Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 28, 2020
A surprising protein player in diabetes
Conducted by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Riken Center of Integrative Medical Sciences, a study looking at pancreatic beta cells has found a link between a commonly found protein, a subset of switched-off genes and the development of diabetes.

Can't be away from your phone? Study finds link to higher levels of obsession-compulsion
Feelings of panic when a person is away from their smartphone could be connected to general feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, a new study of young people in Portugal suggests.

LSU Health study explains multipronged SARS-CoV-2 attack and widepread COVID-19 infection
A study of a gateway receptor for SARS-CoV-2 led by Walter Lukiw, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience, Neurology and Ophthalmology at LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence and School of Medicine, may help explain the wide variety of symptoms and organs involved with SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19.

A coffee and catnap keep you sharp on the nightshift
A simple coffee and a quick catnap could be the cure for staying alert on the nightshift as new research from the University of South Australia shows that this unlikely combination can improve attention and reduce sleep inertia.

Knowledge about the past can preserve the biodiversity of tomorrow
Climate change threatens plants and animals across the planet. Interdisciplinary research by, among others, climate and biodiversity researchers at the University of Copenhagen, has mapped responds of biodiversity caused by abrupt climate changes in the past.

Cellular energy audit reveals energy producers and consumers
Researchers at Gladstone Institutes have performed a massive and detailed cellular energy audit; they analyzed every gene in the human genome to identify those that drive energy production or energy consumption.

Amateur drone videos could aid in natural disaster damage assessment
It wasn't long after Hurricane Laura hit the Gulf Coast Thursday that people began flying drones to record the damage and posting videos on social media.

Experiment contradicts assumptions about sleep loss and criminal interrogations
An experimental study suggests that sleep restriction may hinder information disclosure during criminal interviews, contradicting widespread assumptions about the effectiveness of sleep deprivation as an interrogation tool.

Cholesterol drug combinations could cut health risk for European patients
More patients could benefit from combinations of cholesterol-lowering drugs to reduce their risk of stroke and heart attacks.

New analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest
High-resolution ocean modelling has found the world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over the coming decades.

Study shows efforts in mangrove conservation and restoration paying off
In recent times, mangrove deforestation has raised alarms about increased carbon emissions into the atmosphere.

Algorithm aims to alert consumers before they use illicit online pharmacies
In a study, a team of Penn State researchers report that an algorithm they developed may be able to spot illicit online pharmacies that could be providing customers with substandard medications without their knowledge, among other potential problems.

Infants in households with very low food security may have greater obesity risk
Infants from households reporting very low 'food security,' a measure of access to adequate and healthy meals, tend to weigh more than those from households with relatively high food security.

Researchers find potential to make brain cancers in children respond better to treatment
Research has identified a small molecule compound that can activate the Wnt pathway in non-Wnt subtypes of medulloblastoma, making these aggressive forms of cancer more responsive to therapies.

Research brief: Researchers 3D print lifelike heart valve models
Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with support from Medtronic, have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient.

NASA Terra Satellite examines Tropical Storm Hernan's relocated center
NASA infrared imagery revealed a burst of strength in Tropical Storm Hernan, located over the Gulf of California.

NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery tracks Tropical Depression Laura over US
A new animation of nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite followed the path of former Hurricane Laura from its landfall in southwestern Louisiana to its movement over the Mississippi Valley.

Scientists listed the main approaches to the treatment of coronavirus
Researchers from Sechenov University together with Russian and Iranian colleagues described currently known approaches to the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Giant nanomachine aids the immune system
In order to kill diseased cells, our immune system must first identify them.

Waiting for Godot Metaphor
Author suggests a gradated Pandemic Index as an initial effort.

A novel salvinia-like slippery surface
Inspired by the hydrophobic leaves of Salvinia molesta and the slippery Nepenthes pitcher plants, a Salvinia-like slippery surface (SSS) consisting of protrusions with slippery heads was designed.

Researchers dramatically downsize technology for fingerprinting drugs and other chemicals
As new infectious diseases emerge and spread, one of the best shots against novel pathogens is finding new medicines or vaccines.

What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators.

"Jumping" DNA regulates human neurons
''Jumping'' sequences of DNA, known as transposable elements, partner up with evolutionarily recent proteins to influence the differentiation and physiological functioning of human neurons.

How to treat high blood pressure without ruining your sex life
Men with untreated high blood pressure have poorer penile blood flow than those with normal blood pressure, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.1 The differences disappeared with blood pressure medication.

The "gold" in breast milk
Breast milk strengthens a child's immune system, supporting the intestinal flora.

Cardiac biomarker shows stronger associations with kidney disease progression than BP
Identifying biomarkers for kidney disease progression may elucidate disease pathways and inform treatment.

Look beyond opioids to solve national substance use epidemic, study suggests
A new study published reveals that three-quarters of participants in an inpatient addiction intervention program at Oregon Health & Science University came into the hospital using more than one substance.

Which OCD treatment works best? New brain study could lead to more personalized choices
New research could improve the odds that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will receive a therapy that really works for them - something that eludes more than a third of those who currently get OCD treatment.

Low-cost, fly footpad-like adhesive structure capable of repeated attachment/detachment
NIMS, HUE and HUSM have succeeded in developing a method of easily and cheaply producing an adhesive structure capable of repeated attachment and detachment.

Engineers uncover biomechanical effects of skin rubbing
Understanding the skin damage caused by rubbing could lead to better topical skin treatments and help prevent the formation of new routes for viral and bacterial infection.

Children with no COVID-19 symptoms may shed virus for weeks
New research suggests that children can shed SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, even if they never develop symptoms or for long after symptoms have cleared.

Tungsten isotope helps study how to armor future fusion reactors
A team of ORNL researchers working with tungsten to armor the inside of future fusion reactors had some surprising results when looking at the probability of contamination.

Study finds that sleep restriction amplifies anger
Feeling angry these days? New research suggests that a good night of sleep may be just what you need.

Host tissue T cells may have an unexpected role in graft-versus-host disease
A new study has found that skin and intestinal T cells in the recipient survive conditioning regimens and continue to perform their normal functions.

Nurses burned out and want to quit
A survey of nurses caring for children with heart problems has revealed that more than half are emotionally exhausted.

Sunflower oil shows unexpected efficiency in corrosion prevention
Sunflower oil, which is found in almost every home, can be used not only in cooking, everyday life and cosmetology - it will help avoid complications (gas hydrates and corrosion) during oil and gas production.

Structural colors from cellulose-based polymers
A surface displays structural colors when light is reflected by tiny, regular structural elements in a transparent material.

Researchers explore how retail drone delivery may change logistics networks
Three UT Dallas researchers found that last-mile delivery networks will become more decentralized and the delivery speed of the drones will increase as the technology matures.

Change is constant: How the COVID-19 pandemic may shape the future of studying abroad
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact on higher education systems.

Natural disasters must be unusual or deadly to prompt local climate policy change
Natural disasters alone are not enough to motivate local communities to engage in climate change mitigation or adaptation, a new study from Oregon State University found.

Atheists are more likely to sleep better than Catholics and Baptists
A new study of sleep, religious affiliation, and perceptions of heaven found that atheists and agnostics are significantly more likely to be better sleepers than Catholics and Baptists.

New study examines long-term aesthetic outcomes of implant-based breast reconstruction
Breast reconstruction is an important option for women undergoing mastectomy, and a two-stage approach using implants is by far the most common reconstruction technique.

Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
The anatomy of plant fossils including an enormous tree that grew 10 million years ago in the now arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau calls current paleoclimate models into question, suggesting that the area was more humid than models predict.

NASA Terra Satellite sees development of Tropical Storm Maysak
NASA infrared imagery revealed several areas of strong thunderstorms around the center of the recently organized Tropical Storm Maysak.

Why are there differing preferences for suffixes and prefixes across languages?
While speakers of English and other Western languages prefer using suffixes more than prefixes, a new study reveals that this preference is not as universal as once thought.

Observation charge accumulation at nanocavity on plasmonic photocatalyst
Understanding where the plasmonic charge accumulated at catalysts surface and how to improve local charge density at catalytic sites is promising for solar energy conversion.

Fidelity of El Niño simulation matters for predicting future climate
A new study led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, published in the journal Nature Communications this week, revealed that correctly simulating ocean current variations hundreds of feet below the ocean surface - the so-called Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent - during El Niño events is key in reducing the uncertainty of predictions of future warming in the eastern tropical Pacific.

Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
A new study shows how two responses in separate locations inside plant cells work in concert to help corn plants respond to heat stress.

A review of ridge subduction, magmatism and metallogenesis
Ridge subduction events are very common and important geodynamic processes in modern oceanic plate tectonics (Figure 1), and play an important role in the generation of arc magmatism, material recycling, growth and evolution of continental crust, deformation and modification of overlying plates and metallogenesis.

Physiological test for autism proves effective independent of co-occurring conditions
Developing a physiological test for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one that measures certain components in the blood, has the potential to be a paradigm shift for diagnosing ASD.

Maternal insecticide use during pregnancy and neonatal jaundice
Association between pesticide usage during pregnancy and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring treatment: The Japan Environment and Children's study.

COVID-19 exposes broadband gaps
The COVID-19 crisis has increasingly highlighted shortcomings in Australia's National Broadband Network, Flinders University experts say.

How Neanderthals adjusted to climate change
Climate change occurring shortly before their disappearance triggered a complex change in the behaviour of late Neanderthals in Europe: they developed more complex tools.

NASA sees wind shear still battering tropical storm Iselle
NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear continued to batter Tropical Storm Iselle in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for the second day.

New malaria transmission patterns emerge in Africa
An international study reveals how future climate change could affect malaria transmission in Africa over the next century.

Portland State lab finds finds new levels of detail about key membrane proteins
Portland State University researchers used advanced electron microscopy to create a 3-D reconstruction of a membrane protein at an unprecedented level of resolution, setting the stage for the development of drugs that could target the protein more effectively to treat a variety of diseases.

Failures of Germany's largest cliff coast sensed by seismometers
The ten km long, bright white coast of Germany's largest island, Rügen, is shaped by episodically occurring failures.

New palliative care model shown to reduce costs without compromising on quality of care
Findings from a large-scale clinical trial testing a new palliative care model have shown to be lower cost, viewed positively by patients and their carers while showing no difference in patient-reported outcomes when compared with standard care.

How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut.

Farmers' quick sale of poultry during outbreaks may increase deadly virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study by an international team of researchers.

Women with higher neuroticism are less physically active
A new study from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, shows that the role of personality may vary depending on how physical activity is measured.

International screening of the effects of a pathogenic fungus
The pathogenic fungus Candida auris, which first surfaced in 2009, is proving challenging to control.

Preventing infection, facilitating healing: New biomaterials from spider silk
New biomaterials developed at the University of Bayreuth eliminate risk of infection and facilitate healing processes.

Vaccines against respiratory infections linked with less heart failure deaths
Influenza and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with fewer hospital deaths in patients with heart failure.
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