Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 28, 2020
USC-led study traces the evolution of gill covers
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (PNAS), USC Stem Cell scientists and their collaborators have identified a key modification to the genome that led to the evolution of gill covers more than 430 million years ago.

Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW.

Building walls that will make summer heat waves more bearable
A research team in Korea has developed a new material for buildings walls that can help reduce the penetration of heat from the outside.

First study with CHEOPS data describes one of the most extreme planets in the universe
CHEOPS keeps its promise: Observations with the space telescope reveal details of the exoplanet WASP-189b - one of the most extreme planets known.

Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation
Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation, a new study shows.

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found.

New interactive tool will help farmers contain the spread of clubroot
'ClubrootTracker is an interactive tool that will help farmers locate clubroot-infected areas and can be used by farmers, researchers, and industry and government representatives to share the clubroot status of their land,' explained Edel Pérez-López, one of the plant pathologists involved in the development of this tool.

How important is sex to women as they age?
CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--Despite a common belief that women lose interest in sex as they age, a new study demonstrates that a significant percentage of women continue to rate sex as important throughout midlife.

Scientists precisely measure total amount of matter in the universe
A top goal in cosmology is to precisely measure the total amount of matter in the universe, a daunting exercise for even the most mathematically proficient.

Inside mitochondria and their fascinating genome
EPFL scientists have observed -- for the first time in living cells -- the way mitochondria distribute their transcriptome throughout the cell, and it involves RNA granules that turn out to be highly fluid.

Snakes disembowel and feed on the organs of living toads in a first for science
The Small-banded Kukri Snake seems to have evolved a particularly macabre feeding habit that has never been witnessed in a serpent before.

Memory training for the immune system
The immune system will memorize the pathogen after an infection and can therefore react promptly after reinfection with the same pathogen.

Painting a clearer picture of COVID-19
When Saathvik Kannan's father, a faculty member at the University of Missouri, saw his friend, Kamlendra Singh, a research professor at MU, on television being interviewed for his research identifying possible treatments for COVID-19, he called Singh to congratulate him on his work.

MarrowQuant: A new digital-pathology tool
EPFL scientists have developed a digital pathology tool for quantifying bone marrow compartments in standard histological sections.

Lung cancer screening a step closer to reality following combined study
Newly released study results present a strong case for lung cancer screening in New Zealand - particularly for Māori whose mortality rates are between three and four times higher than other ethnic groups.

Stanford scientists solve secret of nerve cells marking a form of schizophrenia
A common genetic deletion boosts the risk for schizophrenia by 30-fold.

Influence of prone positioning on electrocardiogram in patient with COVID-19
Electrocardiographic findings a woman in her 50s with COVID-19, fever and shortness of breath, with comorbidities that included morbid obesity and obstructive sleep apnea, are reported in this case series.

New study finds novel functions of the pyruvate-sensing protein PdhR in E. Coli
Scientists at Meiji University, Hosei University, and Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) aimed to better understand the homeostasis of pyruvate, a key connection point of many metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli bacteria.

About 14% of cerebral palsy cases may be tied to brain wiring genes
In an article published in Nature Genetics, NIH funded researchers confirm that about 14% of all cases of cerebral palsy, a disabling brain disorder for which there are no cures, may be linked to a patient's genes and suggest that many of those genes control how brain circuits become wired during early development.

Cincinnati Children's research helps pave way for newly approved use of drug
Following two decades of research on a group of rare diseases called hypereosinophilic syndrome at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved the drug Nucala (mepolizumab) for use in the treatment of patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome.

Evolutionary and heritable axes shape our brain
Every region has its place in the brain. However, it has been unclear why brain regions are located where they are.

Helium, a little atom for big physics
Helium is the simplest multi-body atom. Its energy levels can be calculated with extremely high precision only relying on a few fundamental physical constants and the quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory.

How the brain balances emotion and reason
Navigating through life requires balancing emotion and reason, a feat accomplished by the brain region ''area 32'' of the anterior cingulate cortex.

Tone of voice matters in neuronal communication
Neuronal communication is so fast, and at such a small scale, that it is exceedingly difficult to explain precisely how it occurs.

Plastic-eating enzyme 'cocktail' heralds new hope for plastic waste
The UK-US team who re-engineered the plastic-eating enzyme PETase have now created an enzyme 'cocktail' which can digest plastic up to six times faster.

Research on emerging COVID-19 (target, mechanism, and therapeutics)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B publishes special issue on 'Research on Emerging COVID-19 (Target, Mechanism, and Therapeutics)' edited by Hai-Bin Luo, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China; Shilin Chen, Institute of Chinese Materia Medica, Beijing, China and Peiqing Liu, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Water at the end of the tunnel
We humans need oxygen to breath - for a lot of microbes it is a lethal poison.

Researchers discover a new method to regulate cell plasticity
Researchers at IRB Barcelona's Cellular Plasticity and Disease Laboratory propose a more efficient way to limit cell plasticity without causing cell damage.

Could your menopause symptoms be hard on your heart?
Menopause is accompanied by numerous symptoms that can interfere with a woman's quality of life, but can they also cause health problems?

Newer Type 2 diabetes medications have heart and kidney disease benefits, too
Two newer classes of medications used to treat Type 2 diabetes have been shown to protect patients against heart disease and chronic kidney disease, in addition to their ability to help manage blood glucose.

Spinal injuries: the recovery of motor skills thanks to nanomaterials
Re-establishing motor skills and neuronal connectivity thanks to the implantation of carbon nanotubes in the injury site.

Volunteers receiving government aid while unemployed face scrutiny, bias from public
With the worldwide spike in unemployment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, many people may turn to volunteerism as a way to pass their newly found free time.

Penn researchers uncover epigenetic drivers for Alzheimer's disease
New findings suggest that late-onset Alzheimer's Disease is driven by epigenetic changes -- how and when certain genes are turned on and off -- in the brain.

Disastrous duo: Heatwaves and droughts
Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the Unites States, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University.

Ancient Adélie penguin colony revealed by snowmelt at Cape Irizar, Ross Sea, Antarctica
Researcher Steven Emslie encountered a puzzle at Cape Irizar, a rocky cape located just south of the Drygalski Ice Tongue on the Scott Coast, Ross Sea.

New drug targeting DNA repair shows promise in range of advanced cancers
A new precision drug which stops cancer from repairing its DNA has shown promise in an early-stage clinical trial - highlighting the potential of a new class of drugs known as ATR inhibitors.

ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
The percentage of low- and middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pocket health care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of the health insurance marketplaces and Medicaid expansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act, known widely as Obamacare.

Fungal compound inhibits important group of proteins
Researchers in the group of Jeroen den Hertog at the Hubrecht Institute in the Netherlands, in collaboration with researchers in Leiden, have found that a compound inhibits a group of proteins called BMP receptors.

Strong activation of anti-bacterial T cells linked to severe COVID-19
A type of anti-bacterial T cells, so-called MAIT cells, are strongly activated in people with moderate to severe COVID-19 disease, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that is published in the journal Science Immunology.

Study finds older persons underrepresented in COVID-19 treatment and vaccine trials
A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine revealed that older persons are highly likely to be excluded from the majority of COVID-19 trials that seek to establish effective treatments, as well as find a preventive vaccine.

Genetic testing cost effective for newly diagnosed GIST
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers reported that genetic testing is cost-effective and beneficial for newly diagnosed patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a rare type of cancer.

Clinical trial of selpercatinib shows strong response for patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Drug shown to precisely target non-small cell lung cancer driven by mutations to gene RET.

Surplus sugar helps whiteflies detoxify plant defenses
When attacking crucifers, the sap-sucking whitefly Bemisia tabaci can activate the chemical defenses of these plants.

Fine-tuning stem cell metabolism prevents hair loss
An international research team has shown in mice that Rictor, a protein that helps to regulate the growth, energy, and oxygen consumption of cells, plays a key role in the cellular metabolism and longevity of hair follicle stem cells / publication in 'Cell Metabolism'

Similarities and dissimilarities between automatic learning in bees and humans
This study provides the first systematic comparison of automatic visual learning in humans and honeybees, showing that while both species extract statistical information about co-occurrence contingencies of visual scenes, in contrast to humans, bees do not automatically encode predictability information in those scenes.

Tests indicate modern oral nicotine products elicit lower toxicity responses than cigs
New research by BAT indicates that Modern Oral Products (MOPs) showed lower toxicity responses in certain assays than traditional cigarettes.

A new study may revise a theory of flowing viscous liquids that was accepted for 60 years
The international collaborative team has discovered for the first time a topological change of a classical interfacial hydrodynamics, which is driven by 'a partially miscibility'.

Physicians bring attention to overlooked issue of malnutrition among those with obesity
A new editorial accompanying a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology is bringing attention to the underappreciated and often overlooked issue of malnutrition among those who are obese.

The cost of drought in Italy
Drought-induced economic losses ranged in Italy between 0.55 and 1.75 billion euros over the period 2001-2016, and droughts caused significant collateral effects not only on the agricultural sector, but also on food manufacturing industries.

Scientists use 'genomic time travel' to discover new genetic traits to breed more productive and resilient African cattle
New study deploys advanced tools to retrace 1,000 years of African pastoralist cattle breeding, identifying traits to help cattle survive blistering heat, drought and advancing diseases.

Effect of time-restricted eating on weight loss
This randomized clinical trial looked at the effect on weight loss and metabolic health of restricting eating to between 12 p.m. and 8 p.m. among overweight and obese individuals.

Pandemic sets off future wave of worsening mental health issues
Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research.

CNIC design an algorithm for personalized cardiovascular risk estimation in healthy people
A machine learning tool assesses a range of variables including age, blood pressure, diet, and blood and urine markers.

The Lancet: Radiotherapy following prostate cancer surgery can safely be avoided for many men
Most men receiving surgery for localised and locally advanced prostate cancer can have radiotherapy safely removed from their initial treatment, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in The Lancet.

New abdominal aortic aneurysm genes identified, could help pinpoint those at risk
A study of US veterans identified 14 genes that may predict the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Surgical quality and safety rely on institutional leadership, resources, and culture
A comprehensive review of four key principles of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Quality Verification Program demonstrates the importance of an overall hospital culture of quality and safety, including top- and mid-level, quality-focused leadership and a committee dedicated to quality improvement.

Childhood and adult trauma create sleepless nights for midlife women
Sleep disturbances are often reported by postmenopausal women. A new study reports just how prevalent those sleep problems are and that women who endured trauma as children or adults are more likely to suffer poor-quality sleep.

Cancer's hidden vulnerabilities
To fight cancer more effectively, a Caltech researcher probes its inner workings for metabolic weaknesses.

Lipids, lysosomes, and autophagy: The keys to preventing kidney injury
Lysosomes are cellular waste disposal organelles containing potent enzymes that cause cellular damage if they leak out of ruptured lysosomes.

Cell therapy designed to treat inflammatory bowel disease
The UPV/EHU's NanoBioCel research group has for many years been developing systems enabling cells to be used as drugs.

Team develops wearable sensor to help people with inflammatory bowel disease
University of Texas at Dallas researchers have designed a wearable device that monitors sweat for biomarkers that could signal flare-ups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

How does this blue flower tea change color? (video)
Maybe you've seen a beautiful, color-changing tea on social media.

Copycat plant booster improves on nature
A molecular mimic designed to promote plant growth and limit witchweed infestation shows promise in initial trials.

The ocean has become more stratified with global warming
A new study found that the global ocean has become more layered and resistant to vertical mixing as warming from the surface creates increasing stratification.

Landmark discovery could improve Army lasers, precision sensors
An Army-funded landmark discovery at New York University could change the way researchers develop and use optical technologies, such as lasers, sensors and photonic circuits over the next decade.

Thousands of excess deaths from cardiovascular disease during the COVID-19 pandemic
Thousands of excess deaths from cardiovascular disease during the COVID-19 pandemic A major new study has identified 2085 excess deaths in England and Wales due to heart disease and stroke during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

AI technology can predict vanadium flow battery performance and cost
A research team led by Prof. LI Xianfeng from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed a machine learning-based strategy to predict and optimize the performance and cost of vanadium flow batteries (VFBs).

How hormone therapy slows progression of atherosclerosis
As one of the most common treatments for effectively managing menopause symptoms, hormone therapy (HT) is also known to provide multiple health benefits, including slowing the progression of atherosclerosis.

Scientists explored optimal shapes of thermal energy storages
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), and the Institute of Automation and Control Processes of the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IACP FEB RAS) have studied a correlation between the shape of Thermal Energy Storages (TES) used in traditional and renewable energy sectors and their efficiency.

A red future for improving crop production?
Researchers have found a way to engineer more efficient versions of the plant enzyme Rubisco by using a red-algae-like Rubisco from a bacterium.

Discovery of large family of two-dimensional ferroelectric metals
Recently, a team from University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, led by Prof.

Oligomeric materials to enhance water splitting
Researchers from the Llobet group have developed a new molecular material made out of oligomers and used it as a catalyst in water oxidation, achieving unprecedented current densities for molecular catalysts.

New study shows converting to electric vehicles alone won't meet climate targets
Today there are more than 7 million electric vehicles (EVs) in operation around the world, compared with only about 20,000 a decade ago.

Advances in nonhormone therapies provide women with more options for managing hot flashes
Although many women manage menopause symptoms with hormone therapy, increasing numbers of women are considering nonhormone options.

Genetic differences in body fat shape men and women's health risks
New findings about body fat help explain the differing health risks men and women face - and set the stage for better, more targeted treatments.

Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
ETH Zurich researchers have developed a new generation of microelectrode-array chips for measuring nerve impulses, enabling studies of how thousands of nerve cells interact with each other.

Wound-healing waves
How do cells in our bodies ask for directions? Without any maps to guide them, they still know where to go to heal wounds and renew our bodies.

Antiferromagnet lattice arrangements influence phase transitions
New research published in EPJ B reveals that the nature of the boundary at which an antiferromagnet transitions to a state of disorder slightly depends on the geometry of its lattice arrangement.

Unconventional T cell subset enriched in airways of some patients with severe COVID-19
Unconventional T cells called mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are recruited to the airways and strongly activated in some patients with severe COVID-19, a new study has found, suggesting the cells' possible involvement in the development of disease.

Exclusion of older persons from vaccine, treatment trials for COVID-19
The likelihood of older adults being excluded in randomized clinical trials for COVID-19 treatment and vaccine interventions is evaluated in this study.

COVID-19 control rests with human behavior, at least until a vaccine arrives
As the world awaits a COVID-19 vaccine and confirmed cases exceed 30M, Australian and American behavioural researchers say the key to containment rests in understanding human behaviour and how our personalities may influence better cooperative behaviour for the global good.

New potential treatment approach for patients with salt sensitive hypertension
A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has found that an alpha adrenoceptor blocker (a class of drugs that relaxes smooth muscle or blood vessels) may represent a new treatment approach for patients with salt sensitive hypertension.

Bird brains are surprisingly complex
Some birds can achieve extraordinary cognitive performance - but their brains were considered to be rather disorganized compared to those of mammals.

To kill a quasiparticle: a quantum whodunit
Quasiparticles die young, lasting far, far less than a second.

Cement-free concrete beats corrosion and gives fatbergs the flush
Researchers from RMIT University have developed an eco-friendly zero-cement concrete, which all but eliminates corrosion.

Heart disease in young people may be linked to diabetes exposure in the womb
Heart disease in young adults and teenagers may be related to exposure to diabetes in the womb, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190797.

In-hospital cardiac arrest in COVID-19
Outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest among patients with COVID-19 are examined in this case series.

Sleep challenges during COVID-19 pandemic
How parents can help their children adjust sleep schedules, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, is discussed in this Patient Page.

Study finds spreading ghost forests on NC coast may contribute to climate change
A new study found the spread of ghost forests across a coastal region of North Carolina may have implications for global warming.

AI learns to trace neuronal pathways
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists dramatically improved the efficiency of automated methods for tracing neuronal connections.

Artificial intelligence can help protect orchids and other species
Many orchid species are threatened by land conversion and illegal harvesting.

Anti-convulsant drug can modify DNA conformation and interact with chromosome proteins
Brazilian research group shows that valproic acid (VPA), used to treat epilepsy since the 1960s, modulates gene expression in tumor gene models and acts on DNA conformation and the histones in chromatin.

Understanding ghost particle interactions
Argonne scientists were part of a team that constructed a nuclear physics model capturing the interactions between neutrinos and atomic nuclei.

Analysis of wild tomatoes elucidates genetic basis underlying fruit traits
Wild tomato species represent a rich gene pool for numerous desirable traits lost during domestication.

The key to lowering CO2 emissions is made of metal
Researchers at Osaka City University produce malic acid, which contains 4 carbon atoms, through artificial photosynthesis by simply adding metal ions like aluminum and iron.

New hormone therapies for hot flashes offer enhanced benefits and minimized risk
Hormone therapy remains the best proven method for managing menopause symptoms such as hot flashes.

Salute the venerable ensign wasp, killing cockroaches for 25 million years
An Oregon State University study has identified four new species of parasitic, cockroach-killing ensign wasps that became encased in tree resin 25 million years ago and were preserved as the resin fossilized into amber.

Earthquake lightning: Mysterious luminescence phenomena
Photoemission induced by rock fracturing can occur as a result of landslides associated with earthquakes.

Spinal cord stimulation reduces pain and motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients
A team of researchers in the United States and Japan reports that spinal cord stimulation (SCS) measurably decreased pain and reduced motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, both as a singular therapy and as a 'salvage therapy' after deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapies were ineffective.

Inequalities in premature deaths have increased between the rich and poor in Canada
Socioeconomic inequalities in premature deaths in Canada have increased over the last 25 years, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191723.

Busy pictures hinder reading ability in children
A new study published by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University shows extraneous images draw attention from text, reducing comprehension in beginning readers

The pace of environmental change can doom or save coral reefs
Increasing fishing too quickly can cause coral reef ecosystems to collapse, according to new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Cannabis use for menopause symptom management
CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--As legislation relaxes regarding cannabis, it is being used to manage numerous chronic health conditions and mood symptoms.

The testimony of trees: How volcanic eruptions shaped 2000 years of world history
Researchers have shown that over the past two thousand years, volcanoes have played a larger role in natural temperature variability than previously thought, and their climatic effects may have contributed to past societal and economic change.

COVID-19 may deplete testosterone, helping to explain male patients' poorer prognosis
For the first time, data from a study with patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 suggest that the disease might deteriorate men's testosterone levels.

Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breeding
Research led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath found that a range of factors affected the fidelity and parenting behaviour of plovers, rather than being defined by the species.

Naked prehistoric monsters! Evidence that prehistoric flying reptiles probably had
Pterosaur expert Dr David Unwin from the University of Leicester's Centre for Palaeobiology Research, and Professor Dave Martill, of the University of Portsmouth have examined the evidence that these creatures had feathers and believe they were in fact bald

Sentinels of ocean acidification impacts survived Earth's last mass extinction
Two groups of tiny, delicate marine organisms, sea butterflies and sea angels, were found to be surprisingly resilient--having survived dramatic global climate change and Earth's most recent mass extinction event 66 million years ago, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Stable supramolecular structure system to identify activity origin of CO2 electroreduction
N-doped or N-heterocyclic nanostructured electrocatalysts for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction reaction have made important progress in product selectivity.

Despite high hopes, carbon absorbed by Amazon forest recovery is dwarfed by deforestation emissions
After calculating how much carbon had been lost through deforestation, scientists have discovered that, in more than 30 years, the regrowth of secondary forests in the Brazilian Amazon has offset less than 10 per cent of emissions from the loss of old-growth forests.

Research confirms link between sleep apnea and Alzheimer's disease
New research shows damage in the brain starts in the same place and spreads in the same way in sleep apnea, as in Alzheimer's disease.

Natural capital a missing piece in climate policy
Clean air, clean water and a functioning ecosystem are considered priceless.

Avoiding environmental losses in quantum information systems
New research published in EPJ D has revealed how robust initial states can be prepared in quantum information systems, minimising any unwanted transitions which lead to losses in quantum information.

Looking at evolution's genealogy from home
Evolution leaves its traces in particular in genomes. A team headed by Dr.

Researchers identify 'druggable' signaling pathway that stimulates lung tissue repair
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a cellular pathway that can be targeted with a naturally occurring drug to stimulate lung tissue regeneration, which is necessary for recovery from multiple lung injuries.

Astronomers find the first galaxy whose ultraviolet luminosity is comparable to that of a quasar
An international scientific team, led by researchers at the Centre for Astrobiology (CAB, CSIC-INTA) and with participation by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), have found the galaxy BOSS-EUVLG1.

New extreme ultraviolet facility opens for use
Researchers have established a novel high-frequency laser facility at the University of Tokyo.

3D biometric authentication based on finger veins almost impossible to fool
Biometric authentication, which uses unique anatomical features such as fingerprints or facial features to verify a person's identity, is increasingly replacing traditional passwords for accessing everything from smartphones to law enforcement systems.

'Portfolio' of marine reserves enhances fish populations
No-take fishing zones on their own act as valuable sources of fish for neighbouring reefs.

ASU study finds association between screen time use, diet and other health factors
In a study recently published in BMC Public Health, Arizona State University researchers found that heavy users of screens -- defined as those who use screens an average of 17.5 hours per day -- reported the least healthful dietary patterns and the poorest health-related characteristics compared with moderate and light users, who averaged roughly 11.3 and 7 hours of screen use per day, respectively.

Scientists kill cancer cells by 'shutting the door' to the nucleus
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that blocking the construction of nuclear pores complexes--large channels that control the flow of materials in and out of the cell nucleus--shrank aggressive tumors in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed.

Covid-19: Social distancing is more effective than travel bans
Travel bans will delay the peak of infection with days, while social distancing has a much stronger impact, amounting in up to 4 weeks delay, scientists report.

Neurons in spinal-cord injuries are reconnected in vivo via carbon nanotube sponges
Research conducted by two groups at the Center for Cooperative Research in Biomaterials CIC biomaGUNE and one at SISSA, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (Italy), showed that functional materials based on carbon nanotubes offer a possible means for facilitating the reconnecting of neuronal networks damaged as a result of spinal cord injuries.

Freezing prostate cancer: Study shows notable outcomes with cryoablation
A less-invasive treatment technique called hemi-gland cryoablation (HGCryo) -- destroying the areas of the prostate where cancers are located by freezing them -- provides a high rate of effective prostate cancer control, according to a new study published in The Journal of Urology®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA).

Antacid monotherapy more effective in relieving epigastric pain than in combination with lidocain
Antacid monotherapy is more effective in relieving epigastric pain than in combination with lidocaine.

E. coli engineered to grow on CO2 and formic acid as sole carbon sources?
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed a strategy to grow an E. coli strain to higher cell density solely on CO?and formic acid.

Biodiversity increases plant decomposition rate; should be factored into climate models, study finds
An international team of researchers published a meta-analysis of 176 studies investigating the effect of diverse leaf litter decay on ecosystems around the world on Sept.

SwRI study describes discovery of close binary trans-Neptunian object
A new study authored by Southwest Research Institute scientists Rodrigo Leiva and Marc Buie reveals the binary nature of a trans-Neptunian object (TNO).

Boosting public trust in scientists hangs on communications methods
According to Geah Pressgrove, of West Virginia University, scientists and communications professionals need to rethink how they communicate through four distinct dimensions of trust: competence, integrity, benevolence and openness.

Microbiome-based technologies drive multibillion-dollar market
New research field promises to transform food production and treatment of diseases.

The Arctic is burning in a whole new way
'Zombie fires' and burning of fire-resistant vegetation are new features driving Arctic fires -- with strong consequences for the global climate -- warn international fire scientists in a commentary published in Nature Geoscience.

How zika virus degrades essential protein for neurological development via autophagy
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) shed new light on how Zika virus hijacks our own cellular machinery to break down an essential protein for neurological development, getting it to ''eat itself''.

Study helps explain cognition decline after the menopause transition
Women often complain of being more forgetful during the transition from premenopause to perimenopause to postmenopause.

Disparities in migraine by sexual orientation
Survey data were used to examine the association between sexual orientation (exclusively heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, lesbian, gay or bisexual) and migraine.

Increasing stability decreases ocean productivity, reduces carbon burial
As the globe warms, the atmosphere is becoming more unstable, but the oceans are becoming more stable, according to an international team of climate scientists, who say that the increase in stability is greater than predicted and a stable ocean will absorb less carbon and be less productive.

Insect Armageddon: low doses of the insecticide, Imidacloprid, cause blindness in insects
Joint research provides important evidence on the role of insecticides on the longevity of insect population.

Study shows heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury
Early results of an experimental vaping study have shown significant lung injury from E-cigarette (eC) devices with nickel-chromium alloy heating elements.

1 in 3 parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids during COVID-19 pandemic
The pandemic doesn't seem to be changing parents' minds about the importance of the flu vaccine.

Missing rehab due to COVID-19 increased distress in women with breast cancer
Beyond the tragic surges in hospitalizations and deaths, the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted healthcare for people with a wide range of medical conditions - including cancer.

NIH-funded study sheds light on abnormal neural function in rare genetic disorder
A genetic study has identified neuronal abnormalities in the electrical activity of cortical cells derived from people with a rare genetic disorder called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

Noninvasive sleep test may help diagnose and predict dementia in older adults
Researchers have discovered and validated a marker of dementia that may help clinicians identify patients who have the condition or are at risk of developing it.

NASA casts an infrared eye on Tropical Storm Kujira's very cold cloud tops
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Kujira using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm.
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