells communicate through very different mechanisms.

Research finds daily cranberry intake associated with reduced with reduced H. pylori infection rates
A new clinical trial found consuming cranberry juice containing 44 mg of proanthocyanidins (or ''PACs'') per 240-mL serving twice daily for eight weeks resulted in a 20% reduction in the H. pylori infection rate in Chinese adult participants, when compared to those consuming lower amounts of juice and a placebo.

Potency-enhancing drugs linked to decreased risks in men with colorectal cancer
A new study from Lund University and Region Skåne in Sweden indicates that potency-enhancing PDE5 inhibitor drugs have an anti-cancer potential with the ability to improve the prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

Food safety model may help pandemic management
No precedent exists for managing the COVID-19 pandemic - although a plan for working through major public food scares may point to the best ways of alerting and communicating with the public.

Discovery promising for millions at risk from antibiotic resistance
There is new hope for approximately 700,000 people who die each year from antibiotic resistant infections, with University of Queensland researchers discovering how bacteria share antibiotic-resistance genes.

Immunotherapy extends survival in mouse model of hard-to-treat breast cancer (video)
Immunotherapies for cancer -- treatments that prime the immune system to attack tumors -- are valuable weapons in the anti-cancer arsenal.

Climate change mitigation not the primary motivator in regenerative ranching
Regenerative ranching, a holistic approach to managing grazing lands, enhances ranchers' adaptive capacity and socioeconomic well-being while also providing an opportunity to mitigate climate change.

Stomach SIDT1 mediates dietary microRNA absorption: ending of the 10-year debate
In a new study published in Cell Research, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University School of Life Sciences, China, reports that SIDT1 in the mammalian stomach mediates host uptake of dietary and orally administered microRNAs (miRNAs), thus exerting biological functions in the host.

568 genes identified with the potential to trigger cancer
Analysis of the genomes of 28,000 tumours from 66 types of cancer has led to the identification of 568 cancer driver genes Performed by the Biomedical Genomics Lab at IRB Barcelona, the study has allowed a major update of the Integrative OncoGenomics (IntOGen) platform, aimed at identifying mutational cancer driver genes.

Tumour gene test could help to predict ovarian cancer prognosis
A global team of medical researchers led by UNSW have developed a test that could help to predict survival for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and pave the way towards personalised treatment.

'Cyborg' technology could enable new diagnostics, merger of humans and AI
Although true ''cyborgs'' are science fiction, researchers are moving toward integrating electronics with the body.

Policy implications of orphan drug designation for remdesivir to treat COVID-19
This Viewpoint highlights loopholes in U.S. orphan drug policy as exemplified by the use of remdesivir to treat COVID-19.

Method proposed for more accurate determinations of neutron star radii
Neutron stars are the smallest and densest astrophysical objects with visible surfaces in the Universe.

New research reveals effect of global warming on Greenland ice melt
New analysis of almost 30 years' worth of scientific data on the melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet predicts global sea level rise of at least 10 centimetres by the end of the 21st Century if global warming trends continue.

Energy-efficient tuning of spintronic neurons
The human brain efficiently executes highly sophisticated tasks, such as image and speech recognition, with an exceptionally lower energy budget than today's computers can.

Contextual engineering adds deeper perspective to local projects
Contextual engineering is a novel approach combining technological expertise with deep understanding of cultural and societal conditions.

Study reveals how two sex chromosomes communicate during female embryo development
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have solved a mystery that has long puzzled scientists: How do the bodies of female humans and all other mammals decide which of the two X chromosomes it carries in each cell should be active and which one should be silent?

New superlattice by CCNY team could lead to sustainable quantum electronics
A team of international physicists led by Lia Krusin-Elbaum of the City College of New York, has created a new topological magnetic superlattice material, that at a high temperature can conduct electrical current without dissipation and lost energy.

Switching off 'master regulator' may shield the brain from Parkinson's-related damage
Switching off a molecular 'master regulator' may protect the brain from inflammatory damage and neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease, reports a study published today in Nature Neuroscience.

DNA damage triggers reprogramming into stem cells
A joint research team from the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) in Japan, Huazhong Agricultural University in China, and the Czech Academy of Sciences in the Czech Republic has discovered that DNA damage causes cell? to reprogram themselves into stem cells and regenerate new plant bodies in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

Naturally occurring antibodies against prion proteins found in humans
Antibodies targeting the normal PrP version of the prion protein have been found in humans selected at random with no history of any associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

No limit yet for carbon nanotube fibers
Rice University researchers report advances in their quest to make the best carbon nanotube fibers for industry.

Mixing silk with polymers could lead to better biomedical implants
Spun by spiders and silkworms, silk has mystified human engineers who have yet to figure out how to artificially recreate it.

First ever observation of 'time crystals' interacting
For the first time ever, scientists have witnessed the interaction of a new phase of matter known as 'time crystals'.

Army and Illinois researchers design, test protein that may lead to COVID-19 therapeutic
Army scientists have demonstrated that a ''decoy'' receptor developed by University of Illinois researchers has potent neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2--activity that is on par with the best neutralizing antibodies identified to date.

Flies and mosquitoes beware, here comes the slingshot spider
Running into an unseen spiderweb in the woods can be scary enough, but what if you had to worry about a spiderweb - and the spider - being catapulted at you?

Shock to bacteria activates nature's electrical grid
The ocean floor and the ground beneath our feet are riddled with tiny nanowires -- 1/100,000th the width of a human hair -- created by billions of bacteria that can generate electric currents from organic waste.

Regulation of cancer stemness by the best combination of nanotech and genetic engineering
Photo-active nanocomplexes are successfully developed. The nanocomplexes allow spatiotemporal controlling genetically-engineered cells that are overexpressing temperature-sensitive membrane proteins.

Designed bacteria produce coral-antibiotic
Corals growing on the reefs of the Bahamas produce an active agent that kills multi-resistant tuberculosis bacteria.

A new treatment concept for age-related decline in motor function
A research group led by Professor Yuji Yamanashi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, conducted experiments using aged mice to demonstrate that muscle denervation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, *1) could be appreciably offset by an NMJ formation-enhancing treatment that strengthened the motor function and muscle of aged mice.

Stanford researchers develop new way to study ocean life
Insights from innovative device could provide a new window into secrets of microscopic ocean life and their effects on crucial planetary processes, such as carbon fixation.

Converting solar energy to hydrogen fuel, with help from photosynthesis
Global economic growth comes with increasing demand for energy, but stepping up energy production can be challenging.

Environment drivers of ecological complexity in marine intertidal communities
Environmental conditions such as sea surface temperature and the occurrence of cold water upwelling events drive the structure of interaction networks in marine intertidal communities via their effects on species richness, according to new research.

Scientists develop approach to synthesize unconventional nanoalloys for electrocatalytic application
Prof. Mansoo Choi's group from Seoul National University (SNU) and Prof.

Filling the void in ammonia synthesis: The role of nitrogen vacancies in catalysts
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) explore how nitrogen vacancies in catalysts participate in the synthesis of ammonia, a pivotal chemical in the fertilizer industry.

Long-term exposure to traffic noise may impact weight gain in the UK population
A new study by the University of Oxford and the University of Leicester has found a connection between traffic noise and obesity.

New research will improve early warning of devastating megastorms
Scientific research will make it easier to predict the path of some of the world's most powerful storms, enabling communities to better protect themselves from severe flooding.

Penguins are Aussies. Or are they Kiwis?
UC Berkeley and Pontifical Catholic University of Chile researchers sequenced the genomes of all 18 recognized species of penguin to assemble a family tree, showing that the largest of the penguins - king and emperor - split off from all other penguins not long after penguins arose 22 million years ago in Australia and New Zealand.

Simultaneous stimulation helped a spinal cord injury patient regain the ability to walk
At the BioMag Laboratory, the first promising results have been achieved in the application of synchronised electrical and magnetic stimulation therapy when rehabilitating a paraplegic patient and restoring his ability to walk.

Drexel study: Measuring social networks of young adults with autism
While social isolation is a core challenge associated with autism, researchers from Drexel University's A.J.

NASA sees former Tropical Storm Josephine open into a trough
Tropical Storm Josephine weakened on Aug. 16 in the North Atlantic Ocean and satellite imagery showed the storm had become elongated and stretched out into a trough of low pressure a couple of hundred miles north of Puerto Rico.

Ultra-low voltage proven effective at killing bacteria, study finds
Research into the antimicrobial properties of ultra-low voltage electricity demonstrates that the power creates holes in the bacteria's outer membrane allowing two-way leakage and ultimately killing the cell.

Cormorant predation may reduce perch catches, especially close to breeding areas
The joint study estimated the impact of cormorants breeding and living in Quark on perch populations and catches in the area.

AACN Distinguished Research Lecturer explores her role as nurse scientist
In her role as the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) 2020 Distinguished Research Lecturer, Karen Giuliano, a University of Massachusetts Amherst associate professor, has examined her ''unconventional journey'' from caring for patients at the bedside to challenging precedent in critical care to medical device design and innovation.

Photo and collage by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications
Physicists at PPPL discover a new trigger for edge localized modes (ELMs) -- instabilities that can halt fusion reactions and damage the tokamaks that house such reactions.

USU mathematicians unravel a thread of string theory
Thomas Hill and Andreas Malmendier of Utah State University, and Adrian Clingher of the University of Missouri-St.

Quantum-mechanical interaction of two time crystals has been experimentally demonstrated
An international team of researchers have demonstrated that a new phase of matter which has, until recently, been mere speculation, obeys basic quantum mechanics laws.

Why young and female patients don't respond as well to cancer immunotherapy
UC San Diego researchers discovered that tumor cells in younger and female patients accumulate cancer-causing mutations that are more poorly presented to the immune system, better enabling tumors to escape detection and clearance.

The easy way to get a square deal
Scientists at Osaka University introduce an easy method for adding cubane molecules to previously synthesized crystals.

UIC study examines high schoolers' accuracy in classification of their peers
A study led by UIC's Rachel Gordon examines the accuracy of adolescent peer group classifications based on similar values, behaviors, and interests.

Mild COVID-19 cases can produce strong T cell response
Mild cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can trigger robust memory T cell responses, even in the absence of detectable virus-specific antibody responses, researchers report August 14 in the journal Cell.

Social connection boosts fitness app appeal
Apps alone don't motivate most people to exercise but interacting with an online exercise community as well provides the impetus for exercisers to do more - and enjoy what they are doing.

Targeting iron uptake to create a new class of antibiotics against UTIs
At least half of all women will have a urinary tract infection during their lifetimes, and many of the infections -- which have increasingly become resistant to a wide array of antibiotics -- recur.

Assessment of COVID-19 hospitalizations by race/ethnicity in 12 states
Data from a COVID-19 tracking project were used to assess how common COVID-19 infection was by race/ethnicity in 12 states in this observational study.

Major savings possible with app-based osteoarthritis treatment
Osteoarthritis treatment conducted digitally via an app costs around 25% of what conventional care costs, according to a study from Lund University in Sweden published in the research journal PLOS ONE.

Gene targeting helps overcome the resistance of brain cancer to therapy
New insight into a gene that controls energy production in cancer stem cells could help in the search for a more effective treatment for glioblastoma.

Wearable sensors printed on natural materials analyze substances present in sweat
Applied to skin as a piece of sticking plaster, the device developed by Brazilian researchers can be used to monitor human metabolism and administer drugs.

New superlattice material for future energy efficient devices
A team of international physicists including Jennifer Cano, PhD, of Stony Brook University, has created a new material layered by two structures, forming a superlattice, that at a high temperature is a super-efficient insulator conducting current without dissipation and lost energy.

Chatbots delivering psychotherapy help decrease opioid use after surgery
A study showed that patients receiving messages from a chatbot used a third fewer opioids after fracture surgery, and their overall pain level fell, too.

Antibiotics associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
Antibiotics use, particularly antibiotics with greater spectrum of microbial coverage, may be associated with an increased risk of new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and its subtypes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

Ocean microbes could interact with pollution to influence climate
Little is known about how gases and aerosols made by ocean microbes affect weather and climate, or how pollution could influence this process.

Applying machine learning to biomedical science
Dr Pengyi Yang and colleagues from the University of Sydney have brought together the latest developments in applications of machine learning in biomedical science, showing that new techniques are combining ensemble methods with deep learning, with potential applications in cancer research and better understanding viruses.

Arecibo Observatory data help lead to discovery of cosmic 'heartbeat'
An international team of researchers using data from Arecibo Observatory and the Fermi Space Telescope have discovered what they call a ''gamma-ray heartbeat'' coming from a cosmic gas cloud.

Desire to be in a group leads to harsher judgment of others
In a time where political affiliations can feel like they're leading to tribal warfare, a research team from Duke has found that the desire to be part of a group is what makes some of us more likely to discriminate against people outside our groups, even in non-political settings.

Patterns in daily reported infections, deaths for COVID-19
Patterns in daily reported infections and deaths for COVID-19 are investigated in this study.

Novel method can efficiently create several 'building blocks' of pharmaceutical drugs
A class of organic compounds that form the backbone of several pharmaceuticals, alicyclic compounds, are difficult to synthesize.

To perceive faces, your brain relies on a process similar to face recognition systems
Imagine if every time you looked at a face, one side of the face always appeared distorted as if it were melting, resembling a painting by Salvador Dalí.

Immune response to Sars-Cov-2 following organ transplantation
Even patients with suppressed immune systems can achieve a strong immune response to Sars-Cov-2.

Is exposure to BPA associated with long-term risk of death?
Whether exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in many consumer products, is associated with the long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer or any cause among US adults was examined in this observational study.

Harmonizing models and observations by Earth system science data assimilation
The data assimilation (DA), which enabled models and observations cooperate with each other in harmony, has the potential to become a common methodology for Earth system science (ESS) overall and its branches.

Researchers got busy: After nearly allowing the solution to a math riddle
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) thought that they were five years away from solving a math riddle from the 1980's.

NASA researchers track slowly splitting 'dent' in Earth's magnetic field
A host of NASA scientists in geomagnetic, geophysics, and heliophysics research groups observe and model the SAA, to monitor and predict future changes - and help prepare for future challenges to satellites and humans in space.

NASA looks at water vapor in remnants of tropical depression 10E
Tropical Depression 10E weakened to a remnant low-pressure area in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Social distancing decreased paediatric respiratory tract infections in Finland
Finland declared a lockdown in response to the coronavirus pandemic in March 2020, and the ensuing social distancing measures decreased the number of paediatric emergency room visits to nearly one-third of what they used to be, according to a recent register-based study conducted in collaboration between the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio University Hospital and the National Institute for Health and Welfare.

Bacteria's secret weapon revealed
Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) scientists have discovered a previously unknown method used by bacteria to evade immune responses.

More than half of world's oceans already being affected by climate change
Study looked at the deeper ocean, where impacts of climate change are harder to spot, to calculate when the effects of climate change on temperature and salt levels will be detected above natural variability.

Scientists use photons as threads to weave novel forms of matter
New research from the University of Southampton has successful discovered a way to bind two negatively charged electron-like particles which could create opportunities to form novel materials for use in new technological developments.

Society perceives the poor as less affected by distress than those with more means
The poor are perceived to be less harmed by negative events than those with more means, even when this is patently false, according to a series of studies published by Princeton University.

How the brain's internal states affect decision-making
By recording the activity of separate populations of neurons simultaneously, researchers have gained an unprecedented insight into how the 'waxing and waning' of our mental state influences the decisions we make.

New study: Hydroxychloroquine ineffective as a preventive antiviral against COVID-19
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have added to the growing body of understanding about how hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is not a possible defense against COVID-19.

Half of parents report butting heads with child's grandparent over parenting
Nearly half of parents describe disagreements with one or more grandparent about their parenting, with one in seven going so far as to limit the amount of time their child sees certain grandparents.

Prescription opioid use, misuse among cancer survivors
This survey study looked at the frequency of prescription opioid use and misuse among adult cancer survivors compared with individuals without cancer.

Using personal frequency to control brain activity
Individual frequency can be used to specifically influence certain areas of the brain and thus the abilities processed in them - solely by electrical stimulation on the scalp, without any surgical intervention.

Micro- and nanoplastics detectable in human tissues
Plastic pollution is a global problem. Even when plastic bags or water bottles break down, tiny fragments can still contaminate the environment.

How sour beer gets so... sour (video)
Sour beer has recently surged in popularity in the US Today, scientists report progress on a study of how acids and other flavor components in the beverage evolve as it ages.

Stopping tooth decay before it starts -- without killing bacteria
Eating sugar or other carbohydrates after dental cleanings causes oral bacteria to quickly rebuild plaque and to produce acids that corrode tooth enamel, leading to cavities.

UCI materials scientists study a sea creature that packs a powerful punch
University of California, Irvine materials science researchers discovered that the dactyl clubs of mantis shrimp have a uniquely designed nanoparticle coating that absorbs and dissipates energy.

The missing piece of the brain's multitasking network
Multitasking performance stems from the speed of information exchange between inner and outer regions of the brain, according to new research in eNeuro.

Effects of nutrient pollution in marine ecosystems are compounded by human activity
Nutrient pollution in the oceans caused by human activity can significantly impact marine life.

3D printing steps up to the frontlines in the battle against Covid-19
The versatility of 3D printing has enabled on demand solutions for needs ranging from personal protection equipment to medical devices and isolation wards, proving the technology's vital use in addressing worldwide disruptions in supply chains.

New study reveals strength of the deep ocean circulation in the South Atlantic
A new study from oceanographers at NOAA and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) has for the first time described the daily variability of the circulation of key deep currents in the South Atlantic Ocean.

Researchers discover how enzyme protects cells from DNA damage
A research team from Mount Sinai has unraveled for the first time the three-dimensional structure and mechanism of a complex enzyme that protects cells from constant DNA damage, opening the door to discovery of new therapeutics for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancers.

Targeted treatment for depression could benefit patients with psychosis
Patients with early onset psychosis may benefit from treatment for depression, including with anti-depressants alongside other medication, new research shows.

Molecular stress indicator not observed in survivors of child sexual abuse
Researchers and medical experts have long known that child sexual abuse has profoundly negative effects on the health of survivors; however, an international team of researchers was not able to find a link between the abuse and telomere length, considered an indicator of cellular aging and health.

Researchers develop new detection method to protect Army networks
Army researchers developed a novel algorithm to protect networks by allowing for the detection of adversarial actions that can be missed by current analytical methods.

Desert greenhouses offer growth opportunities
Efficient greenhouse complexes that will grow crops using the resources available on desert coasts could improve food security for millions.

Interest in quitting vaping among adolescents
Adolescents using electronic cigarettes were asked if they had seriously thought about or tried to quit vaping.

Study hopes to encourage use of new technology to reduce errors in DNA testing
The paper published in PLOS Genetics points out that existing problems of paternity testing have occurred over many years.

Smartphones may help detect diabetes
Researchers at UC San Francisco have developed a ''digital biomarker'' that would use a smartphone's built-in camera to detect Type 2 diabetes - one of the world's top causes of disease and death - potentially providing a low-cost, in-home alternative to blood draws and clinic-based screening tools.

Telehealth visits have skyrocketed for older adults, but some concerns & barriers remain
One in four older Americans had a virtual medical visit in the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic, most of them by video, a new telehealth poll finds.

New model for pricing carbon will help meet net-zero climate change goals
An article released today by researchers at Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy in the journal Nature Climate Change introduces a new approach for pricing carbon -- Near-term to Net Zero.

Protein produced by the nervous system may help treatments for inflammatory diseases
A Rutgers-led team discover a protein produced by nervous system may be key to treating inflammatory diseases like asthma, allergies, chronic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

NASA finds short-lived Fausto faded fast
Post-Tropical Storm Fausto faded fast in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Experiments replicate high densities in 'white dwarf' stars
In a project conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a research team including University of Rochester engineering professor Gilbert (Rip) Collins, simulated the crushing pressure created as white dwarf stars cease to produce their own fuel, leaving only an extremely dense core.

Are tipping points suitable concepts for developing environmental policies?
Environmental policy decisions are often based on so-called tipping points.

Equatorial winds ripple down to Antarctica
A CIRES-led team has uncovered a critical connection between winds at Earth's equator and atmospheric waves 6,000 miles away at the South Pole.

Strange gamma-ray heartbeat puzzles scientists
Scientists have detected a mysterious gamma-ray heartbeat coming from a cosmic gas cloud.

Where lions operate, grazers congregate ... provided food is great
Meals are typically family affairs for zebras, gazelles, cape buffalo and other grazing species in the African Serengeti, but in one of the first studies of its kind, ecologists have found grazing species can be more willing to share meals in areas frequented by lions.

How viral infections associated with cancer become persistent?
A new study led by Pedro Simas, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM; Portugal) and Kenneth M.

Autism-cholesterol link
Study identifies genetic link between cholesterol alterations and autism.

Safer, more comfortable soldier uniforms are in the works
Uniforms of U.S. Army soldiers must feel comfortable in all climates, be durable through multiple washings, resist fires and ward off insects, among other things.

Realtime observation of structural dynamic of influenza A hemagglutinin during viral entry
Researchers in Kanazawa University has recently reported their study in Nano Letters regarding a high-speed atomic force microscopy study on a biological event that happens during flu virus enters infects its host cell.

COVID-19 hospitalizations analysis shows disparities across racial and ethnic groups
Adding to mounting evidence of COVID-19's disproportionate impact on some US communities, a new analysis of hospitalization rates from the University of Minnesota shows Black, Hispanic, American Indian and Alaskan Native populations in the United States are significantly more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19 than whites.

Extrachromosomal DNA is common in human cancer and drives poor patients outcomes
The multiplication of genes located in extrachromosomal DNA that have the potential to cause cancer drives poor patient outcomes across many cancer types, according to a Nature Genetics study published Aug.

Experts elucidate latest knowledge on phosphate metabolism and related disorders
Special issue of Calcified Tissue International features expert reviews that give state-of-the-art insights into the underlying mechanisms of phosphate metabolism and discuss advances in knowledge and management of hypo- and hyperphosphatemia, as well as oncogenic osteomalacia.

Findings refute idea of monarchs' migration mortality as major cause of population decline
Research shows that the decline in the monarchs' overwintering numbers is not due to an increase in the deaths of monarchs during the migration.

New Guidelines for Phage Preparation Can Accelerate Lifesaving Treatment
The goal: Bring lab therapeutics to patients' bedsides in half the current time frame.

Survival of the fit-ish
It can be hard to dispute the common adage 'survival of the fittest'.

NASA satellite catches the end of Post-tropical Storm Kyle
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of the end of Post-tropical Storm Kyle in the North Atlantic Ocean on Aug.

New practice guidelines on non-invasive ventilation in chronic stable Hypercapnic COPD
A subcommittee of the American Thoracic Society Assembly in Sleep and Respiratory Neurobiology has released new clinical practice guidelines to help advise clinicians on the optimal management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic hypercapnia.

NASA infrared data shows Genevieve strengthening into a hurricane
NASA's Terra satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures and found them surrounding a developing eyewall around Genevieve as it was strengthening into a hurricane.

New kind of interaction discovered in hydrogen-producing enzymes
Hydrogenases can convert hydrogen just as efficiently as expensive platinum catalysts.

Why aren't sea trout thriving anymore?
Sea trout numbers are declining in Norway and scientists don't know why.

Widespread electric vehicle adoption would save billions of dollars, thousands of lives
A new study found that if EVs replaced 25% of combustion-engine cars currently on the road, the United States would save approximately $17 billion annually by avoiding damages from climate change and air pollution.

Cashew shell compound appears to mend damaged nerves
In laboratory experiments, a chemical compound found in the shell of the cashew nut promotes the repair of myelin, a team from Vanderbilt University Medical Center reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Targeted therapy combination effective for patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma and BRAF mutations
In a Phase II trial led by MD Anderson researchers, a combination targeted therapy acheived a 51% overall response rate in patients with cholangiocarcinoma and BRAF V600E mutations.

Farmers help grow water plan
Overallocation of surface water for growing food crops is shifting agriculture and other industry to use groundwater - which is much more difficult to measure and monitor.

Negative side effects of opioids could be coming from users' own immune systems (video)
In addition to possibly developing opioid use disorder, those who take opioids long term can develop chronic inflammation and heightened pain sensitivity.

World film premiere: Watch cell infected by tuberculosis die
Norwegian researchers have managed to show exactly how the tuberculosis bacterium kills its host cell by filming the process in detail for the first time.

Does city life make bumblebees larger?
Does urbanisation drive bumblebee evolution? A new study by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig provides an initial indication of this.

Scientists further cowpea research--boosting canopy CO2 assimilation, water-use efficiency
In a recent study published in Food and Energy Security, a research aimed to understand how much variation exists within diverse cowpea lines' canopy photosynthesis.

More healthful milk chocolate by adding peanut, coffee waste
Milk chocolate is a consumer favorite worldwide, prized for its sweet flavor and creamy texture.

2D materials for ultrascaled field-effect transistors
Since the discovery of graphene, two-dimensional materials have been the focus of materials research.

Lack of continuous infectious disease pandemic research endangers responses
The coronavirus was also studied considerably less than blood borne viruses like Hepatitis B or C and H.I.V. and its research community has less prolific researchers than the other investigated diseases.
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