Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 09, 2020
Adding stem cells to educational intervention can significantly help kids with autism
Results of a clinical trial released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine indicate that a combination of stem cell therapy and educational intervention can significantly help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Humans, not climate, have driven rapidly rising mammal extinction rate
Human impact can explain ninety-six percent of all mammal species extinctions of the last hundred thousand years, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

Do as plants do: Novel photocatalysts can perform solar-driven conversion of CO2 into fuel
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, develop a novel ''heterostructured'' photocatalyst using titanium and copper, two abundant and relatively inexpensive metals.

Metabolite signature of COVID-19 reveals multi-organ effects
SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, can cause a wide range of symptoms, from none at all to severe respiratory stress, multi-organ failure and death.

Pro-inflammatory lipids precede Type 1 diabetes onset in mouse model and children
Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where immune cells -- led by inflammatory macrophages -- attack and destroy the pancreatic beta cells.

The marshmallow test revisited
Children will wait longer for a treat to impress others, new psychology experiments show.

Women's heart health linked to age at first menstrual period
CLEVELAND, Ohio (Sept. 9, 2020)--Early menarche has been associated with many cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, but little is known about its association with overall heart health.

Virtual tourism could offer new opportunities for travel industry, travelers
A new proposal for virtual travel, using advanced mathematical techniques and combining livestream video with existing photos and videos of travel hotspots, could help revitalize an industry that has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

Consequences of the 2018 summer drought
The drought that hit central and northern Europe in summer 2018 had serious effects on crops, forests and grasslands.

National parks preserve more than species
National parks are safe havens for endangered and threatened species, but an analysis by Rice University data scientists finds parks and protected areas can preserve more than species.

Lecturer takes laptops and smart phones away and musters student presence
Danish university lecturer experiments with banning screens in discussion lessons.

New method prevents quantum computers from crashing
Quantum information is fragile, which is why quantum computers must be able to correct errors.

New perception metric balances reaction time, accuracy
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new metric for evaluating how well self-driving cars respond to changing road conditions and traffic, making it possible for the first time to compare perception systems for both accuracy and reaction time.

NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Paulette
Tropical Storm Paulette has run into wind shear that is pushing the bulk of clouds and showers away from its center of circulation, and that is apparent on infrared imagery from NASA.

A new kind of liquid scintillator via hybridizing perovskite nanocrystals with organic molecules
Highly-efficient scintillators are playing an essential role in various fundamental science and industrial applications.

UC Davis researchers find a way to help stem cells work for the heart
Blocking an enzyme linked with inflammation makes it possible for stem cells to repair damaged heart tissue, new research from UC Davis Health scientists shows.

New microfluidic device minimizes loss of high value samples
A major collaborative effort that has been developing over the last three years between Arizona State University and European scientists, has resulted in a significant technical advance in X-ray crystallographic sample strategies.

Different response of mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue to endurance e
In obese individuals, endurance exercise improves fitness and increases the number of mitochondria * and cellular respiration in skeletal muscles.

Study finds babies born in fall at higher risk for allergic diseases
Researchers at National Jewish Health have determined that many allergic conditions likely start with dry, cracked skin, which leads to a chain reaction of allergic diseases known as the atopic march.

Rethinking business: Disruptions like the corona crisis also create new opportunities
Study analyses importance of historical times of change and the significance of disruptions for new success strategies.

Associations of alcohol consumption, alcohol-induced passing out with risk of dementia
The risk of future dementia associated with overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-induced loss of consciousness in a population of current drinkers was examined in this observational study with more than 131,000 adults.

Where rocks come alive: OSIRIS-REx observes an asteroid in action
While studying asteroid Bennu up close, NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft witnessed periodic outbursts of material being kicked up from the surface.

Muscle weakness in patients in intensive care: Potential approach to treatment
Critical Illness Myopathy (CIM) has taken on a new relevance as a result of the Corona virus.

The neurons that connect stress, insomnia, and the immune system
Researchers have pinpointed the circuit in the brain that is responsible for sleepless nights in times of stress--and it turns out that circuit does more than make you toss and turn.

Vibration device makes homes 'smart' by tracking appliances
To boost efficiency in typical households - where people forget to take wet clothes out of washing machines, retrieve hot food from microwaves and turn off dripping faucets - Cornell University researchers have developed a single device that can track 17 types of appliances using vibrations.

Common diabetes drug reverses inflammation in the liver
The diabetes drug metformin has been prescribed to hundreds of millions of people worldwide as the frontline treatment for type 2 diabetes.

Mysterious cellular droplets come into focus
Researchers are shedding light on a type of membrane-less organelle, known as biological condensates, that play a role in DNA repair and aging.

A window into adolescence
Why do some adolescents take more risks than others? Research from University of Delaware Biomedical Engineer Curtis Johnson and graduate student Grace McIlvain suggests that two centers in the brain, one which makes adolescents want to take risks and the other which prevents them from acting on these impulses, physically mature at different rates and that adolescents with large differences in the rate of development between these two brain regions are more likely to be risk-takers.

New way to target some rapidly dividing cancer cells, leaving healthy cells unharmed
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Oxford say they have found a new way to kill some multiplying human breast cancer cells by selectively attacking the core of their cell division machinery.

Analysis: 'Near-zero incidence' of patients acquiring COVID-19 at Brigham and Women's
In the midst of the state surge, the Brigham cared for over 9,000 inpatients, including nearly 700 with COVID-19.

Hoarding and herding during the COVID-19 pandemic
Understanding the psychology behind economic decision-making, and how and why a pandemic might trigger responses such as hoarding, is the focus of a new paper published in the Journal of Behavioral Economics for Policy.

Hair loss drug spironolactone may be safe for use in breast cancer survivors
Researchers at the George Washington University have found that the hair loss drug spironolactone is not associated with increased risk of female breast cancer recurrence and may be safe to treat female pattern hair loss in breast cancer survivors.

RIT/NTID researchers study how deaf and hearing people watch sign language
A recent study has shown that readers' eye gaze behaviors are strong indicators of words that are unexpected, new, or difficult to understand.

Massive halo finally explains stream of gas swirling around the Milky Way
Astronomers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and their colleagues have discovered that a halo of warm gas surrounding the Magellanic Clouds likely acts as a protective cocoon, shielding the dwarf galaxies from the Milky Way's own halo and contributing most of the Magellanic Stream's mass.

Story tips from Johns Hopkins experts on COVID-19
Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on Covid-19

New ultrafast yellow laser poised to benefit biomedical applications
Researchers have developed a new compact and ultrafast, high-power yellow laser.

Caffeine shot delivers wakeup call on antifungal drug resistance
The management of fungal infections in plants and humans could be transformed by a breakthrough in understanding how fungi develop resistance to drugs.

Adolescent girls at risk for self-injury can be identified using a short psychological profile
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports on three key factors found amongst adolescents that could be used to predict the first occurrence of nonsuicidal self-harm, over a 3 year period.

Study suggests unconscious learning underlies belief in God
Individuals who can unconsciously predict complex patterns, an ability called implicit pattern learning, are likely to hold stronger beliefs that there is a god who creates patterns of events in the universe, according to neuroscientists at Georgetown University.

Making dog food more delectable by analyzing aromas
Dogs aren't known for being picky about their food, eating the same kibble day after day with relish.

For an effective COVID vaccine, look beyond antibodies to T-cells
Most vaccine developers are aiming solely for a robust antibody response against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, despite evidence that antibodies are not the body's primary protective response to infection by coronaviruses, says Marc Hellerstein of UC Berkeley.

Finding a handle to bag the right proteins
A method that lights up tags attached to selected proteins can help to purify the proteins from a mixed protein pool.

Physicists explain mysterious dark matter deficiency in galaxy pair
A new theory about the nature of dark matter helps explain why a pair of galaxies about 65 million light-years from Earth contains very little of the mysterious matter, according to a study led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside.

Researchers draw more links between vaping, smoking, young people, and coronavirus
Vapers, smokers, and non-smokers with chronic conditions are all at higher risk for COVID-19.

The Lancet Global Health: Modelling study estimates health-care cost of COVID-19 in low- and middle-income countries at US$52 billion every four weeks
New modelling research, published in The Lancet Global Health journal, estimates that it could cost low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) around US$52 billion (equivalent to US$8.60 per person) over four weeks to provide an effective health-care response to COVID-19, assuming each country's reproductive number (average number of contacts that a case infects) remained unchanged (table 2).

Transistor-integrated cooling for a more powerful chip
EPFL researchers have created a single chip that combines a transistor and micro-fluidic cooling system.

Development of photovoltaics that can be applied like paint for real-life application
Researchers in Korea have successfully developed a high-efficiency large-area organic solution processable solar cell by controlling the speed at which the solution of raw materials for solar cells became solidified after being coated.

Cell-autonomous immunity shaped human evolution
Every human cell harbors its own defenses against microbial invaders, relying on strategies that date back to some of the earliest events in the history of life, researchers report.

Telehealth scales up during the pandemic to offer patient care in the safety of the home
The Medical University of South Carolina rapidly mobilized a four-pronged initiative to ensure continuity of care for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and continued ambulatory care for all other patients, reports a team of telehealth and bioinformatics experts in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

A new technique prevents errors in quantum computers
A paper recently published in Nature presents a protocol allowing for the error detection and the protection of quantum processors in case of qubit loss.

Case study describes unexpected diagnosis of one of the first cases of MIS-C in US
At the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in April, a 14-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency department at Nemours Children's Health System in Delaware with mysterious symptoms in what would later be identified as one of the first cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) in the U.S.

Green light therapy shown to reduce migraine frequency, intensity
A study by University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers found that green light therapy resulted in about a 60% reduction in the pain intensity of the headache phase and number of days per month people experienced migraine headaches.

Oxygen-releasing bioink for 3D bioprinting
Newly developed bioink enhances the ability of implanted cells to grow and regenerate new tissue

Researchers show how AI-controlled sensors could save lives in 'smart' hospitals and homes
Interdisciplinary researchers nationwide are developing AI systems that would go into hospital rooms and elder care homes, to weave 'ambient intelligence' into the places where health care is delivered in order to avoid fatal medical errors and improve therapeutic outcomes.

Allergic immune responses help fight bacterial infections
Researchers from CeMM, MedUni Vienna and Stanford University, have found that a module of the immune system, best known for causing allergic reactions, plays a key role in acquiring host defense against infections triggered by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

SwRI-led study indicates sand-sized meteoroids are peppering asteroid Bennu
A new study published this month in JGR Planets posits that the major particle ejections off the near-Earth asteroid Bennu may be the consequence of impacts by small, sand-sized particles called meteoroids onto its surface as the object nears the Sun.

Wild cousins may help crops battle climate change
Wild relatives of our domestic crops already cope with harsh conditions and resist disease.

Lumpy proteins stiffen blood vessels of the brain
Deposits of a protein called ''Medin'', which manifest in virtually all older adults, reduce the elasticity of blood vessels during aging and hence may be a risk factor for vascular dementia.

Prediction of protein disorder from amino acid sequence
Structural disorder is vital for proteins' function in diverse biological processes.

Flipping light on-off turns bacteria into chemical factories
Researchers at Princeton University have created a new and improved way to more precisely control genetically engineered bacteria: by simply switching the lights on and off.

Oxford University researchers discover 'genetic vulnerability' in breast cancer cells
The study, published in the scientific journal Nature, has uncovered a genetic vulnerability present in nearly 10% percent of all breast cancers tumours, and found a way to target this vulnerability and selectively kill cancer cells.

Quantum shake
There they were, in all their weird quantum glory: ultracold lithium atoms in the optical trap operated by UC Santa Barbara undergraduate student Alec Cao and his colleagues in David Weld's atomic physics group.

Muscle aging: Stronger for longer
With life expectancy increasing, age-related diseases are also on the rise, including sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass due to aging.

AI used to show how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets
Researchers have used a combination of AI and quantum mechanics to reveal how hydrogen gradually turns into a metal inside giant planets.

Special journal issue features Nemours heart specialists' best practices for children
The September issue of Progress in Pediatric Cardiology will exclusively feature articles by pediatric cardiologists at Nemours Children's Health System on echocardiography and other cardiac imaging techniques used in the care of children with cardiovascular disease.

Australian scientists discover new corals on most comprehensive deep-sea study of GBR
For the first time, scientists have viewed the deepest regions of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, discovered five undescribed species consisting of black corals and sponges, and recorded Australia's first observation of an extremely rare fish.

Study shows Latin America twice as rich in plant species as tropical Africa
Latin America is more than twice as rich in plant species as tropical Africa and is home to a third of the world's biodiversity, a new paper published today in Science Advances confirms.

Cancer drug can rebalance kidney function in a devastating genetic disease
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Zurich have discovered that a drug newly approved for cancer improves kidney dysfunction in a mouse model of Dent disease 2 and Lowe syndrome

Land development in New Jersey continues to slow
Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report.

Climate engineering: Modelling projections oversimplify risks
Climate change is gaining prominence as a political and public priority.

The birth of a male sex chromosome in Atlantic herring
The evolution of sex chromosomes is of crucial importance in biology as it stabilises the mechanism underlying sex determination and usually results in an equal sex ratio.

Refined finish for fine fish oil
Not all fish oils are high quality oils, so scientists have developed a superior method to help produce better dietary Omega-3 health and dietary supplements.

At least 28 extinctions prevented by conservation action in recent decades
Conservation action has prevented the global extinction of at least 28 bird and mammal species since 1993, a study led by Newcastle University, UK and BirdLife International has shown.

Advanced NVMe controller technology for next generation memory devices
KAIST researchers advanced non-volatile memory express (NVMe) controller technology for next generation information storage devices, and made this new technology named 'OpenExpress' freely available to all universities and research institutes around the world to help reduce the research cost in related fields.

Atomistic modelling probes the behavior of matter at the center of Jupiter
EPFL professor and NCCR MARVEL project leader Michele Ceriotti and colleagues have developed a physics-based machine learning approach to examine the behavior of hydrogen at extremely high pressures.

Dismantling structural racism in nursing
Confronting the uncomfortable reality of systemic racism - the system that creates and maintains racial inequality in every facet of life for people of color - is having a national heyday.

Generic cholesterol drugs save medicare billions of dollars, study finds
The switch from brand name to generic cholesterol medications that occurred between 2014 and 2018 has saved Medicare billions of dollars, even as the number of people on cholesterol-lowering drugs has increased, UT Southwestern scientists have calculated.

Baboon matriarchs enjoy less stress
You know the type: Loud. Swaggering. Pushy. The alpha male clearly runs the show.

New tool outsmarts COVID-19 virus to help vaccine development
Melbourne researchers have developed a tool to monitor mutations that make it difficult to develop coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines and drugs.

Researchers solve decades old mitochondrial mystery that could lead to new disease treatments
Penn Medicine researchers have solved a decades old mystery around a key molecule fueling the power plant of cells that could be exploited to find new ways to treat diseases, from neurodegenerative disorders to cancer.

Failure to calibrate for ethnicity in fracture epidemiology would do more harm than good
A recent article from the NEJM questioned the use of ethnicity in risk assessment algorithms, including the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool FRAX.

Velcro-like food sensor detects spoilage and contamination
MIT engineers have designed a Velcro-like food sensor, made from an array of silk microneedles, that pierces through plastic packaging to sample food for signs of spoilage and bacterial contamination.

Targeting 'cost-effective zones' to protect global biodiversity could help balance conservation goals and political priorities
Scientists have identified regions of land around the world with both high conservation value and low levels of human impact.

Designed antiviral proteins inhibit SARS-CoV-2 in the lab
Computer-designed miniproteins have now been shown to protect lab-grown human cells from SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Rutgers-led national survey uncovers doctors' misconceptions about nicotine risks
Most doctors misperceive the risks of nicotine, the addictive chemical in tobacco products, according to a Rutgers-led national survey.

Spotlight on artificial intelligence: ONR to highlight AI research at DoD Symposium
Leaders from the Office of Naval Research will discuss how the Department of the Navy can best harness the power and potential of artificial intelligence (AI) during two panel sessions at the Department of Defense (DoD) Artificial Intelligence Symposium and Exposition, held Sept.

Americans continue to struggle controlling high blood pressure; 11% fewer adults have it in check
The percentage of American adults with controlled blood pressure dropped 11% between 2013 and 2018.

The presence of resonating cavities above sunspots has been confirmed
An international team of researchers, led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has confirmed the existence of resonant cavities above sunspots.

Restless nature of human spinal cord revealed by non-invasive functional imaging
EPFL scientists have developed a non-invasive technique for unraveling the complex dynamics generated by spinal cord circuits to unprecedented detail, a first in functional magnetic resonance imaging that may one day help diagnose spinal cord dysfunction or injury.

Feline leukaemia virus infection: A clinical and epidemiological enigma
Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a gammaretrovirus that occurs worldwide in domestic cats, as well as small wild cats.

Incidence of nosocomial COVID-19 in patients hospitalized at large US academic medical center
Over the first 12 weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, about 700 patients were admitted to Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston with COVID-19 and more than 8,000 patients without COVID-19.

Where rocks come alive: NASA's OSIRIS-REx observes an asteroid in action
In a special collection of research papers published Sep. 9 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, the OSIRIS-REx science team reports detailed observations that reveal Bennu is shedding material on a regular basis.

Putting a future avocado apocalypse on ice
For the first time, an Australian cryogenics scientist has shown that avocado shoot tips can be successfully frozen and revived -- and that's great news for future generations of the fruit.

In Ancient Giant Viruses Lies the Truth Behind Evolution of Nucleus in Eukaryotic Cells
An exchange of genetic material that occurred when ancient giant viruses infected ancient eukaryotic cells could have caused the nucleus of the eukaryotic cell--its defining feature--to form.

Magnetic whirls crystallize in two dimensions
Cooperation within the TopDyn research center paves the way for the investigation of two-dimensional phases and phase transitions

Mineral undergoes self-healing of irradiation damage
Several minerals suffer radioactive self-irradiation and hence experience long-term changes of their properties.

BIO Integration Journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 2, publishes
New journal BIO Integration (BIOI) publishes its second issue, volume 1, issue 2.

NASA infrared imagery shows Tropical Storm Rene's seesaw of strength
Tropical Storm Rene weakened to a tropical depression late on Sept.

Researchers report positive results for ReWalk ReStore exosuit in stroke rehabilitation
The trial determined the safety, reliability, and feasibility of the device in this stroke population.

Rural COVID-19 mortality highest in counties with more blacks and hispanics
A recent study by researchers from Syracuse University shows that the average daily increase in rural COVID-19 mortality rates has been significantly higher in counties with the largest percentages of Black and Hispanic residents.

Sampling the gut microbiome with an ingestible pill
Gut microbes affect human health, but there is still much to learn, in part because they're not easy to collect.

Seeing objects through clouds and fog
Using a new algorithm, Stanford researchers have reconstructed the movements of individual particles of light to see through clouds, fog and other obstructions.

Nature as a model: Researchers develop novel anti-inflammatory substance
Anti-inflammatory substances based on components of human cells could one day improve treatment in patients.

Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey
A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

New vaccine design reduces inflammation, enhances protection
Researchers have discovered a new way to limit inflammation from adjuvants, a key ingredient of many modern vaccines, by adding a molecule that disrupts certain pathways in cells.

More chemicals can be assessed for endocrine disrupting effects
A European guidance document aimed at identifying endocrine disrupting pesticides can--with some modifications--be used to assess other chemicals' endocrine disrupting effects.

Study finds botanical effective for chemo-resistant colon cancer
The natural botanical Andrographis paniculata, when given in conjunction with chemotherapy, may eventually change the way doctors treat chemotherapy-resistant colorectal cancer.

Unlocking the mystery of tau for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases
A team of researchers from various collaborating universities and hospitals in Japan has uncovered crucial molecular details regarding the activity of the ''tau'' protein, promising to revolutionize the therapy of tau-induced neurodegenerative diseases.

Establishment of a rapid synthesis method for useful organic fluorine compounds
A new synthesis method has been developed for the efficient production of fluorinated alkenes.

Vitamin B1 deficiency a key factor in the development of alcohol-related dementia
A research group led by Stephan Listabarth from MedUni Vienna's Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Social Psychiatry, has now developed a hypothesis whereby iron deposits in the brain -- resulting from alcohol-induced vitamin B1 deficiency -- can be regarded as key factors in cognitive decline.

As collegiate esports become more professional, women are being left out
A new study finds the rapidly growing field of collegiate esports is effectively becoming a two-tiered system, with club-level programs that are often supportive of gender diversity being clearly distinct from well-funded varsity programs that are dominated by men.

MDIBL scientists decipher role of a stress response gene
A team of scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, led by James A.

Feeling misunderstood boosts support for Brexit
Feeling misunderstood by other groups makes people more likely to support separatist causes like Brexit and Scottish independence, new research suggests.

How small particles could reshape Bennu and other asteroids
NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft observed tiny bits of material jumping off the surface of the asteroid Bennu.

Small proteins against SARS-CoV-2 neutralize infection in cell culture
Using innovative computer-based approaches, researchers have developed protein inhibitors that block the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 virus and human cell receptor ACE2.

A new study of ocean salinity finds substantial amplification of the global water cycle
An improved estimate of the global water cycle change has been compiled based on the new salinity data, salinity-contrast metrics and model simulations.

Urbanization and agriculture are land uses that most affect Brazil's rivers
A literature review by researchers affiliated with universities in Brazil and the United States produces the first ever nationwide survey of land use impacts on water quality, showing how a lack of planning may affect the availability of a natural resource that is already becoming scarce.

Mindfulness with paced breathing and lowering blood pressure
Now more than ever, Americans and people all over the world are under increased stress, which may adversely affect their health and well-being.

Artificial intelligence aids gene activation discovery
Scientists have long known that human genes are activated through instructions delivered by the precise order of our DNA.

New tracking technology will help fight rhino poaching in Namibia
Interactive software that 'reads' and analyzes footprints left by black rhinoceroses can be used to monitor the movements of the animals in the wild, giving conservationists a new way to keep watch on the endangered species and help keep it safe from poachers, according to a Duke University-led study.

RIT scientists contribute to the first discovery of an intermediate-mass black hole
The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration recently announced the discovery of GW190521, the most massive gravitational wave binary observed to date, and Rochester Institute of Technology scientists played an important role in identifying and analyzing the event.

More than one drink a day may raise high blood pressure risk in adults with Type 2 diabetes
In a large study of adults with Type 2 diabetes, moderate drinking (defined as eight or more alcoholic beverages a week) was associated with a 60% or higher increased risk of high blood pressure.

An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect
Scientists have found that chance events can be more important than natural selection in defining the genome of species like humans and other mammals.

Malnutrition among a hunter-gatherer group
The diets of hunter-gatherers are changing at a fast pace, as in the contemporary world, they are increasingly being deprived of their access to land and natural resources and urged to adapt to sedentary lifestyle.

Sexual minority men who smoke report worse mental health and more frequent substance use
Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in sexual and gender minority populations, according to Rutgers researchers.

Iron is to blame for carbon dioxide emissions from soil, says a soil scientists from RUDN
Iron minerals and bacteria can be the main agents of carbon dioxide emissions from the soil.

Research brief: New insight on the impacts of Earth's biosphere on air quality
A new study provides the first global satellite measurements of one of the most important chemicals affecting Earth's atmosphere.

Australian telescope finds no signs of alien technology in 10 million star systems
A radio telescope in outback Western Australia has completed the deepest and broadest search at low frequencies for alien technologies, scanning a patch of sky known to include at least 10 million stars.

Probiotic skin therapy improves eczema in children, NIH study suggests
An experimental treatment for eczema that aims to modify the skin microbiome safely reduced disease severity and increased quality of life for children as young as 3 years of age, a National Institutes of Health study has found.

Discovery challenges the foundations of gene therapy
An article published today in Science Translational Medicine by scientists from Children's Medical Research Institute has challenged one of the foundations of the gene therapy field and will help to improve strategies for treating serious genetic disorders of the liver.

New drug could improve life expectancy and quality for pancreatic cancer patients
First-in-class drug starves certain tumor types of the resources they need to grow and spread to other parts of the body.

More cats might be COVID-19 positive than first believed, study suggests
A newly published study looking at cats in Wuhan, where the first known outbreak of COVID-19 began, shows more cats might be contracting the disease than first believed.

Gut microbiota not involved in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus
Consuming the combination of fish oil and probiotic food supplements modulate the composition of gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women, reveals a new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland.

Black people more likely than others to die from colorectal cancer spreading to the liver
Colorectal cancer is more prevalent among Black people, a group that has the highest rates of death for an illness that is curable if caught early.

A chemist from RUDN developed a new type of one-molecule thick water-repellent film
A chemist from RUDN University together with colleagues created a new type of two-dimensional nanofilm from an organic material called calixarene.

ENT physicians and researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Virtual Annual Meeting
During the AAO-HNSF 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, which runs from September 13 through October 25, the most current research in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be introduced during the Scientific Oral Presentations.

Vaccine proponents and opponents are vectors of misinformation online
Researchers from the George Washington University, University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University assessed content from the most active vaccine-related accounts on Twitter and found that even accounts with pro-vaccination views and higher public health credibility can be vectors of misinformation in the highly uncertain and rapidly changing environment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Changes in blood pressure control over 2 decades among US adults with high blood pressure
National survey data were used to examine how blood pressure control changed overall among U.S. adults with high blood pressure between 1999-2000 and 2017-2018 and by age, race, insurance type and access to health care.

Studying short-term cloud feedback to understand climate change in East Asia
Short-term cloud feedback is a useful variable for estimating the uncertainties relating to clouds, and it can provide a reference for the study of long-term cloud feedback and narrowing the inter-model uncertainties in long-term cloud feedbacks through the relationship between long- and short-term cloud feedbacks in East Asia

During the pandemic, online lecture series helps fill gaps in training for urology residents
The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has affected all aspects of healthcare - including sharp drops in educational opportunities for resident physicians in training.

Substances with anti-cancer action are identified in Brazilian red propolis
Researchers isolated eight novel polyphenols from the rarest type of propolis.
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