Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 02, 2020
Eat more to grow more arms...if you're a sea anemone
An international group of researchers, led by scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, have discovered that the number of tentacle arms a sea anemone grows depends on the amount of food it eats.

Making more of methane
Looking closely at the chemical process that transforms methane into useful products could help unveil more efficient ways to use natural gas.

NASA catches formation of Atlantic's record-breaking 15th tropical storm
Tropical Depression 15 strengthened into a tropical storm late on Sept.

Common sunscreen ingredients prove dangerous for freshwater ecosystems
The results show that long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) filters--including avobenzone, oxybenzone, and octocrylene--is lethal for some organisms living in freshwater environments.

Researchers warn of food-web threats from common insecticides
In an opinion in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from North Carolina State University and Pennsylvania State University argued for curbing the use of neonicotinoid insecticides.

Reef manta rays make long-term use of marine-protected areas
Understanding the key areas where migratory species like the reef manta ray like to congregate is crucial for their future conservation.

Development of next-generation zinc ion battery without the risk of explosion or fire
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has announced that a research team of the Center for Energy Storage Research had developed a next-generation secondary battery that uses zinc metal as an electrode without any risk of explosion or fire.

Effect of dexamethasone on days alive, ventilator-free in patients with COVID-19, acute respiratory distress syndrome
This randomized clinical trial in Brazil of 299 patients with COVID-19 and moderate or severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) examined if intravenous dexamethasone plus standard care compared with standard care alone would increase the number of days patients were alive and free from mechanical ventilation.

Possible blood-clotting mechanism in COVID-19 found
Why so many COVID-19 patients get blood clots (thrombosis) remains uncertain.

Seaport expansion costs will greatly exceed sea-level rise adaption costs through 2050
Seaport footprints will need to expand by up to 3,689 square kilometers (1,424 square miles) worldwide in the next three decades to cope with the combination of sea-level rise and rising demand, according to a new study published in Earth's Future, a peer-reviewed scientific journal focusing on climate change and future sustainability.

Heart disease signs improve when using arthritis medication
Drugs used to treat initial signs of rheumatoid arthritis also improve the early stages of heart disease, according to new research

New study on migration success reinforces need for monarch butterfly milkweed habitat
A recently published study presents evidence that the migration success of monarchs hasn't declined in recent years and thus cannot explain the steep decline in the monarch population over the last few decades.

Half of Medicare patients do not receive recommended health care after hospitalization
A study published today by the JAMA Network Open shows that in the period from October 2015 to September 2016 before the Affordable Care Act, a substantial portion of Medicare patients referred to home health care after hospitalization did not receive that care.

Newly identified gene grants tomatoes resistance to bacterial speck disease
Bacterial speck disease, which reduces both fruit yield and quality, has been a growing problem in tomatoes over the last five years.

COVID has likely tripled depression rate: BU study
A first-of-its-kind study from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) finds 27.8% of U.S. adults had depression symptoms as of mid-April, compared to 8.5% before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dartmouth-led team engineers new treatment for drug-resistant bacterial infections
A new antibacterial agent that has been engineered by researchers at Dartmouth to essentially hide from the human immune system may treat life-threatening MRSA infections.

Effect of hydrocortisone on death, respiratory support among critically ill COVID-19 patients
The purpose of this randomized clinical trial in France was to evaluate the effect of low-dose hydrocortisone for the treatment of ICU patients with COVID-19-related acute respiratory failure but the trial was stopped early.

Latest version of climate system model shows significant improvements in simulation performance
The simulating performance of the latest climate system model FGOALS-f3-L is evaluated and significant improvements are apparent compared with the previous version.

Electromagnetic chirality: From fundamentals to nontraditional chiroptical phenomena
Theoretical frameworks of chiroptical properties of electromagnetic materials and fields are reviewed.

Origin of a complex life form revealed
Researchers from McGill University have revealed the steps by which two very distinct organisms -- bacteria and carpenter ants -- have come to depend on one another for survival to become a single complex life form.

Globalization is reweaving the web of life
Networks of interactions among species are becoming increasingly similar across ecosystems, according to a global analysis published this week in Nature.

Rapid HIV, HCV testing at drug detoxification centers led to higher test result delivery
With an increase in HIV and HCV infections as a consequence of the ongoing opioid epidemic, Boston Medical Center researchers found that only a small number of those who test positive for those infections at a drug detoxification center followed up for a clinical visit after their test.

Heaviest black hole merger is among three recent gravitational wave discoveries
Scientists observed what appears to be a bulked-up black hole tangling with a more ordinary one.

Researchers identify five types of cat owner
Cat owners fall into five categories in terms of their attitudes to their pets' roaming and hunting, according to a new study.

New method of detecting illnesses including coronavirus and cystic fibrosis
A new and quicker method of diagnosing diseases in patients has been created by researchers.

An unprecedented discovery of cell fusion
Understanding how bacteria interact is critical to solving growing problems such as antibiotic resistance, in which infectious bacteria form defenses to thwart the medicines used to fight them.

How mechanical forces nudge tumors toward malignancy
Researchers studying two forms of skin cancer identified a long-overlooked factor determining why some tumors are more likely to metastasize than others: the physical properties of the tissue in which the cancer originates.

Handgrip strength shown to identify people at high risk of type 2 diabetes
A simple test such as the strength of your handgrip could be used as a quick, low-cost screening tool to help healthcare professionals identify patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.

UIC research discovers links among poor sleep, high blood pressure, gut microbiome
University of Illinois Chicago researchers have found associations among disrupted sleep, elevated blood pressure and changes in the gut microbiome.The research aimed to determine whether a 28-day period of disrupted sleep changed the microbiota in rats.

Great Barrier Reef 'glue' at risk from ocean acidification
Scientists have suspected that increasing ocean acidity would weaken and thin the structures underpinning tropical reefs.

Bus drivers more likely to let white customers ride for free
A new paper in The Economic Journal finds that bus drivers are more likely to let white riders ride for free and less likely to let Black riders ride without paying the fee.

Scientists detect first-of-its-kind 'intermediate-mass' black hole
An international research collaboration including Northwestern University astronomers has witnessed the birth of an ''intermediate-mass'' black hole.

Steroid found to improve survival of critically ill COVID-19 patients
A new international study published today [02 September] has shown that treating critically ill patients with COVID-19 with the steroid hydrocortisone improves their chances of recovery.

Antiretroviral therapy fails to treat one-third of HIV patients in Malawi hospital
Antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure and drug resistance are extremely common in patients living with HIV who are admitted to hospital in Malawi, according to new research published in Lancet HIV.

Risk factors for mortality in diabetic patients discharged from hospital identified
When patients are discharged from Hospital those with diabetes are at an increased risk of readmission and mortality, there are guidelines for discharging patients with diabetes to reduce these risks, however researchers from the Institute of Digital Healthcare at WMG, University of Warwick and Warwick Medical School have identified known risk factors for mortality in adult patients discharged from hospital with diabetes.

COVID-19 and the threat to American voting rights
The COVID-19 pandemic has illuminated three main pathologies of American voting rights.

Studies: E-cigarettes won't help smokers quit, but they may become addicted to vaping
Two UC San Diego School of Medicine-led analyses report that e-cigarettes are not effective in helping adults to quit smoking.

Insights into behavior during chimney tops 2 fire could improve evacuation planning
To understand what motivates people to evacuate during a wildfire, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) surveyed affected residents.

Experimental vaccine that boosts antigen production shows promise against COVID-19
A bioengineering technique to boost production of specific proteins could be the basis of an effective vaccine against the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, new research suggests.

Study details how general anesthetics and 'benzos' act on receptors in the brain
As you drift into unconsciousness before a surgery, general anesthetic drugs flowing through your blood are putting you to sleep by binding mainly to a protein in the brain called the ?-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor.

Protein discovery could improve type 2 diabetes treatment
A world first discovery of how a protein works in the liver could lead to a more effective type 2 diabetes drug.

Ambient light alters refraction in 2D material
Microscopic crystals in tantalum disulfide have a starring role in what could become a hit for 3D displays, virtual reality and even self-driving vehicles.

Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
A better understanding of how gravity waves in the upper atmosphere interact with the jet stream, polar vortex and other phenomena could be key to improved weather predictions and climate models.

Decades-old mystery of lithium-ion battery storage solved
For years, researchers have aimed to learn more about a group of metal oxides that show promise as key materials for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries because of their mysterious ability to store significantly more energy than should be possible.

Photo catalysts show promise in creating self-cleaning surfaces and disinfecting agents
The team produced and studied new active photocatalysts based on natural aluminosilicate nanotubes with cadmium sulfide quantum dots stabilized on their surface synthesized by self-assembly.

Cancer's ongoing evolution
A new algorithmic approach reveals individual tumors continue to evolve and remodel their genomes, and this occurs across a broad range of tumor types.

Why naming neurons can help cure brain disease
A group of 74 scientists proposed the use of single-cell RNA sequencing as the skeleton for a unified classification of cortical neurons.

The widespread footprint of blue jean microfibers
With many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, blue jeans are a more popular wardrobe choice than ever.

Plasmin could be the link between COVID-19 comorbidities and serious illness
Why is the COVID-19 virus more dangerous in people with comorbidities?

Aviation contributes 3.5% to the drivers of climate change that stem from humans
Study analysed the individual components of aviation's impact on climate change, and is unique as it used a new metric introduced by the IPCC in 2013.

Continuous and stable lasing achieved from low-cost perovskites at room temperature
New research from Kyushu University and Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, shows that lasing for over one hour at room temperature can be achieved from low-cost quasi-2D perovskite materials by properly managing losses caused by triplet excitons.

Common drugs tied to increased risk of cognitive decline
A class of drugs used for many conditions, including allergies, colds, high blood pressure and depression, may be associated with an increased risk of developing mild thinking and memory problems, particularly in people who have genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease or markers of this condition, according to a study published in the Sept.

Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients
Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients

Brazilian researcher proposes universal mechanism for ejection of matter by black holes
The process occurs in active-core nuclei. A molecular gas cloud that accumulates in the central region is blown away by radiation from the black hole's accretion disk, forming a huge expanding hot bubble, whose radius can reach 300 light years.

Zooming in on dark matter
Cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe - which could help us to find the real thing in space.

For vulnerable families, the pandemic's effect on mental health is swift and harsh
In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic swiftly and substantially worsened mental health among US hourly service workers and their children -- especially those experiencing multiple hardships, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University and Barnard College.

Examining how common depression symptoms are in adults before, during COVID-19 pandemic
This is a survey study that examines how common depression symptoms are among U.S. adults during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with before the pandemic.

Strong fields and ultrafast motions - how to generate and steer electrons in liquid water
Water molecules undergo ultrafast dithering motions at room temperature and generate extremely strong electric fields in their environment.

New connections reveal how cancer evades the immune system
If cancer is a series of puzzles, a new study pieces together how several of those puzzles connect to form a bigger picture.

Travel site aggregators face challenges when compared to airlines that market directly
If you are a budget-conscious traveler, there is a chance you've used a travel site aggregator like Orbitz to book your air transportation.

Using tattoo ink to find cancer
The humble ink in a tattoo artist's needle could be the key to improving the detection of cancer.

Viruses on glaciers highlight evolutionary mechanism to overcome host defenses
An international team of scientists led by Christopher Bellas from the University of Innsbruck, Austria, studying life on the surface of glaciers in the Arctic and Alps challenge assumptions on virus evolution.

New populations of black holes revealed by gravitational waves
The gravitational wave detectors LIGO and Virgo have just chalked up their biggest catch yet, a black hole 142 times the mass of the Sun, resulting from the merger of two ''lighter'' black holes.

Virus in the blood can predict severe COVID-19
A blood test on hospital admission showing the presence or absence of SARS-CoV-2 can identify patients at a high risk of severe COVID-19.

Effect of hydrocortisone on death, organ support in patients with severe COVID-19
This randomized clinical trial of patients with severe COVID-19 was stopped early after results from another trial were released but this study investigated whether intravenous hydrocortisone (administered either as a seven-day fixed-dose course or restricted to when shock is clinically evident) improved 21-day organ support-free days.

Paper ballots, risk-limiting audits can help defend elections and democracy, study finds
With just over two months before the 2020 election, three professors at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business offer a comprehensive review of how other nations are seeking to protect their democratic institutions and presents how a multifaceted, targeted approach is needed to achieve that goal in the U.S., where intelligence officials have warned that Russia and other rivals are again attempting to undermine our democracy.

Using magnetic resonance elastography to detect epilepsy
A new study from the Beckman Institute used magnetic resonance elastography to compare the hippocampal stiffness in healthy individuals with those who have epilepsy.

Trial clarifies use of blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients
Restricting blood transfusion in anaemic heart attack patients to those with very low haemoglobin levels saves blood with no negative impact on clinical outcomes.

Study finds hospital-diagnosed overweight or obesity linked with markedly higher risk of death over 40 years
Individuals whose overweight or obesity is diagnosed in hospital are 60% more likely to die compared to the general population, according to a nationwide Danish study that followed over 1.9 million people for up to 40 years, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO), held online this year from 1-4 September.

Microbial genetics: A protean pathogen
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is linked to increased risk of stomach cancer, and is genetically highly variable.

Bilingual children may lose less brain matter as they grow up
Children and adolescents who speak more than one language may reach adulthood with better brain structure, according to a new study.

Depression worsens over time for older caregivers of newly diagnosed dementia patients
Caring for a partner or spouse with a new diagnosis of Alzheimer's or related dementia is associated with a 30% increase in depressive symptoms, compared to older adults who don't have a spouse with dementia -- and these symptoms are sustained over time, a new University of Michigan study found.

Even light alcohol consumption linked to higher risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome in study of 27 million adults
Consuming more than half a standard alcoholic drink a day (equivalent to 7g of pure alcohol) is associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome in both men and women, and the risk rises in proportion with alcohol intake, according to a nationwide study involving nearly 27 million adults (aged 20 years and older) from South Korea, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO).

Revolutionary quantum breakthrough paves way for safer online communication
The world is one step closer to having a totally secure internet and an answer to the growing threat of cyber-attacks, thanks to a team of international scientists who have created a unique prototype which could transform how we communicate online.

A molecular approach to quantum computing
Molecules in quantum superposition could help in the development of quantum computers.

These lifestyle choices can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease
Active lifestyle choices such as eating vegetables, exercising and quitting smoking can reduce the risk of chronic kidney disease, a new study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Griffith University in Australia, reports.

Interventions improve bystander CPR, increase out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival
Study by researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School, Duke University and SingHealth finds that dispatch-assisted CPR, training in CPR and use of an Automated External Defibrillator, and a volunteer first responder mobile app, increased the likelihood of laypeople performing CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, which was associated with increased survival rates.

More nutrient reduction still needed to save lakes in China
Chinese people have been paying more and more attention to water safety, especially since the Wuxi 'water crisis' in Lake Taihu in 2007.

Study leads to better understanding of blood pressure regulation, atherosclerosis
A new University of Kentucky College of Medicine study provides insight into how a protein called angiotensinogen contributes to blood pressure regulation and atherosclerosis.

Mammoth collision of `impossible' black holes detected for the first time
The most massive black hole collision ever detected has been directly observed by the LIGO and VIRGO Scientific Collaboration, which includes scientists from The Australian National University (ANU).

Predictive placentas: Using artificial intelligence to protect mothers' future pregnancies
After a baby is born, doctors sometimes examine the placenta for features that indicate health risks in any future pregnancies.

Gut microbiome composition is associated with age and memory performance in pet dogs
Our gut microbiota can crucially influence our behaviour and neurodevelopment.

Novel technology for the selection of single photosynthetic cells
New research, published in the journal Science Advances, demonstrates how microfluidic technologies can be used to identify, isolate and propagate specific single photosynthetically active cells for fundamental industry applications and improved ecosystem understanding.

Researchers find molecular link between liver disease, insulin resistance
Yale researchers have zeroed in on a molecular link between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

Stanford engineers reprogram yeast cells to become microscopic drug factories
Since antiquity, cultures on nearly every continent have discovered that certain plant leaves, when chewed or brewed or rubbed on the body, could relieve diverse ailments, inspire hallucinations or, in higher dosages, even cause death.

Familial incarceration negatively impacts mental health for African American women
More than half of all African American women in the United States report having at least one family member who is incarcerated, causing higher levels of depressive symptoms and psychological distress than previously understood.

Teens who think their parents are loving are less likely to be cyberbullies
Adolescents who perceive their parents to be loving and supportive are less likely to engage in cyberbullying, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

NASA finds new Tropical Storm Nana strengthening in the Caribbean
The storm was a potential tropical depression on Sept. 1, but by Sept.

In a mite-y bit of trouble
Mite extinctions are occurring at least 1,000 times the 'natural' rate - a finding a University of Queensland researcher says is another warning that global biodiversity is in deep trouble.

Partnership leverages evidence-based practices to improve long-term care quality
A study published in the Journal of the Medical Directors Association demonstrated that a partnership between long-term care organizations in two countries working in collaboration with researchers and national health care organizations can generate changes that improve quality of care for residents.

Moffitt researchers identify metastasis driver in BRAF inhibitor resistant melanoma
In a new article published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Moffitt researchers identify erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2) as a driver of metastasis and BRAF-MEK inhibitor resistance in melanoma.

NASA-NOAA satellite tracking Typhoon Maysak's approach to landfall
Typhoon Maysak was moving north through the East China Sea early on Sept.

Climate change could increase rice yields
Research reveals how rice ratooning practices can help Japanese farmers increase rice yields.

Asphalt adds to air pollution, especially on hot, sunny days
Asphalt is a near-ubiquitous substance -- it's found in roads, on roofs and in driveways -- but its chemical emissions rarely figure into urban air quality management plans.

Heavy TV and computer use impacts children's academic results
Grade 3 students who watch more than two hours of TV daily or spend more than one hour a day on a computer experience a decline in academic results two years later, a new study has found.

How do tumor cells divide in the crowd?
Scientists led by Dr. Elisabeth Fischer-Friedrich, group leader at the Excellence Cluster Physics of Life (PoL) and the Biotechnology Center TU Dresden (BIOTEC) studied how cancer cells are able to divide in a crowded tumor tissue and connected it to the hallmark of cancer progression and metastasis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

Plant pathogens reorder physical structures of effectors to escape plant recognition
Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete, or water mold, that causes the devastating potato disease known as late blight or potato blight and was responsible for the famous Irish Famine of the 1840s.

Association between treatment with corticosteroids, risk of death among critically ill patients with COVID-19
The results of seven randomized clinical trials with 1,703 critically ill patients with COVID-19 were combined to estimate the association between administration of corticosteroids compared with usual care or placebo and the risk of death after 28 days.

Genomic analysis of STEC in a child reveals insights on a virulent, emerging fo
University at Buffalo researchers have completed the genomic analysis of an increasingly common strain of Shiga-toxin E. coli (STEC) that can cause severe disease outbreaks.

Researchers identify proteins that prevent COVID-19 transmission through the placenta
Researchers from Boston Medical Center's Maxwell Finland Laboratory for Infectious Diseases have identified properties in placenta tissue that may play an important role in preventing the transmission of COVID-19 from a mother with the virus to her fetus.

Finding cortisone alternatives with fewer side effects
Many people use cortisone of a regular basis. It is used for treating rheumatism, asthma, multiple sclerosis, or even COVID-19.

Alzheimer's burden greater in rural Appalachia, study finds
Alzheimer's disease is more common in rural Appalachian Ohio communities than in other rural areas in the state - raising concerns about access to early, specialized care in a region where many residents face struggles getting the medical care they need, a new study has found.

Pandemic accelerated remote work, a trend likely to remain
The coronavirus pandemic has profoundly changed workplaces and the nature of work itself, according to a new article published by an international panel of management experts, including Michael Wilmot, assistant professor in the Sam M.

Investigational ALS drug generates promising clinical trial results
An experimental medication slows the progression of ALS

Editors' Choice in Science: an unusual superconductor
Professor Wang Jian at Peking University and collaborators observed the experimental evidence of anomalous metallic state and detected type-II Ising superconductivity existing in centrosymmetric systems.

Gene therapy: Novel targets come into view
Retinitis pigmentosa is the most prevalent form of congenital blindness.

COVID-19 sparks 12-fold increase in remote delivery of mental health care across the US
The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred a remarkable number of psychologists across the United States to shift to delivering mental health care to patients remotely, according to a national study led by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Has Earth's oxygen rusted the Moon for billions of years?
To the surprise of many planetary scientists, the oxidized iron mineral hematite has been discovered at high latitudes on the Moon, according to a study led by University of Hawaii researchers.

MSK study links inflammation to Alzheimer's disease development
Scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute have discovered a direct link between the immune response to viruses and bacteria and the development of plaques in the brain that characterize Alzheimer's disease.

After Medicaid expansion, 'unmet need' for joint replacement surgery
States that have expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act have seen an 'early surge in demand' for hip and knee replacement surgery, reports a study in the September 2, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

GSA publishes 9 articles on COVID-19 and aging; Ageism webinar for health care professionals
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access.

Guilt by dissociation: Study sheds light on serotonin in autism
A study on serotonin, a mood-regulating molecule in the brain that regulates many brain synapses, is helping to unravel the puzzle surrounding its role in autism.

Circadian rhythms help guide waste from brain
New research details how the complex set of molecular and fluid dynamics that comprise the glymphatic system - the brain's unique process of waste removal - are synchronized with the master internal clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle.

Kidney problems as a young adult may affect thinking skills in midlife
If you have moderate-to-high risk of kidney failure as a young adult, you may be at risk for worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a study published in the Sept.

Excitable cells
A study led by researchers from Tasmania, Chile and Germany has furthered our understanding of plant evolution by tracking the origins of electrical signalling components that plants developed to communicate and adapt to life on land.

A 'bang' in LIGO and Virgo detectors signals most massive gravitational-wave source yet
Researchers have detected a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves.

PLOS Special Collection launch: Populations HRSA serves
On September 2 2020, the open-access journals PLOS ONE & PLOS Medicine launched a Special Collection of manuscripts centered around the healthcare provided by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the primary U.S. federal agency for improving healthcare in underserved or vulnerable populations.

'No, you go first'
New research into highly social yet invasive house sparrows reveals that they can learn from each other and adapt their behavior.

Political ads have little persuasive power
Every four years, US presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads.

Study examines the benefits of virtual stroke rehabilitation programs
While virtual medical and rehabilitation appointments seemed novel when COVID-19 first appeared, they now seem to be part of the new norm and might be paving the way to the future.

An unexpected origin story for a lopsided black hole merger
A lopsided merger of two black holes may have an oddball origin story, according to a new study by researchers at MIT and elsewhere.

Attacking tumors directly on identification
The combination of a biomolecule and a metal complex can target, bind, mark and damage cancer cells.

A new way of modulating color emissions from transparent films
Transparent luminescent materials have several applications; but so far, few multicolor light-emitting solid transparent materials exist in which the color of emission is tunable.

Parasitic plants attack crops when defending themselves from microbes
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have discovered a link between defensive responses in plants and the beautiful but devastating crop parasite witchweed.

Bering Sea ice extent is at most reduced state in last 5,500 years 
Through the analysis of vegetation from a Bering Sea island, researchers have determined that the extent of sea ice in the region is lower than it's been for thousands of years.

COVID-19 impact survey yields unexpected findings for individuals with progressive MS
Dr. Chiaravalloti: 'People with progressive MS appeared to have adapted more effectively to the lockdown conditions.

How your BMI might affect your spontaneous food purchases
The degree to which spontaneous food purchases divert/attract attention may be related to your weight and the energy density of the food, according to a small, preliminary study using mobile eye-tracking technology to provide real information about consumers' food choice behaviour.

Long sick leave after low-grade brain tumor
One year after the diagnosis of low-grade malignant brain tumor, a University of Gothenburg study shows, just under three people in ten were in full-time employment.

Corticosteroids improve survival in critically ill COVID-19 patients
In a tremendous demonstration of global collaboration, clinician-scientists have pooled data from 121 hospitals in eight countries to find that inexpensive, widely available steroids improve the odds that very sick COVID-19 patients will survive the illness.

NASA analyzes typhoon Haishen's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on recently developed Typhoon Haishen and found powerful storms in two locations.

Climate change could deliver more sediment and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta
Climate change could deliver more silt, sand and pollution to the San Francisco Bay-Delta, along with a mix of other potential consequences and benefits, according to a new study in the AGU journal Water Resources Research.

Viruses could be harder to kill after adapting to warm environments
Enteroviruses and other pathogenic viruses that make their way into surface waters can be inactivated by heat, sunshine and other microbes, thereby reducing their ability to spread disease.

Subtypes and developmental pathways of innate T cells identified
Study finds T cells differentiate into memory cells before meeting antigens - a clue to developing new immunotherapy

New anode material could lead to safer fast-charging batteries
Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles.

Biological control agents can protect soybeans from Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS)
Recently, Mirian Pimentel, a PhD student, and a group of plant pathologists at Southern Illinois University, discovered a promising new tool to fight sudden death syndrome (SDS).

Televised political campaign ads with different features have similarly small effects on voters
New research suggests that the effect of any individual televised political ad on how much a subject favors a candidate and who they plan to vote for is relatively minor.

Combining PCR and antibody tests at point of care dramatically increases COVID-19 detection
A Cambridge hospital has piloted the use of combined rapid point-of-care nucleic acid and antibody testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection after researchers at the University of Cambridge showed that this approach was superior to virus detection alone for diagnosing COVID-19 disease.

Toxicity of dorsal root ganglia is widely associated with CNS AAV gene therapy
A meta-analysis of non-human primate (NHP) studies showed that adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy often caused dorsal root ganglion (DRG) pathology.

A disk of gas would explain mysterious light changes observed in Sagittarius constellation
The enigmatic variations of light in a binary system, located in Sagittarius constellation, could be explained by the presence of a variable gas disk around a hot star that revolves around a cooler star.

Many forests scorched by wildfire won't bounce back
A study of 22 burned areas across the Southern Rocky Mountains found that forests are becoming less resilient to fire, with some converting to grasslands after burning.

Common species mirror rare animals' response to global change
A study of more than 2,000 species reveals animal populations around the world - from the very common to endangered species - are going up and down as global change alters land, sea and freshwater ecosystems.

Regional variations in freshwater overconsumption
Freshwater -- which falls to the earth as precipitation or exists beneath the surface as groundwater -- is desperately needed to sustain people, plants and animals.

Significantly more Danes infected with campylobacter in 2019
In 2019, the number of registered campylobacter infections increased by almost a fifth and studies show that many of the campylobacter outbreaks recorded that year were caused by chicken meat.

Overlap between immunology of COVID-19 and obesity could explain the increased risk of death in people living with obesity, and also older patients
Data presented in a special COVID-19 session at the European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020) suggests that there are overlaps between the immunological disturbances found in both COVID-19 disease and patients with obesity, which could explain the increased disease severity and mortality risk faced by obese patients, and also elderly patients, who are infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 disease.
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