Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 10, 2020
Improving the transition from pediatric to adult rheumatology care
As children with chronic rheumatic illnesses age, it's important that they experience a smooth transition from pediatric to adult care.

Researchers reveal a much richer picture of the past with new DNA recovery technique
Researchers at McMaster University have developed a new technique to tease ancient DNA from soil, pulling the genomes of hundreds of animals and thousands of plants -- many of them long extinct -- from less than a gram of sediment.

Study provides insights on bouncing back from job loss
Stress associated with job loss can have a host of negative effects on individuals that may hinder their ability to become re-employed.

Epigenetic changes precede onset of diabetes
Epigenetic* changes in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas can be detected in patients several years before the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

Environment: Removing marine plastic litter is costly for small island states
Removing all of the plastic litter from the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Aldabra Atoll -- a ring of islands formed from coral reef in the Seychelles -- would cost US $4.68 million and require 18,000 hours of labour, according to a study in Scientific Reports.

Evidence of power: Phasing quantum annealers into experiments from nonequilibrium physics
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) use commercially available quantum annealers, a type of quantum computer, to experimentally probe the validity of an important mechanism from nonequilibrium physics in open quantum systems.

Concussion discovery reveals dire, unknown effect of even mild brain injuries
Even mild concussions cause severe and long-lasting impairments in the brain's ability to clean itself, and this may seed it for Alzheimer's, dementia and other neurodegenerative problems.

Hospital COVID-19 risk lowest among intensive care staff
Contrary to expectations, the risk of COVID-19 infection among hospital staff at the height of the coronavirus pandemic was lowest among intensive care clinicians, reveals a study of one major UK medical centre, published in the journal Thorax.

COVID-19, disparities, opportunities for equity in otolaryngology
This Viewpoint discusses the disproportionate burdens related to COVID-19 experienced by minority populations as well as strategies to limit disparities in health care, access and outcomes.

Infrared NASA imagery provides Paulette's temperature palette
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Paulette in infrared imagery as it moved through the Central Atlantic Ocean.

Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age
Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers.

Researchers discovered a novel gene involved in primary lymphedema
Reseachers have made an important discovery how mutations in a novel gene, ANGPT2, cause a lymphatic disease called primary lymphedema.

Major trial uses blood test to match women with breast cancer to precision treatments
A blood test that can identify a variety of mutations in advanced breast cancer can reliably match women to effective targeted treatments, early results of a major clinical trial reveal.

More small-scale dark matter gravitational lenses than expected in galaxy clusters
The gravitational pull of cold dark matter in galaxy clusters can distort or bend the light coming from distant background galaxies, in a phenomenon called gravitational lensing.

Uncovering the science of Indigenous fermentation
Australian wine scientists are shedding scientific light on the processes underlying traditional practices of Australian Aboriginal people to produce fermented beverages.

Ellipsys system offers greater patient eligibility and reduced time to dialysis
Two devices for creating minimally invasive dialysis access--the Ellipsys® Vascular Access System and the WavelinQ™ 4F System--demonstrated high rates of technical success and low rates of complications, according to a new study published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology.

Scientists predicted new superhard materials
A group of Skoltech scientists used machine learning (ML) methods to predict superhard materials based on their crystal structure.

New UBCO study examines pain tolerance among cannabis users
A recent study examining pain among cannabis users suggests that--unlike long-term opioid use--regular cannabis use does not appear to increase pain sensitivity.

Treating hypertension lowers the risk for orthostatic hypotension, or drop in blood pressure upon standing
A systematic review of published evidence suggests that hypertension treatment lowers the risk for orthostatic hypotension, or extreme drop in blood pressure upon standing.

Solvation rearrangement brings stable zinc/graphite batteries closer to commercial grid storage
A research team led by Prof. CUI Guanglei and ZHAO Jingwen from Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) proposed an approach of solvation rearrangement that brings stable zinc/graphite batteries closer to commercial grid storage.

How loss of single gene fuels deadly childhood brain cancer
UC San Diego researchers describe how the functional loss of a single gene negatively impacts neural development and promotes the growth of a particularly deadly form of pediatric brain cancer.

Multiphase buffering by ammonia explains wide range of atmospheric aerosol acidity
Anthropogenic ammonia emissions and the water content matter more than dry particle composition for the acidity of atmospheric aerosols in populated regions.

Sleep apnea linked with higher spine fracture risk among women
Emerging evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may negatively affect bone health.

Structure of 'immortality protein' now better understood
A key role in studying the telomerase of Hansenula polymorpha was played by KFU's nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer.

Systematic approach crucial for person-centred care
Systematic efforts and a clear structure are decisive factors in the transition to person-centred health care.

Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions.

Researchers reveal safeguarding of key DNA sensor in innate immune system
This research, published in Science, reveals in detail how the nucleosomes inside our cells block cGAS from unintentionally triggering the body's innate immune response to our own DNA.

Seeing the eye like never before
In a big step for ophthalmology, scientists created a method to view the inner workings of the eye and its diseases at the cellular level.

Emotion vocabulary reflects state of well-being, study suggests
The vast way in which you describe your emotions can reveal your lived experience and wellness status.

The pharmacist's role in HIV care in France
In France, antiretroviral treatment (ARV) can be dispensed by hospitals and/or community pharmacies.

Gut microbiome data may be helpful in routine screening of cardiovascular disease
Previous studies have found the human gut microbiome, bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Does the Mediterranean diet protect against rheumatoid arthritis?
Previous research has demonstrated a variety of health benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet, which is rich in olive oil, cereals, fruit and vegetables, fish, and a moderate amount of dairy, meat, and wine.

Older and richer: Old grasslands show high biodiversity and conservation value
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba and Kobe University have found that the long-term, sustained existence of grasslands can increase plant diversity, and can act as an indicator for grasslands of high conservation importance.

Addicted to the sun? Research shows it's in your genes
Sun-seeking behaviour is linked to genes involved in addiction, behavioural and personality traits and brain function, according to a study of more than 260,000 people led by King's College London researchers.

Jupiter's moons could be warming each other
The gravitational push and pull by Jupiter's moons could account for more warming than the gas giant Jupiter alone.

Safety-net clinicians' caseloads received reduced merit-based incentive payment scores
A team of researchers led by Kenton Johnston, Ph.D., conducted a study to investigate how outpatient clinicians that treated disproportionately high caseloads of socially at-risk Medicare patients (safety-net clinicians) performed under Medicare's new mandatory Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

UCLA study shows how interferon-gamma guides response to cancer immunotherapy
UCLA researchers shed light on how interferon-gamma (IFN-y) guides the treatment response in people with advanced melanoma who are treated with one of the leading immunotherapies -- immune checkpoint blockade.

Giant particle accelerator in the sky
A new study led by researchers from GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences shows that electrons in the radiation belts can be accelerated to very high speeds locally.

Bumblebees benefit from faba bean cultivation
About one third of payments received by farmers are linked to 'greening measures' to promote biodiversity.

People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, study shows
People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, a new study shows.

COVID-19 study links strict social distancing to much lower chance of infection
Using public transportation, visiting a place of worship, or otherwise traveling from the home is associated with a significantly higher likelihood of testing positive with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, while practicing strict social distancing is associated with a markedly lower likelihood.

Children will wait to impress others -- another twist on the classic marshmallow test
When it comes to self-control, young children are better able to resist temptation and wait for greater rewards if they take into consideration the opinions of others.

$500 billion question: what's the value of studying the ocean's biological carbon pump?
A new study puts an economic value on the benefit of research to improve knowledge of the biological carbon pump and reduce the uncertainty of ocean carbon sequestration estimates.

Racial/ethnic variation found in nasal gene expression of key protein used by SARS-CoV-2
In a study published in JAMA on September 10, 2020, Mount Sinai researchers report findings that shed some light on the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Blacks, who have experienced rates of infection and death that are much greater, in some areas twice and three times more, than their proportion of the population.

COPD program decreases 30-day hospital readmission, may increase mortality
The 30-day readmission rate for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has decreased but the mortality rate has increased.

Kids with white-coat hypertension might be at risk for eventual progression to sustained high blood
Children and adolescents diagnosed with white-coat hypertension, a condition where blood pressure is higher when at the doctor's office, might eventually progress to sustained hypertension, according to a new study.

Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to the body's first line of defense
Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to interferon, one of the body's first line of defense.

Hubble observations suggest a missing ingredient in dark matter theories
Astronomers have discovered that there may be a missing ingredient in our cosmic recipe of how dark matter behaves.

Vaccine proves effective against the most severe type of pneumonia
A pneumococcal vaccine was effective at protecting children in Laos against the most severe type of pneumonia, a new study has found.

Artificial intelligence helps cut down on MRI no-shows
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, artificial intelligence predictive analytics performed moderately well in solving complex multifactorial operational problems--outpatient MRI appointment no-shows, especially--using a modest amount of data and basic feature engineering.

Pregnant women's psychological health during the COVID-19 outbreak
A recent study that examined the psychological health of pregnant women during the COVID-19 outbreak uncovered fear and depression in many participants.

66 million years of Earth's climate uncovered from ocean sediments
Changes in the Earth's climate over the last 66 million years have been revealed in unprecedented detail by a team involving UCL researchers, highlighting four distinctive climatic states and the natural million- and thousand-year variability that Earth's climate has experienced.

Body cameras may have little effect on police and citizen behaviors
A recent analysis published in Campbell Systematic Reviews indicates that body cameras worn by police do not have clear or consistent effects on officers' use of force, arrests, or other activities

Factors linked to college aspirations, enrollment, and success
A recent study has identified certain factors associated with a greater likelihood that a high school student will decide to attend college, enroll in college the fall semester immediately following high school graduation, and then return to that same college a year later as a retained college student.

How coronavirus took hold in North America and in Europe
Early interventions were effective at stamping out coronavirus infections before they spread, according to a study published in the journal Science.

GTEx studies reveal variation in gene expression among individuals and, to small degree, by sex
Seven new studies from Science and Science Advances present the third and final phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, begun over a decade ago by scientists aiming to better understand the effects of genetic diversity in healthy individuals.

GTEx Consortium releases fresh insights into how DNA differences govern gene expression
Scientists from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, a National Institutes of Health-funded consortium, have completed a wide-ranging set of studies documenting how small changes in DNA sequence can impact gene expression across more than four dozen tissues in the human body.

Levodopa may improve vision in patients with macular degeneration
Investigators have determined that treating patients with an advanced form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with levodopa, a safe and readily available drug commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease, stabilized and improved their vision.

NASA's Terra highlights aerosols from western fires in danger zone
The year 2020 will be remembered for being a very trying year and western wildfires have just added to the year's woes.

Seven in 10 Americans willing to get COVID-19 vaccine, survey finds
Almost seven in 10 Americans would be interested in receiving a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available, according to a new study.

New machine learning-assisted method rapidly classifies quantum sources
Purdue University engineers created a new machine learning-assisted method that could make quantum photonic circuit development more efficient by rapidly preselecting these solid-state quantum emitters.

How chemical diversity in plants facilitates plant-animal interactions
As we continue to lose global biodiversity, we are also losing chemical diversity and the chance for discovery,''said Lauren Maynard, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences within the College of Science.

FSU-led research team discovers unique supernova explosion
A 7-member international research team led by Florida State University Assistant Professor of Physics Eric Hsiao discovered a supernova that could help uncover the origins of the group of supernovae this star belongs to.

High-fidelity record of Earth's climate history puts current changes in context
For the first time, climate scientists have compiled a continuous, high-fidelity record of variations in Earth's climate extending 66 million years into the past.

Over a century later, the mystery of the Alfred Wallace's butterfly is solved
An over a century-long mystery has been surrounding the Taiwanese butterfly fauna ever since the 'father of zoogeography' Alfred Russel Wallace described a new species of butterfly: Lycaena nisa, whose identity was only re-examined in a recent project looking into the butterflies of Taiwan.

Understanding the 'deep-carbon cycle'
New geologic findings about the makeup of the Earth's mantle are helping scientists better understand long-term climate stability and even how seismic waves move through the planet's layers.

Male circumcision campaigns in Africa to fight HIV are a form of cultural imperialism
World Health Organization-recommended campaigns to circumcise millions of African boys and men to reduce HIV transmission are based more on systemic racism and 'neocolonialism' than sound scientific research, according to a critical appraisal published in Developing World Bioethics.

Loss of a pet can potentially trigger mental health issues in children
The death of a family pet can trigger a sense of grief in children that is profound and prolonged, and can potentially lead to subsequent mental health issues.

In the line of fire
People are starting almost all the wildfires that threaten US homes, according to an innovative new analysis combining housing and wildfire data.

Unraveling 66 million years of climate history from ocean sediments
Researchers have analyzed data from deep-sea sediments in order to reconstruct Earth's climate with an unprecedented temporal resolution.

Dietary changes could produce big offsets to carbon emissions
Eating less meat and dairy products in favor of plant-based proteins like those found in grains, legumes and nuts could make a huge difference in how much carbon dioxide reaches the atmosphere.

Americans sick with Covid disproportionately poor, minorities, uninsured and food insecure
A new study finds that working-age adults who stayed home sick with symptoms of coronavirus in April-May were more likely to be people of color (Black, Hispanic, Asian), low-income, and have less education, compared to adults who remained working or who were absent from work because of non-Covid illness.

FABP4: Preschool-aged biomarker discovered for autism spectrum disorder
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Japan have discovered a biomarker that can detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in preschool-aged children.

Research sheds light on earliest stages of Angelman syndrome
New research provides insights into the earliest stages of Angelman syndrome.

Study takes us a step closer to a universal antibody test for COVID-19
A new study released by Houston Methodist Sept. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation takes researchers a significant step closer to developing a uniform, universal COVID-19 antibody test.

Revealing the secrets of high-energy cosmic particles
The ''IceCube'' neutrino observatory deep in the ice of the South Pole has already brought spectacular new insights into cosmic incidents of extremely high energies.

Rationally designing hierarchical zeolites for better diffusion and catalyst efficiency
Alleviating diffusion limitation and enhancement of catalyst effectiveness are urgent problems in zeolite-based catalytic reaction engineering.

Tel Aviv University study confirms widespread literacy in biblical-period kingdom of Judah
Researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) have analyzed 18 ancient texts dating back to around 600 BCE from the Tel Arad military post using state-of-the-art image processing, machine learning technologies, and the expertise of a senior handwriting examiner, and concluded that the texts were written by no fewer than 12 authors, suggesting that many of the inhabitants of the kingdom of Judah during that period were able to read and write,

Experiments reveal why human-like robots elicit uncanny feelings
Experiments reveal a dynamic process that leads to the uncanny valley, with implications for both the design of robots and for understanding how we perceive one another as humans.

LSU Health study 1st to show nonharmful stress protects against disease in offspring
Research led by Jeff Gidday, PhD, Professor of Ophthalmology, Biochemistry, Neuroscience, and Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports what is believed to be the first study in a mammalian model documenting the reprogramming of heritability to promote disease resilience in the next generation.

The web of death
Cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death.

Nanophysics - Spectral classification of excitons
Ultrathin layers of tungsten diselenide have potential applications in opto-electronics and quantum technologies.

Shorter rest periods yield same results when measuring blood pressure
Current guidelines recommending five minutes of rest before a patient can receive a blood pressure screening may not be necessary for patients without high blood pressure.

Some health care professionals use outdated guidelines to screen and diagnose hypertension
Results of a survey show that some health care professionals are not following evidence-based guidelines, potentially leading to under and overdiagnosis of hypertension.

Genome analyses track SARS-CoV-2's early introduction to the US and Europe
SARS-CoV-2 arrived in Washington State somewhere between late January and early February 2020, sparking rapid community transmission of the virus that went undetected for several weeks before this community spread became evident, prompting a change in testing criteria to emphasize individuals with no travel history.

New Hubble data suggests there is an ingredient missing from current dark matter theories
Observations by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have found that something may be missing from the theories of how dark matter behaves.

Study suggests EDs should tailor clinical decision support to avoid antibiotic over-prescribing
Researchers at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus found that a unique set of factors of the emergency department (ED) makes standard Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems not as effective in helping to reduce antibiotic overprescribing in that environment.

High blood pressure treatment linked to less risk for drop in blood pressure upon standing
Treatment to lower blood pressure did not increase and may decrease the risk of extreme drops in blood pressure upon standing from a sitting position.

COVID-19 may have been in LA as early as last December, UCLA-led study suggests
UCLA researchers and colleagues who analyzed electronic health records found that there was a 50% increase in patients with coughs and acute respiratory failure at UCLA Health hospitals and clinics beginning in late December 2019 and continuing into February, suggesting that COVID-19 may have been circulating in the area months before the first definitive cases in the U.S. were identified.

DNA-based nanotechnology stimulates potent antitumor immune responses
Combining their expertise in protein engineering and synthetic DNA technology, Wistar scientists successfully delivered nanoparticle antitumor vaccines that stimulated robust CD8 T cell immunity and controlled melanoma growth in preclinical models.

NASA finds Tropical Storm Rene less affected by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Rene is it continued moving north though the central North Atlantic Ocean.

New genetic analysis method could advance personal genomics
Geneticists could identify the causes of disorders that currently go undiagnosed if standard practices for collecting individual genetic information were expanded to capture more variants that researchers can now decipher, concludes new Johns Hopkins University research.

UNC researchers publish striking images of SARS-CoV-2 infected cells
The UNC School of Medicine laboratory of Camille Ehre, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, produced striking images in respiratory tract cultures of the infectious form of the SARS-CoV-2 virus produced by infected respiratory epithelial cells.

Quirky response to magnetism presents quantum physics mystery
In a new study just published and highlighted as an Editor's Suggestion in Physical Review Letters, scientists describe the quirky behavior of one such magnetic topological insulator.

Lifestyle improvements may lessen cognitive decline
Results from a new study suggest that lifestyle changes may help to improve cognition in older adults experiencing cognitive decline that precedes dementia.

Autistic adults have a higher rate of physical health conditions
Autistic individuals are more likely to have chronic physical health conditions, particularly heart, lung, and diabetic conditions, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge.

New drug could stop deadly superbug, save tens of thousands of lives
A pair of Purdue University researchers from the College of Pharmacy and the College of Veterinary Medicine developed small molecules to combat deadly, drug-resistant enterococcus.

Climate changed in steps in the past
An international study published in Science significantly improves the potential for understanding how the Earth's climate system evolved over the past 66 million years.

Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19
New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19 compared to those who haven't experienced weight stigma.

Superconductors are super resilient to magnetic fields
A Professor at the University of Tsukuba provides a new theoretical mechanism that explains the ability of superconductive materials to bounce back from being exposed to a magnetic field.

Tracking structural regeneration of catalysts for electrochemical CO2 reduction
Electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to fuels and chemicals is one of the most attractive routes for CO2 utilization.

Scientists map freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean
The Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers flow into the Kara and Laptev seas and account for about half of the total freshwater runoff to the Arctic Ocean.

Exercise improves learning and memory in young adults
Exercise Improves Learning and Memory in Young Adults

Binge-drinkers' brains have to work harder to feel empathy for others
New research shows that binge-drinkers' brains have to put more effort into trying to feel empathy for other people in pain.

Biological sex affects genes for body fat, cancer, birth weight
Biological sex has a small but ubiquitous influence on gene expression in almost every type of human tissue, reports a new study.

Drugs bill warning over US/UK trade deal
The NHS would spend billions of pounds more on drugs if it had to pay US prices following a US/UK trade deal.

Historical climate fluctuations in Central Europe overestimated due to tree ring analysis
Tree rings exaggerate, a team of researchers finds. Scientists deduce historical climatic conditions for the past hundreds of years from the width of the annual growth rings of trees.

Fatter legs linked to reduced risk of high blood pressure
Adults with a higher percentage of fat tissue in their legs were less likely than those with a lower percentage to have high blood pressure.

A new way to solve thermal maturity of marine shales with high-over maturities
Maturity is important for petroleum source rock evaluation as well as shale oil and gas exploration.

Degradation outpaces deforestation in Brazilian Amazon
The area of the Brazilian Amazon affected by forest degradation--where forest biomass is lost but not completely converted to another use--is greater than the area affected by deforestation, according to a long-term study by Eraldo Aparecido Trondoli Matricardi and colleagues.

The Lancet: Largest global vaccine confidence survey reveals hesitancy hotspots
Public confidence in vaccines varies widely between countries and regions around the world, with signs that public trust may be improving in parts of Europe, whilst several countries experiencing political instability and religious extremism are seeing growing scepticism that vaccines are safe, and the spread of misinformation online is threatening vaccination programmes worldwide.

Rebirth of a volcano
Continued volcanic activity after the collapse of a volcano has not been documented in detail so far.

Mold now associated with food quality
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied a range of perceptions among Danes about good, healthy and safe foodstuffs.

New ACM study gives most detailed picture to date of US bachelor's programs in computing
ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, recently released its eighth annual Study of Non-Doctoral Granting Departments in Computing (NDC study).

Inexpensive, non-toxic nanofluid could be a game-changer for oil recovery
Researchers from the University of Houston have demonstrated that an inexpensive and non-toxic nanofluid can be used to efficiently recover even heavy oil with high viscosity from reservoirs.

For job seekers with disabilities, soft skills don't impress in early interviews
A new study by Rutgers University researchers finds that job candidates with disabilities are more likely to make a positive first impression on prospective employers when they promote technical skills rather than soft skills, such as their ability to lead others.

CityU develops anti-bacterial graphene face masks
A research team from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has successfully produced laser-induced graphene masks with an anti-bacterial efficiency of 80%, which can be enhanced to almost 100% within 10 minutes under sunlight.

Monitoring sleep positions for a healthy rest
MIT researchers have developed a wireless, private way to monitor a person's sleep postures -- whether snoozing on their back, stomach, or sides -- using reflected radio signals from a small device mounted on a bedroom wall.

Volcanic ash may have a bigger impact on the climate than we thought
Volcanic ash shuts down air traffic and can sicken people.

Portable MRI brings brain imaging to the patient bedside
A portable, low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device can be safely used at bedside in complex clinical care settings to evaluate critically-ill patients.

Skin creams, make-up and shampoos should be free from Pluralibacter
The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has assessed the health risks associated with cosmetic products contaminated with P. gergoviae.

Diamondback moth uses plant defense substances as oviposition cues
Researchers showed that isothiocyanates produced by cruciferous plants to fend off pests serve as oviposition cues.

In the absence of otters, climate warming leads to Aleutian Reef decline
Sea otters prey on urchins and keep their population in check.

The surprising rhythms of Leopards: Females are early birds, males are nocturnal
After 10 months of camera surveillance in the Tanzanian rainforest, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have become the first to conclude that female and male leopards are active at very different times of the day.

Mutant tomato helps to crack the secrets of fruiting
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that fruit development in tomatoes rewires their central metabolism.

Research on the impact of ACE-i and ARBs for patients with COVID-19 continues to evolve
Three research studies featured in the release related to low blood pressure, or hypotension in COVID-19 patients.

Combination immunotherapy benefits subset of patients with advanced prostate cancer
esults from a Phase II trial led by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center suggest that a combination of ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) plus nivolumab (anti-PD-1) can generate durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced prostate cancer.

Coming up for air: Extinct sea scorpions could breathe out of water, fossil detective unveils
Through computed tomography (CT) imaging, West Virginia University geologist James Lamsdell led a team that found evidence of air breathing in a 340 million-year-old sea scorpion, or eurypterid.

High-precision electrochemistry: The new gold standard in fuel cell catalyst development
As part of an international collaboration, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have made a pivotal discovery that could extend the lifetime of fuel cells that power electric vehicles by eliminating the dissolution of platinum catalysts.

Correcting COVID-19 misconceptions may require speaking to individuals' moral values
The effectiveness of educational content aimed at correcting misconceptions about the risks, transmission, and prevention of Covid-19 is largely influenced by a person's prevailing moral values, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.

Brazilian researcher creates an ultra-simple inexpensive method to fabricate optical fiber
The conventional process requires costly large-scale equipment. The novel method can be executed in a single step by a device no larger than a microwave oven.

Netflix - a zebra among horses: QUT researcher
Netflix is often criticised as a Hollywood-style entertainment behemoth crushing all competition and diminishing local content, but an Australian-based academic says that's a simplistic view.

Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer.

Antibiotic molecule enables immune system to kill HIV infected cells
A class of antibiotic molecules called pleicomacrolides inhibit the Nef protein, which HIV uses to evade the body's immune system.

Innate immune system -- How cGAS is kept bottled up
In higher organisms, detection of DNA in the cytoplasm triggers an immune reaction.
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