Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 08, 2020
Study finds surprisingly little difference in hospitalization rates between children with COVID-19
As the fall approaches, pediatric hospitals will start seeing children with seasonal influenza A and B.

Association of mobile phone location data indications of travel, stay-at-home mandates with COVID-19 infection rates in US
Anonymous mobile phone location data were used to examine travel and home dwelling time patterns before and after enactment of stay-at-home orders in US states to examine associations between changes in mobility and the COVID-19 curve.

Russia's regions and their preferences for strong alcohol
HSE University economists analyzed two data sets for Russian regions in 2010-2016: the official statistics of the Russian Statistics Agency on alcohol sales and estimates of unregistered alcohol consumption modeled by the study's authors relying on the Ministry of Health's own methodology.

UBC scientists find clues to queen bee failure
Scientists at UBC are unravelling the mysteries behind a persistent problem in commercial beekeeping that is one of the leading causes of colony mortality--queen bee failure.

Glasgow Coma Scale: A simple tool to use when verbal component scores are missing
The authors created a simple and practical tool for use in assessing impaired consciousness in the clinical setting when the verbal component of the Glasgow Coma Scale is missing.

Proximity of mass shootings to schools, places frequented by children
This study examined the location of mass shootings (four or more people injured or killed by a firearm) last year relative to schools and other places frequented by children.

In Brazil, homicides are decreasing in big cities, increasing in smaller towns: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study maps changes in homicide rates across Brazil from 2000 through 2014.

Cashing in on marine byproducts
As exploitation of wild fisheries and marine environments threaten food supplies, Flinders University scientists are finding sustainable new ways to convert biowaste, algal biomass and even beached seaweed into valuable dietary proteins and other products.

Researchers make tiny, yet complex fiber optic force sensor
Researchers have developed a tiny fiber optic force sensor that can measure extremely slight forces exerted by small objects.

Chemotherapy drug more effective when combined with microbubbles
Hepatocellular carcinoma is usually treated by blocking the flow of blood to the tumor to induce cancer cell death, but the common treatment, transarterial chemoembolization, is invasive and too imprecise to be a local drug delivery method.

Study highlights possible causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer deaths
New research provides insights on the potential causes of racial disparities in deaths following prostate cancer surgery.

Lightweight green supercapacitors could charge devices in a jiffy
In a new study, researchers at Texas A&M University have described their novel plant-based energy storage device that could charge even electric cars within a few minutes in the near future.

Older women with type 2 diabetes have different patterns of blood use in their brains
A University of Houston researcher is reporting that the brains of older women with Type 2 diabetes do not use as much oxygenated blood as those who don't have the disease.

Small study shows convalescent plasma is safe to use in pediatric patients with COVID-19
Early findings from researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) show that convalescent plasma appears to be a safe and possibly effective treatment for children with life-threatening cases of COVID-19.

A new method for directed networks could help multiple levels of science
In the paper, 'How directed is a directed network?', published today, the 9th September in the journal Royal Society Open Science, researchers from the University of Warwick and the University of Birmingham reveal a new method for analysing hierarchies in complex networks and illustrate it by applications to economics, language and gene expression.

Gut microbes could allow space travelers to stay healthy on long voyages
Space travel is associated with a variety of negative health effects, including bone loss and mental health issues, which could limit our ability to undertake long-distance space missions, such as a mission to Mars.

Brain stimulation reduces dyslexia deficits
Restoring normal patterns of rhythmic neural activity through non-invasive electrical stimulation of the brain alleviates sound-processing deficits and improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published September 8, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Silvia Marchesotti and Anne-Lise Giraud of the University of Geneva, and colleagues.

Quantum light squeezes the noise out of microscopy signals
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used quantum optics to advance state-of-the-art microscopy and illuminate a path to detecting material properties with greater sensitivity than is possible with traditional tools.

Delayed immune responses may drive COVID-19 mortality rates among men and the elderly
COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) infections tend to be more severe among older adults and males, yet the mechanisms underlying increased mortality in these two demographics are unknown.

Method to derive blood vessel cells from skin cells suggests ways to slow aging
Salk scientists have used skin cells called fibroblasts from young and old patients to successfully create blood vessels cells that retain their molecular markers of age.

Boundaries no barrier for thermoelectricity
Rice University researchers show how thermoelectricity hurdles some defects, but not others, in gold nanowires.

More than just genetic code
Researchers discover how messenger RNAs transport information to where photosynthesis takes place.

New role of arginine metabolism in plant morphogenesis identified
A research team led by ExCELLS/NIBB found that arginine metabolism has a vital role in regulating gametophore shoot formation in the moss Physcomitrium patens.

Recharging N95 masks for continued usage
N95 masks achieve 95% efficiency at filtering out 0.3-micron particles, while maintaining reasonable breathability, thanks to a layer of polypropylene fibers incorporating electrical charges to attract particles.

New insights into why people with down syndrome are at higher risk for leukemia
Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H.

NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP captures fires and aerosols across America
On Sep. 07, 2020, NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite provided two different views of how fires are affecting the US.

New process boosts lignin bio-oil as a next-generation fuel
A new low-temperature multi-phase process for upgrading lignin bio-oil to hydrocarbons could help expand use of the lignin, which is now largely a waste product left over from the productions of cellulose and bioethanol from trees and other woody plants.

Trees living fast die young
A global analysis reveals for the first time that across almost all tree species, fast growing trees have shorter lifespans.

Bio-based resin invented by Lithuanian researchers: A breakthrough in rapid prototyping
Lithuanian researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Vilnius University synthesised and tested a bio-based resin for optical 3D printing (O3DP).

A spillover effect: Medicaid expansion leads to healthier dietary choices
Besides providing health care to millions, the Medicaid program helps recipients make healthier food choices, according to work UConn research recently published in the journal Health Economics.

Amid fire and flood, Americans are looking for action
A new survey reveals how Americans feel about adaptation and prevention policies to combat wildfires and floods in the face of climate change.

Meteorites show transport of material in early solar system
New studies of a rare type of meteorite show that material from close to the Sun reached the outer solar system even as the planet Jupiter cleared a gap in the disk of dust and gas from which the planets formed.

Temporal-spatial order property of hollow multishelled structures enables sequential drug release
A recent research led by Prof. WANG Dan and Prof.

NASA-NOAA satellite sees new Tropical Storm Rene drenching Cabo Verde islands
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the latest tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic hurricane season.

NSAIDs not associated with more severe coronavirus disease, study finds
The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen and diclofenac, is not associated with any adverse effects in people who have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a new study published September 8 in PLOS Medicine by Anton Pottegård of the University of Southern Denmark and colleagues from Aarhus University Hospital and the Danish Medicines Agency.

Climate change will decimate Palm Springs, Coachella Valley tourism
A new UC Riverside study finds that climate change will have a devastating effect on the greater Palm Springs area's dominant industry -- tourism.

Study highlights ties between racism and activism in black youth
A new study finds that experiences with racism are associated with increased social consciousness and social justice activism in Black youth.

Lost frogs rediscovered with environmental DNA
Scientists have detected signs of a frog listed extinct and not seen since 1968, using an innovative technique to locate declining and missing species in two regions of Brazil.

New insights into evolution of gene expression
The long-term expression of genes in vertebrate organs predisposes these genes to be subsequently utilized in other organs during evolution.

Opioid prescriptions for knee surgery vary widely from state to state
New research from Texas A&M University and the University of Pennsylvania on opioid prescribing practices across the country after outpatient knee surgeries found that prescription strength and number of tablets is prescribed highest in Oklahoma and lowest in Vermont.

Innovative, minimally invasive treatment can help maintain prostate cancer patients' quality of life
Focal HIFU ablation is an effective treatment for prostate cancer while maintaining continence and sexual function, as well as improving recovery time.

Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study from researchers at Penn Medicine and Mayo Clinic.

Linking calorie restriction, body temperature and healthspan
Cutting calories significantly may not be an easy task for most, but it's tied to a host of health benefits ranging from longer lifespan to a much lower chance of developing cancer, heart disease, diabetes and neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's.

Romantic partners influence each other's goals
Over the long-term, what one partner in a two-person relationship wishes to avoid, so too does the other partner -- and what one wants to achieve, so does the other.

Cellular-level interactions that lead to the cytokine storm in COVID-19
Scientists review macrophage activation syndrome -- a feature of the cytokine storm that kills patients with severe cases of COVID-19, as well as possible treatments.

High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer: First US study shows promising outcomes
High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) - a technology used to treat localized prostate cancer - has shown adequate control of prostate cancer while avoiding major side effects of surgery or radiation therapy, according to a new study in the Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Comparison of clinical features of COVID-19 vs seasonal influenza in US children
Clinical features of COVID-19 are compared in this observational study with those of influenza A and B in U.S. children.

'One size fits all' medication approach doesn't work in pregnancy
New research led by the University of South Australia shows that a blanket approach to prescribing medication during pregnancy may put low birth weight babies at risk for the rest of their lives.

How birth control, girls' education can slow population growth
Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends.

Oncotarget: GATA3 and APOBEC3B are prognostic markers in adrenocortical carcinoma
The cover for issue 36 of Oncotarget features Figure 7, 'Knockdown of APOBEC3B is associated with a lower tumor growth in an adrenocortical carcinoma xenograft mouse model,' by Gara, et al. which reported that the role of APOBEC3B in adrenocortical carcinoma and the mechanisms through which its expression is regulated in cancer are not fully understood.

Study underscores value of down syndrome clinic to you program
A new software program effectively brings the expertise of Massachusetts General Hospital specialists to many more patients with Down syndrome.

Peel-apart surfaces drive transistors to the ledge
Surfaces featuring atomic-scale ledges and steps can act as reusable templates for producing nanoelectronic components.

Betrayal or cooperation? Analytical investigation of behavior drivers
At the macroscopic level, there are numerous examples of people cooperating to form groupings.

The Art of War: how bacteria gather intel for guiding their CRISPR-Cas systems
Researchers from the Severinov Lab at Skoltech have looked at how a poorly studied type of CRISPR-Cas defense system from a bacterium living at extremely high temperature gets to know its enemy by selecting snippets of bacteriophage's genetic information for a genetic 'database' it uses to ward off subsequent infections.

Some children at higher risk of privacy violations from digital apps
While federal privacy laws prohibit digital platforms from storing and sharing children's personal information, those rules aren't always enforced, researchers find.

Lockdown did not reduce "most harmful" type of air pollution in Scotland
The significant reduction in vehicle journeys during the COVID-19 lockdown did not reduce the level of toxic fine particles in Scotland's air, according to experts at the University of Stirling.

Study pinpoints process that might have led to first organic molecules
New research led by the American Museum of Natural History and funded by NASA identifies a process that might have been key in producing the first organic molecules on Earth about 4 billion years ago, before the origin of life.

New glove-like device mimics sense of touch
UNSW engineers have invented a soft wearable device which simulates the sense of touch and has wide potential for medical, industrial and entertainment applications.

Terahertz receiver for 6G wireless communications
Future wireless networks of the 6th generation (6G) will consist of a multitude of small radio cells that need to be connected by broadband communication links.

Physicists achieve tunable spin wave excitation
Physicists have demonstrated new methods for controlling spin waves in nanostructured bismuth iron garnet films via short laser pulses.

Medicaid expansion improved insurance stability for low-income pregnant women
Medicaid expansion improved the stability of insurance coverage for low-income women in the months leading up to and right after their baby's birth.

NASA-NOAA satellite tracking record-breaking Tropical Storm Paulette
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Paulette as it tracked through the Central North Atlantic Ocean on Sept.

Thermal imaging enhances engineers' understanding of breast tumors
New research performed at The University of Texas at Dallas and published June 22 in Nature Research's Scientific Reports takes a critical step toward making digital infrared thermal imaging more useful for monitoring breast cancer.

Suicide on screen: Getting the message right can support better mental health outcomes
In a new paper, University of South Australia researchers have confirmed that portrayals of suicide in moving-image fiction and non-fiction media, such as television and web series, films, and documentaries, has the potential to increase suicidal ideation and behaviour.

California offshore winds show promise as power source
One of the challenges of moving toward fully renewable energy in California by 2045 is matching production to demand.

Glial cells play an active role in the nervous system
Researchers at Münster University, Germany, have discovered that glial cells - one of the main components of the brain -not only control the speed of nerve conduction, but also influence the precision of signal transduction in the brain.

New nanosystem from Tel Aviv university enhances treatment for melanoma in animal models
Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro of TAU's Department of Physiology and Pharmacology at the Sackler School of Medicine, have developed an innovative nanotechnological drug delivery system that significantly enhances the effectiveness of treatment for the aggressive skin cancer melanoma.

Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms.

UCF researchers are developing models to predict storm surges
Storm surges sometimes can increase coastal sea levels 10 feet or more, jeopardizing communities and businesses along the water, but new research from the University of Central Florida shows there may be a way to predict periods when it's more likely that such events occur.

Protein causes mutations that lead to breast cancer cell aggression
In her previous research, University of Alberta biochemist Ing Swie Goping identified that the protein, BCL-2 interacting killer (BIK), was associated with relapses in breast cancer patients.

New fossil ape is discovered in India
A 13-million-year-old fossil unearthed in northern India comes from a newly discovered ape, the earliest known ancestor of the modern-day gibbon.

Insomnia identified as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes in new study which also confirms many other risk and protective factors
A new 'global atlas' study published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) is the first to identify insomnia as a risk factor associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Polycythaemia vera: Determination of individual DNA variants allows for more effective treatment
Polycythaemia vera is a chronic malignant disease of the haematopoietic system and is treated with interferon-alpha-based drugs, in most cases with long-lasting success.

New subspecies of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly found in the Arctic Circle of Yakutia
An isolated population of the rarest Palaearctic butterfly species: the Arctic Apollo (Parnassius arcticus), turned out to be a new to science subspecies with distinct looks as well as DNA.

A new method may make tomatoes safer to eat
When vegetable farmers harvest crops, they often rely on postharvest washing to reduce any foodborne pathogens, but a new University of Georgia study shows promise in reducing these pathogens - as well as lowering labor costs-- by applying sanitizers to produce while it is still in the fields.

People with anorexia and body dysmorphic disorder show brain similarities, differences
A new UCLA study shows partially overlapping patterns of brain function in people with anorexia nervosa and those with body dysmorphic disorder, a related psychiatric condition characterized by misperception that particular physical characteristics are defective.

Ghrelin may be an effective treatment for age-related muscle loss
The hormone, ghrelin, may help protect the elderly population from muscle loss, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020.

Lineshape-tailoring of coupled plasmonic systems based on first principle
Coupled photonic systems attract intensive attentions, but available theories either cannot reveal the underlying physics or are empirical in nature.

Data collection, sharing practices of apps played by young children
Researchers investigated data collection and sharing practices of mobile apps played by preschool-age children and the associated sociodemographic characteristics of the children.

Elevated clotting factor V levels linked to worse outcomes in severe COVID-19 infections
ICU patients on ventilators who had abnormally high factor V activity were at higher risk for blood clots, and when factor V was lower, the risk for death was increased.

California's creek fire creates its own pyrocumulonimbus cloud
On Friday September 4, 2020 at about 6:44 PM PDT the Creek Fire began in the Big Creek drainage area between Shaver Lake, Big Creek and Huntington Lake, Calif.

Through enzyme testing, researchers sharpen CRISPR gene-editing tool
One of the biggest scientific advances of the last decade is getting better thanks to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin; the University of California, Berkeley; and Korea University.

CEOs with uncommon names tend to implement unconventional strategies
If you're looking for an unconventional approach to doing business, select a CEO with an uncommon name, according to new research co-authored by an expert at Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business.

OHSU discovers cell in zebrafish critical to brain assembly, function
New research from Oregon Health & Science University for the first time documents the presence of astrocytes in zebrafish, a milestone that will open new avenues of research into a star-shaped type of glial cell in the brain that is critical for nearly every aspect of brain assembly and function.

Scientists probe the chemistry of a single battery electrode particle both inside and out
Cracks and chemical reactions on a battery particle's surface can degrade performance, and the particle's ability to absorb and release lithium ions also changes over time.

The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
A new study reports the oldest mitochondrial genome of a Neanderthal from Central-Eastern Europe.

As information flows through brain's heirarchy, higher regions use higher frequency waves
New study by MIT neuroscientists also finds specific frequency bands associated with encoding, or inhibiting encoding, of sensory information across the cortex.

Deep channels link ocean to Antarctic glacier
Newly discovered deep seabed channels beneath Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica may be the pathway for warm ocean water to melt the underside of the ice.

Cascades with carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is not just an undesirable greenhouse gas, it is also an interesting source of raw materials that are valuable and can be recycled sustainably.

US aid restrictions reduce delivery of key health services for PEPFAR beneficiaries
In 2017, the Trump administration reinstated and expanded the Mexico City Policy, officially titled Protecting Life In Global Health Assistance.

Gun owner perceptions about firearm dangers suggest opportunities for improving gun safety
There is significant disconnect among gun owners about perceived and actual firearm dangers.

Scientists have discovered an environmentally friendly way to transform silicon into nanoparticles
Scientists have developed a new method of silicon recycling. The majority of solar panels that are produced in ever-increasing quantities use silicon.

COVID-stress may be hard to beat even with exercise
In a study of twins, people who reported increasing their physical activity after the start of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those whose activity levels stayed the same.

Research unravels what makes memories so detailed and enduring
In years to come, our personal memories of the COVID-19 pandemic are likely to be etched in our minds with precision and clarity, distinct from other memories of 2020.

A pain reliever that alters perceptions of risk
While acetaminophen is helping you deal with your headache, it may also be making you more willing to take risks, a new study suggests.

Health system clinicians perform better under medicare value-based reimbursement
A team of researchers led by Kenton Johnston, Ph.D. of Saint Louis University's College for Public Health and Social Justice conducted a study investigating the association between health system affiliations of clinicians and their performance scores and payments under Medicare value-based reimbursement.

Benefits likely outweigh costs for national monuments in the American west
New peer-reviewed research describes the history of the 1906 Antiquities Act (used to create national monuments), the controversies that have swirled around monument designation, and findings in the peer-reviewed literature about their impacts on surrounding communities.

Brain's immune cells promising cellular target for therapeutics
Inspired by the need for new and better therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, researchers are exploring the link between uncontrolled inflammation within the brain and the brain's immune cells, known as microglia, which are emerging as a promising cellular target because of the prominent role they play in brain inflammation.

Plant Science Research Network releases decadal vision 2020-2030
Plant science research has tremendous potential to address pressing global issues including climate change, food insecurity and sustainability.

Firearm ownership among LGBT adults
Nearly 16% of LGBT adults in California own a gun or live in a household with a gun

New research in JNCCN sheds light on multi-organ adverse events from immunotherapy
New international research in the September 2020 issue of JNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds immunotherapy-related adverse events (irAEs) can impact more than one organ in a single patient.

Cholesterol's effects on cellular membranes
The findings have far-reaching implications in the general understanding of disease, the design of drug delivery methods, and many other biological applications that require specific assumptions about the role of cholesterol in cell membranes.

Tool transforms world landmark photos into 4D experiences
Using publicly available tourist photos of world landmarks such as the Trevi Fountain in Rome or Top of the Rock in New York City, Cornell University researchers have developed a method to create maneuverable 3D images that show changes in appearance over time.

Star-cells "shine" to make sense of touch
The IBS research group reports a rather surprise finding as to how GABA works to control the tactile sense.

COVID-19 deaths among black essential workers linked to racial disparities
Racial disparities among essential workers could be a key reason that Black Americans are more likely than whites to contract and die of COVID-19, according to researchers at the University of Utah.

UC study: Secondhand smoke sends more kids to the hospital
Children who are exposed to tobacco have higher rates of hospital admissions after visiting emergency departments or urgent care facilities, according to a new study by University of Cincinnati researchers.

COVID-19 story tip: Racism amid the COVID-19 pandemic -- a path forward
Because SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was first discovered in China, Chinese American families in the United States have reported an increase in racist experiences during the ongoing pandemic.

Skeletal study suggests at least 11 fish species are capable of walking
An international team of scientists has identified at least 11 species of fish suspected to have land-walking abilities.

State laws key to HIV prevention efforts
HIV prevention remains a public health priority in the United States.

CNIO researchers develop an effective strategy against KRAS mutant lung tumors in mice
Researchers achieved complete remission of 25% of lung tumours caused by the KRAS oncogene in mice by inactivating CDK4 and RAF1, two genes that act at different levels in the signalling pathway of this oncogene.

Theoretical prediction of reverse intersystem crossing for organic semiconductors
A team of Japanese researchers developed a method to predict rate constants of reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) associated with light emission efficiency of organic semiconductors used for OLED through quantum chemical calculations with computers.

International Symposium on Olfaction and Taste at Association for Chemoreception Sciences
Across 5 days in August (3rd-7th), scientists from around the world gathered virtually to present and discuss new information on the role of the chemical senses in disease, nutrition, and social interactions in humans and animals.

Fossil growth reveals insights into the climate
Panthasaurus maleriensis is an ancestor of today's amphibians and has been considered the most puzzling representative of the Metoposauridae.

People who were children when their parents divorced have less 'love hormone'
People who were children when their parents were divorced showed lower levels of oxytocin -- the so-called ''love hormone'' -- when they were adults than those whose parents remained married, according to a Baylor University study.

Skin lightening products linked to altered steroid hormone levels
Women who misuse corticosteroid creams for cosmetic skin lightening may be at risk of developing adrenal insufficiency, according to research presented at e-ECE 2020.

International study gets at the root of what makes deer migrate
Researchers found that the dynamics of springtime plant growth, specifically whether green-up progresses like a wave or not, explain where deer migration occurs in many ecosystems.

A lack of oxygen in tumors promotes metastasis
Metastases are formed by cancer cells that break away from the primary tumor.

NASA satellites catch Typhoon Haishen before and after landfall
Formerly a typhoon, Tropical Storm Haishen made landfall in South Korea on Monday, Sept.

Detecting soil-surface ozone early can help prevent damage to grapes and apples
Farmers and fruit growers report that climate change is leading to increased ozone concentrations on the soil surface in their fields and orchards, which can cause irreversible plant damage, reduce crop yields and threaten the food supply.

Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell.

Scientists develop low-cost chip to detect presence and quantity of COVID-19 antibodies
Robust and widespread antibody testing has emerged as a key strategy in the fight against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dropping it in the mail: Best practices detailed for mail-in colon cancer screenings
A program that asks patients to mail in stool samples to screen for colon cancer is an effective way to expand screenings to underserved and underinsured communities and offers an alternative to in-person testing during the pandemic, according to a study conducted by UT Southwestern.

Fighting cardiovascular disease with acne drug
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and Stanford University have found the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure - and identified a potential treatment for it: a drug already used to treat acne.

Targeted drug found effective in patients who have lung cancer with certain mutations
A targeted therapy called capmatinib can provide significant benefits to patients who have advanced lung cancer with specific gene mutations, according to recently published results from a phase two clinical trial.
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