Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 04, 2020
The genetics of blood: A global perspective
To better understand the properties of blood cells, an international team led by UdeM's Guillaume Lettre has been examining variations in the DNA of 746,667 people worldwide.

Quantum algorithm proposed to solve Dyck language problems
In the paper, Khadiev and his colleagues demonstrated an algorithm that can solve the problem in 40 seconds and also proved that it cannot be solved in less than 10 second on a quantum computer.

FSU researchers track nutrient transport in the Gulf of Mexico
Florida State University researchers found no evidence that nitrate from the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River System is mixing across the Northern Gulf shelf into the open waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

New weight-loss hope for those with highest obesity risk: Underserved, low-income patients
Low-income Louisiana patients enrolled in a tailored obesity intervention program lost much more weight than counterparts receiving usual care.

Factors that raise the risk of mortality among children with several acute malnutrition
#AJCN review identifies independent predictors of inpatient mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition: HIV infection, diarrhea, pneumonia, shock, lack of appetite, and low weight-to-height ratio.

New peer reviews of COVID-19 preprints from the MIT Press journal RAPID REVIEWS COVID-19
Peer reviewers highlight promising research on increased risk for severe complications from COVID-19 in post-menopausal women; improved prognostic scoring for hospital admissions; and a new therapeutic approach that could lead to more effective treatments.

NASA satellite finds Haishen now a super typhoon
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Philippine Sea on Sept.

The case of ibuprofen: evidence of huge impact of COVID-19 misinformation when coming from credible sources
Researchers analysed the digital life of fake news about the adverse effects of ibuprofen in coronavirus patients, driven by a tweet posted by a French minister

Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen.

The Lancet: Preliminary results from Russian trials of vaccine candidates reported
Preliminary results from Russian trials find that vaccine candidates led to no serious adverse events and elicit antibody response

Plant protein discovery could reduce need for fertilizer
Researchers have discovered how a protein in plant roots controls the uptake of minerals and water, a finding which could improve the tolerance of agricultural crops to climate change and reduce the need for chemical fertilisers.

The Lancet: Preliminary results from Russian trials find that vaccine candidates led to no serious adverse events and elicit antibody response
Results from two early-phase Russian non-randomised vaccine trials (Sputnik V) in a total of 76 people are published today in The Lancet, finding that two formulations of a two-part vaccine have a good safety profile with no serious adverse events detected over 42 days, and induce antibody responses in all participants within 21 days.

Common class of drugs linked to increased risk of Alzheimer's disease
UC San Diego researchers report that a class of drugs used for a broad array of conditions, from allergies and colds to hypertension and urinary incontinence, may be associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline, particularly in older adults at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease.

New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record
Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team.

Fatty acid receptor involved in temperature-induced sex reversal of Japanese medaka fish
A research collaboration based at Kumamoto University (Japan) has found that activation of PPARα, a fatty acid receptor that detects fatty acids in cells and regulates physiological functions, causes Japanese rice fish (medaka) to become male.

How screen time and green time may affect youth psychological outcomes
Less screen time and more green time are associated with better psychological outcomes among children and adolescents, according to a study published September 4 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tassia Oswald of the University of Adelaide, and colleagues.

Researchers identify nanobody that may prevent COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a small neutralizing antibody, a so-called nanobody, that has the capacity to block SARS-CoV-2 from entering human cells.

Autophagy: the beginning of the end
Autophagy, from the Greek for 'self-eating', is an essential process that isolates and recycles cellular components under conditions of stress or when resources are limited.

NASA's Aqua Satellite finds wind shear not letting up on Omar  
Tropical Depression Omar is one stubborn storm. Since it developed early in the week, it was being affected by wind shear.

Researchers find unexpected electrical current that could stabilize fusion reactions
PPPL scientists have found that electrical currents can form in ways not known before.

Japan's geologic history in question after discovery of metamorphic rock microdiamonds
A collaboration of researchers based in Kumamoto University, Japan have discovered microdiamonds in the Nishisonogi metamorphic rock formation in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan.

Unconventional T cells in severe COVID-19 patients could predict disease outcome
Researchers in France have discovered that patients suffering from severe COVID-19 show changes in a class of immune cells known as unconventional T cells.

Painting with light: Novel nanopillars precisely control intensity of transmitted light
By shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of tiny titanium dioxide pillars, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their collaborators have reproduced with astonishing fidelity the luminous hues and subtle shadings of 'Girl With a Pearl Earring.'

Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides - long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago - an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand.

Scientists propose nano-confinement strategy to form sub-nanometer reactors
Prof. LIU Jian from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and his collaborators proposed a nano-confinement strategy to host multiple Fe and Cu single atoms inside the extremely narrow yet regular surface cavities of graphitic carbon nitride to form 'sub-nanometer reactors'.

Squaring the circle -- Breaking the symmetry of a sphere to control the polarization of light
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech, Japan) and Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO, Spain) develop a method to generate circularly polarized light from the ultimate symmetrical structure: the sphere.

Running on fumes
A hospitalist charts his emotional journey in this narrative essay from when once brightly colored signs declared hospital workers as heroes to now when the signs have faded and the steady and intense work of helping patients with COVID-19 has seemingly become mundane.

Ocean carbon uptake widely underestimated
The world's oceans soak up more carbon than most scientific models suggest, according to new research.

Intelligent software for district renewable energy management
CSEM has developed Maestro, an intelligent software application that can manage and schedule the production and use of renewable energies for an entire neighborhood.

SUTD develops intelligent model simulator that maps complex phenomena of memristor memory
Memristor memory technology is one of the most promising candidates for next generation edge computing.

Researchers study why neural networks are efficient in their predictions
A study has tested the predictions of a neural network to check whether they coincide with actual results.

Misaligned planet-forming rings around triple young stars
An international team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) found a peculiar dust ring system around the young triple star GW Orionis.

Psychological abuse: obstetric care must delve deeper
As domestic violence skyrockets amid COVID-19, women's health experts are calling for compulsory training of obstetric health practitioners to ensure they can recognise the signs of coercive control for women in their care.

Relief for people who struggle with CPAP masks
A trial of a simple yet effective surgery has led Australian experts to promote it as an option to specialists around the world for managing difficult obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) cases.

Chemistry's Feng Lin Lab is splitting water molecules for a renewable energy future
Feng Lin, an assistant professor of chemistry in the Virginia Tech College of Science, is focusing on energy storage and conversion research.

Electric current is manipulated by light in an organic superconductor
A polarized petahertz current is driven by an ultrashort laser in an organic superconductor.

Key priorities for transplant and living donor advocacy during COVID-1
Researchers describe ways to achieve optimal patient advocacy for kidney recipients and donors during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Study: Why people with knee osteoarthritis experience different kinds of pain
People with more pain sensitization were more likely to suffer from constant and unpredictable pain, rather than just intermittent pain.

Nanoearthquakes control spin centers in SiC
Researchers from the Paul-Drude-Institut in Berlin, the Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden and the Ioffe Institute in St.

Identification and treatment key in responding to COVID-19 health anxiety in children
Psychologists from the University of Bath have published advice for practitioners on responding to health anxieties among children and young people resulting from COVID-19.

A chemist from RUDN developed a green catalyst for pharmaceutical and industrial chemistry
Many production facilities (e.g. plastic manufacturers, pharma companies, and others) use nanocatalysts that contain palladium--an expensive component that is not sustainably produced.

Unraveling the secrets of Tennessee whiskey
More than a century has passed since the last scientific analyses of the famed 'Lincoln County [Tennessee] process' was published, but the secrets of the famous Tennessee whiskey flavor are starting to unravel at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture.

Inequality of opportunity drags down everyone's motivation
Unequal compensation reduces people's motivation to work, even among those who stand to benefit from unfair advantages, finds a new UCL-led study published in PLOS One.

Red hot meat: the wrong recipe for heart disease
From MasterChef to MKR, the world's best chefs have taught us how to barbeque, grill and panfry a steak to perfection.

'Floppy' atomic dynamics help turn heat into electricity
Materials scientists at Duke University have uncovered an atomic mechanism that makes certain thermoelectric materials such as iron sulfide incredibly efficient near high-temperature phase transitions.

More power to you: A novel betavoltaic technology with dyes for better energy production
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have found a way to improve the efficiency of betavoltaic devices, a type of power source that uses an internal radioactive material.

Does the COVID-19 cytokine storm exist?
Cytokines play a crucial role in the immune response. If this immune response is too strong, also known as ''cytokine storm'', it can cause harm to the patient.

Apps and social distancing: Why we accept corona rules - or not
Study in psychology explores which factors are related to our motivation to use corona apps and to perform social distancing.

Common cold combats influenza
As the flu season approaches, a strained public health system may have a surprising ally -- the common cold virus.

Surprise on Mars
NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars.

Deep underground forces explain quakes on San Andreas Fault
Rock-melting forces occurring much deeper in the Earth than previously understood drive tremors along a segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, Calif., new USC research shows.

Scientists predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds
Scientists have predicted new hard and superhard ternary compounds in the tungsten-molybdenum-boron system using computational methods.

Cell-autonomous immunity and the pathogen-mediated evolution of humans
Although immune responses are generated by a complex, hierarchical arrangement of immune system organs, tissues, and components, the unit of the cell has a particularly large effect on disease progression and host survival.

Uncovering the genetics behind heart attacks that surprise young, healthy women
New genetic research finds spontaneous coronary artery dissection, or SCAD, heart attacks may be more similar to different diseases than to other heart attacks.

Post-COVID syndrome severely damages children's hearts
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) appears even after asymptomatic cases of COVID-19, a case review confirms, and in some children damages the heart to the extent that the children will need long-term monitoring and interventions.

Repulsion mechanism between neurons governs fly brain structure
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the discovery that in the developing fly brain, neurons stemming from the same parent cell experience repulsion.

Offspring of mice fed imbalanced diets shown to be neurologically 'programmed' for obesity
Pregnant mice fed diets high in omega-6 fats and low in omega-3 fats are shown in a new study to produce offspring whose brains had a higher level of dopamine-producing neurons--the neurological reward system.

Striving and stumbling towards sustainability amongst pandas and people
Understanding how achieving one of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals spins off more SDG success -- or sabotages progress on another goal across spatial and administrative boundaries.

Air pollution renders flower odors unattractive to moths
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and the University of Virginia, USA, showed that tobacco hawkmoths lost attraction to the scent of their preferred flowers when that scent had been altered by ozone.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.