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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | September 16, 2020


Breast cancer surgery type, quality of life among younger women
Researchers investigated differences in quality of life and other outcomes (including physical functioning, body image, sexual health, anxiety and depressive symptoms) by type of breast cancer surgery (such as mastectomy or breast conserving surgery) in women 40 and younger.
NASA finds coldest cloud tops on hurricane Teddy's western side
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm.
New Viking DNA research yields unexpected information about who they were
In the popular imagination, Vikings were fearsome blonde-haired warriors from Scandinavia who used longboats to carry out raids across Europe in a brief but bloody reign of terror.
Domestic horses probably did not originate in Anatolia
Domestic horses likely did not originate in Anatolia as previously suspected, according to a new study of ancient horse remains dating as far back as 9000 BCE.
Climate change threatens Komodo dragons
The world's largest lizard, the Komodo dragon, could be driven to extinction by climate change unless significant measures to intervene are taken soon.
Potential COVID-19 drug azithromycin may increase risk for cardiac events
Azithromycin -- a commonly-prescribed antibiotic -- also is being investigated as a potential treatment for COVID-19.
The persistence of plastic
The amount of synthetic microfiber we shed into our waterways has been of great concern over the last few years, and for good reason: Every laundry cycle releases in its wastewater tens of thousands of tiny, near-invisible plastic fibers whose persistence and accumulation can affect aquatic habitats and food systems, and ultimately our own bodies in ways we have yet to discover.
MTU and Argonne engineers improve signal processing for small fiber optic cables
Tiny circuits can go the distance. Researchers at Michigan Tech have mapped a noise-reducing magneto-optical response that occurs in fiber-optic communications, opening the door for new materials technologies.
Scientists studied color change from green to red in the fluorescent protein
Researchers undertook a detailed study on green-to-red photoconversion (light-induced conversion) of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP).
Liquid water at 170 degrees Celsius
Using the X-ray laser European XFEL, a research team has investigated how water heats up under extreme conditions.
A quantum thermometer for measuring ultra-cold temperatures
In everyday life, measuring temperature is pretty straightforward. But in the quantum world, which deals with the super small and the ultra-cold, determining how hot or cold something is starts to get more challenging.
World's oldest animal sperm found in tiny crustaceans trapped in Myanmar amber
An international collaboration between researchers at Queen Mary University of London and the Chinese Academy of Science in Nanjing has led to the discovery of world's oldest animal sperm inside a tiny crustacean trapped in amber around 100 million years ago in Myanmar.
Princeton scientists explaining how diverse species coexist in microbial communities
In their paper appearing September 11, 2020 in the journal eLife, Princeton researchers Amir Erez, Jaime Lopez, Ned Wingreen and colleagues use mathematical modeling to explore how species diversity in a bacterial community is affected when the nutrients the microbes depend upon are only seasonally available.
Paleontology -- The oldest known sperm cells
An international team of paleontologists has discovered giant sperm cells in a 100-million year-old female ostracod preserved in a sample of amber.
Oral radiography can reveal chronic coronary artery disease
A study found a link between carotid artery calcification observable in radiographs and coronary artery disease as well as several oral infections.
Stop Livin to make lymphoma cells stop living
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that the protein Livin, an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, mediates resistance to immunotherapy in some lymphoma variants.
Researchers have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector.
Scientists identify gene family key to unlocking vertebrate evolution
New University of Colorado Boulder-led research finds that the traits that make vertebrates distinct from invertebrates were made possible by the emergence of a new set of genes 500 million years ago, documenting an important episode in evolution where new genes played a significant role in the evolution of novel traits in vertebrates.
Tailored education system to benefit kidney transplant patients
Researchers find their computer-tailored education system, 'Your Path to Transplant' increases knowledge and readiness to pursue kidney transplant.
Physicists make electrical nanolasers even smaller
Researchers cleared the obstacle that had prevented the creation of electrically driven nanolasers for integrated circuits.
Women hold prominent roles, publish more in 'open science' vs. 'reproducibility' model
An international group of researchers examined the two paths that scientists are following to improve science: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science.
Tortoise hatchlings are attracted to faces from birth
Tortoises are born with a natural preference for faces, according to new research from scientists at Queen Mary University of London, the University of Trento and the Fondazione Museo Civico Rovereto.
Seismic monitoring may improve early warnings for glacial lake outburst floods
Vibrations in the ground may help to improve advanced warnings about sudden floods that result from glacial melting, according to a study published today in Science Advances.
Temple researchers discover new path to neuron regeneration after spinal cord injury
The astrocytic glial cell has the unique ability to form scar tissue around damaged neurons.
How a giant short-faced bear reached the California Channel Islands
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, University of Oregon, and others report the unexpected discovery of an isolated short-faced bear toe bone from California's Channel Islands, presenting a puzzling scenario for how the largest mammalian carnivore to ever walk North America ended up in an island cave.
Generation of three-dimensional heart organoids
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) engineered three-dimensional functional heart organoids resembling the developing heart.
Can life survive a star's death? Webb telescope can reveal the answer
When stars like our sun die, all that remains is an exposed core - a white dwarf.
Reducing colorectal cancer disparities among African american men
Out of any other racial group, African American men have the lowest five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer (CRC).
People's life goals relate to their personality type, UC Davis study suggests
A new University of California, Davis, study suggests that for the most part, people formulate goals consistent with their personality traits.
Multi-institutional collaborative effort to create a cell map of the human heart
Researchers from the? Masonic Medical Research Institute (MMRI), the Precision Cardiology Lab (PCL) of the Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard, Bayer USA, Massachusetts General Hospital, and University of Pennsylvania collaborated to uncover some pressing questions about the biology of the heart.
Microsoft and University of Copenhagen collaboration yields promising material for quantum computing
Researchers at the Microsoft Quantum Materials Lab and the University of Copenhagen, working closely together, have succeeded in realizing an important and promising material for use in a future quantum computer.
Nicotine vapour more rewarding for adolescents than adults
University of Guelph researchers are the first to discover that adolescents react differently to e-cigarette vapour than adults.
Can pumping up cold water from deep within the ocean halt coral bleaching?
Rising ocean temperatures cause marine heat waves, which place stress on living coral animals, as well as the photosynthetic algae on which they depend for energy.
Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
The eyes of the fruit fly are covered by a thin and transparent coating with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties.
Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models.
Controlled dynamics of colloidal rods
Colloidal particles have become increasingly important for research as vehicles of biochemical agents.
Researchers ask: how sustainable is your toothbrush?
Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have examined the sustainability of different models of the most commonly used oral health product - the toothbrush - to ascertain which is best for the planet and associated human health.
How Dantu Blood Group protects against malaria - and how all humans could benefit
The secret of how the Dantu genetic blood variant helps to protect against malaria has been revealed for the first time by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kenya.
NASA sees tropical storm Karina's night moves
Tropical Storm Karina was making night moves like the old Bob Seger song.
Increase in alcohol-industry funded research is a cause for concern, study suggests
A study by the University of York has found that since 2009, there has been a 56% increase in research funded by alcohol companies or affiliated organisations - with some studies making claims about the health benefits of alcohol.
How cigarette butts can be recycled into bricks: a step-by-step plan
Fired-clay bricks with 1% recycled cigarette butt content are as strong as normal bricks and use less energy to produce.
NASA observes Hurricane Sally making early morning landfall in Alabama    
NASA's Aqua satellite and the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided views of the strength, extent and rainfall potential as Hurricane Sally was making landfall during the morning hours of Sept.
NASA imagery reveals Paulette became a strong extratropical cyclone 
Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low-pressure area.
Climate crisis ages fish, amphibians and reptiles
Climatic conditions are changing at an unprecedented rate, affecting mainly fish, amphibians and reptiles, ectothermic animals that are unable to generate their own internal heat.
Extent of India's COVID nudge campaign revealed
The Government of India's use of nudge theory in the first three months of the pandemic helped to tackle the virus on numerous fronts, a new study suggests.
Factors inherent to obesity could increase vulnerability to COVID-19
Conditions related to obesity, including inflammation and leaky gut, leave the lungs of obese patients more susceptible to COVID-19 and may explain why they are more likely to die from the disease, UTSW scientists say in a new article published online in eLife.
Scientists updated genome editing technology
International scientific group compared their developed carriers for delivery of genome editing (GE) tools with other available analogues.
Researchers demonstrate record speed with advanced spectroscopy technique
Researchers have developed an advanced spectrometer that can acquire data with exceptionally high speed.
How vitamin E acetate might injure vapers' lungs
E-cigarette, or vaping, associated lung injury (EVALI) has sickened thousands of people, most under the age of 35.
Predicting therapeutic response in depressed teen girls
The risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD) surges during adolescence-particularly for girls.
Researchers discover new photoactivation mechanism for polymer production
A team of researchers has demonstrated a way to use low-energy, visible light to produce polymer gel objects from pure monomer solutions.
Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?
Multiresistant bacteria are a serious problem in hospital and healthcare environments.
New data processing module makes deep neural networks smarter
Artificial intelligence researchers have improved the performance of deep neural networks by combining feature normalization and feature attention modules into a single module that they call attentive normalization.
Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown.
Mercury concentrations in Yukon River Fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
First of its kind research estimates potential releases of mercury from thawing permafrost in high and low emissions scenarios.
Minimally invasive ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release improves long-term outcomes
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release quickly improves hand function and reduces hand discomfort; improvement persisted beyond one year.
Machine learning models identify kids at risk of lead poisoning
Machine learning can help public health officials identify children most at risk of lead poisoning, enabling them to concentrate their limited resources on preventing poisonings rather than remediating homes only after a child suffers elevated blood lead levels, a new study shows.
A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, PhD student at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider.
Skoltech research puts exciton-polaritons in their place with new artificial laser-built lattices
Researchers at the Hybrid Photonics Laboratories in Skoltech and Southampton (UK), in collaboration with Lancaster University (UK), have demonstrated a new optical method to synthesize artificial solid-state crystal structures for cavity-polaritons using only laser light.
Biologists developing global citizen network to monitor insect abundance
A University of Arkansas biologist is part of an international team of researchers is building a volunteer network of citizen scientists to help monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies.
Social distancing and microbial health
Social distancing is a key component of the expert-recommended strategy to reduce the spread of COVID-19.
Scientists look into tropopause to find early signals of persistent strong rainfall
10 days before the peak rainfall, the joint action of the South Asia high and the Okhotsk Sea blocking high compresses the anomaly cold air between the two highs, and forms a narrow and steady cold air transport channel on the inclined isentropic surface.
KU astronomer helps confirm first-ever planet found orbiting white dwarf
A University of Kansas astronomer played a key role on the team that today announced the first-ever discovery of a planet orbiting a white dwarf.
Eyeglasses and COVID-19
Researchers in this observational study examined the association between wearing eyeglasses daily and susceptibility to COVID-19.
Middle-aged adults with healthy heart habits may lower high blood pressure risk years later
Middle-aged adults who didn't have high blood pressure and had positive health factors, as identified by the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 scale, were less likely to develop high blood pressure years later.
Great progress for electronic gadgets of the future
A new discovery is an important step towards smaller, more advanced electronics.
T cells take the lead in controlling SARS-CoV-2 and reducing COVID-19 disease severity
A multi-layered, virus-specific immune response is important for controlling SARS-CoV-2 during the acute phase of the infection and reducing COVID-19 disease severity, with the bulk of the evidence pointing to a much bigger role for T cells than antibodies.
A ferry protein in the pancreas protects it from the stress induced by a high-fat diet
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have now uncovered a key mechanism by which pancreatic function is maintained in response to a high-fat diet.
The accident preventers
Before autonomous vehicles participate in road traffic, they must demonstrate conclusively that they do not pose a danger to others.
Potent drug supply drop, not domestic drug policies, likely behind 2018 OD death downturn
The slight decline in drug overdose deaths in 2018 coincides with Chinese regulations on the powerful opioid carfentanil, rather than the result of domestic U.S. efforts to curb the epidemic, a new analysis reveals.
World's largest DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors - the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond.
Accurate labels like 'aerosol' or 'chemicals' increase perceived risks of e-cigarette use
Researchers at George Mason University found that students perceived e-cigarette emissions to be more harmful when accurate labels such as 'chemicals' and 'aerosols' were used to describe emissions, compared to tobacco industry coined jargon like 'vapor.' Students who viewed questions about 'aerosol' or 'chemical' were more likely to perceive secondhand exposure to e-cigarettes to be 'harmful/very harmful.' Further, students who perceived greater harmfulness from e-cigarette exposure were more likely to support a tobacco-free campus policy.
A 'cell-less' therapy may regenerate heart tissue without cell transplant risks
Ling Gao and colleagues have developed a strategy that uses exosomes - tiny membrane-bound sacs secreted by cells - to mimic the heart-regenerating effects of cardiac cell transplants, while potentially avoiding risks associated with whole-cell transplants.
Reprogramming brain cells enables flexible decision-making
Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations.
A white dwarf's surprise planetary companion
For the first time, an intact, giant exoplanet has been discovered orbiting close to a white dwarf star.
Better communication helps translate molecular tools
Multi-stakeholder collaboration is key for the adoption of molecular approaches that can facilitate accurate, cheaper and faster monitoring of marine ecosystems.
Metalloxocubes: A new class of neutral Co13O8 clusters with cubic aromaticity
Utilizing the customized deep ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry (DUV-LIMS) technique which takes advantage of efficient photoionization for neutral metal clusters, the authors observe the reaction of cobalt clusters with oxygen and find a stable Co13O8 cluster.
Mapping cavefish brains leads to neural origin of behavioral evolution
While studied for nearly a century, little is known about how cavefish brains differ.
Unraveling a spiral stream of dusty embers from a massive binary stellar forge
With almost two decades of mid-infrared imaging from the largest observatories around the world including the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers was able to capture the spiral motion of newly formed dust streaming from the massive and evolved binary star system WR112.
Perfectionists may be more prone to helicopter parenting, study finds
The negative effects of over-parenting on children are well documented, but less is known about why certain people become helicopter parents.
Choosing the right cover crop to protect the soil
Research helps farmers pick the best cover crops to keep their soil and nutrients in the field.
Heart transplants from severely obese donors show comparable outcomes for patients
An analysis of more than 26,000 heart transplant patients found that recipients of hearts from donors with severe obesity had similar post-transplant outcomes to recipients with non-obese donors.
Researchers 3D print tiny multicolor microstructures
Researchers have developed an automated 3D printing method that can produce multicolor 3D microstructures using different materials.
Viral load predicts mortality rate in hospitalized patients with cancer and COVID-19
Higher viral loads are associated with a greater risk of death among cancer and non-cancer patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report September 15 in the journal Cancer Cell.
A new discovery in regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Monash University and Duke-NUS researchers have made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among women
'You have to eat!' It's a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa.
New gene implicated in neuron diseases
Healthy NEMF helps the cell recycle garbled protein fragments. But several mutant forms resulted in neuromuscular, neurodegenerative or other ALS-like disease, the scientists found.
Tail regeneration in lungfish provides insight into evolution of limb regrowth
Researchers at UChicago find that the molecular mechanisms underlying tail regeneration in West African lungfish are similar to those seen in amphibians, suggesting the trait evolved in a common ancestor.
Blonde Scandinavians or well-travelled Southern Europeans? Research busts myths of Vikings
Our notion of the Scandinavian Viking very likely stems from films rather than history.
Sunfleck use research needs appropriate experimental leaves
The use of light by plant leaves to drive photosynthesis is often studied in steady state environments, but most plant leaves are required to adjust to fluctuations in incident light every day.
The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies.
Reviewing the quantum material 'engine room', QAHE
An Australian collaboration reviews the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), one of the most fascinating and important recent discoveries in condensed-matter physics.
Colorado's famous aspens expected to decline due to climate change
Using computer modeling, researchers simulated how the distribution of quaking aspen, a native tree known for its brilliant yellow and orange foliage in fall and the sound of its trembling leaves, will change amid rising temperatures over the next 100 years.
As pandemic progressed, people's perceived risks went up
A recent study documents how personal risk assessment and protective behaviors are linked.
Point-of-care biomarker assay for traumatic brain injury
Intracranial abnormalities on CT scan in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be predicted by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the blood.
Reaching 90% PL quantum yield in 1D metal halide by pressure-suppressed nonradiative loss
Here, we report a significant pressure-induced photoluminescence (PL) enhancement in a one-dimensional hybrid metal halide C4N2H14PbBr4, and the underlying mechanisms are investigated using in situ experimental characterization and first-principles calculations.
Device could help detect signs of extraterrestrial life
Although Earth is uniquely situated in the solar system to support creatures that call it home, different forms of life could have once existed, or might still exist, on other planets.
Mercury concentrations in Yukon river fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
The concentration of mercury in the fish in Alaska's Yukon River may exceed the EPA's human health criterion by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming are not constrained, according to scientific research funded in part by NASA
Systematic parental training helps the well-being of preschool children with ADHD
Research findings from Aarhus University and the Central Denmark Region's Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Centre show that quality of life is poorer for preschool children with ADHD compared to children from the control population.
Novel photoresist enables 3D printing of smallest porous structures
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University have developed a photoresist for two-photon microprinting.
Rapid 3D printing with visible light
3D printing has driven innovations in fields ranging from art to aerospace to medicine.
New targets for melanoma treatment
A collaborative study led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute and the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute (ONJCRI) has uncovered new markers (HLA-associated peptides) that are uniquely present on melanoma tumours and could pave the way for therapeutic vaccines to be developed in the fight against melanoma.
NASA finds wind shear not letting up on Tropical Storm Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Vicky as it continued moving through the eastern North Atlantic Ocean fighting strong wind shear.
Research reveals an enormous planet quickly orbiting a tiny, dying star
Thanks to a bevy of telescopes in space and on Earth -- and even a pair of amateur astronomers in Arizona -- a University of Wisconsin-Madison astronomer and his colleagues have discovered a Jupiter-sized planet orbiting at breakneck speed around a distant white dwarf star.
Physical diseases can negatively affect a depression
Patients with a first-time depression diagnosis have an increased risk of the disease worsening and requiring hospitalisation, if they have previously been treated for a physical disease at a hospital.
SwRI scientist searches for stellar phosphorus to find potentially habitable exoplanets
SAN ANTONIO -- Sept. 16, 2020 -- A Southwest Research Institute scientist has identified stellar phosphorus as a probable marker in narrowing the search for life in the cosmos.
Siberia's permafrost erosion has been worsening for years
The Arctic is warming faster than any other region on the planet.
A novel approach to childhood obesity prevention
A novel taxonomic approach to obesity prevention using existing U.S.
Discovery of a new mass extinction
It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record.
NASA-NOAA satellite finds a strengthening tropical storm Noul NASA-NOAA's Suom
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Noui as it continued to organize and intensify.
Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles.
Adverse pregnancy outcomes, risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women
This observational study looked at whether adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, gestational diabetes and low birth weight are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women, independent of traditional risk factors.
Discoveries made in how immune system detects hidden intruders
Research led by Dr. Wonmuk Hwang has led to better understanding on how components of the body's immune system find intruding or damaged cells, which could lead to novel approaches to viral and cancer treatments.
Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others.
Researchers create better material for wearable biosensors
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate.
Medical robotic hand? Rubbery semiconductor makes it possible
A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available technologies aren't good enough to match the in-person experience.
Biggest fish in the sea are girls
Female whale sharks grow more slowly than males but end up being larger, research suggests.
Pollution exposure linked to stroke risk in people with common heart rhythm disorder
People with atrial fibrillation who are exposed to greater levels of pollution have a higher risk of stroke than their peers who live with less pollution.
Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change
New research from the University of Washington shows that a wide variety of marine animals -- from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks -- already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow.
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes.
Researchers discover effective pathway to convert CO2 into ethylene
The scientists developed nanoscale copper wires with specially shaped surfaces to catalyze a chemical reaction that reduces greenhouse gas emissions while generating ethylene -- a valuable chemical simultaneously.
Oncotarget: ATM inhibition overcomes resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitor
The cover for issue 37 of Oncotarget features Figure 7, ''The combination of romidepsin and KU60019 is synergistic in a xenograft model of MCL,'' by Scotto, et al. which reported that the antiproliferative effect induced by histone deactylase inhibitors is associated with the up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21.
HKU's Laboratory for Space Research member co-discovers first planet found around white dwarf star
An international team of astronomers led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, including NASA co-authors, and Thomas G.
Sturdy fabric-based piezoelectric energy harvester takes us one step closer to wearable electronics
KAIST researchers presented a highly flexible but sturdy wearable piezoelectric harvester using the simple and easy fabrication process of hot pressing and tape casting.
Fast calculation dials in better batteries
A simpler and more efficient way to predict the performance of batteries will lead to better batteries, according to Rice University engineers.
Replicating a genome starts with a twist, a pinch, and a bit of a dance
DNA replication begins with a set of proteins--the Origin of Replication Complex (ORC).
One in 10 older dental patients inappropriately prescribed opioids
A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that a significant proportion of older patients receiving opioids at dental visits also use psychotropic medications -- a potentially harmful combination.
Immune 'cloaking' in cancer cells and implications for immunotherapy
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and the Moffitt Cancer Centre have created a mathematical model that can determine the impact of the immune system on tumour evolution.
Turbulence affects aerosols and cloud formation
Turbulent air in the atmosphere affects how cloud droplets form.
Women more prone to depression in countries with low gender equality rankings
Overall, the presence of depressive symptoms is highly dependent on cultural congruence, whereas self-esteem is not.
Pandemics and epidemics could exacerbate racism xenophobia
Human beings share these same biological impulses as other animals to separate into modular social groups.
Stanford team pinpoints brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences
Stanford scientists identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality.
Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a ''host shift'' of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam.
Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
St. Jude researchers capture the structure of PARP enzymes at work, leading to a new understanding of DNA repair that may aid cancer treatments targeting the process.

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