Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 24, 2020
How to bounce back from stretched out stretchable sensors
Elastic can stretch too far and that could be problematic in wearable sensors.

Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters - study
Scientists used single-cell genomics to show that two groups of poorly known marine protists routinely ingest viruses.

What new research reveals about rude workplace emails
With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic and remote work on the rise, the sheer volume of email exchanges has skyrocketed.

Talc and petroleum jelly among the best lubricants for people wearing PPE
Talcum powder, a coconut oil-cocoa butter beeswax mixture, and petroleum jelly provide the best skin protection for long-term PPE use, say scientists.

5G wireless may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts
Upcoming 5G wireless networks that will provide faster cell phone service may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts, according to a Rutgers study on a controversial issue that has created anxiety among meteorologists.

Handheld device could provide fast method to diagnose concussions in youth athletes
Building upon years of research, a new study has demonstrated how a specific assessment of the eye could someday help properly diagnosis and monitor concussions.

Accuracy of commercial antibody kits for SARS-CoV-2 varies widely
There is wide variation in the performance of commercial kits for detecting antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), according to a study published September 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jonathan Edgeworth and Blair Merrick of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Suzanne Pickering and Katie Doores of King's College London, and colleagues.

Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices - loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM).

In San Francisco bay area, shutdown reduced anthropogenic noise, which changed birdsong quality
Reductions in humanmade noise resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led birds in parts of California to adapt their songs to be higher quality, a new study reports.

Highly detailed map of the human heart could guide personalized heart treatments
Scientists have created a detailed cellular and molecular map of the healthy human heart to understand how this vital organ functions and to shed light on what goes awry in cardiovascular disease.

Metal wires of carbon complete toolbox for carbon-based computers
Carbon-based computers have the potential to be a lot faster and much more energy efficient than silicon-based computers, but 2D graphene and carbon nanotubes have proved challenging to turn into the elements needed to construct transistor circuits.

Hypercoagulability in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
In this AJR article, 82 patients with COVID-19 who underwent abdominal ultrasound or CT were retrospectively compared with 82 patients without COVID-19 for thromboembolism and solid-organ infarction.

New analytical model detects mutations in breast cancer
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a computational model which is effective in detecting and identifying genetic mutations in breast tumours.

Secondary variant of Photorhabdus luminescens interacts with plant roots
One of the basic approaches in organic farming is to use organisms beneficial to the system to combat pests.

Key genetic clue missing in fight against superbugs
For the first time, researchers have discovered how antibiotic resistance genes are spreading, at a continental scale, via bacterial plasmids in the hospital superbug, Klebsiella pneumoniae.

A new strategy of cell entry for some types of parvoviruses
Researchers at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with American scientists, have uncovered a new parvovirus strategy for reaching the cell nucleus which is their site of replication.

Lockdown mental health problems amongst family carers up to 10 times higher
Family carers for children and adults with intellectual disabilities have reported rates of mental health problems under lockdown that are up to 10 times higher than parents without those responsibilities, a new study has found.

Finding the Achilles' heel of a killer parasite
Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes -- parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis.

Study suggests older Western Europeans could already have systemic 'profile' that makes them susceptible to severe COVID-19
New research presented the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) shows that the severe COVID-19 immunological profile, represented by changes in cell populations and circulating inflammatory proteins, is already partly present in older healthy individuals

Study reveals higher COVID-19 mortality in men could be explained by differences in circulating proteins and immune system cells
New research presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) suggests that the higher risk of poor COVID-19 outcomes in men could be explained by differences in circulating proteins and immune system cells compared with women.

Diagnosing sports-related concussion in teens
Researchers investigated the effectiveness of using measurements of how pupils react to light as physiologic biomarker to help diagnose sports-related concussion in adolescents.

NASA estimating Beta's rains moving into the Tennessee valley
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Post-tropical Cyclone Beta's rainfall rates as it moved over Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee.

New issue of Daedalus features essays from sixteen climate change witnesses
A new Issue of Daedalus -- the journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences -- brings together essays by sixteen prominent climate change witnesses, representing multiple fields, backgrounds, and generations.

New 'atlas' of human heart cells first step toward precision treatments for heart disease
Scientists have for the first time documented all of the different cell types and genes expressed in the healthy human heart, in research published in the journal Nature.

CU researcher: Outdated corneal donation policies prevent sight-restoring surgery
U.S. and Canadian restrictions on corneal donations prevented as many as 3,217 corneal donations from gay and bisexual men in 2018, despite a worldwide need for corneas for vision-restoring surgery and a lack of scientific evidence of harm caused by corneas from these men, according to a new study published in the September 24 issue of the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.

COVID-19: Berlin scientists lay basis for a passive vaccination
Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have identified highly effective antibodies against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and are now pursuing the development of a passive vaccination.

Impurities enhance polymer LED efficiencies
New research published in EPJ B reveals that the higher-than-expected efficiency of PLEDs can be reached through interactions between triplet excitons, and impurities embedded in their polymer layers.

Stroke alarm clock may streamline and accelerate time-sensitive acute stroke care
An interactive, digital alarm clock may speed emergency stroke care, starting at hospital arrival and through each step of the time-sensitive treatment process.

Topology-optimized thermal cloak-concentrator
Cloaking a concentrator in thermal conduction via topology optimization. A simultaneous cloaking and concentrating of heat flux is achieved through topology optimization, a computational structural design methodology.

Highly detailed map of human heart could guide personalised heart treatments
Scientists have created the most detailed cellular and molecular map of the healthy human heart ever, to understand how the heart functions, and illuminate what goes wrong in cardiovascular disease.

Sweet success: Heavy consumption of sugary beverages declined in the US from 2003 to 2016
According to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, the percentage of heavy sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumers - those who drink more than 500 calories of SSBs daily - trended downwards in the United States between 2003 and 2016.

Europe: Modelling the evolution of a second wave of COVID-19
Two scientists from IP2I (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), in collaboration with a researcher from the University of Southern Denmark and the University of Naples Federico II, have developed a new mathematical model inspired by high energy physics to predict the next waves of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Opening an autophagy window as the apoptosis door starts to close
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers have successfully attached the cancer cell-targeting antibody Trastuzumab to a previously reported supermolecule that induces autophagic cell death.

Twinkling, star-shaped brain cells may hold the key to why, how we sleep
A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons.

Next-gen bioinformatics tool enables big data analysis without programming expertise
A new data analysis tool developed by MD Anderson researchers incorporates a user-friendly, natural-language interface to aid biomedical researchers without bioinformatics or programming expertise to conduct intuitive data.

Genetic study uncovers mutation associated with fibromuscular dysplasia
Researchers report first clinically actionable findings for a rare blood vessel disease in a study of four unrelated families, all with the same genetic variant.

Research challenges conventional wisdom about key autism trait
A new study into the causes of sensorimotor impairments prevalent among autistic people could pave the way for better treatment and management in the future, say psychologists.

Researchers explore how the human brain is so resilient
Future technology may be able to monitor and modify the brain to produce enhanced team performance, while increasing the efficiency and accuracy of decisions.

A study could provide guideline for exercise training aimed at high blood pressure patient
Brazilian researchers' finding that exercising in the evening reduces blood pressure more than in the morning can help health professionals choose the time of day for aerobic training depending on the type of anti-hypertensive drug they take.

Remote neuropsychology tests for children shown effective
Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children's Health indicates.

Gravity causes homogeneity of the universe
Gravity can accelerate the homogenization of space-time as the universe evolves.

High-intensity resistance training in post-acute care produced better outcomes and patient experience
Today, researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus released a new study evaluating the effectiveness and safety of high-intensity rehabilitation for older adults in skilled nursing facilities.

New system detects faint communications signals using the principles of quantum physics
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised and demonstrated a system that could dramatically increase the performance of communications networks while enabling record-low error rates in detecting even the faintest of signals.

Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19.

Uncovering a 'suPAR' culprit behind kidney injury in COVID-19
A new observational study finds patients in the hospital for COVID-19 have high levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR), an immune-derived pathogenic protein that is strongly predictive of kidney injury.

Stirling experts lead research into impact of climate change on rainforest elephants
Experts from the University of Stirling, working closely with the Government of Gabon, have led an international study into the impact of climate change on Central Africa's rainforests and the threat posed to elephant populations in the region.

Scientists Discover Genetic and Immunologic Underpinnings of Some Cases of Severe COVID-19
New findings by scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators help explain why some people with COVID-19 develop severe disease.

Study of UK key workers shows around half who had COVID-19 symptoms probably did not have the disease
New research from Public Health England (PHE) presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID) shows up to half of UK key workers from a cohort of just under 3,000 individuals recruited (including police, fire and healthcare workers) who had self-reported symptoms of COVID-19 did not test positive for antibodies to the disease.

Assessment of disparities in COVID-19 testing, infection across language groups in Seattle
Researchers evaluated the proportion of patients who completed COVID-19 testing and the proportion of positive cases using language as a surrogate for immigrant status.

Jindal school researchers examine COVID-19 impact on manufacturing
Two Jindal School faculty members found that manufacturing response to COVID-19 has been largely reactive and uncoordinated, and many firms' crisis communication plans do not include managing an infectious-disease outbreak.

Older the person, higher the self-esteem: age differences in self-esteem in Japan
Self-esteem, or the value one assigns oneself, changes through life.

Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilised egg divide and specialise
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies.

Color-coded biosensor illuminates in real time how viruses attack hosts
All viruses can only do damage by replicating inside the cells of another organism, their host.

The return of the spin echo
The spin of particles can be manipulated by a magnetic field.

NASA-NOAA satellite finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Lowell
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Lowell that revealed the storm was dealing with wind shear.

Study provides additional support for use of new class of diabetes drugs
A new study led by a cardiologist from Brigham and Women's Hospital has assessed the cardiovascular and renal outcomes for ertugliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor prescribed for patients with type 2 diabetes to help them control blood sugar levels.

NASA nets Dolphin as an extratropical storm
NASA's Aqua satellite caught a visible image of Dolphin after it passed east central Japan on Sept.

Tracking shape changes in amazon fish after major river is dammed
A team of biologists led by Craig Albertson and Ph.D.

Reasons for football injuries
If professional footballers are out of action due to injuries, this can have serious consequences for the club.

Unusual climate conditions influenced WWI mortality and subsequent Spanish flu pandemic
Scientists have spotted a once-in-a-century climate anomaly during World War I that likely increased mortality during the war and the influenza pandemic in the years that followed.

New research strengthens evidence for climate change increasing risk of wildfires, review finds
New scientific publications reviewed since January 2020 strengthen the evidence that climate change increases the frequency and/or severity of fire weather in many regions of the world.

Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change, say scientists
Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature.

Nanocrystals make volcanoes explode
Tiny crystals, ten thousand times thinner than a human hair, can cause explosive volcanic eruptions.

Carriers of two genetic mutations at greater risk for illness and death from COVID-19
Tel Aviv University researchers suggest that carriers of the genetic mutations PiZ and PiS are at high risk for severe illness and even death from COVID-19.

COVID-19 infected workers return to work faster using time and symptom-based protocols
Recently, investigators assessed the experience of using a test-based protocol in over 1000 infected health care workers.

The Lancet: Experts compare strategies for easing lockdown restrictions in Europe and Asia Pacific and identify key cross-country lessons
Authors of a review of policies, based on the experiences of nine high-income countries and regions' easing of lockdown measures, published in The Lancet journal, are urging governments to consider five key factors in lockdown exit strategies.

Parental touch reduces pain responses in babies' brains
Being held by a parent with skin-to-skin contact reduces how strongly a newborn baby's brain responds to a painful medical jab, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and York University, Canada.

How earthquake swarms arise
A new fault simulator maps out how interactions between pressure, friction and fluids rising through a fault zone can lead to slow-motion quakes and seismic swarms.

Sky islands and tropical alpine sunflowers at risk of disappearing
The plants that live among the mountaintops of the Andes are among those most threatened by climate change because these species have no place left to go to escape rising temperatures.

Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' originate over ocean
Researchers have identified a new type of 'landfalling drought' that originates over the ocean before traveling onto land, and which can cause larger, drier conditions than other droughts.

Bird brains' cortex-like structure may be behind complex cognition, and even consciousness
Informing the century-long riddle of why some birds, despite having a radically different forebrain organization than mammals, demonstrate comparable cognitive abilities, two new studies report that a neuron-dense part of the avian brain, the pallium, may help birds achieve these cognitive feats, including conscious awareness.

Twin studies suggest impaired type I interferon signaling may contribute to severe COVID-19 symptoms
Two new studies report specific mechanisms of impaired type I interferon (IFN) signaling in some hospitalized patients suffering from severe cases of COVID-19, suggesting that screens for these defects could help identify patients at the highest risk of life-threatening complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Simpler models may be better for determining some climate risk
Typically, computer models of climate become more and more complex as researchers strive to capture more details of our Earth's system, but according to a team of Penn State researchers, to assess risks, less complex models, with their ability to better sample uncertainties, may be a better choice.

Putting virtual rehab for stroke patients to the test
Researchers have created a new gaming platform which uses low cost videogame technology to improve the lives of stroke patients suffering from complex neurological syndromes caused by their stroke.

Reimagining everyday technologies in light of COVID-19
In his recent paper published in the Association of Computing Machinery's journal, Interactions, City, University of London's Dr Alex Taylor calls on the industries and practitioners who build technologies, and the scholars who study them, to imagine different futures which are responsive to and responsible for the full diversity of lives lived.

Genetic variation unlikely to influence COVID-19 morbidity and mortality
A comprehensive search of genetic variation databases has revealed no significant differences across populations and ethnic groups in seven genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2.

Scientists trace severe COVID-19 to faulty genes and an autoimmune condition
An international team led by Jean-Laurent Casanova has led to a breakthrough in understanding why only some people develop severe COVID-19: due to faulty genes or misguided antibodies, they lack type I interferons, proteins vital in protecting against viruses.

Marine heatwaves like 2015's Pacific "blob" attributable to anthropogenic climate warming
Severe marine heatwaves, like 2015's Pacific ''blob,'' are far more likely to occur now than before human-induced global warming began, according to a new study.

Loneliness levels high during COVID-19 lockdown
During the initial phase of COVID-19 lockdown, rates of loneliness among people in the UK were high and were associated with a number of social and health factors, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jenny Groarke of Queen's University Belfast, UK, and colleagues.

Mapping the human heart, cell by cell
Scientists have mapped and described the function of cells in six regions of the adult heart, providing a new foundation for studying heart disease.

Faint orbital debris that threatens satellites not being monitored closely enough, warn astronomers
University of Warwick astronomers are warning that orbital debris posing a threat to operational satellites is not being monitored closely enough, as they publish a new survey finding that over 75% of the orbital debris they detected could not be matched to known objects in public satellite catalogues.

Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests.

COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
During the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 created a rally effect around political leaders, according to a large-scale study published Sept.

Mystery of giant proton pump solved
Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, generating energy that supports life.

During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans
People of Asian ancestry face yet another set of challenges posed by racism and xenophobia which has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Researchers demonstrate how deep learning can advance study of neural degeneration
Researchers have demonstrated the utility of artificial intelligence (AI) in identifying and categorizing neural degeneration in the model organism C. elegans.

Age restrictions for handguns make little difference in homicides
In the United States, individual state laws barring 18- to 20-year-olds from buying or possessing a handgun make little difference in the rate of homicides involving a gun by people in that age group, a new University of Washington study has found.

Family care? Healed injuries suggest social behavior in ancestral wolves
Wolves today live and hunt in packs, which helps them take down large prey.

Post-Tropical Storm Teddy in NASA Newfoundland nighttime view
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Post-tropical cyclone Teddy over the province of Newfoundland, Canada in the early morning hours of Sept.

Penicillium camemberti: a history of domestication on cheese
The white, fluffy layer that covers Camembert is made of a mould resulting from human selection, similar to the way dogs were domesticated from wolves.

Something old, something new combine for effective vaccine against parasitic skin disease
Scientists are planning for Phase 1 human trials of a vaccine they developed by using CRISPR gene-editing technology to mutate the parasite that causes leishmaniasis, a skin disease common in tropical regions of the world and gaining ground in the United States.

Remnants of an ancient asteroid shed new light on the early solar system
Researchers have shaken up a once accepted timeline for cataclysmic events in the early solar system.

Climate pledges 'like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing'
Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.

Early admixture with humans led to Y chromosome replacement in late Neanderthals
In one of the first studies to comprehensively analyze Y chromosomes of humans' two closest relatives, Denisovans and Neanderthals, researchers report what prior studies have suggested: early gene flow events between archaic and modern humans led to the eventual replacement of archaic Neanderthal Y chromosomes by introgressed Homo sapiens Y chromosomes.

Some severe COVID-19 cases linked to genetic mutations or antibodies that attack the body
Two new studies offer an explanation for why COVID-19 cases can be so variable.

A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech
Self-erasing chips developed at the University of Michigan could help stop counterfeit electronics or provide alerts if sensitive shipments are tampered with.

Talking alone: Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to predict loneliness
A team led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has used artificial intelligence technologies to analyze natural language patterns to discern degrees of loneliness in older adults.

Antibodies protect against wide range of influenza B virus strains
Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St.

The psychosocial benefits of plastic surgery for young women with congenital breast asymmetry
Nearly all women have breasts that are slightly different from each other.

New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said.

Air pollution leads to increase in electricity usage, study suggests
High levels of air pollution are forcing people inside to consume more electricity, subsequently causing even greater environmental problems by increasing greenhouse gas emissions.

Well-known molecule not found in cancer cells after all
A new research result from Aarhus University shows that a so-called circular RNA molecule, which has been designated as carcinogenic, is actually not found in the cancer cells.

3D camera earns its stripes at Rice
The Hyperspectral Stripe Projector captures spectroscopic and 3D imaging data for applications like machine vision, crop monitoring, self-driving cars and corrosion detection.

Optimizing of VCSEL photon lifetime for minimum energy consumption at varying bit rates
Prof. Bimberg's group at Bimberg Chinese-German Center for Green Photonics Changchun at Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics, and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed VCSELs emitting at 850 nm, 880 nm, 910 nm, 940 nm, which were optimized to achieve 50+ Gb/s, enabling 200+ Gb/s data transmission across a multimode fiber.

Y chromosomes of Neandertals and Denisovans now sequenced
An international research team led by Martin Petr and Janet Kelso of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has determined Y chromosome sequences of three Neandertals and two Denisovans.

Searching together: A lesson from rats
Concentrate on your own task but also pay attention to others--this is the key rule for success, at least for rats when exploring as a group The rat in a maze might be one of the most classic paradigms in the study of behaviour, but an international team of scientists has put a twist on this experimental motif to push the leading edge of technology and research into search strategies of collectives.

Overpriced? TUD researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber
How exactly does the strategy of the artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber work and when is it used?

New nemertean species found in Panama represents the first of its genus from the Caribbean
A novel ribbon worm species was discovered as part of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Training in Tropical Taxonomy program in the Bocas del Toro archipelago in Panama

Atom-Billiards with X-Rays: a new Approach to look inside of Molecules
Since these early days of quantum mechanics, it is known that photons also possess momentum.

Can you paint your migraine?
'Can you draw me a picture of your headache?' may sound like an unusual question - but drawings of headache pain provide plastic surgeons with valuable information on which patients are more or less likely to benefit from surgery to alleviate migraine headaches.

How do Americans view the virus? Anthropology professor examines attitudes of COVID
In her latest study, Northern Arizona University professor Lisa Hardy looks at how Americans' attitudes and responses have changed during the time of the pandemic and how to many people, the virus is not a biological agent but instead a malicious actor.

Born to be wild: Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamine
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found a fungal-bacterial relationship that allows bacteria to travel along fungal highways and supply the fungus with thiamine (vitamin B1), which is essential to most organisms.

A question of reality
Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H.

Job security, finances strongly related to increased anxiety during pandemic
For people still employed during the COVID-19 pandemic, job insecurity and financial concern are associated with greater symptoms of depression and anxiety, according to findings from the UConn School of Nursing published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, or JOEM.

Scientists achieve higher precision weak force measurement between protons, neutrons
Through a one-of-a-kind experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nuclear physicists have precisely measured the weak interaction between protons and neutrons.

Bioelectronic device achieves unprecedented control of cell membrane voltage
Every living cell maintains a voltage across the cell membrane that results from differences in the concentrations of charged ions inside and outside the cell.

Bridging the gap between the magnetic and electronic properties of topological insulators
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology shed light on the relationship between the magnetic properties of topological insulators and their electronic band structure.

A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.

First PhytoFrontiers™ paper discusses arabidopsis response to caterpillars
In their PhytoFrontiers article, Jacquie and colleagues, including first author Zhihong Zhang, who just completed her MSc studies and is interested in the regulation of plant responses to caterpillar herbivory, compare plant responses to two noctuid caterpillar species that are both considered to be ''generalist'' caterpillars.

Cooked carrots can trigger allergic reactions
The consumption of raw carrots triggers allergic reactions in many people.

Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greens
Researchers from Yale-NUS College and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) find support for new hypotheses: that tarantulas' vibrant blue colours may be used to communicate between potential mates, while green colouration confers the ability to conceal among foliage.

Building a better stroke diagnosis
An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University have uncovered a new suite of human blood biomarkers which could someday help emergency clinicians quickly recognize whether someone is experiencing a stroke with a simple blood test.

Waste generation by hospital emergency departments is highlighted for first time
Emergency departments of hospitals generate significant amounts of environmentally harmful waste which could be reduced through basic changes to disposal policies and practices.

Leading water scientists warn of risks in shift to monoculture crops, tree plantations
Conversion of large swaths of land to uniform tree plantations and single-crop species may lead to unintended consequences for the water cycle, putting ecosystems at greater risk for fires, floods, droughts and even hurricanes, warns a think-tank group of almost 30 water scientists from 11 countries.

Lending color to dead cells -- A novel natural dye for screening cell viability
Synthetic dyes are commonly used to assess the toxicity of chemical compounds in cell cultures.

Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions.

LBG individuals use stimulants at higher rates than heterosexuals
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals report higher rates of medical, non-medical, and illegal stimulant use compared to heterosexuals, mirroring patterns seen in other substance use.
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