Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 17, 2020
Changes in lung cancer treatment during COVID-19 pandemic
Changes in lung cancer treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic were evaluated in this study.

Reduction in insomnia symptoms associated with non-invasive neurotechnology
For people with chronic insomnia, a good night's sleep is elusive.

Examining association of coffee consumption, survival in patients with colorectal cancer
Researchers in this observational study investigated the association between the number of cups of coffee consumed per day and survival in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer.

First look at how hallucinogens bind structurally to serotonin receptors
Although hallucinogenic drugs have been studied for decades, little is known about the underlying mechanisms in the brain by which they induce their effects.

'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways.

Comparing virtual and actual pants
The criteria for comparing virtual and actual clothes was clarified, which will be useful for future utilization of 3D simulators for garment production.

Unknown details identified in the Lions' Courtyard at the Alhambra
A novel methodology was followed based on three complementary graphic analyses: first, outstanding images from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries were reviewed; then new computer drawings were made of their muqarnas, following the theoretical principles of their geometrical grouping; and finally, a three-dimensional scan was made to ascertain their precise current state from the point cloud obtained.

All-optical method sets record for ultrafast high-spatial-resolution imaging: 15 trillion frames per second
Scientists at Shenzhen University have recently developed an all-optical ultrafast imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolutions, as well as a high frame rate.

Scientists sound alarm on plastic pollution
A new study shows that despite global commitments to address plastic pollution, growth in plastic waste, or 'plastics emissions' continues to outpace reduction.

Princeton researchers discover how worms pass down knowledge through the generations
Princeton researchers Rachel Kaletsky, Rebecca Moore, Coleen Murphy and colleagues have discovered that the microscopic roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans recognizes a small RNA made by a pathogenic bacterium, and uses that RNA to convey learned avoidance of the bacterium to offspring.

A 48,000 years old tooth that belonged to one of the last Neanderthals in Northern Italy
A child between 11 and 12 years of age lost it near the ''Riparo del Broion'' on the Berici Hills in Veneto.

New research shows how fast our brains are at 'recording' new words
How much time does a brain need to learn a new word?

Why the dose matters: Study shows levels and anti-tumor effectiveness of a common drug vary widely
When used to manage infections, the drug itraconazole is generally given at a single, fixed dose to all patients.

Understanding the movement patterns of free-swimming marine snails
New research looks at the swimming and sinking kinematics of nine species of warm water pteropods (sea snails) to shed light on their ecology, predator-prey interactions, and vertical distributions.

Comparing proportions of female, male corresponding authors in preprint research repositories before, during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers examined changes in the proportion of female corresponding authors in bioRxiv (biorxiv.org) and medRxiv (medrxiv.org), which are online archive and distribution services for unpublished preprint research in the life and health sciences, respectively, before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Authoritative new analysis links increased omega-3 intake to cardioprotection and improved cardiovascular outcomes
A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings provides the most comprehensive analysis of the role of omega-3 dosage on cardiovascular prevention to date.

Sea ice triggered the Little Ice Age, finds a new study
A new study finds a trigger for the Little Ice Age that cooled Europe from the 1300s through mid-1800s, and supports surprising model results suggesting that under the right conditions sudden climate changes can occur spontaneously, without external forcing.

NASA-NOAA satellite catches nighttime view of major hurricane Teddy
An early morning infrared image of Hurricane Teddy taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite shows the proximity of the strengthening hurricane to the Lesser Antilles island chain and Puerto Rico.

Ecologists sound alarm on plastic pollution
Research led by ecologists at the University of Toronto examining plastic pollution entering oceans, rivers and lakes around the world annually, outlines potential impacts of various mitigation strategies over the coming decade.

New mathematical tool can select the best sensors for the job
In the 2019 Boeing 737 Max crash, the recovered black box from the aftermath hinted that a failed pressure sensor may have caused the ill-fated aircraft to nose dive.

Stroke patients with COVID-19 have increased inflammation, stroke severity and death
Stroke patients who also have COVID-19 showed increased systemic inflammation, a more serious stroke severity and a much higher rate of death, compared to stroke patients who did not have COVID-19, according a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study of 60 ischemic stroke patients admitted to UAB Hospital between late March and early May 2020.

Stroke scans could reveal COVID-19 infection
New research from King's College London has found that COVID-19 may be diagnosed on the same emergency scans intended to diagnose stroke.

How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock.

The key to happiness: Friends or family?
Think spending time with your kids and spouse is the key to your happiness?

Metformin for type 2 diabetes patients or not? Researchers now have the answer
Metformin is the first-line drug that can lower blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients.

Curve at tip of shoes eases movement but may lead to weaker muscles, problems
The scientists found that the more curved a toe spring is, the less power the foot inside the shoe has to exert when pushing off from the ground while walking.

How much will polar ice sheets add to sea level rise?
Over 99% of terrestrial ice is bound up in the ice sheets covering Antarctic and Greenland.

Shedding light on the development of efficient blue-emitting semiconductors
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered a new alkali copper halide, Cs5Cu3Cl6I2, that emits pure blue light.

Time-restricted feeding improves health without altering the body's core clock
For the first time, scientists have studied the early effects of time-restricted feeding on the daily periodic oscillations of metabolites and genes in muscle, and metabolites in blood.

New method adds and subtracts for sustainability's true measure
Policies across the world seek clear paths to sustainability, but it takes a broad look to know their true impact.

The Phish scale: NIST's new tool helps IT staff see why users click on fraudulent emails
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new tool called the Phish Scale that could help organizations better train their employees to avoid a particularly dangerous form of cyber attack known as phishing.

Scientists evaluated the prospects of medical tourism in Russia
Scientists from Sechenov University interviewed Russian healthcare experts to find out what problems impeded the development of medical tourism in the country most and what measures would help attract foreigners.

A scientific first: How psychedelics bind to key brain cell receptor
For the first time, scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill and Stanford solved the high-resolution structure of these compounds when they are actively bound to the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor on the surface of brain cells.

0.5°C of additional warming has a huge effect on global aridity
In a simulation study, UTokyo researchers showed that limiting global warming to 1.5°C rather than 2°C will mitigate aridification in some regions of the world including the Mediterranean, western Europe, and southern Africa.

New live biotherapeutic products will require regulatory and scientific innovation
European regulatory expertise centre, the Pharmabiotic Research Institute (PRI), which supports the pharmaceutical development of microbiome-based drug products, a new field of biological medicine, has published a review of the regulatory and scientific requirements needed to properly develop live biotherapeutic products (LBPs).

Medical mistrust grounded in structural and systemic racism affects HIV care for Black women in the US South
For Black women in the southern United States, mistrust of the health care system that is grounded in structural and systemic racism is a key factor affecting participation in HIV prevention and treatment services, reports a study in the September/October issue of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC).

NRL, NCATS scientists develop method to safely study COVID-19, other contagious diseases
Scientists and researchers at NRL and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences collaborate to develop SARS-CoV-2 nanoparticle probes that are used to study fundamental interactions between SARS-CoV-2 Spike proteins and human cells.

Access to cancer medicines and clinical trials show stark variations across Europe
Access to cancer medicines is highly unequal across Europe both for new drugs in development because of uneven access to clinical trials and for currently approved drugs due to huge disparities in healthcare spending by different countries, according to results from studies presented at ESMO 2020.

Model comparison
The major international project ISMIP6 offers new estimates of how much melting ice sheets will contribute to global sea-level rise by 2100.

Study: Europe's old-growth forests at risk
A new study presents the first comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of primary forests in Europe--and shows that many of them are not protected and at risk of being destroyed.

Improving the efficacy of cellular therapies
A new study published in Nature Communications deepens the understanding of the development of T cell, an important component of the immune system.

Detaching and uplifting, not bulldozing
ETH researchers have used a computer model to test a new hypothesis about the formation of the Alps while simulating seismic activity in Switzerland.

Research shows potential of gene editing in barley
An international team of plant scientists have shown the potential to rapidly improve the quality of barley grain through a genetic tool known as CRISPR or gene editing.

Scientists uncover the structural mechanism of coronavirus receptor binding
The spike protein on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus can adopt at least ten distinct structural states, when in contact with the human virus receptor ACE2, according to research from the Francis Crick Institute published in Nature today (Thursday).

Higher dementia risk in women with prolonged fertility
Women with a longer reproductive period had an elevated risk for dementia in old age, compared with those who were fertile for a shorter period, a population-based study from the University of Gothenburg shows.

Trump must contend with a mobilized religious left, new research finds
With the 2020 presidential election on the near horizon, Notre Dame sociologist Kraig Beyerlein discusses what he and his co-researcher learned about the political engagement of U.S. congregations -- and how that may impact results on Nov.

International study will compare different countries' responses to COVID-19
Project led by researchers from Brazilian and American institutions will collect primary data during the pandemic to create a repository that will serve as a basis for future studies.

The acrobatic hydra shows off: How environmental cues can affect behavior
A duo from Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has begun to crack the neural code behind Hydra's simplest behavior, called contraction bursts.

Rapid blood test could detect brain injury in minutes, study shows
A blood protein test could detect the severity of head trauma in under 15 minutes, according to a recent study.

Men and women experience similar rates of anxiety due to job insecurity
Despite gender disparities in the workforce, male and female workers in Europe report similar rates of anxiety in response to job insecurity across countries.

Super-potent blood stem cells discovered in human embryos
In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Andrejs Ivanovs, Alexander Medvinsky (a.medvinsky@ed.ac.uk) and colleagues from the University of Edinburgh discovered that HSCs from early human embryos, when HSCs are just starting to form, are more robust at expanding than those from the cord blood.

Preparing future clinicians to intervene in opioid crisis
Opioid use disorder and overdose have reached unprecedented levels around the world.

University of Cincinnati research produces different results from key China COVID-19 study
Early in the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, a small study in China produced results that influenced subsequent research on the virus.

Smoking linked to bleeding in the brain in large, long-term study of twins
Researchers in Finland found a link between smoking and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a type of bleeding stroke, in a study of more than 16,000 pairs of twins over 42 years.

New study identifies wheat varieties that resist the destructive stripe rust disease
Stripe rust is one of the most destructive wheat diseases in the world, especially in the United States.

New estimates for the rise in sea levels due to ice sheet mass loss under climate change
An international consortium of researchers under the aegis of CMIP6 has calculated new estimates for the melting of Earth's ice sheets due to greenhouse gas emissions and its impact on sea levels, showing that the ice sheets could together contribute more than 40 cm by the end of 2100.

Many practitioners are not prescribing HIV prevention medication, study finds
Only about 54% of medical practitioners surveyed say they have prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to HIV-vulnerable patients, according to a new study by a Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigator.

Smokers increasingly using e-cigarettes to quit, New Zealand survey shows
People who smoke are increasingly using e-cigarettes to try to quit smoking, a study by researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, has found.

Scientists "scent train" honeybees to boost sunflowers' seed production
If you want a dog to hunt something down, it helps to let them sniff an item to pick up the scent.

PPIs may affect responses to atezolizumab in patients with urothelial cancer
Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use was associated with worse outcomes in patients with urothelial cancer treated with the immunotherapeutic atezolizumab (Tecentriq), compared with patients who did not use PPIs.

New smart drug delivery system may help treatment for neurological disorders
A Rutgers-led team has created a smart drug delivery system that reduces inflammation in damaged nervous tissues and may help treat spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders.

Efficacy of povidone-iodine nasal antiseptic for rapid inactivation of SARS-CoV-2
This laboratory study assessed the efficacy of the nasal antiseptic solution povidone-iodine against transmission of SARS-C0V-2.

Invasive shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion
Researchers have identified an invasive blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia's Calvert Island.

Self-imaging of a molecule by its own electrons
Researchers at the Max Born Institute (MBI) have shown that high-resolution movies of molecular dynamics can be recorded using electrons ejected from the molecule by an intense laser field.

Freshwater biology: Turtle scavenging critical to freshwater ecosystem health
Freshwater turtles may have a role in regulating water quality in river systems by scavenging fish carcasses, suggests a study of Emydura macquarii, a vulnerable freshwater turtle species found in Australia.

Emissions could add 15 inches to 2100 sea level rise, NASA-led study finds
An international effort that brought together more than 60 ice, ocean and atmosphere scientists from three dozen international institutions has generated new estimates of how much of an impact Earth's melting ice sheets.

Droughts in the Amazon rainforest can be predicted up to 18 months in advance
For the first time, it is possible to accurately predict severe drought up to 18 months in advance in Tropical South America.

Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity.

Does a healthy diet counter the ill-effects of obesity?
A healthy quality Mediterranean-like diet partially modifies the association between obesity and cardiovascular mortality, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Karl Michaëlsson of Uppsala University, Sweden, and colleagues.

Study shows quizzes improve academic performance
Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new Iowa State University meta-analysis.

New cause of syndromic microcephaly identified
A team of international collaborators identifies a new cause of syndromic microcephaly caused by LMNB1 mutations that disrupt the nuclear envelope.

Rapid test for Covid-19 shows improved sensitivity
A CRISPR-based diagnostic for the SARS-Cov-2 virus can produce results in less than an hour with similar accuracy as the standard PCR test now used.

NASA finds tropical storm Noul packing a punch    
Powerful storms with heavy rainmaking capabilities appeared over the coast of central Vietnam in NASA provided infrared imagery on Sept.

Analysis of COVID-19 publications identifies research gaps
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientific and medical journals have published over 100,000 studies on SARS-CoV-2.

New virtual screening tool eases, accelerates routine diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension
The COVID-19 pandemic has increasing numbers of doctors caring for patients virtually.

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers.

SHEA endorses requiring recommended vaccinations for healthcare personnel, educators and students
All healthcare personnel should be immunized against vaccine preventable diseases recommended by U.S.

Shift in West African wildmeat trade suggests erosion of cultural taboos
New research by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has demonstrated a clear fluctuation in the trade of wildmeat in and around the High Niger National Park in Guinea, West Africa.

Potential target identified for migraine therapy
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan have identified the protein GLT-1 as the neurotransmitter glutamate transporter in the brain that is related to cortical spreading depression, a pathological condition that underlies migraines.

Climate change impacts astronomical observations
Already, climate change is having an impact on the conditions of space observation at the Very Large Telescope in the Atacama Desert.

Could breadfruit be the next superfood? UBC researchers say yes
A fruit used for centuries in countries around the world is getting the nutritional thumbs-up from a team of British Columbia researchers.

A direct link between smoking and fatal brain haemorrhage demonstrated by a Finnish study
According to a recently published study of Finnish twins, smoking most likely causes a significant share of all cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage, the most fatal type of cerebrovascular disturbances.

OHSU-VA research suggests strategies to reduce missed appointments
New research from Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System suggests that a little finesse and a thoughtful approach could go a long way toward reducing a vexing problem in the health care system: missed appointments.

Study shows SARS-CoV-2 jumped between people and mink, providing strong evidence of zoonotic transmission
A study investigating SARS-CoV-2 infections across 16 mink farms in the Netherlands, being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that the virus likely jumped between people and mink and back, providing strong evidence that animal to human (zoonotic) transmission is possible.

Consumers value difficult decisions over easy choices
In a paper co-authored by Gaurav Jain, an assistant professor of marketing in the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer, researchers found that disfluency, or the difficulty for an individual to process a message, increases people's attitudes toward that message after a time delay.

Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
Researchers from The University of Queensland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress.

Coffee associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients
In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study.

Engineered bacteria churn out cancer biomarkers
A Cornell lab has created these very tools by commandeering simple, single-celled microorganisms - namely E. coli bacteria - and engineering them to explore the complex process of glycosylation and the functional role that protein-linked glycans play in health and disease.

Algorithm boosts efficiency, nutrition for food bank ops
Cornell University systems engineers examined data from a busy New York state food bank and, using a new algorithm, found ways to better allocate food and elevate nutrition in the process.

What happens between the sheets?
Adding calcium to graphene creates an extremely-promising superconductor, but where does the calcium go?

Study shows first proof that a safer UV light effectively kills virus causing COVID-19
Researchers offer first proof that Ultraviolet C light with a 222 nm wavelength -- which is safer to use around humans -- effectively kills the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Study finds novel mechanism that may confer protection against glaucoma
A team of researchers from LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence and the University of Copenhagen provides the first evidence that patients with ocular hypertension may exhibit superior antioxidant protection that promotes resistance to the elevated intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma.

Wildfire on the rise since 1984 in Northern California's coastal ranges
High-severity wildfires in northern coastal California have been increasing by about 10 percent per decade since 1984, according to a study from the University of California, Davis, that associates climate trends with wildfire.

Momentum of unprecedented Chilean uprising stalled by COVID-19 pandemic
The uprising that erupted in fall 2019 in Chile against the post-dictatorship government may be diminished by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Do-it-yourself COVID-19 vaccines fraught with public health problems
''Citizen scientists'' developing homemade COVID-19 vaccines may believe they're inoculating themselves against the ongoing pandemic, but the practice of self-experimentation with do-it-yourself medical innovations is fraught with legal, ethical and public health issues, says a new paper co-written by University of Illinois law professor Jacob S.

Live imaging method brings structural information to mapping of brain function
Neuroscientists distinguish brain regions based on what they do, but now have a new way to overlay information about how they are built, too.

Typhoid: Study confirms Vi-DT conjugate vaccine is safe and immunogenic in children 6-23 months
A new study conducted by IVI in collaboration with SK bioscience shows that single-dose and two-dose regimens of Vi-DT typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) are safe and immunogenic in children 6-23 months of age, a group with high rates of typhoid fever in resource-limited settings.

Violence risk assessment in mental health care - Journal of Psychiatric Practice outlines a therapeutic risk management approach
Assessing the potential for violent behavior by patients with psychiatric disorders is an essential but challenging responsibility for mental health professionals.

Curbing land clearing for food production is vital to reverse biodiversity declines
Preserving terrestrial biodiversity requires more ambitious land-conservation targets to be established and met.

Humans develop more slowly than mice because our chemistry is different
Scientists have found that the ''segmentation clock''--a genetic network that governs the body pattern formation of embryos--progresses more slowly in humans than in mice because the biochemical reactions are slower in human cells.

Child neglect linked to teen pregnancy
Children who experience neglect are seven times more likely than other abuse victims to have a teen pregnancy say University of Queensland researchers.

The hormone glucagon may be a warning light for diabetes
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are introducing a new biological concept in the fight against diabetes: glucagon resistance.

Hubble captures crisp new image of Jupiter and Europa
This latest image of Jupiter, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope on Aug.

Ocean acidification puts deep-sea coral reefs at risk of collapse
Deep-sea coral reefs face challenges as changes to ocean chemistry triggered by climate change may cause their foundations to become brittle, a study suggests.

New study estimates nearly 90,000 cancer cases diagnosed in adolescents and young adults
A new report examining cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs), defined as diagnoses occurring during ages 15 to 39, provides updated estimates of the contemporary cancer burden in this age group, predicting that 89,500 cases and 9,270 deaths will occur in 2020 in the United States.

Study shows one quarter of hospitalized young patients aged 18-39 years with COVID-19 developed pneumonia
New research to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that one quarter of hospitalized younger patients with COVID-19 aged 18-39 years developed pneumonia, underlining the danger the disease represents to young people.

Three common medications lower risk and mortality for lung cancer
Combined use of aspirin, statins, and metformin is associated with decreased lung cancer incidence and mortality, according to a study published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO).

Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses
Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life.

New calculation refines comparison of matter with antimatter
An international collaboration of theoretical physicists has published a new calculation relevant to the search for an explanation of the predominance of matter over antimatter in our universe.

Future of genomics at risk without greater public trust in how genetic data is shared
The largest ever survey on global public attitudes towards genomic research and data sharing suggests that work is needed to raise levels of public trust in how genetic data is used in order for that data to fulfil its promise to advance human health and medicine.

Hospitals miss mental illness diagnosis in more than a quarter of patients
Severe mental illness diagnoses are missed by clinicians in more than one quarter of cases when people are hospitalised for other conditions, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in PLOS Medicine.

Mathematical modelling to prevent fistulas
It is better to invest in measures that make it easier for women to visit a doctor during pregnancy than measures to repair birth injuries.

Kang finds keys to control the 'driver of cancer's aggressiveness'
A dangerous protein named SNAI2 helps cancers metastasize and shields cancer from both the immune system and chemotherapy.

Discovery of microbes with mixed membranes sheds new light on early evolution of life
Current research suggests that more complex life-forms, including humans, evolved from a symbiosis event of Bacteria and another single-celled organism known as Archaea.

Sugar promotes sperm longevity in pig reproductive tract
For many livestock species, artificial insemination (AI) is standard. But it can be tricky to achieve success the first time, thanks to variability in ovulation timing across the herd.

Interim data from early US COVID-19 hotspot show mortality and seriousness of disease were not associated with race/ethnicity
A study of interim data from two hospitals in an early US COVID-19 hotspot, to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September), shows that race and ethnicity were not significantly associated with higher in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, and that rates of moderate, severe, and critical forms of COVID-19 were similar between racial and ethnic groups.

The brain's memory abilities inspire AI experts in making neural networks less 'forgetful'
Artificial intelligence (AI) experts at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Baylor College of Medicine report that they have successfully addressed what they call a ''major, long-standing obstacle to increasing AI capabilities'' by drawing inspiration from a human brain memory mechanism known as ''replay.''

Study suggests substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs are infected with SARS-CoV-2 by their owners, due to presence of antibodies in their blood
A small study by Canadian veterinary science experts being presented at this ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) suggests that a substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 by their owners.

NASA analyzes rainfall and rainmaking capability in Hurricane Sally
NASA satellites provided a look at the rainfall potential in Hurricane Sally before and after it made landfall in southern Alabama.

Fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup deliver a one-two punch to health
Consuming high fructose corn syrup appears to be as bad for your health as consuming sugar in the form of fructose alone, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis.

New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method to determine - rapidly, easily and cheaply - how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth.

NASA finds a fading wispy Tropical Depression Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite found Vicky to be a shadow of its former self, devoid of precipitation around its low-level center.

Imaging probe to visualize Alzheimer's disease-related gamma-secretase in the brain
Scientists have developed a molecular imaging probe to reveal Alzheimer's-related γ-secretase in rodents and macaques with translational potentials in humans

Study shows high prevalence of fatigue following SARS-CoV-2 infection independent of COVID-19 disease severity
Research being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that persistent fatigue occurs in more than half of patients recovered from COVID-19, regardless of the seriousness of their infection.

Study quantifies Saharan dust reaching Amazon
MIAMI--A new study by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and ATMO Guyane quantified the amount of Saharan dust reaching the Amazon to better understand how dust could impact soil fertility in the region.

Chaotic "Lévy walks" are a good strategy for animals
A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) explains the advantage that animals have of using a specific type of chaotic type of movement called a ''Lévy walk,'' and how this type of behavior emerges.

CNIC researchers discover a mechanism allowing immune cells to regulate obesity
A CNIC's team have discovered a mechanism explaining how macrophages regulate obesity.

COVID-19 could cause declines in life expectancy
A new analysis of period life expectancy around the world shows that the COVID-19 pandemic could cause a short-term decline in life expectancy in many regions of the world.

Biomechanics: Wearing footwear with toe springs requires less muscle work
Wearing footwear with an upward curvature at the front of the shoe - known as the toe spring - requires less work from the muscles of the feet to walk than shoes with a flatter sole, according to an experimental study published in Scientific Reports.

PET/MRI improves lesion detection, reduces radiation exposure
A single-center observational study of more than 1,000 oncological examinations has demonstrated that positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) facilitates cancer staging as well as PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) and improves lesion detectability in select cancers, potentially helping to promote fast, efficient local and whole-body staging in one step.

Tweets show vapers rarely use e-cigarettes to quit smoking or improve health
The vast majority of Twitter users who vape with JUUL e-cigarettes are not using the devices to stop smoking or to improve their health, according to a research team led by University of Utah Health scientists.

Biomarker predicts who will have severe COVID-19
KAIST researchers have identified key markers that could help pinpoint patients who are bound to get a severe reaction to COVID-19 infection.

Texas Tech, Nanjing Agricultural Research teams make plant nutrient delivery breakthrough
The collaboration revealed that the symbiotic relationship between plants and fungi provides nitrates to plants, which could lead to reduced fertilizer use.

Hubble captures crisp new portrait of Jupiter's storms
Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the famous Great Red Spot region gearing up to change color -- again.

Algorithms uncover cancers' hidden genetic losses and gains
Limitations in DNA sequencing technology make it difficult to detect some major mutations often linked to cancer, such as the loss or duplication of parts of chromosomes.

Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development.
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