Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 21, 2020
Scientists advance understanding of blood-brain barrier health
in a study with potential impacts on a variety of neurological diseases, Virginia Tech researchers have provided the first experimental evidence from a living organism to show that an abundant, star-shaped brain cell known as an astrocyte is essential for blood-brain barrier health.

Scientists reveal details about the first cat infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Spain
The IRTA-CReSA coronavirus research team, alongside researchers from IrsiCaixa, the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) and veterinarians from a veterinary hospital near Barcelona publish in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) the results of postoperative analyzes of COVID-19 positive cat necropsy.

Making sense of diabetes
Throughout her 38-year nursing career, Laurel Despins has progressed from a bedside nurse to a clinical nurse specialist and has worked in medical, surgical and cardiac intensive care units.

'Awe walks' boost emotional well-being
A regular dose of awe is a simple way to boost healthy 'prosocial' emotions such as compassion and gratitude, according to a new study by researchers at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center (MAC) and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) -- a partnership between UCSF and Trinity College Dublin to improve brain health worldwide.

Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread - 4000 years ago
New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.

Researchers discover new molecules for tracking Parkinson's disease
New research describes an innovative method for identifying molecules that can help track the progression of Parkinson's disease.

The impact of COVID-19 on access to Parkinson's disease medication
A global survey of health professionals has shown that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with Parkinson's disease in large parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin and South America experienced difficulty in accessing their medication, which is likely to have led to deterioration of symptom control.

Biomarker indicating neurodegeneration identified in the eye
A new study led by Boston Medical Center researchers indicates a well-known biomarker that serves as a marker for earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is now detectable in the eye.

How to improve the surgery backlog during COVID-19
When the COVID-19 pandemic first began, many non-urgent surgeries were delayed.

Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
How can we explain the fact that no single species predominates?

Study finds that children's immune response protects against COVID-19
The first study comparing the immune responses of adults and children with COVID-19 has detected key differences that may contribute to understanding why children usually have milder disease than adults.

How we age
It is well understood that mortality rates increase with age.

COVID-19 and the decolonization of Indigenous public health
Indigenous self-determination, leadership and knowledge have helped protect Indigenous communities in Canada during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and these principles should be incorporated into public health in future, argue the authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200852.

Researchers identify new type of superconductor
Until now, the history of superconducting materials has been a tale of two types: s-wave and d-wave.

Educational intervention before 'first sex' can protect sexual health of black males
A new Johns Hopkins Medicine study adds to evidence that the earlier parents, educators and health care workers have age-appropriate and frank discussions about safe sex, the better will be their -- and their partners' -- long-term sexual health and developmen

Online training helps preemies
An international team of researchers has now found that computerised training can support preterm children's academic success.

Corona-induced CO2 emission reductions are not yet detectable in the atmosphere
The impact of the corona pandemic will reduce worldwide carbon dioxide emissions by up to eight percent in 2020.

Unlocking the secrets of plant genomes in high resolution
Resolving genomes, particularly plant genomes, is a very complex and error-prone task.

Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in 'ruling reptiles'
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis-a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago-and inferred that it had a ''mosaic'' of functions in locomotion.

USC/Princeton study finds middle-aged americans report more pain than the elderly
Middle-aged Americans report more pain than the elderly. Pain is more prevalent among the two-thirds of U.S. adults without a four-year college degree.

Parkinson's disease is not one, but two diseases
Researchers around the world have been puzzled by the different symptoms and varied disease pathways of Parkinson's patients.

Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports.

Ribeye-eating pigs demonstrate protein quality for humans
Nearly a decade ago, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) developed a new index to assess protein quality in foods.

Regulatory T cells could lead to new immunotherapies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis
In a new University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers have discovered how regulatory T cells (Treg) are instrumental in limiting the damage caused to the spinal cord in diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS).

Deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes based on a doublet-emission cerium(III) complex
In this work, the authors have demonstrated a high external quantum efficiency (EQE) in deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on a new cerium(III) complex Ce-1 as the emitter, which can achieve 100% exciton utilization efficiency (EUE).

Strong markets for cultured meat across meat-reducing Germany and France
New research shows substantial markets for cultured meat and movements towards meat reduced diets across Germany and France.

Bio-based inhibition of gas hydrate formation
Copper stearate was used as the basis for this catalyst test and showed efficiency for in-situ oil combustion.

Unexpected wildfire emission impacts air quality worldwide
During wildfires, nitrous acid plays a leading role--spiking to levels significantly higher than scientists expected, driving increased ozone pollution and harming air quality, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy.

Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength, duration of immunity
New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19.

Researchers find diminished response by 'killer' T cells in elderly COVID-19 patients
Although people of any age can become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, elderly patients face a higher risk of severity and death than younger patients.

Spike in new nut anaphylaxis in children at Halloween and Easter
A new study looking at the link between peanut and tree-nut anaphylaxis in children and holidays found spikes at Halloween and Easter.

Comparing effectiveness of smartphone apps for quitting smoking
This randomized clinical trial compared the effectiveness of two smartphone apps that use different approaches to help smokers quit.

Think you have chemical intolerance? Answer 3 questions
To increase screening of chemical intolerance, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have developed and validated a three-question survey that can be incorporated into patient visits within a minute.

Cleveland Clinic study finds no link between influenza vaccine and COVID-19 risk
Using patient data from Cleveland Clinic's COVID-19 registry, Dr. Joe Zein found that receiving the flu vaccine does not increase risk for COVID-19 or worsen associated disease outcomes, suggesting it is safe and advisable to receive the influenza vaccine this flu season.

Study: Black women with breast cancer experience delayed, longer treatment than whites
One in seven black women with breast cancer had delays in starting treatment, and black women also had extended duration of treatment, according to a study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers.

Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate.

Do rats like to be tickled?
Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalisations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response, according to new research by the University of Bristol.

Why there is no speed limit in the superfluid universe
Physicists from Lancaster University have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit; exotic particles that stick to all surfaces in the superfluid.

40% of O'ahu, Hawai'i beaches could be lost by mid-century
The reactive and piecemeal approach historically used to manage beaches in Hawai'i has failed to protect them.

Suspension of fertility treatments during COVID-19 has mental health impacts
The suspension of fertility treatments due to the COVID-19 pandemic has had a variety of psychological impacts on women whose treatments were cancelled, but there are several protective factors that can be fostered to help in the future, according to a new study by Jennifer Gordon and Ashley Balsom of University of Regina, Canada, published 18 September in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
IIASA researchers have developed a novel measurement framework to track energy poverty that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity.

Immunotherapy is beneficial in gastric and oesophageal cancers, studies show
New data presented at ESMO 2020 have shown that immunotherapy is beneficial for patients with gastric and oesophageal cancers who currently have poor survival.

Insight-HXMT discovers closest high-speed jet to black hole
Insight-HXMT, China's first space X-ray astronomical satellite, has discovered a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) above 200 kiloelectron volts (keV) in a black hole binary, making it the highest energy low-frequency QPO ever found.

Astronomers discover an Earth-sized "pi planet" with a 3.14-day orbit
Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have discovered a ''pi Earth'' -- an Earth-sized planet that zips around its star every 3.14 days, in an orbit reminiscent of the universal mathematics constant.

Marine sponges inspire the next generation of skyscrapers and bridges
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are using the glassy skeletons of marine sponges as inspiration for the next generation of stronger and taller buildings, longer bridges, and lighter spacecraft.

CNIO identifies genetic factors associated to hand-foot syndrome in chemotherapy with capecitabine
* The researchers studied more than 600,000 genetic variants in the genome of 166 patients treated with the chemotherapy drug capecitabine * Before undergoing treatment, the patients carrying the risk alleles for the hand-foot syndrome had low levels of two proteins that are key to the effective functioning of the skin barrier * The finding may help classify patients according to their genetic risk for developing this side effect of some cancer treatments

Funding climate action policies: Consumers weigh in
There is growing demand for countries to take aggressive action to combat climate change, but less consensus on how to fund it.

How to get a handle on carbon dioxide uptake by plants
How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land?

Despite coronavirus: Social contacts increase again
Arrange a get-together with friends, enjoy life out in the fresh air: Despite the corona pandemic, everyday life is returning to normal.

Evaluating impacts of COVID-19 lockdowns on children and young people
Children, who appear at a relatively lower risk from COVID-19, are disproportionally harmed by precautions involved with lockdowns, say Matthew Snape and Russell Viner in a Perspective.

Just add water: Biodiversity resurgence in effluent-fed desert riverbeds
Innovative new projects using effluent to restore flow in rivers, like the Santa Cruz River Heritage Project, are showing almost immediate positive biodiversity effects, and the return of species (such as dragonflies, mayflies and caddisflies) to these rivers after very long dry spells can be incredibly fast.

Researchers find cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees, humans
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity.

Climate: risks and future strategies in Italy
It could be worth up to 8% of GDP per capita, exacerbate the differences between north and south, between society's rich and poor, as well as affect a number of Italy's strategic sectors: climate change is a risk accelerator for many aspects of both the economy and society.

New insights into how the drug pomalidomide fights cancer
Scientists from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo Medical University, and Saitama Medical University have published findings that offer insights into how the drug pomalidomide benefits some patients with a cancer called multiple myeloma.

Nature conservation and tourism can coexist despite conflicts
The concept of sustainable nature tourism plays a key role in mediating conflicts between tourism and nature conservation, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.

Engineers imitate human hands to make better sensors
An international research team has developed ''electronic skin'' sensors capable of mimicking the dynamic process of human motion.

CU Denver researcher analyzes the use of solar energy at US airports
By studying 488 public airports in the United States, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs researcher Serena Kim, PhD, found that 20% of them have adopted solar photovoltaic (PV), commonly known as solar panels, over the last decade.

NASA sees Wilfred degenerate into a trough
Former Tropical Storm Wilfred weakened in the Central Atlantic Ocean and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image after the storm became a trough or elongated area of low pressure.

New composite material revs up pursuit of advanced electric vehicles
Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory used new techniques to create a composite that increases the electrical current capacity of copper wires, providing a new material that can be scaled for use in ultra-efficient, power-dense electric vehicle traction motors.

Minorities suffer most from COVID-19 in nursing homes, assisted living communities
Older racial and ethnic minority residents and their caregivers bear the severest brunt from COVID-19 across the entire spectrum of US nursing homes and assisted living communities, University of Rochester Medical Center researchers report in two groundbreaking studies in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Penn researchers discover potential cause of immunotherapy-related neurotoxicity
New research has uncovered the previously unknown presence of CD19 -- a B cell molecule targeted by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy to treat leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma -- in brain cells that protect the blood brain barrier (BBB).

Hyperbolic metamaterials exhibit 2T physics
According to Igor Smolyaninov of the University of Maryland, ''One of the more unusual applications of metamaterials was a theoretical proposal to construct a physical system that would exhibit two-time physics behavior on small scales.''

Awareness of COVID-19 in severe dementia patients
Tokyo, September 21, 2020- The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has substantially affected patients with dementia and their caregivers.

Genomic adaptations to a rice-based diet mitigate the risk of obesity and diabetes
Populations of China, Korea, and Japan first adopted rice as their main source of nutrition more than 10,000 years ago.

Discovery of druggable pocket in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein could stop virus in its tracks
A druggable pocket in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein that could be used to stop the virus from infecting human cells has been discovered by an international team of scientists led by the University of Bristol.

Artificial intelligence detects osteoarthritis years before it develops
Researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm that can pick up on subtle signs of osteoarthritis - too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist - on an MRI scan taken years before symptom onset.

Dino teeth research prove giant predatory dinosaur lived in water
A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth, by a team of researchers from the University of Portsmouth, proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.

Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat
New heat-harnessing 'solar' cells that reflect 99% of the energy they can't convert to electricity could help bring down the price of storing renewable energy as heat, as well as harvesting waste heat from exhaust pipes and chimneys.

NASA's IRIS spots nanojets: Shining light on heating the solar corona
In a paper published today in Nature Astronomy, researchers report the first ever clear images of nanojets -- bright thin lights that travel perpendicular to the magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere, called the corona -- in a process that reveals the existence of one of the potential coronal heating candidates: nanoflares.

Changes in hospitalizations for alcohol use disorder in US
Changes over nearly two decades in the rate of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths from alcohol use disorder in the US were examined in this study.

Scientists propose multifunctional liquid metal nanocapsules
Prof. LI Chaoxu and his coworkers from the Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have proposed multifunctional liquid metal nanocapsules.

Belief in conspiracy theories is a barrier to controlling spread of COVID-19
Belief in conspiracy theories about the coronavirus pandemic was inversely related to the perceived threat of the pandemic; taking of preventive actions, including wearing a face mask; and the intention to be vaccinated when there is a COVID-19 vaccine.

Fred Hutch-led clinical trial shows new smartphone app helps smokers quit
Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center believe they've found a better of use of mobile technology to help adult cigarette smokers quit.

Who is the weakest link? A better understanding of global supply chains
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused ''kinks'' in the movement of goods and services around the globe, but how important a role do multinational companies play in local economies and supply chains?

Neurobiology - To keep pain in check, count down
Diverse cognitive strategies affect our perception of pain. Studies by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich neuroscientist Enrico Schulz and colleagues have linked the phenomenon to the coordinated activity of neural circuits located in different brain areas.

Having a ball: Crystallization in a sphere
Researchers at The University of Tokyo and Fudan University furthered our understanding of the crystallization process in confined spaces by visualizing the ordering of colloidal particles in a droplet.

Vaccination insights
While scientists race to develop and test a vaccine effective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, recent studies have indicated that countries with widespread BCG vaccination appear to be weathering the pandemic better than their counterparts.

New technology is a 'science multiplier' for astronomy
A new study has tracked the long-term impact of early seed funding obtained from the National Science Foundation on many key advances in astronomy over the past three decades.

October issue of SLAS Discovery now available
The October edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, 'A Critical and Concise Review of Mass Spectrometry Applied to Imaging in Drug Discovery' by Richard J.

Very sensitive optical receivers for space communication
Researchers in Sweden recently demonstrated a novel concept for laser-beam-based communication links using a near 'noiseless' optical pre-amplifier in the receiver.

Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages.

Epigenetics linked to genetic differences between domesticated and wild chickens
Some of the genetic differences that have arisen between domesticated chickens and their wild ancestors, the red junglefowl, are linked to epigenetic changes, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

October issue SLAS Technology now available
The October issue of SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Role of Digital Microfl-uidics in Enabling Access to Laboratory Automation and Making Biology Programmable' by Varun B.

Recurrent heart attacks on the decline, yet risk remains high
After surviving a heart attack, the proportion of patients experiencing a repeat attack within a year fell between 2008 and 2017, with the greatest decline in women.

BU researchers discover how COVID-19 may trigger fatal levels of lung inflammation
Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, requires models that can duplicate disease development in humans, identify potential targets and enable drug testing.

Examining association between sleep duration, cognitive decline
Researchers in this observational study investigated the association between the amount of sleep at night and cognitive decline among participants in two large studies on aging.

NASA analyzes soaking capabilities of hurricane Teddy on Bermuda approach
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Hurricane Teddy's rainfall rates as it approaches Bermuda on Sept.

'Best' hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
A UCLA-led report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile 'Best Hospitals Honor Roll' published annually by US News and World Report.

College students with disabilities at greater risk for substance abuse
College students with physical and cognitive disabilities use illicit drugs more, and have a higher prevalence of drug use disorder, than their non-disabled peers, according to a Rutgers study.

Study on the effect of rosemary and ginger essential oils against Klebsiella pneumoniae
This study aims at investigating the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effect of rosemary and ginger essential oil-based nano-sized formulations on colistin resistant K. pneumonia clinical isolates.

Farmer knowledge is key to finding more resilient crops in climate crisis
A new paper in Frontiers in Plant Science reviews the 'Seeds for Needs' approach that combines farmers' knowledge of resilient crops with 'elite' varieties identified by scientists.

'Bandage' developed to rebuild broken bone
Researchers at King's College London have developed a material that allows transplantation of bone-forming stem cells into severe bone fractures and speeds up the healing process.

New discovery to have huge impact on development of future battery cathodes
New paper in Nature Energy, reveals how researchers fully identified the nature of oxidised oxygen in the important battery material - Li-rich NMC - using RIXS (Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering) at Diamond Light Source.

The overlap between fear and anxiety brain circuits
Fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.

NASA finds Tropical Storm Dolphin going swimmingly
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of recently formed Tropical Depression 14W as it strengthened into a tropical storm.

COVID-19 screening of asymptomatic people could decrease infections, deaths
When the COVID-19 pandemic is slowing, low-cost, recurring screening of asymptomatic people could decrease infections and deaths and be cost-effective.

CHOP researchers find MIS-C associated with myocardial injury
Using sensitive parameters to assess cardiac function, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that cardiac involvement in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) differs from Kawasaki disease (KD) and is associated with myocardial injury.

Researchers discover cyber vulnerabilities affecting bluetooth based medical devices
The Greyhound framework, named after the breed of dogs known for their hunting abilities, was designed and implemented by an SUTD-led research team to systematically sniff out security lapses in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabled devices.

A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
Scientists at EPFL, ETHZ and Harvard Medical School/Boston Children's Hospital have developed an implantable technology that enabled the discovery of an interaction between sensory neurons and immune cells.

2020 Arctic sea ice minimum at second lowest on record
NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder shows that the 2020 minimum extent, which was likely reached on Sept.

NASA satellite found Post-Tropical Storm Alpha fizzle over Portugal and Spain
Former Subtropical Storm Alpha was a short-lived storm that formed and fizzled within 24 hours.

Warming ocean, old-forest loss put a squeeze on an elusive seabird
Squeezed by changing ocean conditions that limit their food options and the long-term loss of old forest needed for nesting, marbled murrelets would benefit most from conservation efforts that take both ocean and forest into account, new research shows.

A faster and more reliable method to categorize olive oil is validated
Classifying olive oils into the categories of extra virgin (EVOO), virgin (VOO) and lampante (LOO) is still quite a challenge to deal with since the official method includes physical-chemical and sensory analyses by means of a panel of tasters.

SwRI instruments aboard Rosetta help detect unexpected ultraviolet aurora at a comet
Data from Southwest Research Institute-led instruments aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft have helped reveal auroral emissions in the far ultraviolet around a comet for the first time.

Ways to improve petroleum coke combustibility studied with presence of metal catalysts
The fixed fluidized bed technology is already widely used overseas, but is relatively new for the Russian oil industry.

Tracking the working dogs of 9/11
A study of search and rescue dogs led by the School of Veterinary Medicine showed little difference in longevity or cause of death between dogs at the disaster site and dogs in a control group.

CRISPR-based malaria testing on-the-fly
A multi-disciplinary research collaboration which was led by Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), created a field-applicable, ultrasensitive diagnostic assay that specifically detects DNA sequences from all Plasmodium species in symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria.

Black women may be less likely to receive timely treatment for breast cancer
New research suggests that Black women experience longer waits for treatment initiation than white women after a breast cancer diagnosis, and their duration of treatment is prolonged.

European survey shows alarmingly low awareness of erectile dysfunction
Awareness of erectile dysfunction (ED) is alarmingly low in men and women aged 20 to 70, a new survey commissioned by the European Association of Urology (EAU) has revealed.

Richmond emergency room experienced a surge in opioid overdoses during pandemic
In a paper published Friday by the Journal of the American Medical Association, Virginia Commonwealth University researchers released data showing an alarming surge in opioid-related overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Falling Medicare reimbursement rates for orthopaedic trauma
The amount Medicare reimburses for orthopaedic trauma surgery has fallen by nearly one-third over the past two decades, reports a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma.

Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and from ETH Zurich want to make so-called zeolites more efficient.

Children with COVID-19 show different immune responses, but better outcomes than adults
A comparison of children and adults hospitalized with COVID-19 reveals pediatric patients, who had better outcomes and shorter hospital stays, displayed altered immune responses and more limited production of antibodies against infection.

Researchers combine photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging in tiny package
Researchers have demonstrated a new endoscope that uniquely combines photoacoustic and fluorescent imaging in a device about the thickness of a human hair.

Scientists identify solid electrolyte materials that boost lithium-ion battery performance
The discovery could help battery researchers design the first solid electrolytes that are safe, cheap and efficient.

Modeling future COVID-19 cases under a variety of immune responses, and with or without vaccines
Researchers who adapted standard epidemiological models to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic trajectory might unfold in the next five years report diverse scenarios ranging from recurring severe epidemics to elimination.

Discovered: New resistance gene to devastating potato disease that caused Irish Famine
In a recent collaboration between the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the James Hutton institute, scientists identified a diploid wild potato with a high resistance to Phytophthora infestans.

New research highlights impact of COVID-19 on food security in Kenya and Uganda
CABI scientists have conducted new research highlighting the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on food security in Kenya and Uganda with more than two-thirds of those surveyed having experienced economic hardship due to the pandemic.

Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins
In a new study, Shaopeng Wang and his colleagues describe a method for examining proteins in keen detail.

Bird beak revealed by HKU-codeveloped laser imaging informs early beak function and development
Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago.

A computer predicts your thoughts, creating images based on them
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique in which a computer models visual perception by monitoring human brain signals.

Ryugu's rocky past
Researchers find evidence that asteroid Ryugu was born out of the possible destruction of a larger parent asteroid millions of years ago.

'Front of package' nutrition labels improved nutrition quality
A new study analyzing 16 years of data on tens of thousands of products finds that the adoption of nutrition data on ''front of package'' labels is associated with improved nutritional content of those foods and their competitors.

Study reveals racial disparities in clinical trial recruitment
In a new study published in Clinical Trials, researchers led by Stephen Juraschek, MD, PhD (Medicine, BIDMC) compared four electronic-based and four traditional recruitment methods for clinical trials to determine how different strategies may impact enrollment of groups traditionally under-represented in the medical literature.

Key discovery in psoriatic arthritis points way for developing targeted treatments
The strongest evidence yet of a single cause for psoriatic arthritis has been discovered by researchers.

Cosmic X-rays reveal an indubitable signature of black holes
A black hole is an exotic cosmic object, from within which nothing, not even light, can escape.

Older people have become younger
The functional ability of older people is nowadays better when it is compared to that of people at the same age three decades ago.

Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage
While the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PVSCs) has already greatly improved in the past decade, the problems of instability and potential environmental impact are yet to be overcome.

AI could expand healing with bioscaffolds
Artificial intelligence can speed the development of 3D-printed bioscaffolds that help injuries heal, according to researchers at Rice University.

Nanoparticle SARS-CoV-2 model may speed drug discovery for COVID-19
Scientists have developed a new tool that mimics how the virus that causes COVID-19 infects a cell, potentially speeding the search for treatments against the disease.

E. coli bacteria offer path to improving photosynthesis
Cornell University scientists have engineered a key plant enzyme and introduced it in Escherichia coli bacteria in order to create an optimal experimental environment for studying how to speed up photosynthesis, a holy grail for improving crop yields.

Study shows vitamin E needed for proper nervous system development
- In research with key ramifications for women of childbearing age, scientists show that embryos produced by vitamin E-deficient zebrafish have malformed brains and nervous systems.

COVID-19 and human trafficking
The amplified impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations has important implications for individuals at risk of or exploited in human trafficking.

Comet Chury's ultraviolet aurora
On Earth, auroras, also called northern lights, have always fascinated people.

Southern hemisphere could see up to 30% less rain at end of the century
Analysis published in Scientific Reports is based on climate models for the mid-Pliocene period, which occurred 3 million years ago and shared characteristics with present-day warming.

Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
Researchers found that nuanced interactions between teachers and campers at a coding camp for middle school girls as well as among the girls themselves impacted how girls viewed themselves as coders.

Extra stability for magnetic knots
Tiny magnetic whirls that can occur in materials - so-called skyrmions - hold high promises for novel electronic devices or magnetic memory in which they are used as bits to store information.

VCU study shows the experimental drug AR-12 could be a promising COVID-19 treatment
A team of scientists led by Paul Dent, Ph.D., at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center has discovered that an experimental cancer drug called AR-12 inhibits the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic, from infecting cells and replicating.

The right formula for scaling production of promising material to decontaminate water
An international team of researchers have found a way to refine and reliably produce an unpredictable and hard-to-control material that could impact environmental conservation, energy and consumer electronics.
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