Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 24, 2020
First review of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 infection models
The first comprehensive review of all relevant animal and cellular models of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 aims to assist with fast-tracking ongoing research into new preventions and treatments.

RNA quality control system goes awry in frontotemporal lobar degeneration
Researchers from Osaka University have uncovered that the RNA exosome is critical for the degradation of defective repeat RNA derived from C9orf72 repeat expansions in patients with C9orf72-associated frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Ventilators could be adapted to help two COVID-19 patients at once
New research has shown how ventilators could be adapted to help two patients simultaneously in the event of a shortage.

Patient monitoring systems for sepsis - mixed results on patient outcomes
Automated patient monitoring systems (PMSs) have been designed to reduce delays in diagnosis of sepsis in hospitalized patients.

Adapting ideas from quantum physics to calculate alternative interventions for infection and cancer
Published in Nature Physics, findings from a new study co-led by Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University teams show for the first time how ideas from quantum physics can help develop novel drug interventions for bacterial infections and cancer.

Pediatric outpatient visits for notifiable infectious diseases in Beijing Hospital during COVID-19
Strict public health measures were implemented in China in response to COVID-19 but little is known about whether other types of hospital visits were affected, especially those for other infectious diseases.

Intensive lifestyle intervention focused on weight loss lowers obesity-related cancer risk
New research shows that an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) aimed at weight loss lowered incidence of obesity-related cancers in adults with overweight or obesity and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society.

Ecologists put biodiversity experiments to the test
Much of our knowledge of how biodiversity benefits ecosystems comes from experimental sites.

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s.

Having a doctor who shares the same race may ease patient's angst
When doctors are the same race as their patients, it can sometimes forge a sense of comfort that helps to reduce anxiety and pain, particularly for Black patients, new research from the University of Miami suggests.

SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater: Monitoring COVID-19 and estimating potential transmission risk
Since the beginning of the pandemic, research groups have been working on methods to detect SARS-CoV-2 viruses in wastewater to monitor the degree of COVID-19 transmission among the population.

Living at higher altitudes associated with higher levels of child stunting
Children living at high altitudes found to be more stunted, on average, than peers at lower altitudes.

Social media information can predict a wide range of personality traits and attributes
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology report the use of machine learning to analyze behavior on Twitter and predict a wide range of personality traits and attributes such as intelligence and extraversion.

Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80.

New deal housing programs dramatically increased segregation, new study finds
Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, finds a new study.

Fat crystals trigger chronic inflammation
A congenital disorder of the fat metabolism can apparently cause chronic hyperreaction of the immune system.

Ludwig Chicago study identifies a novel drug target for the control of cancer metastasis
Researchers led by Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Ronald Rock of the University of Chicago have identified in preclinical studies a potential drug target for curtailing cancer metastasis.

Flexible targets help immune system make finely-tuned antibodies
An in-depth Garvan study of how the immune system generates effective antibodies provides new insights for vaccine design.

Unconventional farming methods could help smallholders fight back against climate change
New research from Ghana shows less popular methods of biochar application are more effective in promoting cowpea growth and yield.

Am I having a panic attack? Internet searches for anxiety attacks take off during COVID-19
A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that online help seeking for severe acute anxiety (including 'panic attacks' and 'anxiety attacks') hit record highs in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Survey finds most Americans feel unprepared to aid victims after a mass casualty attack
A new national survey by Orlando Health finds the majority of Americans are not confident that they could provide life-saving aid following a violent mass attack.

New treatment developed by CHOP shows success in high-risk solid tumors
In a breakthrough study, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have shown that an enhanced treatment developed in their lab leads to long-term remissions in 80% to 100% of mice with drug-resistant or high-risk solid tumors.

Heart repair factor boosted by RNA-targeting compound
Damaged hearts require stem cell activation to heal, but heart attack silences a key signaling molecule.

Re-engineered enzyme could help reverse damage from spinal cord injury and stroke
A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and the University of Michigan has redesigned and enhanced a natural enzyme that shows promise in promoting the regrowth of nerve tissue following injury.

In one cancer therapy, two halves are safer than a whole
Splitting one type of cancer drug in half and delivering the pieces separately to cancer cells could reduce life-threatening side effects and protect healthy, non-cancerous cells, a new study suggests.

Less flocking behavior among microorganisms reduces the risk of being eaten
When algae and bacteria with different swimming gaits gather in large groups, their flocking behaviour diminishes, something that may reduce the risk of falling victim to aquatic predators.

Strigolactones increase tolerance to weevils in tobacco plants
Strigolactones mediate the fine-tuning of the production plant defensive substances in the stem of plants of the wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata.

A leap forward for biomaterials design using AI
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict the degree of water repulsion and protein adsorption by ultra-thin organic materials.

The mathematical magic of bending grids
A mathematical discovery opens up new possibilities for architecture and design: For any desired curved surface a flat grid of straight bars can be calculated that can be folded out to the desired curved structure.

Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?
Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise.

Internet-of-Things air quality sensor that could save the lives of babies and ast
Scientists at the University of Sussex have collaborated with an Oxford company, M-SOLV, and a team of scientists from across Europe to develop a highly sensitive, accurate and affordable carbon-based Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) sensor.

Excessive fructose consumption may cause a leaky gut, leading to fatty liver disease
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that fructose only adversely affects the liver after it reaches the intestines, where the sugar disrupts the epithelial barrier protecting internal organs from bacterial toxins in the gut

Scientists get atomistic picture of platinum catalyst degradation
Degradation of platinum, used as a key electrode material in the hydrogen economy, severely shortens the lifetime of electrochemical energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells.

Illicit fentanyl, stimulants found in majority of overdose deaths in BC
Nonprescribed fentanyl and stimulants were the primary contributors to overdose mortality, while few people had prescribed opioids in their systems, according to new toxicology research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200191.

Mother transmitted COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy, UTSW physicians report
A pregnant mother who tested positive for COVID-19 transmitted the virus causing the disease to her prematurely born baby, UT Southwestern physicians report.

Japanese expedition identifies East Antarctic melting hotspot
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay.

New study: MassBiologics discovers antibodies that may protect against COVID-19
A new study by researchers at MassBiologics of UMass Medical School published in Nature Communications suggests that COVID specific IgA monoclonal antibodies may provide effective immunity in the respiratory system against the novel coronavirus - a potentially critical feature of an effective vaccine.

Storing information in antiferromagnetic materials
Researchers have now not only been able to show that information storage in antiferromagnetic materials is fundamentally possible, but also to measure how efficiently information can be written electrically in insulating antiferromagnetic materials.

Autistic people's nerve cells differ before birth
A new study now shows in human brain cells that Autism, a neurodevelopmental condition, can now be traced back to prenatal development, even though the disorder is not diagnosed until at least 18 months of age.

Dementia kills nearly three times more people than previously thought: BU study
Dementia may be an underlying cause of nearly three times more deaths in the U.S. than official records show, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study.

UVA-led team warns negative emissions technologies may not solve climate crisis
A multidisciplinary team led by University of Virginia researchers used the Global Change Assessment Model developed at the University of Maryland to compare the effects of three negative emissions technologies on global food supply, water use and energy demand.

Citizens' adherence to COVID-19 social distancing measures depends on government response
CU Denver researcher and Business School associate professor Jiban Khuntia, PhD, found while social distancing is an effective preventative measure in the fight against COVID-19, there are significant variations being observed in how and why individuals follow the restrictions in South Korea, North American and Kuwait.

Roadmap for linking neurological and locomotor deficits
Scientists capture highly-detailed ''locomotor signatures'' of mouse models of neurological disease.

Low health literacy may be a risk factor for postoperative infection
CHICAGO: Surgical patients are more likely to experience a postoperative infection if they have low health literacy, which is a limited capacity to understand and act on health information, according to results of a new study presented at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) 2020 Quality and Safety Conference VIRTUAL.

People can make better choices when it benefits others
People are better at learning and decision-making when trying to avoid harm to others, according to new research published in JNeurosci.

Protein 'chameleon' colors long-term memory
Researchers model the binding structures of actin and associated proteins they believe are responsible for the formation of longterm memory.

Failure to 'flatten the curve' may kill more people than we thought
New research by the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington finds that every six additional ICU beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week.

Water availability has changed, and humans are to blame
A new study, realized with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation, demonstrates for the first time that human-induced climate change has influenced water availability on land in the driest months of the year, over the last century.

Novel 3D-printed device demonstrates enhanced capture of carbon dioxide emissions
The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have designed and additively manufactured a first-of-its-kind aluminum device that enhances the capture of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel plants and other industrial processes.

Ancient star explosions revealed in the deep sea
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of supernovae found in deep-sea sediments.

Online searches for 'chest pain' rise, emergency visits for heart attack drop amid COVID
A study of search engine queries addressed the question of whether online searches for chest pain symptoms correlated to reports of fewer people going to the emergency department with acute heart problems during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Climate Insights 2020: Climate opinions unchanged by pandemic, but increasingly entrenched
A new survey provides a snapshot of American opinion on climate change as the nation's public health, economy, and social identity are put to the test.

Landmark HKU-led volume on past progress and new frontiers in the study of early birds and their close relatives
A wealth of spectacular fossils has demonstrated that birds are theropod dinosaurs, with Pennaraptora being the most relevant subgroup to transition from non-avian dinosaurs to birds.

Species 'pushed out of the tropics' by climate change
The world's tropical regions are home to the widest range of plants and animals, but research from The University of Queensland reveals that climate change is pushing species away, and fast.

Nooks, crannies and critters
A team of ecologists and engineers have developed a relatively simple way to standardize how habitat complexity is measured.

Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles are becoming longer lasting
An international research team led by the University of Bern has succeeded in developing an electrocatalyst for hydrogen fuel cells which, in contrast to the catalysts commonly used today, does not require a carbon carrier and is therefore much more stable.

Texas A&M researchers create a contagion model to predict flooding in urban areas
Inspired by the same modeling and mathematical laws used to predict the spread of pandemics, researchers at Texas A&M University have created a model to accurately forecast the spread and recession process of floodwaters in urban road networks.

'Biggest holes in the system'
Older adults living in very rural settings are less likely than those living closer to urban centers to receive available services in health, nutrition and transportation, according to a new study by a Washington State University scientist.

New research contradicts claims that Asian American students are harmed when they cannot attend their first-choice university
A new study finds evidence that contradicts claims in legal complaints to the U.S.

Ocean hitchhiker's sucker mechanism offers potential for underwater adhesion
A new study has revealed how remora suckerfish detach themselves from the surfaces they've clung to - and how the mechanism could provide inspiration for future reversible underwater adhesion devices.

UK/UPenn researchers provide insights into new form of dementia
Working with their colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, researchers at the University of Kentucky have found that they can differentiate between subtypes of dementia inducing brain disease.

Small quake clusters can't hide from AI
A deep learning algorithm developed at Rice University analyzes data from a deadly landslide in Greenland to show how it may someday predict seismic events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Energy-efficient design for mmWave-enabled NOMA-UAV networks
Combining NOMA with mmWave technology in UAV communication networks is promising to enhance the network performance.

Cancer and its treatment may accelerate the aging process in young patients
A new study examines the effects of cancer and its treatment on the aging process.

Internet searches for acute anxiety during early stages of COVID-19 pandemic
To understand the association of COVID-19 with anxiety on a population basis, researchers examined internet searches indicative of acute anxiety during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Large molecules need more help to travel through a nuclear pore into the cell nucleus
A new study in the field of biophysics has revealed how large molecules are able to enter the nucleus of a cell.

Yoga, Tai Chi, and meditation bring specific benefits for veterans
Three popular complementary and integrative health (CIH) therapies - yoga, tai chi, and meditation - lead to significant improvements in key outcomes perceived by Veterans receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VA) system, suggests a study in a special September supplement to Medical Care.

New study: Eyes linger less on 'fake news' headlines
A new study from the University of Copenhagen and Aalborg University reports that people spend a little less time looking at 'fake news' headlines than to factual ones -- knowledge that could make it easier to sort through fake news.

How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility.

NASA's Terra Satellite shows smoky pall over most of California
More than 650 wildfires are blazing in California after unprecedented lightning strikes, storms, and a heatwave that has set new records in the state and NASA's Terra satellite captured the smoke-engulfed state on Aug.

New surgical approach for women at risk of ovarian cancer
A new two-stage surgical approach for cancer prevention is highly acceptable among premenopausal women at high risk of ovarian cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.

Researchers discover immune predictors of COVID-19 cases that fare the worst
Mount Sinai scientists have identified two markers of inflammation that reliably predict the severity of COVID-19 cases and likelihood of survival, providing a foundation for a diagnostic platform and therapeutic targets, according to a study published in Nature Medicine in August.

Finding a way to STING tumor growth
The immune protein STING has long been noted for helping protect against viruses and tumors by signaling a well-known immune molecule.

Machines rival expert analysis of stored red blood cell quality
Once outside the body, stored blood begins degrading until, by day 42, they're no longer usable.

Could COVID-19 in wastewater be infectious?
Bar-Zeev, and his postdoc student, Anne Bogler, together with other renowned researchers, indicate that sewage leaking into natural watercourses might lead to infection via airborne spray.

'Safely returning America to work' -- Occupational medicine specialists offer expertise
As the COVID 19 pandemic continues, business leaders face critical decisions on how to safely reopen and resume operations.

Growth of children living at higher altitudes
This observational study examined the association between living at higher altitudes and growth among children.

Fresh tumor biopsies in world-first technique for cancer treatments
An innovative technique to improve cancer treatments using tumour biopsies less than 30 minutes after they're taken has been developed at The University of Queensland.

Fossils reveal diversity of animal life roaming Europe 2 million years ago
A re-analysis of fossils from one of Europe's most significant paleontological sites reveals a wide diversity of animal species, including a large terrestrial monkey, short-necked giraffe, rhinos and saber-toothed cats.

Deep chest compressions prevent brain damage during cardiac arrest
Deep chest compressions can crack ribs, but they reduce brain damage during cardiac arrest, reports a study presented today at ESC Congress 2020.

Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation.

New approach soft material flow may yield way to new materials, disaster prediction
How does toothpaste stay in its tube and not ooze out when we remove the cap?

Reprogramming immune cells to reduce inflammation, promote tissue repair
A new study suggests that macrophage programming is more complex than previously thought.

Ancient mammoth ivory carving technology reconstructed by archeologists
A team of archeologists from Siberian Federal University and Novosibirsk State University provided a detailed reconstruction of a technology that was used to carve ornaments and sculptures from mammoth ivory.

Pigs grow new liver in lymph nodes, study shows
Hepatocytes -- the chief functional cells of the liver - are natural regenerators, and the lymph nodes serve as a nurturing place where they can multiply.

Sussex study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers
University of Sussex quantum physicists have developed an algorithm which helps early quantum computers to perform calculations most efficiently

None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk
Among the 41 most common blood pressure medications, none of them raised the risk of depression, according to an analysis from Denmark.

Lensless light-field imaging through diffuser encoding
Microlens array based light-field imaging generally suffers from an intrinsic trade-off between the spatial and angular resolutions.

Study offers new insights for sun-gathering technologies
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery (CASD) and ASU's School of Molecular Sciences take a page from Nature's lesson book.

Investigation of core-shell nanocatalyst AU@CDs for ammonia synthesis
In a paper published in NANO, a team of researchers from Xinjiang University, China have prepared Au@CDs photocatalyst with core-shell structure by combining coal-based carbon dots (CDs) with gold sol.

Primary care at a crossroads: Experts call for change
Primary care providers have experienced a rise in responsibilities with little or no increase in the time they have to get it all done, or reduction in the number of patients assigned to them.

Crossbreeding of Holstein cows improves fertility without detriment to milk production
Genetic selection programs in the United States and elsewhere have emphasized milk production at the expense of other traits.

Each human gut has a viral 'fingerprint'
Each person's gut virus composition is as unique as a fingerprint, according to the first study to assemble a comprehensive database of viral populations in the human digestive system.

Severe viral infection overwhelms immune cells
Melbourne researchers have identified mechanisms leading to the functional deterioration of the immune system in response to severe viral infections, such as HIV or COVID-19.

Teamwork can make the 5G dream work: A collaborative system architecture for 5G networks
A research team led by Prof Jeongho Kwak from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) has designed a novel system architecture where collaboration between cloud service providers and mobile network operators plays a central role.

CPR choices of dialysis patients suggest many lack context
Globally some 2 million people with failed kidneys undergo hemodialysis treatment.

Hitting the nail on the head: overcoming therapeutic resistance in lung cancer
An interdisciplinary team at the Medical University of South Carolina has shown that Neuropilin 2, a protein highly expressed in lung cancer cells, is a critical player in conferring resistance to targeted therapy in lung cancer.

Wide variations in car seat breathing assessment conducted on premature newborns
A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found wide variations throughout the United States in the way hospitals ensure that premature or low birth weight infants can breathe safely in a car seat before discharging them.

Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80% of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices, including attendance at seasonal grazing camps and the introduction of livestock to the herd.

Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

NASA tracking Tropical Storm Laura near Cuba
As Tropical Storm Laura continues to move through the Caribbean Sea NASA satellites are providing forecasters with visible, infrared and microwave data.

Big mammals at higher risk of extinction in world's poorest countries, study reveals
A review, which looks at 81 studies carried out between 1980 and 2020, has found that illegal hunting is causing worrying declines in the big mammal populations of protected areas across the globe, and particularly in poorer countries.

Beam me up: Researchers use 'behavioral teleporting' to study social interactions
The team, led by Maurizio Porfiri, Institute Professor at NYU Tandon, devised a novel approach to getting physically separated fish to interact with each other, leading to insights about what kinds of cues influence social behavior.

New species of Cretaceous brittle star named in honour of Nightwish vocalist
Palaeontologists have discovered a previously unknown species of brittle star that lived in the shallow, warm sea which covered parts of the present-day Netherlands at the end of the Dinosaur Era.

Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums
In the nanoworld, tiny particles such as proteins appear to dance as they transform and assemble to perform various tasks while suspended in a liquid.

Global gut health experts guide growth of synbiotics
Chances are you've heard of probiotics: supplements delivering 'good microbes' to the gut, providing a wide range of health benefits.

Faulty brain circuits arise from abnormal fusion
University of Queensland (UQ) researchers have found that when nematode worms were engineered to express the molecules fusogens in their neurons, these nerve cells fused together, causing behavioural impairments.

Inflammatory bowel disease linked to an immune cell run amok
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that the lasting nature of inflammatory bowel disease may be due to a type of long-lived immune cell that can provoke persistent, damaging inflammation in the intestinal tract.

Pot of gold engineered to help with early disease detection
University of Queensland researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold which more effectively detect early signs of disease, potentially improving patient outcomes.

Researchers develop flat lens a thousand times thinner than a human hair
The lens can be used to produce high-resolution images with a wide field of view.

Study identifies first step to beating water scarcity
New research has revealed the locations and industries in the USA where efforts to improve water consumption would have the greatest benefit for economic activity and the environment.

Why COVID-19 infection curves behave so unexpectedly
Most epidemics show infection curves with a typical S-shape. The COVID-19 outbreak, however, shows most infection curves exhibiting a linear growth after the first peak.

Spurring our understanding
Once in a while, over the history of life, a new trait evolves that leads to an explosion of diversity in a group of organisms.

Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons
Six black-naped terns -- a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans -- have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons.

Yoga linked with improved symptoms in heart patients
Yoga postures and breathing could help patients with atrial fibrillation manage their symptoms, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.

Mechanisms identified to restore myelin sheaths after injury or in multiple sclerosis
A research team led by neurobiologist Professor Claire Jacob has identified an important mechanism that can be used to control the restoration of myelin sheaths following traumatic injury and in degenerative diseases.

IKBFU scientists suggest using heather as an antioxidant
Researchers have proven heather to be effective herbal medicinal raw material.

Study: Despite training, Vermont police departments still show widespread racial bias
New research conducted in Vermont shows that, while anti-bias police trainings resulted in small improvements in some police departments in the state, they did not by and large alter police behavior.

The interplay of nonlinearity and topology--nontrivial eigenmodes coupling induced by nonlinearity
Trivial and nontrivial photonic SSH lattices are established by direct cw-laser writing in a bulk nonlinear crystal and thereby the nonlinearity-induced coupling of light into topological edge and interface states is experimentally demonstrated.

New syringe technology could enable injection of highly concentrated biologic drugs
MIT researchers have developed a simple, low-cost technology to administer powerful drug formulations that are too viscous to be injected using conventional medical syringes.

COVID-19 taking a toll on everyday lives, UC Davis research suggests
Rare research on the effects of a pandemic undertaken during an ongoing disaster shows that COVID-19 has severely affected people's daily emotional lives and mental health.

Small change makes cancer vaccine more effective in animal tests
Tweaking the adenovirus spike protein induces a more robust immune reaction for a cancer vaccine against gastric, pancreatic, esophageal and colon malignancies in animal models.

Small molecule treatment reduces colon cancer metastasis
University of Chicago Medicine investigators have found a new way to slow the metastasis of colon cancer: by treating it with a small molecule that essentially locks up cancer cells' ability to change shape and move throughout the body.

Less aggressive treatment better for heart patients who go into shock
Less is sometimes more when treating heart patients who go into shock after a heart attack.

A novel approach produces a completely new kind of dynamic light structure
In a paper published in Nature Communications, USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers showed how combining twisted light and frequency combs together can produce an even more novel structure of light.

Global forest restoration and the importance of empowering local communities
Forest restoration is a crucial element in strategies to mitigate climate change and conserve global biodiversity in the coming decades, and much of the focus is on formerly tree-covered lands in the tropics.

When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

New studies find agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Exposure to imidacloprid, an agricultural insecticide, at environmentally-relevant concentrations in food or water, leaves both crustaceans and molluscs vulnerable to insecticides, weakening their immune system and leaving them susceptible to disease.

Frequent use of antimicrobial drugs in early life shifts bacterial profiles in saliva
The strongest associations were presented with azithromycin that is used for example to middle ear infections, strep throat and pneumonia.

Hydrogen vehicles might soon become the global norm
Roughly one billion cars and trucks zoom about the world's roadways.

Wireless device makes clean fuel from sunlight, CO2 and water
Researchers have developed a standalone device that converts sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into a carbon-neutral fuel, without requiring any additional components or electricity.

Are antivitamins the new antibiotics?
Antibiotics are among the most important discoveries of modern medicine and have saved millions of lives since the discovery of penicillin almost 100 years ago.

Researchers to investigate wind power effects on bats in the Baltic Sea region
Despite the increasing numbers of wind turbines, their impacts on the environment are poorly known.

Army robo-teammate can detect, share 3D changes in real-time
Something is different, and you can't quite put your finger on it.

Routing valley exciton emission of a WS2 monolayer via in-plane inversion-symmetry broken PhC slabs
The researchers demonstrate all-dielectric photonic crystal (PhC) slabs without in-plane inversion symmetry (C2 symmetry) could separate and route valley exciton emission of a WS2 monolayer at room temperature.

Locust swarm could improve collision avoidance
Plagues of locusts, containing millions of insects, fly across the sky to attack crops, but the individual insects do not collide with each other within these massive swarms.
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