Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 26, 2020
Tag team gut bacteria worsen symptoms of multiple sclerosis
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences (IMS) have discovered that a particular combination of microorganisms in the gut can worsen symptoms in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

Army scientists take new spin on quantum research
Army researchers discovered a way to further enhance quantum systems to provide Soldiers with more reliable and secure capabilities on the battlefield.

New study takes aim at advanced types of non-addictive pain therapies
A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and the Biodesign Institute have recently published a study in Nature Communications that helps clarify the contributions to an ion channel's temperature - dependent activation.

Genetic causes of severe childhood brain disorders found using new computational methods
A team of researchers have combined clinical information with large-scale genomic data to successfully link characteristic presentations of childhood epilepsies with specific genetic variants.

Neutralizing antibodies appear to protect humans from coronavirus infection
A Seattle fishing vessel that departed port in May returned 18 days later with an unusual haul: the first human evidence that neutralizing antibodies provide protection from reinfection by SARS-CoV-2.

Scientists use blood test to predict who is likely to develop psychotic disorders
Scientists have discovered that testing the levels of certain proteins in blood samples can predict whether a person at risk of psychosis is likely to develop a psychotic disorder years later.

Don't forget to clean robotic support pets, study says
Robotic support pets used to reduce depression in older adults and people with dementia acquire bacteria over time, but a simple cleaning procedure can help them from spreading illnesses, according to a new study published Aug.

A protein with an unprecedented fold helps bacteria uptake thiosulfate as a sulfur source
L-Cysteine is an important amino acid for our proteins and also widely used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

Meteorite strikes may create unexpected form of silica
When a meteorite hurtles through the atmosphere and crashes to Earth, how does its violent impact alter the minerals found at the landing site?

Unlocking the mysteries of the brain
A research team highlights the mechanisms underlying memory and learning capacity -- specifically, how our brains process, store and integrate information.

Pollution exposure at work may be associated with heart abnormalities among Latinx community
Hispanic/Latinx adults exposed to burning wood, vehicle exhaust, pesticides or metals while at work may have abnormal heart structure and function.

Tethering together type 2 diabetes drugs increases efficacy of combination therapy
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have shown that the effectiveness of a two-pronged type 2 diabetes treatment increases when the drugs are linked by a heat-sensitive tether rather than concurrently administered.

How plants shut the door on infection
A new study by an international team including University of Maryland scientists has discovered the key calcium channel responsible for closing plant pores as an immune response to pathogen exposure.

Heavy metals make soil enzymes 3 times weaker, says a soil scientist from RUDN University
Heavy metals suppress enzyme activity in the soil by 3-3.5 times and have especially prominent effect on the enzymes that support carbon and sulfur circulation.

Novel PROTAC enhances its intracellular accumulation and protein knockdown
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine developed an improved type of PROTAC that has enhanced intracellular accumulation and functions, not only as a degrader, but also as an inhibitor of the target protein.

US political parties become extremist to get more votes
New mathematical modeling shows that US political parties are becoming increasingly polarized due to their quest for voters -- not because voters themselves are becoming more extremist.

Benefits of inhaled nitric oxide therapy for pregnant patients with COVID-19
Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) can be a valuable adjunct respiratory therapy for pregnant women with severe and critical COVID-19.

Nanodots made of photovoltaic material support waveguide modes
New spectroscopic technique for studying nanostructures demonstrates that stibnite nanodots can act as high-optical-quality waveguides and are promising candidates as photoswitchable materials for future applications

Gunshot injuries in California drop, but percentage of firearm death goes up
Despite a significant drop in gun injuries, California has experienced a substantial increase in the state's overall death rate among those wounded by firearms.

Shoulder replacements benefit most patients for more than ten years, study shows
The The Lancet Rheumatology study examined data on nearly 18,000 people who have had shoulder replacements.

New Nitrogen Assembly Carbon catalyst has potential to transform chemical manufacturing
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a metal-free carbon-based catalyst that has the potential to be much less expensive and more efficient for many industrial concerns, including manufacturing of bio- and fossil fuels, electrocatalysis, and fuel cells.

Terms in Seattle-area rental ads reinforce neighborhood segregation
A new University of Washington study of Seattle-area rental ads shows how certain words and phrases are common to different neighborhoods, helping to reinforce residential segregation.

Study finds 'nomophobia' is associated with poor sleep health in college students
A new study found that the fear of being out of mobile phone contact -- 'nomophobia' -- is extremely common among college students and is associated with poor sleep health.

New tech extracts potential to identify quality graphene cheaper and faster
Engineers at Australia's Monash University have developed world-first technology that can help industry identify and export high quality graphene cheaper, faster and more accurately than current methods.

Study of Asia's hillstream loaches reveals keys to fish family's land-walking abilities
A new genetic and morphological study of South Asia's hillstream loach (Balitoridae) family is shedding new light on the fishes' unusual land-walking capabilities, including that of the family's strangest relative -- Cryptotora thamicola -- a rare, blind cavefish from Thailand with an uncanny ability to walk on land and climb waterfalls using four limbs that move in salamander-like fashion.

New therapy targets breast cancer metastases in brain
When breast cancer spreads to the brain, the prognosis is grim.

New study explores symptomatology, quality of life before and after labiaplasty
For patients with elongated labia, vague terms like 'vaginal rejuvenation' and 'designer vagina' can undermine the seriousness of the condition, which includes a variety of functional concerns.

Researchers pursue 'hidden pathology' to explain fatigue in multiple sclerosis
In a study published in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital used positron emission technology (PET) imaging to look for brain's immune cells that may become erroneously activated in MS, leading to fatigue.

Long naps may be bad for health
Many believe that lying down for a snooze is a harmless activity.

New treatment possibilities for young women diagnosed with rare form of ovarian cancer
A recent finding by researchers at the BC Cancer Research Institute and the University of British Columbia (UBC) may offer a new treatment possibility for people diagnosed with a rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer.

The patients left behind by HIV research
People from BAME communities, women and heterosexual men are being left behind by HIV research.

Proven: Historical climate changes occurred simultaneously in several parts of the world
A new study published by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and partner institutions has proven that repeated and abrupt climate changes during the last ice age occurred simultaneously in South America, Southeast Asia, Europe and Greenland.

Placenta can indicate how body responds to opioids during pregnancy
Scientists at the University of Missouri have discovered possible biological markers that they hope could one day help identify the presence of an opioid use disorder during human pregnancy.

Bacteria could survive travel between Earth and Mars when forming aggregates
The hypothesis called ''panspermia'' proposes an interplanetary transfer of life.

How plants close their gates when microbes attack
Like humans, plants protect themselves against pathogens. An international consortium under the lead of UZH professor Cyril Zipfel has now identified a long sought-after factor of this plant immune system: The calcium channel triggers the closure of stomata upon contact with microbes such as bacteria.

Lung cancer trial of RET inhibitor selpercatinib achieves durable responses in majority of patients with RET gene fusions
For patients with non-small cell lung cancers marked by RET gene fusions, the targeted therapy selpercatinib was well tolerated and achieved durable objective responses, or tumor shrinkage, in the majority of patients in a Phase I/II trial.

Steps outlined to reduce the risk of stroke during, after heart surgery
A stroke during or soon after heart surgery, called a perioperative stroke, increases the risk of death and can result in major disability for survivors.

New observations of black hole devouring a star reveal rapid disk formation
When a star passes too close to a supermassive black hole, tidal forces tear it apart, producing a bright flare of radiation as material from the star falls into the black hole.

How cold was the ice age? Researchers now know
A University of Arizona-led team has nailed down the temperature of the last ice age -- the Last Glacial Maximum of 20,000 years ago - to about 46 degrees Fahrenheit.

Why flat-faced dogs remain popular despite health problems
Owners of bulldogs, French bulldogs and pugs are highly likely to want to own their breed again in the future, and to recommend their breed to other owners, according to a study published August 26, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Rowena Packer of the Royal Veterinary College, UK, and colleagues.

Following 'Eatwell Guide' diet could reduce your risk of dying early and lower your environmental footprint
Adhering to Public Health England's 'Eatwell Guide' of a balanced diet could reduce your chance of dying prematurely and lower your environmental footprint, according to a new study in BMJ Open.

Study examines link between sperm quality and light from devices at night
Men might want to think twice before reaching for their smartphone at night.

Female chromosomes offer resilience to Alzheimer's
Women live longer than men with Alzheimer's because their sex chromosomes give them genetic protection from the ravages of the disease.

New Mass. poll: Markey up 12 points in US Senate primary
Incumbent Edward Markey has opened up a double-digit lead over challenger US Rep.

Seizures during menstrual cycle linked to drug-resistant epilepsy
More frequent seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with genetic generalized epilepsy have been linked for the first time to drug-resistant epilepsy, when anti-seizure medications don't work, according to a Rutgers coauthored study that may help lead to tailored treatments.

How 'swapping bodies' with a friend changes our sense of self
A study appearing August 26 in the journal iScience shows that, when pairs of friends swapped bodies in a perceptual illusion, their beliefs about their own personalities became more similar to their beliefs about their friends' personalities.

New form of brain analysis engages whole brain for the first time
A new method of brain imaging analysis offers the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of noninvasive brain stimulation treatment for Alzheimer's, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and other conditions.

Barcoding long DNA quantifies CRISPR effects
A sequencing approach can home in on a rare mutation within a large number of cells, revealing implications for CRISPR genome editing and early cancer detection.

Thin-skinned solar panels printed with inkjet
Efficient, yet exceptionally light organic solar cells created entirely by inkjet printing.

Difficult, complex decisions underpin the future of the world's coral reefs
Effective solutions to the climate challenge threatening the world's coral reefs require complex decisions about risk and uncertainty, timing, quality versus quantity as well as which species to support for the most robust and productive future.

Study finds that water efficiency achievable throughout US without decree
Northern Arizona University researchers Ben Ruddell and Richard Rushforth, with collaborators throughout the country, looked at how much water conservation can readily and affordably be achieved in each region and industry by looking at what conservation measures were already working and considering how much water is being used.

Stop! Grand theft water
An international team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide has developed a new method to better understand the drivers of water theft, a significant worldwide phenomenon, and deterrents to help protect this essential resource.

50% drop in patients attending cardiology services during coronavirus lockdown
The number of NHS patients presenting to cardiology services for serious heart problems more than halved while the number of heart attacks diagnosed fell by 40% at one centre in Scotland during the coronavirus lockdown, finds research published in the online journal Open Heart.

New device can measure toxic lead within minutes
Rutgers researchers have created a miniature device for measuring trace levels of toxic lead in sediments at the bottom of harbors, rivers and other waterways within minutes -- far faster than currently available laboratory-based tests, which take days.

A ribosome odyssey in mitochondria
The ciliate mitoribosome structure provides new insights into the diversity of translation and its evolution.

Racial segregation drives disparities in COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses
Across the US, COVID-19 and HIV diagnoses are lowest in primarily white counties.

Investigational new therapy prevents onset of Dravet syndrome symptoms in mice
In a development that may finally offer hope to children with Dravet syndrome and their parents, a promising investigational new therapeutic appears to alter the destructive course of the deadly disease in a mouse model.

Catching genes from chlamydiae allowed complex life to live without oxygen
Researchers has discovered a new group of Chlamydiae - named the Anoxychlamydiales - living under the ocean floor without oxygen.

Transplanted brown-fat-like cells hold promise for obesity and diabetes
A potential therapy for obesity would transplant HUMBLE (human brown-like) fat cells, human white fat cells that have been genetically modified using CRISPR to become similar to heat-generating brown fat cells.

New insights into mechanism of therapy to reduce liver fat and prevent fibrosis
A team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has taken an important step forward in the goal of developing a potential treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Researchers discover gene controlling nectar spur development
A team of researchers from California State University in Sacramento, University of California in Santa Barbara, and Harvard University have identified the key gene controlling the development of nectar spur in Aquilegia.

Parental instruction instrumental for children to learn how to safely cross busy roads
New research from the University of Iowa shows parents who teach children ahead of time how to properly choose gaps in traffic can help them learn more quickly how to cross roads safely.

Link between cognitive impairment and worse prognosis in heart failure patients
Heart failure is an endemic disease affecting 250 000 Swedes.

NASA sees typhoon Bavi from one million miles away
Typhoon Bavi is a large storm moving through the Yellow Sea.

Study rules out DM destruction as origin of extra radiation in galaxy center
In a paper in Physical Review D, a University of California, Irvine-led team reports that - through an analysis of the Fermi data and an exhaustive series of modeling exercises - they were able to determine that an observed excess of gamma rays could not have been produced by what are called weakly interacting massive particles, most popularly theorized as the stuff of dark matter.

Progress toward a treatment for Krabbe disease
The inherited disease, which typically kills children before their second birthday, has no cure, but a University of Pennsylvania study in a canine model offers hope for an effective gene therapy with lasting results.

Too many COVID-19 patients get unneeded 'just in case' antibiotics
More than half of patients hospitalized with suspected COVID-19 in Michigan during the state's peak months received antibiotics soon after they arrive, just in case they had a bacterial infection in addition to the virus, a new study shows.

Fear of missing out impacts people of all ages
The social anxiety that other people are having fun without you, also known as FoMO, is more associated with loneliness, low self-esteem and low self-compassion than with age, according to a recent study led by Washington State University psychology professor Chris Barry.

Rare encounters between cosmic heavyweights
Astronomers using Maunakea Observatories - Subaru Telescope, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Gemini Observatory - have discovered three pairs of merging galaxies.

Tailored hardening of ZrCuAl bulk metallic glass induced by 2D gradient rejuvenation
A team at Tohoku University have perfected a new heat treatment technique with rapid heating and asymmetrical cooling processes in metallic glass.

Mount Everest summit success rates double, death rate stays the same over last 30 years
A new study led by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of California, Davis, finds that the success rate of summiting Mount Everest has doubled in the last three decades, even though the number of climbers has greatly increased, crowding the narrow route through the dangerous ''death zone'' near the summit.

Getting to the root of the problem
Researchers analyze bean root architecture for better crop breeding

Immune protein IL-17A responsible for lethal side effects of gastric cancer
The formation of scar tissue, or fibrosis, as gastric cancer disseminates throughout the peritoneum can be more lethal than the cancer itself and can interfere with chemotherapy.

Obesity linked with higher risk for COVID-19 complications
From COVID-19 risk to recovery, the odds are stacked against those with obesity, and a new study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Gillings School of Global Public Health raises concerns about the impact of obesity on the effectiveness of a future COVID-19 vaccine.

Native desert bighorn sheep in ecologically intact areas are less vulnerable to climate change
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change.

Experts reveal major holes in international ozone treaty
A new paper, co-authored by a University of Sussex scientist, has revealed major holes in an international treaty designed to help repair the ozone layer, putting human health at risk and increasing the speed of climate change.

Spit in a tube to diagnose heart attack
A saliva test could fast track heart attack diagnosis, according to preliminary research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.1 The innovative technique requires patients to spit into a tube and provides results in 10 minutes, compared to at least one hour for the standard blood test.

New method to combat damage, help revive NY berry industry
Greg Loeb of Cornell University has been experimenting with a thin mesh covering, called exclusion netting, around berry crops as a means to prevent spotted wing drosophila infestation.

Clubs closed? Study finds partygoers turn to virtual raves and happy hours during pandemic
People have traded in nightclubs and dance festivals for virtual raves and Zoom happy hours as a result of lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic--yet, many are using drugs in these socially distanced settings, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research at NYU School of Global Public Health.

GSA's journals publish three new articles on COVID-19 and Aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access.

Overlooked 'housekeeping' gene plays unexpected role in seizures
Molecules known as tRNAs are often overlooked in studies of disease processes.

Domesticated chickens have smaller brains
Researchers from Linköping University suggest a process by which the timid junglefowl from the rain forest could have become today's domesticated chicken.

Antarctic ice shelves vulnerable to sudden meltwater-driven fracturing, says study
A new study says that many of the ice shelves ringing Antarctica could be vulnerable to quick destruction if rising temperatures drive melt water into the numerous fractures that currently penetrate their surfaces.

NASA's orbital views of a strengthening, dangerous major hurricane Laura
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station provided images of Hurricane Laura as it continues to strengthen in the Gulf of Mexico.

NASA examines powerful Major Hurricane Laura headed for landfall
During the afternoon of Aug. 26, as major Hurricane Laura nears landfall near the Texas/Louisiana border, NASA satellites have been providing forecasters with a great deal of data on the storm, examining temperature, rainfall capability, storm structure and extent.

Got fatigue? Study further pinpoints brain regions that may control it
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine using MRI scans and computer modeling say they have further pinpointed areas of the human brain that regulate efforts to deal with fatigue.

Study finds association between nightmares and heart disease in veterans
A new study found a surprising association between frequent and severe nightmares and cardiovascular disease in veterans, even after controlling for post-traumatic stress disorder.

Researchers unravel two mysteries of COVID-19
A team from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University has made significant steps forward in understanding COVID-19 through two back-to-back studies published this week in Critical Care Explorations.

Natural radiation can interfere with quantum computers
Radiation from natural sources in the environment can limit the performance of superconducting quantum bits, known as qubits.

Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
A collaboration between scientists with the Vidali at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Madrid resulted in the first article addressing the involvement of cytosolic calcium oscillations and waves in the immune response of P. patens to a biotic stress.

ITMO University scientists develop a tool for wireless charging of multiple devices
When we need to borrow a charger for our device, we often face the fact that different manufacturers produce different charger connectors.

Ensure long term support is available for COVID-19 survivors
'Ensure long term support is available for COVID-19 survivors.' Healthcare systems around the world need to develop ways of supporting people in the community who are recovering from COVID-19, say researchers.

Unique HIV reservoirs in elite controllers
Unlike ART-treated individuals, elite controllers' viral reservoirs appear to be incapable of being reactivated.

UC creates living tribute to Ohio botanist
The University of Cincinnati and Spring Grove Cemetery & Arboretum replaced invasive and nonnative ground cover on E.

Strong, durable responses to selpercatinib in RET-driven medullary thyroid cancer
Selpercatinib (Retevmo), a drug targeted precisely against cancers driven by mutations or alterations in the gene RET, was effective in a clinical trial at shrinking tumors in patients with medullary thyroid cancer.

Blocking nerve signals to the pancreas halts type 1 diabetes onset in mice
In a new Science Advances study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that the nervous system may be driving this patchy cell die-off.

Gastrointestinal innovation holds potential for treating variety of conditions
Proof-of-concept studies in models of lactose intolerance, diabetes and infectious disease demonstrate potential applications.

COVID-19 vaccines are moving fast, but will americans agree to get them?
Only one in three US adults received the flu vaccine in 2018, a number that has critical implications for the impending flu season, which threatens to overwhelm medical resources and lead to tens of thousands of deaths at a time when Americans are still reeling from the COVID-19 pandemic.

COVID-19 -- Scenarios for the post-lockdown period in Italy
The researchers have generated scenarios of the Italian infection dynamics resulting from the bulk effect of lockdown lifting, which initiated on May 4.

Corona pandemic: What dashboards do not show
How can the course of the corona pandemic and its effects be illustrated?

UofSC researchers reveal how THC may treat acute respiratory distress syndrome
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), when caused by a bacterial toxin known as Staphylococcal enterotoxin, can be completely prevented by treatment with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant.

Synthetic coating for the GI tract could deliver drugs or aid in digestion
MIT engineers have devised a way to apply a temporary synthetic coating to the lining of the small intestine.

Radiation for young adult cancer linked to worse BC survival in premenopausal women
Bottom Line: Among premenopausal women with breast cancer, those who were previously treated with radiation for a primary childhood, adolescent, or young adult cancer had worse breast cancer-specific survival.

New neural network differentiates Middle and Late Stone Age toolkits
The change from Middle Stone Age (MSA) to Later Stone Age (LSA) marks a major cultural change amongst our hunter-gatherer ancestors, but distinguishing between these two industrial complexes is not straightforward.

Microscopic robots 'walk' thanks to laser tech
A Cornell University-led collaboration has created the first microscopic robots that incorporate semiconductor components, allowing them to be controlled - and made to walk - with standard electronic signals.

Artificial pancreas effectively controls type 1 diabetes in children age 6 and up
A clinical trial at four pediatric diabetes centers in the United States has found that a new artificial pancreas system -- which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels -- is safe and effective at managing blood glucose levels in children as young as age six with type 1 diabetes.

Thermodynamics of computation: A quest to find the cost of running a Turing machine
Turing machines are widely believed to be universal, in the sense that any computation done by any system can also be done by a Turing machine.

Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age
Depression or anxiety in adolescence is linked with a 20% greater likelihood of having a heart attack mid-life, according to research released today at ESC Congress 2020.

UMBC study reveals gender bias in bird song research and impact of women on science
A new paper has found that women are more likely than men to be authors, and even more likely to be first authors, of research papers about female bird song.

Hip fracture risk linked to nanoscale bone inflexibility
New research has highlighted a preventative treatment gap in patients prone to bone fractures who are otherwise healthy.

New study warns: We have underestimated the pace at which the Arctic is melting
Arctic sea ice is melting more quickly than once assumed.

When two tribes go to war -- how tribalism polarized the Brexit social media debate
Tribal behaviour on social media widened the gulf between Remain and Leave voters in the United Kingdom's debate whether to leave the European Union, re-aligned the UK's political landscape, and made people increasingly susceptible to disinformation campaigns, new research from the University of Bath shows.

USDA says current poultry food safety guidelines do not stop salmonella outbreaks
Current poultry food safety guidelines for Salmonella, the leading cause of foodborne illness outbreaks, are inadequate.

Antagonistic genes modify rice plant growth
Rice stems lengthen when a newly identified gene activates during flooding.

Novel alkaline hydrogel advances skin wound care
Effective wound care requires the maintenance of optimal conditions for skin and tissue regeneration.

Octupole corner state in a three-dimensional topological circuit
Higher-order topological insulators featuring quantized bulk polarizations and zero-dimensional corner states are attracting increasing interest due to their strong mode confinement.

Mandatory vote-by-mail modestly increases voter turnout without giving either party an edge in elections, study suggests
Mandatory vote-by-mail modestly increases voter turnout without advantaging one party over the other, according to a causal inference analysis of 30 years of nationwide US county-level data and more than 40 million individual-level voter records from the states of Washington and Utah.

What is cerebral venous thrombosis? study finds blood clot condition on the rise
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) occurs when a blood clot forms in one of the veins in the brain, preventing blood from draining out of the brain.

US hospital admissions for stroke fell by almost a third during lockdown
Almost a third fewer cases of stroke and mini-stroke (TIA) were seen in US hospitals during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic between March and April this year compared to the same time in 2019, finds research published in the journal Stroke and Vascular Neurology.

Interventions stem antibiotic prescribing rates in telemedicine
Two different interventions both worked to significantly reduce the rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions made by physicians in a telemedicine practice, a new study led by Children's National Hospital researchers shows.

New Cretaceous Jehol fossil sheds light on evolution of ancestral mammalian middle ear
A joint research team led by Dr. MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof.

Scientists to discover the unique ductile properties of aluminum
During experiments on high-performance Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) researchers from Peter the Great St.

Cosmic rays may soon stymie quantum computing
Infinitesimally low levels of radiation, such as from incoming cosmic rays, may soon stymie progress in quantum computing.

Samara Polytech scientists studied a new compound for lithium and sodium-ion batteries
The research team that includes Samara Polytech scientists obtained monoclinic NaVPO4F by solid-state synthesis using quenching and showed that sodium ions were inactive.

New analysis shows hydroxychloroquine does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and is associated with increased mortality when combined with the antibiotic azithromycin
A new meta-analysis of published studies into the drug hydroxychloroquine shows that it does not lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and using it combined with the antibiotic azithromycin is associated with a 27% increased mortality.

From photons to feelings: Researchers reveal a color palette in brain
A recent study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Peking University described in greater detail than ever before the anatomical embodiment of color sensations in the cerebral cortex, linking brain structure to perceptual function.

Social distancing is instinctive but hard for humans and animals
Human beings and animals will practice social distancing to avoid disease--to a point.

Additional data on blood thinner efficacy for COVID-19 and insight on best possible regimens
Mount Sinai study is the basis of a new international clinical trial.

NTU Singapore scientists use fruit peel to turn old batteries into new
Scientists led by NTU Singapore have developed a novel method of using fruit peel waste to extract and reuse precious metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in order to create new batteries.

Consuming your own fecal microbiome when dieting may limit weight regain -- Ben-Gurion University
''It is well known that most weight-loss dieters reach their lowest body weight after 4-6 months, and are then challenged by the plateau or regain phase, despite continued dieting,'' says Dr.

Research finds people who eat pasta have better overall quality diets than those who don't
Good news for pasta eaters! New research published in Frontiers in Nutrition this month, analyzing the diets of adults and children who eat pasta, has revealed good news about one of America's favorite foods.

Sm(Fe0.8Co0.2)12 with a lean rare earth content exhibits superb magnetism
NIMS and Tohoku Gakuin University have developed a boron-doped anisotropic Sm(Fe0.8Co0.2)12 thin film containing only small amount of rare earth elements.

How vitamin C could help over 50s retain muscle mass
New research shows that vitamin C could help over 50s retain muscle mass in later life.

Planetary ball-milling helps protect our planet from plastics pollution
Researchers at Osaka University have developed supramolecular polymeric materials that combine rapid self-healing with high toughness by using the efficient molecular mixing method of planetary ball-milling.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.