Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 22, 2020
The co-occurrence of cancer driver genes, key to precision medicine
Researchers from the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology Laboratory at IRB Barcelona develop a system to predict tumour response to different treatments.

Mayo study identifies barriers to physician adoption of federal Right to Try law
A new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute is the first to examine the opinions and experiences of clinical oncologists working at a major medical center on the Federal Right to Try (RTT) law.

People with 'silent' COVID-19 have as much coronavirus as those with symptoms
People with 'silent' COVID-19 infection have as much coronavirus in their noses and throats as those with symptoms, reveals research published online in the journal Thorax.

Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with challenges.

Compounding impact of severe weather events fuels marine heatwave in the coastal ocean
Researchers at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab with support from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory can offer insight into why these storms intensified quickly as they moved across the continental shelf.

Who's Tweeting about scientific research? And why?
Although Twitter is best known for its role in political and cultural discourse, it has also become an increasingly vital tool for scientific communication.

Single photon emission from isolated monolayer islands of InGaN
Single photon emitters are essential devices for the realization of future optical quantum technologies including optical quantum computing and quantum key distribution.

COVID-19: Second wave for some; others remain in first wave
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, some locations have experienced decreasing numbers of cases followed by an increase.

When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques
Researchers found that whether humans would embrace a range of deceptive and sneaky negotiating techniques was dependent both on the humans' prior negotiating experience in negotiating as well as whether virtual agents where employed to negotiate on their behalf.

Wels catfish genome assembled
By deciphering the genetic code of the barbelled giant, scientists expect to better understand the secrets of the wels catfish's exceptionally rapid growth, enormous appetite and longevity.

Most infants are well even when moms are infected by COVID-19
Infants born to women with COVID-19 showed few adverse outcomes, according to the first report in the country of infant outcomes through eight weeks of age.

Evaporation critical to coronavirus transmission as weather changes
As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures.

Web resources bring new insight into COVID-19
Two new web resources put at researchers' fingertips information about cellular genes whose expression is affected by coronavirus infection and place these data points in the context of the complex network of host molecular signaling pathways.

Global survey suggests patients most with type 1 diabetes that have adapted to remote medical appointments would continue this post COVID-19 pandemic
A survey of more than 7,000 patients with type 1 diabetes from 89 countries, presented at this year's online Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that three quarters of patients who have adapted to telemedicine appointments would consider continung the use of online or telephone appointments with their doctors

Self-harm content on Instagram: "self-harm or self-help?"
Instagram users who post self-harm content online are choosing ambiguous hashtags in an attempt to circumvent the social media platform's ban on harmful content, a researcher at the University of Otago, Wellington, has found.

A fresh sense of possibility
A multisensory graphene-based skin can sense in extreme environments where other sensors cannot be used.

Nearly 20 percent of americans don't have enough to eat
More than 18 percent of US adults do not know whether they will have enough to eat from day to day, and the numbers are worse for Hispanics, Blacks, people with obesity, and women, a new report shows.

Healthier lifestyles may increase lifespan even in people with multiple chronic conditions
A very healthy lifestyle is associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women, regardless of the presence of multiple chronic conditions, according to a study published September 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yogini Chudasama of the University of Leicester, and colleagues.

Animals lose fear of predators rapidly after they start encountering humans
Most wild animals show a suite of predator avoidance behaviors such as vigilance, freezing, and fleeing.

Nationwide study shows disparities in COVID-19 infection for Black and Hispanic people
A study of around 5.8 million people who receive care from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) found that Black and Hispanic people were substantially more likely than their White counterparts to test positive for COVID-19, although no differences in 30-day mortality were observed between these groups.

Divide and enlarge
Researchers discover a mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow.

Scientists identify new species of crystal-encrusted truffle, thanks to bonobos
Mushroom-munching bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have introduced scientists to a new species of truffle.

For black girls, attitudes about being black affect risk of depression
A new study suggests that the messages Black girls hear at home about being Black, and about being Black women in particular, can affect their risk of exhibiting the symptoms of depression.

Small increase in risk of autism seen for pre- and post-term births
A study of more than 3.5 million Nordic children suggests that the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may increase slightly for each week a child is born before or after 40 weeks of gestation.

Global change ecologist leads NASA satellite study of rapid greening across Arctic tundra
As Arctic summers warm, Earth's northern landscapes are changing. Using satellite images to track global tundra ecosystems over decades, a team of researchers finds the region has become greener as warmer air and soil temperatures lead to increased plant growth.

Playing video games as a child can improve working memory years later
UOC research reveals cognitive changes can be found even years after people stop playing

NASA sees rebirth of Tropical Storm Paulette
Tropical Storm Paulette just reformed in the central North Atlantic Ocean today, Sept.

Herd immunity an impractical strategy, study finds
Achieving herd immunity to COVID-19 is an impractical public health strategy, according to a new model developed by University of Georgia scientists.

Ethical challenges in cross-cultural research
A group of social scientists who conduct cross-cultural research are casting a critical lens on their own practices in the Sept.

New freshwater database tells water quality story for 12K lakes globally
Although less than one per cent of all water in the world is freshwater, it is what we drink and use for agriculture.

Remembrance of waves past: memory imprints motion on scattered waves
Now, it appears that between relativity and the classical (stationary) wave regime, there exists another regime of wave phenomena, where memory influences the scattering process.

Shared protein fingerprint could simplify treatment of common inherited heart disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists discovered that many different genetic mutations result in surprisingly similar changes to heart muscle proteins in patients with the most severe manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

Why some cancers may respond poorly to key drugs discovered
Scientists have identified a driver of drug resistance in breast, ovarian and prostate cancers that may help doctors predict which patients will become resistant to a class of drugs frequently used to treat BRCA 1/2-deficient tumors.

'Firefly' imaging method zooms in on 'the forces within us'
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level.

Is your drinking water toxic? This app may help you find out
Since fracking sites use a diverse mix of chemical ingredients, often individuals and researchers are in the dark about the health consequences of living near a particular well.

Children's immune response more effective against COVID-19
Children and adults exhibit distinct immune system responses to infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, a finding that helps explain why COVID-19 outcomes tend to be much worse in adults, researchers from Yale and Albert Einstein College of Medicine report Sept.

COVID-19 and type 2 diabetes: do shared pathways have therapeutic implications?
During a special COVID-19 session at this year's online Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Prof.

Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other.

New approach to exotic quantum matter
A team of international researchers reports on new advances in the understanding of fractional angular momentum and anyon statistics of impurities in Laughlin liquids.

Engineers pre-train AI computers to make them even more powerful
Engineers at CSEM have developed a new machine-learning method that paves the way for artificial intelligence to be used in applications that until now have been deemed too sensitive.

Ecologists confirm Alan Turing's theory for Australian fairy circles
Fairy circles are one of nature's greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena.

Entomologists from SPbU discover a rare species of tropical Heteroptera with long antennae
An international team of scientists, including researchers from St Petersburg University, has discovered a new genus and species of bug from the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia.

Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?
Scientists discovered in 1996 that sunquakes are linked to solar flares.

Photoacoustic microscopy for identifying sentinel lymph nodes of breast cancer
Tumor metastatic sentinel lymph nodes is difficult to distinguish from normal or inflamed lymph nodes (Inf-LN).

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration.

Stanford researchers combine CAT scans and advanced computing to fight wildfires
Engineers at Stanford have used X-ray CT scans, more common in hospital labs, to study how wood catches fire.

News coverage in Chicago disproportionately devalues Black and Hispanic lives
Social scientists found that homicide victims killed in Chicago's predominantly Black and Hispanic neighborhoods received less news coverage than those killed in mostly white neighborhoods.

Test, isolate, communicate: Keys to controlling a COVID-19 outbreak in a long-term care facility
A new study led by Carl Shrader, a physician and researcher in the Department of Family Medicine in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, revealed the role that communication played in quashing a COVID-19 outbreak at Sundale, a long-term care facility.

Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
The disruptive inventions that make people go ''Wow!'' tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests.

US cellphone data uncovers 'hotspots' where COVID-19 social distancing levels are low
US cellphone data analysis finds 'hotspots' where COVID-19 social distancing levels are low, as well as revealing how demographics and governmental restrictions interact.

Higher risk of death in cancer patients with COVID-19 may be due to advanced age and more pre-existing conditions, rather than cancer itself
New research presented at this this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) suggests that the poor outcomes and higher death rates in cancer patients with COVID-19 could be due to them generally being older and having more underlying conditions, rather than due to the cancer itself.

NASA catches Tropical Storm Dolphin swimming north   
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Dolphin as it continued moving north though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on a track toward east central Japan.

Silk offers homemade solution for COVID-19 prevention
A University of Cincinnati biology study found that silk fabric performs similarly to surgical masks when used in conjunction with respirators but has the added advantages of being washable and repelling water, which would translate to helping to keep a person safer from the airborne virus.

Study shows that control of blood sugar levels improved among people with type 1 diabetes who stopped working during lockdown
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that among people with type 1 diabetes who stopped working in the COVID-19 lockdown, blood sugar levels improved during the first week of lockdown despite having reduced opportunities for exercise and heightened psychological stress.

Water on exoplanet cloud tops could be found with hi-tech instrumentation
University of Warwick astronomers have shown that water vapour can potentially be detected in the atmospheres of exoplanets by peering literally over the tops of their impenetrable clouds.

New theory predicts movement of different animals using sensing to search
A Northwestern University research team has developed a new theory that can predict the movement of an animal's sensory organs -- such as eyes, ears and nose -- while searching for something vital to its life.

NASA imagery reveals strongest areas of Tropical Storm Beta
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Beta in infrared imagery to determine where the strongest parts of the storm were located.

When painting reveals increases in social trust
Scientists from the CNRS, ENS-PSL, Inserm, and Sciences Po revealed an increase in facial displays of trustworthiness in European painting between the fourteenth and twenty-first centuries.

COVID-19 mortality rates higher among men than women
A new review article from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shows people who are biologically male are dying from COVID-19 at a higher rate than people who are biologically female.

COVID opens a partisan gap on voting by mail
Study by UC's New Electorate Project documents a growing divide on preferences for absentee ballots.

Living in an anoxic world: Microbes using arsenic are a link to early life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead.

Black and Hispanic people in US face increased risk of testing positive for coronavirus
Individuals from Black and Hispanic backgrounds in the United States are twice as likely to test positive for COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to new research in PLOS Medicine.

Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods
Millions of mummified ibis and birds of prey, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley.

MTU engineers build three new open-source tools for COVID-19
A 3D printer that can take the heat, breathing tech to keep firefighters safe and a ventilator design printed for less than $170.

Wildfire smoke more dangerous than other air pollutants for asthma patients
For people who suffer from asthma, wildfire smoke is more hazardous than other types of air pollution, according to a new study from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Renown Institute for Health Innovation (Renown IHI) and the Washoe County Health District (WCHD).

Fostering 'political' attitude adjustments
When political views are at the extreme ends of the spectrum, they are known as political polarization.

Having high cholesterol levels early in life leads to heart problems by middle age
Having elevated cholesterol during the teens or early twenties increases a person's risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event during middle age.

New research says Sodium-ion batteries are a valid alternative to Lithium-ion batteries
A team of scientists including WMG at the University of Warwick combined their knowledge and expertise to assess the current status of the Na-ion technology from materials to cell development, offering a realistic comparison of the key performance indicators for NBs and LIBs.

Targeting the treatment of autoimmune diseases
A team of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum (DRFZ) Berlin, a Leibniz Institute, have successfully treated two patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus.

NIST scientists get soft on 3D printing
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3D-printing gels and other soft materials.

Exercise before menopause is important to optimise health in later years
The small blood vessels in muscles of women after menopause are less able to grow compared to young women, according to new research published today in the Journal of Physiology.

Bundled payment model reduces health disparities for Black patients
A new nationwide model of care for hip and knee joint replacements appears to reduce disparities in health outcomes for Black patients, according to new research led by Oregon Health & Science University.

NIH study details self-reported experiences with post-exertional malaise in ME/CFS
One of the major symptoms of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is post-exertional malaise (PEM), the worsening of symptoms after physical or mental activities.

These birds communicate by fluttering their feathers -- and they have different accents
Fork-tailed Flycatchers, scientists just discovered, communicate with the sounds made when they flutter their feathers.

Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought
Radio-resistance in bacteria first evolves through the adaptation of DNA repair mechanisms, however as evolution continues more mutations accumulate, and more cellular metabolic processes are affected.

Most people infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop symptoms
While some people who contract SARS-CoV-2 infections never experience any symptoms, there remains disagreement about what proportion of total infections these cases represent.

Parylene photonics enable future optical biointerfaces
Carnegie Mellon University's Maysam Chamanzar and his team have invented an optical platform that will likely become the new standard in optical biointerfaces.

Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now.

Warming temperatures are driving arctic greening
As Arctic summers warm, Earth's northern landscapes are changing. Using satellite images to track global tundra ecosystems over decades, a new study found the region has become greener, as warmer air and soil temperatures lead to increased plant growth.

Forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought
A warming climate and more frequent wildfires do not necessarily mean the western United States will see the forest loss that many scientists expect.

Blood vessel growth in muscle is reduced in women after menopause
A new study from the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports demonstrates that formation of small blood vessels is impaired in the muscle tissue of postmenopausal women.

Deep learning helps explore the structural and strategic bases of autism?
Researchers have applied deep learning models to a vast collection of MRI brain scans of those known to have autism to identify the brain structures and dynamics of the condition in a way far beyond what humans could possibly assess.

Smart cells: Chemists develop tool with potential to treat illness at the cellular level
New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body--with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals.

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with.

'Cheater mitochondria' may profit from cellular stress coping mechanisms
Cheating mitochondria may take advantage of cellular mechanisms for coping with food scarcity in a simple worm to persist, even though this can reduce the worm's wellbeing.

How night vision is maintained during retinal degenerative disease
New insight on how people with retinal degenerative disease can maintain their night vision for a relatively long period of time has been published today in the open-access eLife journal.

Henry Ford study demonstrates UV-C light is effective for killing COVID-19 on N95s
Dermatology researchers at Henry Ford Health System, in collaboration with a team at the University of Michigan, have demonstrated that certain N95 respirators tainted with COVID-19 can be effectively and safely decontaminated for reuse using ultraviolet-C light (UV-C), a method commonly utilized for treating rare skin diseases.

Study shows light therapy is safe and may benefit patients with TBI
Light therapy is safe and has measurable effects in the brain, according to a pioneering study.

ADHD study reveals unique genetic differences in African American patients
Researchers have shown there may be key genetic differences in the causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between African Americans and people of European ancestry, which may play an important part in how patients of different ethnic backgrounds respond to treatments for this condition.

UBCO researchers concerned about prey and predator species in post-fire logging areas
New research from UBC Okanagan shows that salvage logging on land damaged by wildfires has negative impacts on a variety of animals.

Study examines women's attitudes toward long-acting injectable therapy to prevent HIV
A new study among women at high risk for HIV explored their hesitancy to use pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) overall, as well as their interest in and willingness to use long-acting injectable (LAI) PrEP.

Childhood sexual abuse: Mental and physical after-effects closely linked
A new study has uncovered a correlation between psychological distress and genital and urinary health problems in female survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Exercise hormone may modulate genes associated with replication of novel coronavirus
Brazilian researchers observed that in uninfected adipocytes, the hormone irisin altered the expression of genes that regulate ACE-2, which encodes a protein to which the virus binds in order to invade human cells.

Analysis shows high level of SARS-CoV-2 contamination in patient toilets, staff and public areas in hosptials
A systematic review of evidence being presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease shows that air around patients with COVID-19, as well as patients toilets, and staff and public areas in hospitals are all show significant levels of contamination with SARS-CoV-2.

COVID-19 and diabetes: what is the evidence?
In the COVID-19 special session taking place at the online Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Prof.

New drug candidate found for hand, foot and mouth disease
Duke researchers have identified a potential drug candidate against enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children.

What have we learned from COVID-19 in persons with type 1 diabetes?
In a special session on COVID-19 at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), Prof.

Cincinnati Children's scientists identify hormone that might help treat malabsorption
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's used human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells to discover how our bodies control the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat.

Neurological consequences of COVID-19: The 'Silent Wave'
Is the world prepared a wave of neurological consequences that may be on its way as a result of COVID-19?

Study shows that 40% of healthcare workers asymptomatic when COVID-19 positive, raising risk of silent transmission
A review of studies (meta-analysis) presented at this year's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) shows that 40% of healthcare workers who test positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic, raising the risk of silent transmission in healthcare settings.

Dresden physicists develop printable organic transistors
Scientists at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Dresden have come a step closer to the vision of a broad application of flexible, printable electronics.

NASA analyzes Tropical Storm Lowell's very cold cloud tops
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Lowell using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm.

Study shows keeping gratitude journal reduces gossip, incivility in workplace
Gratitude interventions in the workplace can help employee well-being and managers can use these efforts to foster more respectful behavior in their teams.

Mining molecular data with cryo-EM unveils hidden biological secrets
In the new study, Abhishek Singharoy and his colleagues demonstrate that cryo-EM can be pushed to even greater extremes of clarity, by extracting precious information previously buried in the reams of cryo-EM data.

Complications from diabetes linked to worse memory, IQ in children
A study led by UC Davis Health researchers uncovered that even one severe episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is linked to cognitive problems; and among children with a previous diagnosis, repeated DKA exposure predicted lower cognitive performance after accounting for glycemic control.

County and ZIP code-level data show 'stark social inequities' in COVID-19
A geocoding approach - linking routinely collected public health data to neighborhood socioeconomic factors - shows consistently higher rates of COVID-19 illness and death among people living in more-disadvantaged communities, reports a study in the November/December Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.

Johns Hopkins researchers publish COVID-19 'prediction model'
Using a combination of demographic and clinical data gathered from seven weeks of COVID-19 patient care early in the coronavirus pandemic, Johns Hopkins researchers today published a 'prediction model' they say can help other hospitals care for COVID-19 patients -- and make important decisions about planning and resource allocations.

Mount Sinai researchers develop COVID-19 mortality prediction model
Using the largest development dataset yet (n=3841), and a systematic machine learning framework, Mount Sinai researchers developed a COVID-19 mortality prediction model that showed high accuracy (AUC=0·91) when applied to test datasets of retrospective (n=961) and prospective (n=249) patients.

When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Using data from all 50 US states plus the District of Columbia, two mathematicians have developed a new method to analyse COVD-19 rates to help policymakers identify demonstrable turning points in infection surges.

Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming.

Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet
Researchers at Washington State University have predicted how and where the Asian giant hornet, an invasive newcomer to the Pacific Northwest, popularly dubbed the ''murder hornet,'' could spread and find ideal habitat, both in the United States and globally.

Diabetes dramatically reduces the kidney's ability clean itself
The kidneys often become bulky and dysfunctional in diabetes, and now scientists have found that one path to this damage dramatically reduces the kidney's ability to clean up after itself.

"New" lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products.

New vaccine strategy harnesses 'foot soldier' T-cells to protect against influenza
As Americans begin pulling up their sleeves for an annual flu vaccine, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have provided new insights into an alternative vaccine approach that provides broader protection against seasonal influenza.

Thin and ultra-fast photodetector sees the full spectrum
Researchers have developed the world's first photodetector that can see all shades of light, in a prototype device that radically shrinks one of the most fundamental elements of modern technology.

NASA sees Hurricane Teddy threaten Eastern Canada
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy as it nears eastern Canada.

Is rheumatoid arthritis two different diseases?
While disease activity improves over time for most rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, long-term outcomes only improve in RA patients with autoantibodies, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Xanthe Matthijssen of Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands, and colleagues.

Patients with COVID-19 may have higher risk of kidney injury
According to Jochen Reiser, MD, PhD, the Ralph C Brown MD professor and chairperson of Rush's Department of Internal Medicine, patients with COVID-19 experience elevated levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR), an immune-derived pathogenic protein that is strongly predictive of kidney injury.

Better conservation planning can improve human life too
Conservation planning can be greatly improved to benefit human communities, while still protecting biodiversity, according to University of Queensland research.

Concordia researchers delve into the Montreal Casino's "Vegas Nights" experience
Three researchers from Concordia University's Centre for Sensory Studies recently completed a study that looks at how all the specific techniques the local casino uses to create a ''sensuous'' gambling experience affect the client.

Risk of death may increase for successive generations of immigrants with type 2 diabetes
A 10-year nationwide study investigating survival rates in all people with type 2 diabetes in Sweden, to be published in Diabetologia, finds that non-Western immigrants experienced a higher risk of death with each generation born in the country.

Children and schools during the COVID-19 pandemic: do school closures help?
A special session at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) will see a new review of the evidence presented to address the difficult issue of school closures and reopenings.

Water trapped in star dust
Dust particles in space are mixed with ice, as a research team from Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy has now proven in lab experiments.

Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation.

Lower zinc levels in the blood are associated with an increased risk of death in patients with COVID-19
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that having a lower level of zinc in the blood is associated with a poorer outcome in patients with COVID-19.

Underground connection
Researchers present first global analysis of how effective and topographic catchment areas differ.

Wound therapy device might not lower infection risk in women with obesity after C-section
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers are learning more about ways to prevent infections in women with obesity who have cesarean delivery.

Muslims, atheists more likely to face religious discrimination in US
A new study led by the University of Washington found that Muslims and atheists in the United States are more likely than those of Christian faiths to experience religious discrimination.

The impact of human mobility on disease spread
In a paper publishing on Tuesday in the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics, Daozhou Gao of Shanghai Normal University investigated the way in which human dispersal affects disease control and total extent of an infection's spread.

Stanford psychologists investigate COVID-19's mental toll on teenagers
The researchers identified specific patterns of brain activation that protect adolescents from experiencing COVID-19-related anxiety and depression.

Perspective on employment rates after spinal cord injury - 30 years after the ADA
Thirty years after the passage of the ADA, planning for return to work is often a low priority during rehabilitation for spinal cord injury, The authors emphasize that vocational rehabilitation services, when delivered soon after injury and integrated into the medical rehabilitation plan, contribute to better employment outcomes.
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