Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 25, 2020
A toxic trio of parental problems strongly linked to childhood sexual abuse
A new study has found that adults who had parents who struggled with substance dependence, intimate partner violence and mental illness are more than 10 times more likely to have been victims of childhood sexual abuse than those whose parents did not have these problems, once age and race are taken into account.

Quantum simulation for 3D chiral topological phase
Professor Liu at PKU, Professor Du and Professor Wang at USTC build up a quantum simulator using nitrogen-vacancy center to investigate a three-dimensional (3D) chiral topological insulator which was not realized in solid state system, and demonstrate a complete study of both the bulk and surface topological physics by quantum quenches.

Video is not always effective in science communication
What we can learn for online public relations: - Keep the information concise so that one can go thorough it within about 1 minute.

Atmospheric scientists study fires to resolve ice question in climate models
Black carbon from fires is an important short-term climate driver because it can affect the formation and composition of clouds.

Pain 'catastrophizing' may lead to little exercise, more time sedentary
Chronic pain affects the majority of older adults in the US, and getting enough exercise plays a key role in pain management.

Sandwich catalysts offer higher activity and durability
POSTECH professor In Su Lee's team develops a double-layered nanoporous platinum catalyst that activates hydrogen generation.

How zebrafish maintain efficient and fair foraging behaviours
New insight on how zebrafish achieve near-optimal foraging efficiency and fairness among groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

NBA playoff format is optimizing competitive balance by eliminating travel
In addition to helping protect players from COVID-19, the NBA 'bubble' in Orlando may be a competitive equalizer by eliminating team travel.

Thin layer protects battery, allows cold charging
In the search for a reliable, quick-charging, cold-weather battery for automobiles, a self-assembling, thin layer of electrochemically active molecules may be the solution, according to a team or researchers.

High human population density negative for pollinators
Population density, and not the proportion of green spaces, has the biggest impact on species richness of pollinators in residential areas.

In sickness and in health
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that for men with major cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, their wives are more likely to suffer from the same diseases.

Rates of e-cigarette and marijuana use not associated with vaping-related lung injuries
Higher rates of e-cigarette and marijuana use in U.S. states did not result in more e-cigarette or vaping-related lung injuries (known as EVALI), a new study from the Yale School of Public Health finds.

Importance of rainfall highlighted for tropical animals
Imagine a tropical forest, and you might conjure up tall trees hung with vines, brightly colored birds, howling monkeys, and ... rain.

New blood, new hope: Transfusions protect the brain from stroke damage
In a study led by Xuefang ''Sophie'' Ren, a research assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience, a team of West Virginia University neuroscientists found that blood substitution therapy rescues the brains of mice from ischemic damage, a potential breakthrough in stroke therapy.

How effective does a COVID-19 vaccine need to be to stop the pandemic?
The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, is committed to publishing the most robust, evidence-based research and commentary on COVID-19 as they unfold to keep readers up to date and aware of issues relevant to community and individual health during this continually evolving global outbreak.

Using light's properties to indirectly see inside a cell membrane
Using properties of light from fluorescent probes is at the heart of a new imaging technique developed at Washington University's McKelvey School of Engineering that allows for an unprecedented look inside cell membranes.

New technique to prevent imaging cyberthreats proposed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
As part of his Ph.D. research, Ben-Gurion University researcher Tom Mahler has developed a technique using artificial intelligence that analyzes the instructions sent from the PC to the physical components using a new architecture for the detection of anomalous instructions.

New study shows evolutionary breakdown of 'social' chromosome in ants
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found that harmful mutations accumulating in the fire ant social chromosome are causing its breakdown.

Measles outbreaks in Niger linked to rainfall and temperature, study finds
Rainfall and temperature drive agricultural activity, which, in turn, influences patterns of measles outbreaks in the West African nation of Niger, according to an international team of researchers.

Research shows potential to improve paints, coatings
New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York could lead to more environmentally friendly paints and coatings.

A galaxy's stop-and-start young radio jets
VLBA image shows details of a young jet emitted from the core of an active galaxy, revealing that the jet activity stopped, then restarted only a decade ago.

New insights into lithium-ion battery failure mechanism
Researchers have identified a potential new degradation mechanism for electric vehicle batteries - a key step to designing effective methods to improve battery lifespan.

Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children without COVID-19 symptoms
The rate of positive test results for SARS-CoV-2 in children without symptoms who were treated in U.S. hospitals for other conditions was examined in this study.

Changing landscapes, changing diets
A new study led by Enquye Negash, a postdoctoral researcher in the George Washington University Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences documents dietary shifts in herbivores that lived between 1-3 million years ago in Ethiopia's Lower Omo Valley.

New method to track ultrafast change of magnetic state
An international team of physicists from Bielefeld University, Uppsala University, the University of Strasbourg, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, ETH Zurich, and the Free University Berlin have developed a precise method to measure the ultrafast change of a magnetic state in materials.

New tool for identifying endangered corals could aid conservation efforts
A newly developed genotyping ''chip''--the first of its kind for corals--allows researchers to genetically identify corals and the symbiotic algae that live within the coral's cells, a vital step for establishing and maintaining genetic diversity in reef restoration efforts.

UC Davis researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
A study published today (Aug. 25, 2020) in eLife provides the first-ever, atomic-level, 3D structure of the largest protein complex (complex I) involved in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain.

Computers excel in chemistry class
Machine learning models can rapidly and accurately estimate key chemical parameters related to molecular reactivity.

Fifty new planets confirmed in machine learning first
Fifty potential planets have had their existence confirmed by a new machine learning algorithm developed by University of Warwick scientists.

Most adults with lupus or common types of arthritis have similar risks of getting admitted to hospital as other COVID-19 patients
Most adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are not at increased risk of hospitalization from COVID-19 due to medications used to dampen their altered immune system, the cause of their disease.

Battery life for wearable electronic devices could be improved
Researchers in WMG and the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick have found that asymmetric stresses within electrodes used in certain wearable electronic devices provides an important clue as to how to improve the durability and lifespan of these batteries.

Beating noise via superposition of order
Information can successfully be transmitted through noisy channels using quantum mechanics, according to new research from The University of Queensland and Griffith University.

Researchers show potential for subseasonal forecasts to predict dengue outbreaks
A new study demonstrates for the first time that subseasonal rainfall and temperature forecasts can be used to predict outbreaks of dengue fever by estimating mosquito abundance.

Plant living with only one leaf reveals fundamental genetics of plant growth
Clinging to the walls of tropical caves is a type of plant with a single leaf that continues to grow larger for as long as the plant survives.

UC Berkeley demographers put COVID-19 death toll into perspective
With over 170,000 COVID-19 deaths to date, and 1,000 more each day, America's life expectancy may appear to be plummeting.

Researchers help inform cassava breeding worldwide
Scientists in Cornell University's NextGen Cassava project have uncovered new details regarding cassava's genetic architecture that may help breeders more easily pinpoint traits for one of Africa's key crops.

Study evaluates immersive virtual reality as a sleep aid for teens
While teens are encouraged to turn off electronics before bedtime, a new study suggests that visiting a virtual environment may benefit their sleep health.

The secret life of melons revealed: "Jumping sequences" may alter gene expression
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found in a comparison of melon genomes that retrotransposons (a.k.a.

Cyberintimacy: Technology-mediated romance in the digital age
Digital technology has had a transformative effect on our romantic lives.

Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Fewer of the world's large aquifers are depleting than previously estimated, according to a new study by the University of Sussex and UCL.

Health IT improves engagement in preconception health to reduce racial disparities
New research from Boston Medical Center highlights the benefits of using health technology to engage African American and Black women earlier in preconception care in an effort to close the gap on racial disparities in birth outcomes and maternal mortality.

Opioid prescription rates for knee surgery vary, but higher strength dosage common
Examining insurance data, Penn researchers found 36% of patients received an opioid prescription that was stronger than the CDC-recommended dose.

One size may not fit all: BILH psychiatrists develop mental health app assessment tool
Researcher-clinicians from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, both part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, have collaborated to develop an online assessment tool to help patients and providers make more informed decisions about choosing and using a mental health app.

Mineral dust ingested with food leaves characteristic wear on herbivore teeth
In a controlled feeding study of guinea pigs, paleontologists have discovered that mineral dust ingested with food causes distinct signs of wear on the teeth of plant-eating vertebrates, which can differ considerably depending on the type of dust.

Accumulating extra genome copies may protect fly brain cells during aging
Scientists have discovered a novel anti-aging defence in the brain cells of adult fruit flies: producing extra copies of the genome, according to a new study published today in eLife.

Legacy
Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests.

Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
A study is the first long-term, in-depth analysis of the elasmobranch community in Florida's Indian River Lagoon and develops capacity to understand how these species may respond to further environmental changes.

Global magnetic field of the solar corona measured for the first time
An international team led by Professor Tian Hui from Peking University has recently measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time.

NUS researchers develop new system for accurate telomere profiling in less than 3 hours
The novel STAR assay developed by NUS researchers can be used to rapidly determine telomere dysregulation in cancers and age-related diseases in clinical settings.

Galactic bar paradox resolved in cosmic dance
New light has been shed on a mysterious and long-standing conundrum at the very heart of our galaxy.

Before eyes open, they get ready to see?
A KAIST research team's computational simulations demonstrated that the waves of spontaneous neural activity in the retinas of still-closed eyes in mammals develop long-range horizontal connections in the visual cortex during early developmental stages.

Study: Student debt may hurt chances at full-time employment
A recently published study led by The University of Texas at Arlington says that student debt may hurt students' chances of securing full-time employment due to added pressure in their job search.

Restoring the world's forests requires partnering with local communities
Global forest restoration is a critical strategy for removing carbon from the atmosphere but its success depends on empowering local communities, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

Housing First proves cost effective especially for the most-vulnerable homeless group
Canadians spend big money dealing with the consequences of homelessness, but the money spent could be far more effective.

Study shows socioeconomic status linked to heart failure mortality in United States
A variety of treatments exist to address heart failure, yet it continues to carry a poor prognosis.

Finnish children get to participate in the evaluation of their early childhood education and care
Finnish children have a very positive attitude towards early childhood education and care (ECEC), according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland.

Scientists create protein models to explore toxic methylmercury formation
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a computational model of the proteins responsible for the transformation of mercury to toxic methylmercury, marking a step forward in understanding how the reaction occurs and how mercury cycles through the environment.

Magnetic stimulation dramatically improves fecal incontinence
Painless magnetic stimulation of nerves that regulate muscles in the anus and rectum appears to improve their function and dramatically reduce episodes of fecal incontinence, a debilitating problem affecting about 10% of the population, investigators report.

Plastics, waste and recycling: It's not just a packaging problem
Discussions of the growing plastic waste problem often focus on reducing the volume of single-use plastic packaging items such as bags, bottles, tubs and films.

Moving bits, not watts
The phrase ''too much of a good thing'' may sound like a contradiction, but it encapsulates one of the key hurdles preventing the expansion of renewable energy generation.

Nursing home study suggests dialysis patients at greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection
It's widely known that the causative agent for COVID-19, the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can spread rapidly among residents in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, leading to high numbers of cases and deaths in a very vulnerable population.

Coastal development, changing climate threaten sea turtle nesting habitat
A research team led by Florida State University found that sea turtles in the US will have less suitable nesting habitat in the future because of climate change and coastal development.

NASA's terra satellite catches the demise of post-tropical cyclone Marco
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico early on Aug.

Revised code could help improve efficiency of fusion experiments
Researchers led by PPPL have upgraded a key computer code for calculating forces acting on magnetically confined plasma in fusion energy experiments.

UC researchers pinpoint hierarchy of breast cancer cells as potential cause for treatment resistance
In a recent study, published in the journal eLife, University of Cincinnati researchers say it can take cells in different forms or ''life stages'' to cause cancer to grow and spread.

Researchers see an increase in fraudulent COVID-19 posts on social media
In a new study from UC San Diego School of Medicine, thousands of fake social media posts tied to COVID-19 and financial scams are found on two popular platforms.

Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes.

Why we distort probability
A team of scientists has concluded that our cognitive limitations lead to probability distortions and to subsequent errors in decision-making.

A colorful detector
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba introduced a new type of porous crystal that can indicate the presence of moisture based on a reversible change in color.

Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells.

Study shines new light on young tree seedlings
X-ray images show a plant's power source may be different than thought.

Some of America's favorite produce crops may need to get a move on by 2045
New research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that by the years 2045-2049 future temperatures will have more of an effect on when cool-season crops, such as broccoli and lettuce, can be grown than on where, while for warm-season crops (cantaloupe, tomatoes, carrots) the impact will be greater for where they can be grown versus when.

Deep learning algorithm to speed up materials discovery in emerging tech industries
Solid-state inorganic materials are critical to the growth and development of electric vehicle, cellphone, laptop battery and solar energy technologies.

Effectiveness of cloth masks depends on type of covering
Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, wearing a mask while out in public has become the recommended practice.

Hydrochloric acid boosts catalyst activity
A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Johannes Lercher has developed a synthesis process which drastically increases the activity of catalysts for the desulfurization of crude oil.

Effectiveness of primate conservation measures mostly unproved
Less than 1% of scientific literature on primates evaluate the effectiveness of conservation interventions, says a new study compiled by an international team of experts led by researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), University Halle-Wittenberg, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Cambridge.

SARS-CoV-2 RNA detected in untreated wastewater from Louisiana
A group of scientists have detected genetic material from SARS-CoV-2 in untreated wastewater samples collected in April 2020 from two wastewater treatment plants in Louisiana, USA.

One step closer to earlier diagnosis of bipolar disorder and psychoses
In a new study from the Danish psychiatry project iPSYCH, researchers have identified genetic risk factors for developing bipolar disorder and psychoses among people with depression.

Clinical trial shows potential benefit to anti-platelet therapy
Heart patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or stent placement? nonsurgical procedures to improve blood flow to the heart are typically prescribed anti-platelet therapy to avoid blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke.

How men and women network impacts their labor market performance
A new paper in The Economic Journal, published by Oxford University Press, develops a theory of how people's social network structure impacts productivity and earnings.

Vast stone monuments constructed in Arabia 7,000 years ago
In a new study published in The Holocene, researchers from the Max Planck Society in Jena together with Saudi and international collaborators, present the first detailed study of 'mustatil' stone structures in the Arabian Desert.

Changing ties that naturally bind
In all social animals, gaining valuable information requires physical contact among individuals, an action that risks spreading contagion.

University of Ky study leads to potential for new treatment approach to Alzheimer's
The paper explains that current therapeutic approaches to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease focus on the major pathological hallmarks of the disease which are amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles.

Building mechanical memory boards using origami
Origami can be used to create mechanical, binary switches, and in Applied Physics Letters, researchers report the fabrication of such a paper device, using the Kresling pattern, that can act as a mechanical switch.

Treating COVID-19 could lead to increased antimicrobial resistance
Research led by the University of Plymouth suggests the increased use of antibiotics in the treatment of COVID-19 patients could be placing an additional burden on waste water treatment works, particularly those serving large or emergency hospitals

UCF researchers develop AI to detect fentanyl and derivatives remotely
To help keep first responders safe, University of Central Florida researchers have developed an artificial intelligence method that not only rapidly and remotely detects the powerful drug fentanyl, but also teaches itself to detect any previously unknown derivatives made in clandestine batches.

To stop COVID-19 spread in schools, start with local data and do the math
As schools across the country continue to wrestle with configurations of online and in-classroom learning, a new study from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals shows that public data and a simple equation may be all that is required to estimate the number of infected students who might be in a classroom.

'Oral' bacteria may disrupt the balance of the vaginal microbiome
A study published in PLOS Biology by Amanda Lewis at University of California, San Diego, and colleagues suggests that mutually beneficial relationships between different species of vaginal bacteria may encourage growth of potentially harmful pathogens, such as the common oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum.

Studying water polo for kicks
Scientists at the University of Tsukuba monitored the motion and forces associated with the ''eggbeater'' kick of water polo players.

Compared to placebo, vitamin D has no benefit for severe asthma attacks
Contrary to earlier observational results, vitamin D supplements do not prevent severe asthma attacks in at-risk children, according to the first placebo-controlled clinical trial to test this relationship.

NASA gathers nighttime images of Laura becoming a Hurricane   
Tropical Storm Laura strengthened to a hurricane in the morning hours of Aug.

Researchers reversibly disable brain pathway in primates
For the first time ever, neurophysiologists of KU Leuven, Harvard and the University of Kyoto have succeeded in reversibly disabling a connection between two areas in the brains of primates while they were performing cognitive tasks, or while their entire brain activity was being monitored.

A case for botanical gardens to lead in global plant crisis
In a paper published in Plants, People, Planet, The Morton Arboretum scientists Murphy Westwood, Ph.D., and Nicole Cavender, Ph.D., in collaboration with Abby Meyer, and Paul Smith, Ph.D., from Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), detail how botanical gardens have the skills and knowledge, facilities, plant collections, and access to the public required to advance plant conservation, but lack the funding and public recognition necessary to achieve significant impact on global conservation.

Less "sticky" cells become more cancerous
In cooperation with colleagues from Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, researchers at Leipzig University have investigated the structure of tumour tissue and the behaviour of tumour cells in detail, gaining important insights that could improve cancer diagnosis and therapy in the future.

Socially isolated elderly more likely to use hospital and emergency room resources
Those over age 65 who self-reported as socially isolated were more likely to have a future hospital admission or emergency room visit.

Virtual imaging trials optimize CT, radiography for coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), virtual imaging trials using computational patient models and a human phantom with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) abnormalities via multidiagnostic confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection yield simulations of 'realistic' texture and shape--suggesting that such trials could be utilized to compare CT and radiography, improve both screening and follow-up protocols, and train artificial intelligence tools.

More than half of "sudden" cardiac arrest victims had contacted health services before
Today scientists report that 58% of ''sudden'' cardiac arrest sufferers sought medical help during the two weeks before the event.

Researchers introduce new theory to calculate emissions liability
A new study by Michigan Tech researchers questions conventional methods of calculating carbon emissions liability based on point source pollution by introducing new ''bottleneck'' theory.

Scientists prove SARS-CoV-2 potential to infect human brain organoids
SARS-CoV-2 can infect human neural progenitor cells and brain organoids, as shown by researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators from The University of Hong Kong (HKU).

Faster, more efficient energy storage could stem from holistic study of layered materials
A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed a novel, integrated approach to track energy-transporting ions within an ultra-thin material, which could unlock its energy storage potential leading toward faster charging, longer lasting devices.

Study reveals two major microbial groups can't breathe
A new scientific study has revealed unique life strategies of two major groups of microbes that live below Earth's surface.

Tracing the cosmic origin of complex organic molecules with their radiofrequency footprint
How did organic matter reach the Earth in the first place?

Cardiology trial shows potential benefit of genetic testing when selecting blood thinners
An international, first-of-its-kind cardiology trial used personalized genetic testing to reduce by 34 per cent the number of serious adverse events following balloon angioplasty, a treatment for the most common form of heart disease.

Stronger together in the microbiome: How gut microbes feed each other to overcome dietary deficiencies, change host behavior, and improve reproduction
To study how the microbiome affects their host behavior, a group of researchers at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, in Lisbon - Portugal, used the fruit fly combined with high-tech tools to show that two gut bacteria establish a metabolic cross-feeding that enables them to grow in diets that lack the nutrients that are essential for their growth and to allow them to change host decision making and reproduction.

Life in a nutshell: New species found in the carapace of late cretaceous marine turtle
Fossils have often been known to tell stories of immobile organisms living in the hard tissues of dead ancient marine animals.

Treatment for teen anxiety
In a new National Institute of Mental Health-funded study, led by Jeffrey Strawn and published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, UC researchers took a first look at one particular medication for treatment of anxiety disorders in pediatric patients to see if it was beneficial.

Trust the power of markets
Organizations using groups or committees to make decisions might do better to crowdsource their decisions, says UC Riverside-led research.

Blocking cellular communication stops SARS-CoV-2
Many viruses use and manipulate the communication pathways of their host cells to boost their own replication.

Discovery of new genes that influence the success of cancer treatment
One of the great mysteries of cancer research is why certain patients respond better to radiation therapy than others.

Hydroxychloroquine plus azithromycin increases heart risk, finds global study
In the largest observational study of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, the drug combination has been linked to significant cardiovascular risks, including death.

Lockdowns have economic and social costs for world's poorest families
Low socioeconomic families - and particularly women - experienced increased financial hardship, food insecurity, domestic violence and mental health challenges during COVID-19 lockdown measures in Bangladesh, a new research study shows.

A multicenter look at gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy
A new study confirms the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in children with spinal muscular atrophy under two years old.

UBCO researcher uses computer modelling to predict reef health
A UBC Okanagan researcher has developed a way to predict the future health of the planet's coral reefs.

To be or not to be in the ER, that is the question
Researchers discovered a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins that may help better understand human NGLY1 deficiency.

Metabolic syndrome linked to worse outcomes for COVID-19 patients
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who had a combination of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes were over three times more likely to die from the disease, according to a new Tulane University study published in Diabetes Care.

COVID-19 human milk studies should continue without stopping breastfeeding
It is not easy to conduct human milk research during a pandemic.

Quit smoking to reduce stroke risk if you have irregular heartbeat
Scientists today urged people with atrial fibrillation - the most common heart rhythm disorder - to kick the habit and cut their stroke risk.

Less is more: A soft, self-actuated pump to simplify mechatronic devices
As electromechanical devices become increasingly small and complex, the high number of required components becomes a limiting factor.

Three-dimensional quantum Hall effect and global picture of edge states in Weyl semimetals
Recently, Professor Xie and his collaborators investigate the three-dimensional quantum Hall effect in Weyl semimetals and elucidate a global picture of the edge states.

Memory protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.

NASA missions explore a 'TIE Fighter' active galaxy
Not so long ago, astronomers mapped a galaxy far, far away using radio waves and found it has a strikingly familiar shape.

Oncotarget: Paradox breaker BRAF inhibitors in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 34 features Figure 1, ''BRAF inhibitor-induced changes in cell viability,'' by Pickles, et which reported that the BEACON CRC trial demonstrated a survival advantage over chemotherapy for a combination of targeted agents comprising the potent BRAF inhibitor encorafenib together with cetuximab and binimetinib.

Enzyme prisons
A team at the MDC has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years.

Polymers prevent potentially hazardous mist during dentist visit
If the mist in a dentist's office -- sent flying into the air by spinning, vibrating tools -- contains a virus or some other pathogen, it is a health hazard.

Hydroxychloroquine reduces in-hospital COVID-19 mortality
An Italian observational study contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the use of hydroxychloroquine in the current pandemic.

Sleep duration, efficiency and structure change in space
It's hard to get a good night's sleep in space.
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