Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 23, 2020
KIST develops ambient vibration energy harvester with automatic resonance tuning mechanism
Korean researchers have developed an energy harvester that can generate electric power from ambient vibrations with diverse frequencies through a novel automatic resonance tuning mechanism.

Red blood cell distribution width, mortality risk in hospitalized adults with SARS-CoV-2 infection
The potential use of red blood cell distribution width for risk stratification of patients with COVID-19 was looked at in this observational study.

Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19
Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface.

Study suggests link between decreasing viral load and proportion of COVID-19 patients needing intensive care
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) suggests that, as lockdown took effect and case numbers dropped, the amount of virus patients were exposed to (viral load) fell, and this could be linked to lower proportions of patients requiring intensive care and dying.

Perovskite light-emitting/detecting bifunctional fibers for wearable LiFi communication
LiFi is paradigm-shifting the common means of high-capacity wireless communication technologies and needs wearable and full-duplex compact design on account of its great significance in smart wearables as well as the 'Internet of Things'.

This tiny device can scavenge wind energy from the breeze you make when you walk
Most of the wind available on land is too gentle to push commercial wind turbine blades, but now researchers in China have designed a kind of 'tiny wind turbine' that can scavenge wind energy from breezes as little as those created by a brisk walk.

Stability check on Antarctica reveals high risk for long-term sea-level rise
The warmer it gets, the faster Antarctica loses ice - and much of it will then be gone forever.

Driven by climate, more frequent, severe wildfires in Cascade Range reshape forests
New research from Portland State University found that while the increased wildfire activity is causing widespread changes in the structure and composition of these mid-to-high elevation forests, the new landscapes are also likely more resilient to projected upward trends in future fire activity and climate conditions.

Routine blood test predicts increased mortality risk in patients with COVID-19
A standard test that assesses blood cells can identify which patients who are admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 face a high risk of becoming critically ill and dying.

Researchers uncover tools used by predatory bacteria to escape unharmed from prey cell
Predatory bacteria, capable of invading and consuming harmful bugs such as E .coli and Salmonella, use a unique tool to help them escape the cell they have invaded without harming themselves, according to a new study.

NTU Singapore scientists devise 'Trojan horse' approach to kill cancer cells without using drugs
Cancer cells are killed in lab experiments and tumour growth reduced in mice, using a new approach that turns a nanoparticle into a 'Trojan horse' that causes cancer cells to self-destruct, a research team at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found.

A high potential biphenol derivative cathode
Herein a stable air-insensitive biphenol derivative cathode, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylaminemethylene-4,4'-biphenol (TABP), with high solubility (>1.5 mol L-1) and redox potential (0.91 V vs.

Statins reduce COVID-19 severity, likely by removing cholesterol that virus uses to infect
Analyzing anonymized patient medical records, UC San Diego researchers discovered that cholesterol-lowering statins reduced risk of severe COVID-19 infection, while lab experiments uncovered a cellular mechanism that helps explain why.

The Lancet journals: Papers at Lancet journals' session at ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID)
The following papers will be presented at a Lancet journals' session at ECCVID 2020, organised by European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

Suicidality among adult survivors of childhood cancer
A recent study found that survivors of childhood cancer have a similar risk of having suicidal thoughts compared with other individuals, and they have lower risk of suicidal behaviors and suicidal death.

NASA sees post-tropical storm Teddy generating heavy rain over Eastern Canada
Hurricane Teddy has transitioned to a large post-tropical cyclone over eastern Canada.

New tool mimics human skin to allow detailed study of mosquito biting
Scientists have developed a tool for studying the biting behaviour of common pathogen-carrying mosquitoes, according to new research published this week in eLife.

Likely molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis are revealed by network biology
Researchers have built an interactome that includes the lung-epithelial cell host interactome integrated with a SARS-CoV-2 interactome.

How is COVID-19 affecting Holocaust survivors?
Bar-Ilan University researchers examined whether exposure to specific Holocaust adversities would be related to amplified psychological reactions to COVID-19.

Decreased protein degradation in cerebellum leads to motor dysfunction
A research team from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed an animal model that reproduces motor dysfunction and cerebellar neurodegeneration similar to that in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) by inhibiting chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cerebellar neurons.

Study shows impact of climate change on Neotropical freshwater ecosystems
Researchers from six countries in the Americas explored bromeliad microcosms, showing how drought and flood affect the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, especially at the bottom of the food chain.

Ultra-low-cost hearing aid could address age-related hearing loss worldwide
Using a device that could be built with a dollar's worth of open-source parts and a 3D-printed case, researchers want to help the hundreds of millions of older people worldwide who can't afford existing hearing aids to address their age-related hearing loss.

Study suggests elderly care home outbreaks in England were caused by multiple indepedent infections and also within-home spread
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Congress on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) shows that outbreaks of COVID-19 in elderly care homes were caused by multiple independent infections from outside, plus within care home spread.

Controlling ultrastrong light-matter coupling at room temperature
Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, together with colleagues in Russia and Poland, have managed to achieve ultrastrong coupling between light and matter at room temperature.

Nanostructures with a unique property
Nanoscale vortices known as skyrmions can be created in many magnetic materials.

A multishot lensless camera in development could aid disease diagnosis
A new type of imaging that does not require a lens and uses reconfigurable particle-based masks to take multiple shots of an object is being developed by researchers at Penn State.

SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy was not associated with complications in neonates
In a new study published in the journal JAMA researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital have examined the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy and complications in mothers and their newborn babies.

Study shows weighted blankets can decrease insomnia severity
Weighted blankets are a safe and effective intervention in the treatment of insomnia, according to Swedish researchers who found that insomnia patients with psychiatric disorders experienced reduced insomnia severity, improved sleep and less daytime sleepiness when sleeping with a weighted chain blanket.

Bristol scientists shine light on tiny crystals behind unexpected violent eruptions
In a new study of volcanic processes, Bristol scientists have demonstrated the role nanolites play in the creation of violent eruptions at otherwise 'calm' and predictable volcanoes.

New brain cell-like nanodevices work together to identify mutations in viruses
In the September issue of the journal Nature, scientists from Texas A&M University, Hewlett Packard Labs and Stanford University have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell.

Feeding indoor cats just once a day could improve health
New University of Guelph research has found that feeding cats one large meal a day may help control hunger better than feeding them several times a day.

Meditation for mind-control
Carnegie Mellon Biomedical Engineering Department Head Bin He and his team have discovered that mindful meditation can help subjects learn and improve the ability to mind-control brain computer interfaces (BCIs).

New materials: A toggle switch for catalysis
A special material made of lanthanum, strontium, iron and oxygen can be switched back and forth between two different states: In one state the material is catalytically extremely active, in the other less so.

A Sudoku-solving algorithm holds promise for protein medicine
Computational biologists from the University of Toronto have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that has the potential to design novel protein molecules as finely tuned therapeutics.

Prenatal cannabis exposure associated with adverse outcomes during middle childhood
Research from the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences at Washington University in St.

One of the world's driest deserts is the focus of a new study on our changing climate
Carbon, one of the main building blocks for all life on Earth, cycles among living organisms and the environment.

New mouse model of tau propagation
Accumulation of assembled tau protein in the central nervous system is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies.

New study: Face-covering use up, more people are taking COVID-19 threats seriously
A new National Science Foundation-funded survey of six states has found that during the past two months, more people are wearing masks, vaccine uncertainty is on the rise, and many people are overestimating their risk of becoming seriously ill and dying from COVID-19.

Insomnia treatment offers relief
Insomnia causing sleepless nights, daytime fatigue and poor health outcomes is a cycle worth busting, experts say, with depression, anxiety and stress a common co-occurrence.

UK lockdown and air pollution: Nitrogen dioxide halved but sulphur dioxide doubled
A University of Liverpool study of air pollution in the UK during the first 100 days of lockdown has revealed that whilst nitrogen oxide levels were cut by half, levels of sulphur dioxide increased by over 100%.

URI grad student finds PFAS in seabirds from Narragansett Bay, Massachusetts Bay, Cape Fear
A recent study by a University of Rhode Island graduate student researching PFAS exposure found high levels of the compounds in seabirds from offshore Massachusetts and coastal Rhode Island and North Carolina adding to the accumulating pile of evidence related to human and animal exposure to these chemical compounds.

BrainHealth's SMART methodology helps patients make more informed treatment decisions
Researchers at Center for BrainHealth® collaborated with scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to examine whether the SMART program affects people's abilities to make informed decisions about their medical treatment options.

Structural biology -- ribosomes and Russian dolls
Maturation of the ribosome is a complex operation. Work by an Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team now shows that the 90S precursor of the small 40S subunit undergoes a 'molting' process, during which it progressively discards its outermost components.

Study identifies weight-loss threshold for heart health in patients with obesity, diabetes
A Cleveland Clinic study shows that 5 to 10 percent of surgically induced weight loss is associated with improved life expectancy and cardiovascular health.

SLAC invention could make particle accelerators 10 times smaller
A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has invented a new type of accelerator structure that could make accelerators used for a given application 10 times shorter.

Large study confirms men have 62% increased risk of COVID-19 associated death, possibly related to higher degree of inflammation
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) confirms that men with COVID-19 have worse outcomes than women, possibly related to them experiencing higher levels of inflammation.

Placing barthelonids on the tree of life
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have clearly defined the phylogenetic position of barthelonids, a group of microscopic free-living anaerobic biflagellates.

Berry good news -- new compound from blueberries could treat inflammatory disorders
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), caused by chronic inflammation in the digestive tract linings, can be debilitating and life threatening.

Study shows that cycling is associated with reduced risk of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among people with diabetes
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that cycling reduces the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among people with diabetes, and could be a useful addition to existing physical activity referral schemes for patients with the disease.

Genetic analysis links obesity to higher rheumatoid arthritis risk
An analysis of genetic data collected from more than 850,000 individuals of European ancestry has found a link between obesity-related genes and rheumatoid arthritis.

Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice
The small subpopulation of polar bears in Kane Basin were doing better, on average, in recent years than in the 1990s.

Multidisciplinary approaches to solving cold cases
Forensic DNA analysis enables new and increasingly sophisticated Technology for solving cold cases.

Neurotic college students could benefit from health education
College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Survey reveals popular misconceptions about child marriage
Misconceptions about child marriage (marriage under 18) appear widespread among the American public, potentially hampering efforts to address the practice globally.

Feeling frisky makes you see what you want to see
A group of psychologists at the University of Rochester and the Israeli-based Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya discovered that we see possible romantic partners as a lot more attractive if we have what the scientists call ''a sexy mindset.'' Under the same condition we also tend to overestimate our own chances of romantic success.

World first study links obesity with reduced brain plasticity
A world-first study has found that severely overweight people are less likely to be able to re-wire their brains and find new neural pathways, a discovery that has significant implications for people recovering from a stroke or brain injury.

Uncovering new understanding of Earth's carbon cycle
A new study led by a University of Alberta PhD student--and published in Nature--is examining the Earth's carbon cycle in new depth, using diamonds as breadcrumbs of insight into some of Earth's deepest geologic mechanisms.

Generational shifts help migratory bats keep pace with global warming
An international team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research demonstrated that in the common noctule bat, one of the largest European bat species, the colonization of hibernacula progresses from lower to higher latitudes over successive generations of young animals - especially first-year males.

NASA finds Tropical Storm Lowell's center north of strongest side
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Lowell and found them south of the center of circulation.

Prior abortion does not negatively affect feelings of parental competence
A recent study found that a prior induced abortion did not negatively impact a woman's psychological well-being or her thoughts about her competence as a parent when she later became a mother.

UAlberta researchers pinpoint how iron deposits form
University of Alberta scientists have uncovered the formation mechanism behind a class of mineral deposits that have been hotly contested until now.

Research helps people, lunar rovers, get there on time
Illinois graduate student Pranay Thangeda relies on the bus system in Champaign-Urbana to get to class.

Scientists identify dozens of genes allowing cancer cells to evade the immune system
Cancer immunotherapy can be extremely successful but so far has only worked in a fraction of patients and tumour types.

'Save me Seymour!'
New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development.

Boys' club barriers create issues for Australian boards
Pale, male and stale - it's certainly stereotypical, but it's a saying that still holds water when it comes to Australian boards, according to new research from the University of South Australia.

US study shows decline in viral load of patients with COVID-19 as pandemic progressed
A US study from the city of Detroit, presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCMID, online 23-25 September) shows that the initial SARS-CoV-2 viral load in nasopharyngeal samples has been decreasing as the pandemic progressed.

Converting lateral scanning into axial focusing to speed up 3D microscopy
In optical microscopy, high-speed volumetric imaging is limited by either the slow axial scanning rate or aberrations introduced by the z-scanning mechanism.

Combined droughts and heatwaves are occurring more frequently in several regions across the US
The frequency of combined droughts and heatwaves -- which are more devastating when they occur in unison -- has substantially increased across the western US and in parts of the Northeast and Southeast over the past 50 years, according to a new study.

Island-building in Southeast Asia created Earth's northern ice sheets
Tectonic processes are thought to have triggered past ice ages, but how?

WPI math professor verifies centuries-old conjecture about formation of the solar system
Using a limited set of mathematical equations, Worcester Polytechnic Institute mathematical sciences professor Mayer Humi said he has confirmed a 224-year-old math conjecture about the origins of our solar system, providing insights about the process that leads to the formation of solar systems across the universe.

Battery fires: Industry and research must work together for safer batteries
Fire safety issues with lithium-ion batteries could be addressed with better collaboration across sectors, Imperial College London experts have said.

Novel dual CAR T cell immunotherapy holds promise for targeting the HIV reservoir
A recent study published in the journal Nature Medicine, led by researchers James Riley, PhD, a professor of Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Todd Allen, PhD, a professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Group Leader at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, describes a new Dual CAR T cell immunotherapy that can help fight HIV infection.

Breakthrough for tomorrow's dentistry
New knowledge on the cellular makeup and growth of teeth can expedite developments in regenerative dentistry - a biological therapy for damaged teeth - as well as the treatment of tooth sensitivity.

Grappling with questions about how COVID-19 can affect the heart
For an issue once expected to occur mostly in patients with severe COVID-19, heart conditions following SARS-CoV-2 infection are much more prevalent, writes Eric Topol in a Perspective.

Broad beans versus soybeans as feedstuff for dual-purpose chickens
Practices of the poultry industry have raised ethical and ecological concerns: ethical concerns include culling day-old male chicks of egg-laying breeds; ecological concerns include importing large quantities of soybeans for feedstuff.

Study finds lung transplant patients not given antifungal preventive drugs have higher risk of death
Antifungal preventive medications reduce mortality risk by half in the first year following lung transplantation, according to Mayo Clinic research involving 667 patients who received lung transplants from 2005 to 2018.

New insights into colorectal cancer: Growth factor R-spondin suppresses tumor growth
R-spondin, which enhances the growth of healthy cells in the gut, suppresses the growth of intestinal adenoma cells, thus reducing the formation of intestinal tumors.

Examining associations between marijuana use during pregnancy, childhood outcomes
Researchers investigated whether cannabis use during pregnancy was associated with various childhood outcomes, including cognition, social problems and brain structure.

Three genes predict success of naltrexone in alcohol dependence treatment
Of patients who seek treatment for alcohol use disorder, 60% to 80% relapse within a year.

UK's preventive measures to shield homeless people from COVID-19 have prevented hundreds of deaths
Timely preventive measures against COVID-19 such as providing hotel room accommodation for homeless people in the UK are estimated to have prevented hundreds of deaths in this vulnerable population, according to research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) and published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine .

Inside the secret lives of synchronous fireflies
Ever wonder why some fireflies flash in harmony? New research sheds light on this beautiful phenomenon and strives to understand how relatively simple insects manage to coordinate such feats of synchronization.

Customizable synthetic antibiotic outmaneuvers resistant bacteria
Antibiotic resistance is one of the world's most urgent public health threats.

Poll: Americans' views of systemic racism divided by race
In the wake of outrage across the nation and racial justice protests spurred by the deaths and injuries of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake and other Black Americans, more than half of Americans believe policing in the country is not fair, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion.

Alcohol, nicotine mix during pregnancy increases health risk in newborns
In the first study of its kind, University of Houston researchers are reporting that during early pregnancy, the mix of alcohol and nicotine significantly alters the gene regulatory pathways of the developing fetus, which can lead to major deficiencies in brain development.

Mathematics: Modelling the timings of a COVID-19 second wave in Europe
How a second wave of COVID-19 infections may evolve across Europe over the next few months, using data on infection rates and travel within and between European countries, is modelled in a Scientific Reports paper.

Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travel
Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modelling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student.

Metformin treatment linked to slowed cognitive decline
A six-year study of older Australians with type 2 diabetes has uncovered a link between metformin use, slower cognitive decline and lower dementia rates.

Tandon Researchers develop method to create colloidal diamonds
The colloidal diamond could make light waves as useful as electrons in computing, and hold promise for a host of other applications.

Faulty transportation of messenger RNA is the culprit in ALS
A team including Osaka University researchers has discovered a function for the protein missing in many types of ALS and FTLD, two neurodegenerative diseases.

Don't sleep on the hypnotic potential of thalidomide
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel molecular pathway for the hypnotic effects of thalidomide.

Wobbling shadow of the M87 black hole
New analysis from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration reveals the behavior of the supermassive black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy across multiple years, indicating the crescent-like shadow feature appears to be wobbling.

Unraveling the genome in 3D-space
Proper folding of extremely long chromosomal DNA molecules is crucial for the correct functioning of the cell.

UofA lab uncovers new mechanism of action against SARS-CoV-2 by antiviral drug remdesivir
Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a novel, second mechanism of action by the antiviral drug remdesivir against SARS-CoV-2, according to findings published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Greater father involvement in infant parenting is beneficial for paternal mental health
Fathers who are more involved in the parenting of an infant are less likely to experience depressive symptoms during the first year of parenthood.

Analysis reveals heart-related side effects of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine
As the antimalarial drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine have drawn attention as potential therapies for COVID-19 and are being widely used off-label, it's now more important than ever to have a thorough assessment of the safety of these medications.

Sanders-brown research discovers new pathway in TDP-43 related dementias
Recent work published by researchers at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) highlights what the lead investigator calls the ''cornerstone'' of her lab.

Study shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes, regardless of genetic risk
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes (T2D) among middle-aged individuals, regardless of any genetic predisposition they may have towards developing the disease.

Jaws of death: USU Eastern paleontologist renames giant, prehistoric marine lizard
Utah State University Eastern paleontologist Joshua Lively describes a new genus of mosasaur, Gnathomortis stadtmani, a marine lizard that roamed the oceans of North America toward the end of the Age of Dinosaurs.

First evidence that air pollution particles and metals are reaching the placenta
Pollution particles, including metals, have been found in the placentas of fifteen women in London, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.

Study: Death counts fail to capture full mortality effects of COVID-19
A study published in the Journal of Public Health finds that for each person in the U.S. who died after contracting COVID-19, an average of nearly 10 years of life had been lost.

NASA tracking Beta's heavy rainfall into lower Mississippi Valley
Slow-moving post-tropical storm Beta continues to drop large amounts of rainfall in Texas as it moves into the Lower Mississippi Valley on Sept.

Sport and memory go hand in hand
If sport is good for the body, it also seems to be good for the brain.

Early treatment for leg ulcers leads to better outcomes for patients
Early surgical treatment of leg ulcers caused by varicose veins improves healing and reduces the risk of the condition coming back, according to a new study.

Study shows diagnoses of common conditions at family doctor halved during COVID-19 lockdown
New research from the UK, being presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online from 23-25 September) shows that the diagnosis of several common conditions including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular (circulatory) disease, diabetes, and mental health conditions approximately halved during the country's COVID-19 lockdown.

Genome duplications as evolutionary adaptation strategy
Genome duplications play a major role in the development of forms and structures of plant organisms and their changes across long periods of evolution.

NASA finds Dolphin swimming against wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of a slightly elongated Tropical Storm Dolphin as it battled wind shear upon its approach to east central Japan.

Persons with Parkinson's disease can have a brighter future
Well over six million people globally have been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, which has an enormous impact on the lives of patients and their families and incurring mounting costs for society.

Pale melanomas masked by albino gene
People with pale coloured melanomas are more likely to have a gene mutation associated with albinism, University of Queensland research has found.

Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health.

Oncotarget: A comprehensive analysis of clinical trials in pancreatic cancer
The cover for issue 38 of Oncotarget features Figure 3, 'Summary of the time and cost for drug development (modified from DiMasi et al [2016],' by Katayama, et al. which reported that Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive common cancer and is desperately in need of novel therapies.

Novel cell membrane model could be key to uncovering new protein properties
Researchers have recently shed light on how cell membrane proteins could be influenced by the lipids around them.

Caregiving factors may affect hospitalization risk among disabled older adults
Few studies have investigated the potential impact of caregivers and caregiver factors on older adults' likelihood of being hospitalized.

Fructose made in the brain could be a mechanism driving Alzheimer's disease
New research released from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus proposes that Alzheimer's disease may be driven by the overactivation of fructose made in the brain.

Amyloid deposits not associated with depression in the elderly
Researchers have suspected that Aβ deposits might also underlie the cognitive decline seen in older people with depression, however a new study from researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has found that abnormal Aβ deposits were actually found in fewer older adults with major depression compared to non-depressed control subjects.

Technology for printing customized neuroprostheses on a 3D bioprinter
Researchers from St Petersburg University have developed the NeuroPrint soft neuroprosthesis 3D printing technology.

HIV drugs could prevent diabetes, study suggests
Patients taking drugs called NRTIs to treat HIV and hepatitis B had a 33% lower risk of developing diabetes.

The biomimetic hand prosthesis Hannes uniquely similar to a human hand
Researchers from Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia and Centro Protesi INAIL in Italy reported on Science Robotics about the prosthetic hand Hannes able to replicate the key biological properties of the human hand.

New model -- Antarctic ice loss expected to affect future climate change
In a new climate modeling study that looked at the impacts of accelerated ice melt from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) on future climate, a team of climate scientists reports that future ice-sheet melt is expected to have significant effects on global climate.

Study shows the disproportionate impact of early-onset adult type 2 diabetes on individuals of South Asian and African-Caribbean ethnicity
A new study presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows the disproportionate impact of early-onset adult type 2 diabetes (T2D) on individuals of South Asian and African-Caribbean ethnicity in the UK.

A cheaper, faster COVID-19 test
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a method for fast, cheap, yet accurate testing for COVID-19 infection.

Tiny worlds reveal fundamental drivers of abundance, diversity
Ecology is traditionally a data-poor discipline, but tiny microbial worlds offer the quantity of data needed to solve universal questions about abundance and diversity.

Donor-conceived adults have higher incidence of immunology diseases
Adults conceived through sperm donation reported higher frequencies of allergies, type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune conditions.

Study finds gut microbiome plays important role in sleep regulation
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects more than one billion people worldwide.

High-intensity interval training combining rowing and cycling improves insulin sensitivity, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in obesity and type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) combining cycling and rowing markedly improves insulin sensitivity, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in cases of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D)

COVID-19 antibody studies across Brazil reveal Amazon region badly affected, with poorer Indigenous communities hit hardest
Two nationwide COVID-19 antibody seroprevalence studies from Brazil show that many cities along the Amazon were hit hardest at the beginning of the epidemic in May and June, along with poorer and Indigenous communities.

Center for BrainHealth advances technique to distinguish brain energy molecules
Researchers examined how cells in the brains of people at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease make and use energy.

New genes for human deafness found in Israeli families
Until now, only seven genes were known to be involved in hearing loss in Israel's Jewish population.

Proof-of-concept for a new ultra-low-cost hearing aid for age-related hearing loss
A new ultra-affordable and accessible hearing aid made from open-source electronics could soon be available worldwide, according to a study published September 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Soham Sinha from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia, US, and colleagues.

Head to head comparison of five assays used to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies shows Siemens and Oxford assays met regulatory targets
New research being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) shows that, in a head-to-head comparison of five tests used to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (known as 'immunoassays'), an assay manufactured by Siemens and one developed by an academic partnership led by the University of Oxford had the most accurate results.

Solving the strange storms on Jupiter
Geometric storm patterns on Jupiter's south pole have been a mystery to scientists, but Caltech researchers may have uncovered how they form.

Women orthopaedic surgeons report high rates of sexual harassment
More than two-thirds of women orthopaedic surgeons report experiencing sexual harassment during their residency training, according to a survey study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®.

Guiding light: Skoltech technology puts a light-painting drone at your fingertips
Skoltech researchers have designed and developed an interface that allows a user to direct a small drone to light-paint patterns or letters through hand gestures.

How microbes in a mother's intestines affect fetal neurodevelopment
During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother's intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development, UCLA biologists report Sept.

Glycans in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein play active role in infection
As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, researchers are working overtime to develop vaccines and therapies to thwart SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the disease Many efforts focus on the coronavirus spike protein, which binds the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) on human cells to allow viral entry.

How a single protein in non-neuronal cells controls brain development
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified the protein PRMT1 as an important regulator of glial cell function and normal brain development.

Risk factors for hospitalization, mechanical ventilation or death among patients with SARS-CoV-2
This observational study used data from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system to examine what risk factors are associated with hospitalization, mechanical ventilation and death among patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Magnetic 'T-Budbots' made from tea plants kill and clean biofilms (video)
Biofilms -- microbial communities that form slimy layers on surfaces -- are difficult to treat and remove, often because the microbes release molecules that block the entry of antibiotics and other therapies.

From carbon taxes to tax breaks, emission reduction policies have widespread support
As the general election nears amid a historic season of hurricanes, wildfires, and heat waves, a new survey finds that majorities of Americans are supportive of climate change mitigation measures.

NASA's terra satellite confirms Paulette's second post-tropical transition
NASA's Terra satellite passed over post-tropical storm Paulette after it had transitioned for a second time.

Halt post-disturbance logging in forests
Please do not disturb: After forest fires, bark beetle infestations and other damage, the affected forests should not be cleared.

GSA publishes seven articles on COVID-19 and aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access.

Scientists develop forecasting technique that could help advance quest for fusion energy
An international group of researchers has developed a technique that forecasts how tokamaks might respond to unwanted magnetic errors.

Amazonia racing toward tipping point, fueled by unregulated fires
Amazonia is closer to a catastrophic ecological tipping point than any time in the last 100,000 years, and human activity is the cause.
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