Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 27, 2020
Life expectancy gap between Black and white people in Washington, DC, analyzed
Heart disease, homicide and cancer are leading contributing factors to stark differences in life expectancy between Black people and white people in Washington, DC, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

Newly discovered rare dinosaur embryos show sauropods had rhino-like horns
An incredibly rare dinosaur embryo discovered perfectly preserved inside its egg has shown scientists new details of the development and appearance of sauropods which lived 80 million years ago.

The northern quoll: An amazingly versatile survivor?
The northern quoll, one of Australia's most adorable and endangered native carnivores, appears to be adapted to dramatically different landscapes -- which may be key to the species' survival.

Artificial pancreas can prevent dangerously low blood sugar in people with T1D
A new artificial pancreas system can prevent hypoglycemia--episodes of dangerously low blood sugar--during and after heavy exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

MHC class II transactivator CIITA induces cell resistance to Ebola Virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Discoveries from the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI) have identified a new cellular protection pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses, and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, Boston University School of Medicine and MRIGlobal have shown that this pathway can protect cells from infection by Ebola virus and coronaviruses, like SARS-CoV-2.

A.I. tool promises faster, more accurate Alzheimer's diagnosis
By detecting subtle differences in the way that Alzheimer's sufferers use language, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed an A.I. algorithm that promises to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's without the need for expensive scans or in-person testing.

Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry -- unique discovery in Baltic sea wreck from 1495
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: A two-metre-long Atlantic sturgeon.

Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide.

Earth may always have been wet
The Earth is the only planet known to have liquid water on its surface, a fundamental characteristic when it comes to explaining the emergence of life.

Trapping of acetylene
Ethylene, a key feedstock in the chemical industry, often includes traces of acetylene contaminants, which need to be removed.

Survey finds election concerns vary by race, education levels, party affiliation
The coronavirus pandemic is creating concerns about the safety of the 2020 elections, with some people also questioning the integrity of the safety precautions being taken.

Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute.

South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears - ''a mosaic'' of unequal protection across different land management types.

Genetics of the tree of life
The African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is called the tree of life.

Search for COVID-19 drugs boosted by SARS discovery
An extensive search and testing of current drugs and drug-like compounds has revealed compounds previously developed to fight SARS might also work against COVID-19.

Using the past to maintain future biodiversity
New research shows that safeguarding species and ecosystems and the benefits they provide for society against future climatic change requires effective solutions which can only be formulated from reliable forecasts.

Research brief: How genetics could impact COVID-19 treatments
U of M study looked at how pharmacogenomics could improve the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 drug therapies.

Beating HIV and COVID-19 may depend on tweaking vaccine molecules
In a new Immunity study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) show that one way to improve the body's immune response to vaccines is to factor in antigen valency.

Round nanoparticles improve quality factors of surface lattice resonances: Study
A research group led by Dr. LI Guangyuan from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that nanohemisphere arrays can significantly improve the quality factors of surface lattice resonances.

Binding sites for protein-making machinery
ETH Zurich researchers can predict how tightly a cell's protein synthesis machinery will bind to RNA sequences - even when dealing with many billions of different RNA sequences.

How to make AI trustworthy
One of the biggest impediments to adoption of new technologies is trust in AI.

Ocean acidification causing coral 'osteoporosis' on iconic reefs
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals' ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth.

NASA finds new Tropical Storm Iselle already battling wind shear
NASA infrared imagery shows that newly formed Tropical Storm Iselle is already battling for its life under wind shear.

A spatial regime shift to stickleback dominance
Large numbers of three-spined stickleback have gradually taken over larger parts of the Baltic Sea's coastal ecosystem, shows a new scientific study.

Study confirms link between influenza, heart complications
The link between influenza and serious heart conditions just grew stronger.

Daylight study reveals how animals adapt between seasons
Scientists have discovered how a biological switch helps animals make the seasonal changes crucial for survival, such as growing a warm winter coat and adjusting body temperatures.

Weight in first years of life can affect lung health in later childhood
Study of more than 1,200 children analyses body mass index trajectories from birth to age four years and their relationship to lung function at age seven years

Researchers identify RNA molecule that helps lung cancer cells evade immune system
Researchers in Spain have identified a non-coding RNA molecule that helps lung cancer cells proliferate and avoid being killed by the body's immune cells.

Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study run by a University of Cincinnati researcher.

Medical errors increase following the spring change to daylight saving time
Seeking medical care after springing forward to daylight saving time could be a risky proposition.

Premature deaths from alcoholic liver disease rising as gap between men and women narrows
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine identifies emerging patterns in the rate of and age at premature death from alcoholic (alcohol-associated) liver disease (ALD) in the US over the last two decades.

Why 'one day at a time' works for recovering alcoholics
''One day at a time'' is a mantra for recovering alcoholics, for whom each day without a drink builds the strength to go on to the next.

High walk and bike scores associated with greater crash risk
Neighbourhoods with high bikeability and walkability scores actually present higher crash risks to cyclists and pedestrians in Vancouver, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

Single-use N95 respirators can be decontaminated and used again, study finds
N95 respirators, which are widely worn by health care workers treating patients with COVID-19 and are designed to be used only once, can be decontaminated effectively and used up to three times, UCLA scientists and colleagues report.

How cells solve mazes and traverse great distances through the body
Cells are particularly good at solving mazes, according to a new study, which demonstrates how they are able to navigate long and complicated routes through the body using self-generated chemoattractant gradients.

Rejuvenating old organs could increase donor pool
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are leading efforts to breathe new life into older organs by leveraging a new class of drugs known as senolytics, which target and eliminate old cells.

COVID-19 less deadly and causes milder symptoms in children
Children and teenagers are less likely than adults to develop severe Covid-19 or die from the disease, according to the world's largest study of hospital patients with Covid-19.

Study finds younger and older drivers more likely to drive older, less safe vehicles
A new study found that teen drivers and drivers 65 years and older - two age groups at a higher risk of being involved in an automobile accident - are more likely to be driving vehicles that are less safe, putting them at even higher risk of injury.

Discovered: Cellular pathway involved in resistance to Ebola virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Researchers working in human cells have identified a new pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses.

Mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 model provides new tool for COVID-19 discoveries
A new mouse model is laying the groundwork for antivirals, vaccines and antibodies in the fight against COVID-19.

Are all vegetarian diets healthy?
Vegetarian foods are not equally healthy, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.

First in situ radiation measurements 21 km up into the air over Tibetan Plateau
In situ vertical radiation measurements from the surface up to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), about 10~22 km in altitude, are rare over the TP or even over a large territory of China.

New tool identifies which cancer patients are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy
A new diagnostic tool that can predict whether a cancer patient would respond to immunotherapy treatment has been developed by scientists at the University of Bath.

Scientists establish first lethal mouse model for COVID-19
Army scientists have developed the first lethal mouse model of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, using mice that were genetically engineered to express the human ACE2 gene -- a key mechanism by which the virus enters human cells.

Early Cambrian fossil discovery gives new understanding into the origin of hemichordates
A half-a-billion years old fossil species of marine animal sheds light on how the anatomies of the two main types of an animal group called the hemichordates are related, and provides new evidence in the historical debate among zoologists.

Study: COVID-19 messaging less effective when tied to Trump
According to a new study on how the source of a COVID-19 prevention message affects its perceived effectiveness, when Trump's name was associated with the message, the effectiveness of those messages decreased, not just compared to other sources, but even when there was no source at all.

Topological superconducting phase protected by 1D local magnetic symmetries
Scientists from China and USA classified 1D gapped topological superconducting quantum wires with local magnetic symmetries (LMSs), in which the time-reversal symmetry is broken but its combinations with certain crystalline symmetries, such as MxT, C2zT, C4zT, and C6zT, are preserved.

Phase 1 human trials suggest UIC-developed breast cancer drug is safe, effective
A new type of breast cancer drug can help halt progression of disease and is not toxic, according to phase 1 clinical trials.

How sticklebacks dominate perch
A research project on algal blooms along the Swedish coast, caused by eutrophication, revealed that large predators such as perch and pike are also necessary to restrict these blooms.

Cigarette-like 'cigarillos' flout efforts to curb smoking
Tax cigarillos in line with cigarettes to stop tobacco companies from exploiting loopholes in system, say researchers.

A government program that reduces mortgage defaults
Lower-income households that received mortgages through state affordable mortgage programs were less likely to default or foreclose than similar households that received conventional financing, a national study found.

Artificial intelligence learns continental hydrology
The data sets on the Earth's gravitational field which are required for this, stem from the GRACE and GRACE-FO satellite missions.

Children notice race several years before adults want to talk about it
Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Continuous infrared winds discovered during the eruption of a stellar mass black hole
A team of researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has detected for the first time the constant infrared emission from winds produced during the eruption of a black hole in an X-ray binary.

A Politecnico di Milano study reveals DNA "grammar"
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order.

The Newtonian gravitational constant: Latest advances of the measurements
The Newtonian gravitational constant G, which is one of the most important fundamental physical constants in nature, describes the strength of the gravitational interaction between objects, while it is considered to be one of the most difficult to measure accurately so far due to the extreme weakness and unshieldability of gravity.

Quantum simulation of quantum crystals
International research team describes the new possibilities offered by the use of ultracold dipolar atoms

Songbirds reduce reproduction to help survive drought
New research from the University of Montana suggests tropical songbirds in both the Old and New Worlds reduce reproduction during severe droughts, and this - somewhat surprisingly -- may actually increase their survival rates.

Playfulness can be trained - here's why you should do it
Simple exercises can help to make people more playful and consequently feel more satisfied with their lives.

Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal and in Berkeley, California outline a method to synthesize complex bioactive molecules much more quickly and efficiently.

NASA's Terra Satellite reveals burn scars from California's two largest fires
On Aug. 26, 2020, NASA's Terra satellite was able to image the two areas in California where the fires have been most active and using the false color reflectance bands on the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard.

QUT algorithm could quash Twitter abuse of women
Online abuse targeting women, including threats of harm or sexual violence, has proliferated across all social media platforms but QUT researchers have developed a sophisticated statistical model to identify misogynistic content and help drum it out of the Twittersphere.

Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Iowa State's Martin Thuo and his research group have developed technology to make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals.

Gut microbes could unlock the secret to healthy ageing
Bacteria and other microorganisms in the digestive tract are linked with dozens of health conditions including high blood pressure, high blood lipids, and body mass index (BMI) according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.

New era in brain monitoring technology
Subscalp brain monitoring devices could offer long-term, continuous, and reliable recording of neural activity at home and in the clinic.

FEFU scientists are paving way for future tiny electronics and gadgets
Scientists of the School of Natural Sciences of Far Eastern Federal University (SNS FEFU) with colleagues from Russia, South Korea, and Australia suggest the breaking new ground approach to manage spin-electronic properties and functionality of the thin-film magnetic nanosystems.

First complete dinosaur skeleton ever found is ready for its closeup at last
The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than a century and a half ago.

Call of the wild: Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement
A new study has shown for the first time that acoustic monitoring can be used in place of photographs to generate abundance estimates of dolphin populations.

AI as good as the average radiologist in identifying breast cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden have compared the ability of three different artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to identify breast cancer based on previously taken mammograms.

Prior Zika virus infection increases risk of severe dengue disease
A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, finds that people who have antibodies to the mosquito-borne Zika virus are more vulnerable to developing dengue disease.

Optical imaging enters sub-nanometer era
Researchers improved the spatial resolution from 8 nm to ~8 Å of photoluminescence imaging.

AI accurately identifies infants with low risk of serious bacterial infection
Artificial intelligence, or 'supervised machine learning,' could help identify which well-appearing infants with fever, who are 60 days old or younger, are at low risk for a serious bacterial infection, according to a study published in Pediatrics.

Vertebral body tethering shows clinical success as treatment for scoliosis
Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity affecting pediatric patients.

Our energy hunger is tethered to our economic past
Current world energy consumption is tied to unchangeable past economic production.

Fabrication of a single-crystal giant magnetoresistive device on a polycrystalline film
NIMS and AIST have jointly succeeded in fabricating a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) device comprising single-crystal Heusler alloys on an practical silicon substrate.

Elderly in the US: Risk of dementia has been rising for years - instead of falling
Risk of cognitive impairment increased from 1996 to 2014.

Char application restores soil carbon and productivity
After two years of char application, researchers find increased soil Carbon, magnesium, and sodium concentrations.

For healthcare organizations responding to COVID-19, 'creative destruction' leads to accelerated innovation
COVID-19 has upended essentially every sector of the economy, and none more so than healthcare.

Student research team develops hybrid rocket engine
In a year defined by obstacles, a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign student rocket team persevered.

All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
The debate on the risks and benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still ongoing, but one thing is certain: without appropriate regulatory measures, AI is potentially dangerous.

Improving weather forecasts with observations from the microwave instruments onboard China's FY-3D satellite
Observations from FY-3D microwave instruments not only benefit both the NWP and climate communities by complementing the current observing system but also ensure the continuity of Earth observations between FY-3C and FY-3E.

Archaeology: Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots -- charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls -- may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilizations.

Zika infection enhances Dengue disease risk
Prior Zika virus infection can enhance the risk of severe dengue disease, according to a new study, which uses a unique cohort from Nicaragua to confirm previous reports that have suggested the action of cross-reactive antibodies between the two closely related flaviviruses.

Spouses shed more pounds together than alone
Weight loss is most successful in heart attack survivors when partners join in the effort to diet, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.

Two discoveries boost next-generation organoid development
Scientists from Cincinnati Children's and RIKEN in Japan report detecting a set of signals within the foregut--a proto-organ in very early-stage embryos--that trigger how and when the other organs form.

Breakthrough in using stem cells to treat enteric nervous system disorders
Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how the enteric nervous system forms, which could pave the way for new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's.

Antiviral used to treat cat coronavirus also works against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at the University of Alberta are preparing to launch clinical trials of a drug used to cure a deadly disease caused by a coronavirus in cats that they expect will also be effective as a treatment for humans against COVID-19.

Fossil evidence of 'hibernation-like' state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
University of Washington scientists report evidence of a hibernation-like state in Lystrosaurus, an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago.

Land use change leads to increased flooding in Indonesia
While high greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss are often associated with rapid land-use change in Indonesia, impacts on local water cycles have been largely overlooked.

NASA's Terra Satellite sees the end of Bavi
NASA's Terra satellite captured visible imagery as Tropical Storm Bavi made landfall in northwestern North Korea and moved inland.

An improved wearable, stretchable gas sensor using nanocomposites
A stretchable, wearable gas sensor for environmental sensing has been developed and tested by researchers at Penn State, Northeastern University and five universities in China.

DNA repair - Locating and severing lethal links
Covalent cross-links between proteins and DNA are among the most hazardous types of DNA damage.

Princeton labs report new platform for stereocontrol
Princeton Chemistry labs collaborate to demonstrate the ability of photoredox catalysis to take traditionally static stereocenters and render them dynamic by continuously and controllably breaking and re-forming molecular bonds.

Meteorite study suggests Earth may have been wet since it formed
A new study finds that Earth's water may have come from materials that were present in the inner solar system at the time the planet formed -- instead of far-reaching comets or asteroids delivering such water.

Genetic link between cattle temperament and autism
Researchers have discovered that cattle share an overlap of genes with humans that are critical in brain function and response to fear stimuli.

Black children with cancer three times less likely to receive proton radiotherapy than White children
A retrospective analysis led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital has found racial disparities in the use of the therapy for patients enrolled in trials.

The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement.

Older adults's faced mental health issues during the pandemic
Older adults experienced greater depression and loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers, and relationship strength (perceived closeness to network members) moderated the relationship between loneliness and depression.

Unravelling the potential of the unconscious mind
By using a combination of artificial intelligence and brain imaging technology, researchers have discovered that humans can be trained to rationally use the unconscious contents of their mental processes.

Misconceptions about weather and seasonality impact COVID-19 response
Misconceptions about the way climate and weather impact exposure and transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, create false confidence and have adversely shaped risk perceptions, say a team of Georgetown University researchers.

Photonics researchers report breakthrough in miniaturizing light-based chips
Electrical engineers at the University of Rochester have created the smallest electro-optical modulator yet, using a thin film of lithium niobate bonded on a silicon dioxide layer.

Unexpected abundance of hydrogen in meteorites reveals the origin of Earth's water
Meteorite material presumed to be devoid of water because it formed in the dry inner Solar System appears to have contained sufficient hydrogen to have delivered to Earth at least three times the mass of water in its oceans, a new study shows.

Mosquito immune system mapped to help fight malaria
Scientists have created the first cell atlas of mosquito immune cells, to understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections.

NASA sees Hurricane Laura's nighttime landfall
Many NASA assets were used to provide forecasters with information to incorporate into their analysis of Hurricane Laura.

Hurricanes could be up to five times more likely in the Caribbean if tougher targets are missed
Global warming is dramatically increasing the risk of extreme hurricanes in the Caribbean, but meeting more ambitious climate change goals could up to halve the likelihood of such disasters in the region, according to new research.

Growing demand for zero-deforestation cacao might not help Colombian forests
Cacao in Colombia is not a major driver of deforestation - yet.

Molecular dispersion enhances quasi-bilayer organic solar cells
Based on a polymeric donor PBDBT-2F and a nonfullerene (NF) acceptor Y6, researchers proposed a strategy to improve the properties of photovoltaic performances in PHJ-based OSCs through dilute dispersions of the PBDBT-2F donor into the acceptor-dominant phase with the sequential film deposition.

A chiral surprise in the rainforest
Reversed ratio of chiral volatile organic compounds over the Amazon rainforest reveal insects as unexplored important source of forest emissions.

Methane: emissions increase and it's not a good news
It is the second greenhouse gas with even a global warming potential larger than CO2.

UVA-developed artificial pancreas effective for children ages 6-13, study finds
An artificial pancreas originally developed at the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology safely and effectively manages blood sugar levels in children ages 6 to 13 with type 1 diabetes, a national clinical trial has found.

A nighttime view of Tropical Storm Hernan from a NASA-NOAA satellite
Nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Hernan along the coast of western Mexico.

SphingoTec's kidney function biomarker penKid® accurately detects acute kidney injury in infants
penKid® (Proenkephalin), a unique biomarker for the real-time assessment of kidney function.

Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
Non-edible plants are a promising alternative to crude oil, but their heterogenous composition can be a challenge to producing high yields of useful products.

Japanese sake: the new pick-me-up? Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting ornithine
Researchers from the Nara Institute of Science and Technology and the Nara Prefecture Institute of Industrial Development have found that that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces high levels of the amino acid ornithine.

New evaluation of universal health coverage, world will likely fall short of WHO goal
This study uses a new framework to capture how well countries align health services with the needs of the population and how well or poorly those services contribute to people's health.

Estrogen may lessen severity of COVID-19 symptoms in women, study says
Why are men at greater risk than women for more severe symptoms and worse outcomes from COVID-19 regardless of age?

New genetic markers of glucosinolates in rapeseed may help improve oil composition
A group of scientists performed a genetic analysis of the Russian rapeseed collection.

Lung injuries from vaping have characteristic patterns on CT
Injuries to the lungs from vaping have suggestive patterns on CT scans that could help physicians make accurate diagnoses and reduce unnecessary biopsies, according to a new study.

Russian scientists predicted increased unrest in the United States back in 2010
Beginning in May 2020, after the police killing of George Floyd, a Black American man, 'Black Lives Matter' demonstrations and riots engulfed the United States, the United Kingdom, and several European countries.

Researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer cells' immune evasion
Researchers in China have discovered how brain cancer cells increase production of a key protein that allows them to evade the body's immune system.

Penis bones, echolocation calls, and genes reveal new kinds of bats
Vesper bats are the biggest family of bats in the world, and they all kind of look alike, making it hard to tell different species apart.

Expanding researchers' knowledge of the microbial defense toolkit
A new study identifies a wide array of previously unknown molecular functions and enzymatic activities microbes use to protect against viral threats.

Brain-inspired electronic system could vastly reduce AI's carbon footprint
Extremely energy-efficient artificial intelligence is now closer to reality after a study by UCL researchers found a way to improve the accuracy of a brain-inspired computing system.

Age-appropriate contraception counseling helps health care providers educate teens
Preventing unplanned pregnancies in adolescents with effective and easy-to-use contraception is key to ensuring that adolescents do not become parents before they are ready.

Detailed dataset of measures to curb COVID-19 ready for statistical analyses
The Complexity Science Hub Vienna (CSH) compiled a dataset in unprecedented granularity of governmental interventions against the spread of coronavirus.

Children and young people have less severe COVID-19 than adults and death is exceptionally rare
Children and young people have less severe covid-19 than adults and death is exceptionally rare, only occurring in children with serious underlying conditions, confirms a study published by The BMJ today.

A topography of extremes
An international team of scientists from Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, and colleagues from the USA and Switzerland have successfully combined various extreme experimental conditions in a unique way, revealing exciting insights into the conducting properties of the crystalline metal CeRhIn5.

Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common.

Hubble maps giant halo around Andromeda Galaxy
In a landmark study, scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the immense halo of gas enveloping the Andromeda galaxy, our nearest large galactic neighbor.

Cochlear implants should be recommended for adults more often
An international group of hearing specialists has released a new set of recommendations emphasizing that cochlear implants should be offered to adults who have moderate to severe or worse hearing loss much more often than is the current practice.

Decoded: The structure of the barrier between three cells
Organs in animals and in humans have one thing in common: they are bounded by so-called epithelial cells.

American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Cardiology compensation continues to rise; new interventional measures reported
MedAxiom, an American College of Cardiology Company and the premier source for cardiovascular organizational performance solutions, has released its eighth annual Cardiovascular Provider Compensation and Production Survey.

Reduce insecticide spraying by using ant pheromones to catch crop pests
Scientists at Bath have developed a molecular sponge that soaks up the pheromones of ants and releases them slowly to attract the pests to an insecticide trap.

Duchenne: "Crosstalk" between muscle and spleen
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscle disease in children and is passed on by X-linked recessive inheritance.

First 3D look at an embryonic sauropod dinosaur reveals unexpected facial features
About 25 years ago, researchers discovered the first dinosaur embryos in an enormous nesting ground of titanosaurian dinosaurs.

When liver cirrhosis is deadly
A study by an international team of researchers headed by Professor Jonel Trebicka from the Frankfurt University Hospital and funded by the foundation EF Clif, has discovered which patients are particularly at risk for acute-on-chronic liver failure.
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