Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

September 30, 2020
NASA imagery reveals Kujira transitioning into an extratropical cyclone 
Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low-pressure area.

A first in-depth look at the latent virus reservoir of individuals living with HIV
Gladstone Scientist Nadia Roan, PhD, and her team have mapped out an atlas of the reservoir cells of eight individuals living with HIV, which they recently reported in the journal eLife.

How the Humboldt squid's genetic past and present can secure its future
Marine biologists studying the genetic structure of the Humboldt squid population found it is vulnerable to overfishing by fleets on its migration path.

Patients deferred for transcatheter aortic valve replacement because of COVID-19
This single-center study of 77 patients describes the outcomes of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis during the COVID-19 pandemic.

What is your attitude towards a humanoid robot? Your brain activity can tell us!
Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Italy found that people's bias towards robots, that is, attributing them intentionality or considering them as 'mindless things', can be correlated with distinct brain activity patterns.

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with COVID-19
Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with covid-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs
Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

Planktonic sea snails and slugs may be more adaptable to ocean acidification than expected
Pteropods, or ''wing-footed'' sea snails and slugs, may be more resilient to acidic oceans than previously thought, scientists report.

Is it time to reframe the assisted dying debate?
Several articles published by The BMJ today explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives.

Artificial intelligence in art: a simple tool or creative genius?
Intelligent algorithms are used to create paintings, write poems, and compose music.

Largest COVID-19 contact-tracing finds children key to spread, evidence of superspreaders
A Princeton-led study of more than a half-million people in India who were exposed to the novel coronavirus suggests that the virus' continued spread is driven by only a small percentage of those who become infected, known as superspreaders.

Innovative model improves Army human-agent teaming
Army researchers developed a novel computational model for gathering cognitive data that may be a game changer in the fields of neuroscience and econometrics, and has broad relevance to networked and multi-agent systems.

Wasp egg-laying organ inspires new tool to reduce trauma in minimally invasive surgery
A new surgery tool based on the egg-laying organ of parasitic wasps could advance minimally invasive surgery by enabling tissue removal in deeper areas of the body while further minimising trauma and patient recovery time.

Science snapshots September 2020
2D Electronics, Plant Biofactories, Transforming Waste, and Vaccine Development.

Irregular and long menstrual cycles linked to greater risk of early death
Irregular and long menstrual cycles in adolescence and adulthood are associated with a greater risk of early death (before age 70), finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Study looks at encoding the odor of cigarette smoke
A recent publication in the Journal of Neuroscience by a group of researchers at the University of Kentucky looks at Encoding the Odor of Cigarette Smoke.

How green hydrogen can become cheap enough to compete with fossil fuels
The green hydrogen revolution is coming, and Australia is perfectly placed to take advantage of it, an analysis of production costs by UNSW engineers has shown.

Drugs aren't typically tested on women. AI could correct that bias
Researchers at Columbia University have developed AwareDX--Analysing Women At Risk for Experiencing Drug toXicity--a machine learning algorithm that identifies and predicts differences in adverse drug effects between men and women by analyzing 50 years' worth of reports in an FDA database.

New study finds antidepressant drug effective in treating "lazy eye" in adults
In a new study, published in Current Biology, researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine reveal how subanesthetic ketamine, which is used for pain management and as an antidepressant in humans, is effective in treating adult amblyopia, a brain disorder commonly known as ''lazy eye.''

Researchers exploit weaknesses of master game bots
Researchers at Penn State designed an algorithm to train an adversarial bot, which was able to automatically discover and exploit weaknesses of master game bots driven by reinforcement learning algorithms.

Network reveals large variations in shaking in LA basin after Ridgecrest earthquake
The 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence has revealed areas of the Los Angeles basin where the amplification of shaking of high-rise buildings is greatest, according to a new report in Seismological Research Letters.

NASA confirms, heavy rainfall, strengthening of tropical storm Marie
Tropical Storm Marie has formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and NASA satellite data helped confirm the strengthening of the storm.

Genetic test identifies invasive lobular carcinomas that are at high risk of recurring
New results to be presented at the 12th European Breast Cancer Conference show that a test, which looks at the activity of 70 genes in breast cancer tissue, is possible to use in the clinic to identify patients with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) that is at high risk of recurring and progressing.

Why have fewer long-term care residents died from COVID-19 in BC than Ontario?
An analysis comparing COVID-19 deaths in long-term care (LTC) residents in Ontario and British Columbia found that BC was better prepared for the pandemic and responded in a more coordinated and decisive manner, leading to far fewer deaths than in Ontario.

Colloidal quantum dot light emitters go broadband in the infrared
A team of ICFO researchers develops a new class of broadband solid state light emitter in the short-wave infrared that could be miniaturized, integrated with CMOS technology and used for many applications including food inspection, health or safety.

Cannabinoids associated with negative respiratory health effects in older adults with COPD
Cannabinoids, a class of prescription pills that contain synthetically-made chemicals found in marijuana, are associated with a 64 per cent increase in death among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to the first published data on the impact of cannabinoids on the respiratory health of individuals with the lung disease.

Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities
A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification.

Large contact tracing study in Science finds children as active transmitters of COVID-19
A team of investigators from CDDEP, the Government of Tamil Nadu, and Andhra Pradesh studied disease transmission patterns in 575,071 individuals exposed to 84,965 confirmed cases of COVID-19.

Delirium a key sign of COVID-19 in frail, older people
A new analysis of data from researchers at King's College London using information from the COVID Symptom Study app and patients admitted to St Thomas' Hospital in London, has shown that delirium - a state of acute confusion associated with a higher risk of serious illness and death - is a key symptom of COVID-19 in frail, older people.

Scientists discover bacterium linked to deadly childhood disorder
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health have discovered bacteria linked to post-infectious hydrocephalus (PIH), the most common cause of pediatric hydrocephalus worldwide.

Researchers use satellite imaging to map groundwater use in California's central valley
Researchers at the University of California San Diego report in a new study a way to improve groundwater monitoring by using a remote sensing technology (known as InSAR), in conjunction with climate and land cover data, to bridge gaps in the understanding of sustainable groundwater in California's San Joaquin Valley.

Urgent need for blood-based biomarkers to diagnosis concussion
There is an urgent need for objective markers for diagnosing concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury.

Teen social networks linked to adult depression
Teens who have a larger number of friends may be less likely to suffer from depression later in life, especially women, a new MSU research study has found.

Nights warming faster than days across much of the planet
Global warming is affecting daytime and night-time temperatures differently - and greater night-time warming is more common than greater daytime warming worldwide - new research shows.

Antipsychotics for treating adult depression linked with higher mortality
Rutgers researchers, together with colleagues at Columbia University, have reported an increased mortality risk in adults with depression who initiated augmentation with newer antipsychotic medications compared to a control group that initiated augmentation with a second antidepressant.

Wildcats threatened by their domestic cousins
European wildcats, thought to be extinct 50 years ago in the Jura mountains, have since recolonised part of their former territory.

"Immortal" in tree resin
The phenomenon of using DNA from old fossils preserved in amber already inspired Hollywood - in the film Jurassic Park, scientists reproduce the DNA of dinosaurs extracted from a fossil mosquito and thereby resurrect them.

Social novelty has a special place in the brain
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan report that a part of the mouse brain called the SuM is specialized for detecting new experiences.

"There's no place like home" for rehab after stroke
Stroke patients who get professional rehabilitation training in their homes through live video consultations may recover their motor skills better than those who do their rehab in person with a therapist at an outpatient rehabilitation facility, according to a study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals details about individual cells in pancreatic tumors
Led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, and by HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute, an international team of researchers have described in detail the individual cells that comprise the pancreatic cancer microenvironment, a critical step in devising new treatment options for patients with this aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease.

Bacteria virus combo may be cause of neonatal brain infections in Uganda
A newly identified bacteria and a common virus may be the underlying cause of infection-induced hydrocephalus in Uganda, according to an international team of researchers.

Study explores link between methamphetamine use and risky sexual behavior
Recreational use of the illicit drug methamphetamine has long been associated with increases in overall impatient and risky behavior.

Cognitive flexibility training manages responses to social conflict
Scientists at the WRAIR and ARL developed a computer-based training to reduce anger, reactive aggression and hostile attribution bias--the tendency to attribute hostile intent to the actions of others--in ambiguous social conflict situations.

Skoltech scientists discovered a new biomarker for liver cancer diagnosis
A group of Skoltech scientists led by a Skoltech and MSU professor Olga Dontsova discovered a novel liver-specific non-coding RNA.

Screen time can change visual perception -- and that's not necessarily bad
The coronavirus pandemic has shifted many of our interactions online, with Zoom video calls replacing in-person classes, work meetings, conferences and other events.

Consumers who avoid products with harmful chemicals on the label have lower body burden
New research shows that paying close attention to what's in the products you buy can pay off.

Cells sacrifice themselves to boost immune response to viruses
Whether flu or coronavirus, it can take several days for the body to ramp up an effective response to a viral infection.

Molecules responsible for radio-resistant glioblastoma identified
Scientists have identified key molecules that mediate radioresistance in glioblastoma multiforme; these molecules are a potential target for the treatment of this brain cancer.

New mechanism of cell survival in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Researchers at The Wistar Institute unraveled a mechanism employed by chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells for their survival.

The most sensitive and fastest graphene microwave bolometer
Scientists from Harvard, ICFO, MIT, Raytheon BBN Technologies and NIMS construct the fastest and most sensitive graphene-based microwave bolometer achieved so far.

Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials
Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and other tissue.

Cardiac arrest, poor survival rates common in sickest patients with COVID-19
Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients.

Chronically understudied, fences hold grave ecological threats
Fences are one of humanity's most frequent landscape alterations, with their combined length exceeding even that of roads by an order of magnitude.

Data from two Indian states reveal SARS-CoV-2 impacts in a resource-limited setting
In two states in India, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, COVID-19 cases and deaths have been more heavily concentrated in younger cohorts than is seen in high-income countries, among other trends.

Hand pollination, not agrochemicals, increases cocoa yield and farmer income
Agroecologists from Göttingen University compare pesticides, fertilisers, manual pollination and farming costs in Indonesia

Novel role of microglia as modulators of neurons in the brain is discovered
Findings offer potential target for treating behavioral abnormalities associated with neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's Disease.

New study reveals how reptiles divided up the spoils in ancient seas
While dinosaurs ruled the land in the Mesozoic, the oceans were filled by predators such as crocodiles and giant lizards, but also entirely extinct groups such as ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs.

Breaking COVID-19's 'clutch' to stop its spread
The virus that causes COVID-19 uses a clutch-like shifter to enable transcription of one RNA string into multiple proteins, and therein lies a vulnerability.

Rodent ancestors combined portions of blood and venom genes to make pheromones
Experts who study animal pheromones have traced the evolutionary origins of genes that allow mice, rats and other rodents to communicate through smell.

An unintended consequence
Life on Earth is all about strategies for survival, with every organism developing behaviors and bodies that maximize chances of staying alive and reproducing while minimizing the likelihood of being injured or eaten.

Aortic valve replacement during COVID-19 pandemic
The outcomes associated with deferred compared with expedited aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis during the COVID-19 pandemic are evaluated in this observational study.

AI taught to rapidly assess disaster damage so humans know where help is needed most
Researchers trained an AI to assess post-disaster building damage just by looking at aerial images of the aftermath.

Investigational COVID-19 vaccine well-tolerated, generates immune response in older adults
A Phase 1 trial of an investigational mRNA vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection has shown that the vaccine is well-tolerated and generates a strong immune response in older adults.

Chinese researchers uncover link between phase separation and human developmental disorders
Researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry (SIOC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have uncovered the mechanism that underlies the pathogenesis of Noonan syndrome and Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

Revealing the impacts of COVID-19 on unborn children
What are the risks to an unborn child if a woman contracts COVID-19 while pregnant, and how can doctors identify which pregnancies are at greater risk of adverse outcomes if a pregnant mother tests positive?

New way of giving life-saving drug will help frontline responders save the lives of trauma victims
A life-saving treatment for bleeding trauma victims, tranexamic acid (TXA), can now be given by a simple injection at the scene of the injury, according to a new study in British Journal of Anaesthesia.

Medical mystery: 'Creeping fat' in Crohn's patients linked to bacteria
Cedars-Sinai researchers might have solved a mystery surrounding Crohn's disease: Why does fat appear to migrate into patients' small intestines?

Innate lymphoid cells regenerate within lung
Max Planck researcher Dominic Grün teamed up with colleagues from Würzburg headed by Georg Gasteiger and generated a comprehensive atlas of Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) of the lung.

Safe flight: New method detects onset of destructive oscillations in aircraft turbines
''Flutter'' is a complex oscillatory phenomenon that can destroy aircraft turbine blades and has historically been the cause of several plane accidents.

Study: Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in any century over 12,000 years
If human societies don't sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland's rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century over the past 12,000 years, a new study concludes.

Poor cognitive performance predicts impairment in activities of daily living years later
Subtle differences in cognition may help identify individuals at risk for becoming dependent years later upon others to complete daily activities, such as managing medications or finances and other essential activities.

Cerebral palsy also has genetic underpinnings
Scientists have identified mutations in single genes that can be responsible for at least some cases of cerebral palsy, according to a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Children hold leaders primarily responsible, not entitled
Researchers explored how young children conceptualize leadership, specifically whether they view leaders primarily as more entitled individuals or more responsible individuals, relative to non-leaders.

Hospital-based specialist palliative care may slightly improve patient experience and increase their chances of dying in their preferred place (measured by home death)
A Cochrane Review into the effectiveness of hospital-based specialist palliative care has found evidence that when compared to usual care, it may slightly improve patient satisfaction and depression, and increase the chances of patients dying in their preferred place (measured by home death).

Texas A&M study: Marine heatwaves can strengthen hurricanes
Oceanographers have found that a hurricane can be considerably strengthened in the Gulf of Mexico through the compounding effects of two extreme weather events.

Pan-microbial study implicates a potential culprit in a pediatric brain disorder in Uganda
Researchers have identified a new species of bacteria that may contribute to the dangerous buildup of brain fluid after infections in newborns, according to their analysis of 100 infants in Uganda.

Small molecule targets SARS-CoV-2 RNA for destruction
SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19, has wreaked havoc on health care systems, economies and everyday lives worldwide.

Measuring muscle strength provides insights regarding weakness in older adults
Isokinetic dynamometry is a major tool in the measurement of muscle strength in the fields of sports medicine, orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation and exercise physiology.

Heading upriver
A river's only consistent attribute is change. As the Greek philosopher Heraclitus remarked, 'No man ever steps in the same river twice.' Although this dynamic nature is often out of sight and mind, forgetting about it has led to many a historical catastrophe.

A single-application treatment for ear infections that doesn't need refrigeration
Outer ear infections, which affect millions of people each year, are typically caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Repeatedly administering antibiotic drops, the standard treatment, can be a problem for some people, and the only single-use suspension currently available needs to be kept and handled cold.

Hydroxychloroquine no more effective than placebo in preventing COVID-19
Clinical trial with COVID-19 testing of participants shows health care workers in contact with coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine each day did not reduce their rate of infection.

'Street' ERTs are more useful in predicting companies' future tax outcomes, study finds
New research from the University of Notre Dame sheds light on the most effective methods to predict future tax outcomes, which simplifies the decision-making process for investors.

AI can detect COVID-19 in the lungs like a virtual physician, new study shows
A University of Central Florida researcher is part of a new study showing that artificial intelligence can be nearly as accurate as a physician in diagnosing COVID-19 in the lungs.

Cancer cells use nerve-cell tricks to spread from one organ to the next
New research suggests that breast and lung tumors metastasize by hijacking a neural signaling pathway, potentially opening the door to better diagnostics and treatments.

The heat is on for building 3D artificial organ tissues
Bioengineers have devised a technology that uses heat to remotely control the positioning and timing of cell functions to build 3-dimensional, artificial, living tissues.

Mosquitos lost an essential gene with no ill effects
University of Maryland scientists discovered mosquitos are missing a gene that's critical for survival in other insects.

Rapeseed instead of soy burgers: researchers identify a new source of protein for humans
Rapeseed has the potential to replace soy as the best plant-based source of protein for humans.

People with ADHD who experience financial distress may also be at heightened risk for suicide
An analysis of more than 189,000 Swedish credit reports and mental health data from the entire population of the country found that people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who also had the highest risk of credit default were three to four times more likely to commit suicide than those with only one of these two risk factors.

Can organic plant protection products damage crops?
Protecting crops against pests and diseases is essential to ensure a secure food supply.

UM171 saves another life
Developed in Canada, the UM171 molecule was used in a blood transplant by a Montreal medical team on a young man suffering from severe aplastic anemia, an autoimmune disease.

Association of prior psychiatric diagnosis with mortality among hospitalized patients with COVID-19
Researchers evaluated the association between having any prior psychiatric diagnosis and COVID-19- related mortality of hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Shedding light on how urban grime affects chemical reactions in cities
Many city surfaces are coated with a layer of soot, pollutants, metals, organic compounds and other molecules known as ''urban grime.'' Chemical reactions that occur in this complex milieu can affect air and water quality.

Drink coffee after breakfast, not before, for better metabolic control
The new study looked at the combined effects of disrupted sleep and caffeine on our metabolism - with surprising results.

Hackers targeting companies that fake corporate responsibility
A new study found some hackers aren't in it for the money; they want to expose firms that engage in phony philanthropy.

Videos most effective in communicating with parents about secondhand smoke risks
The best way to communicate with parent smokers about the risks of secondhand smoke to their children is to use videos depicting the risks, as well as solutions to reduce those risks.

Extra visit time with patients may explain wage gap for female physicians
A new study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis sheds light on why female primary care physicians receive lower wages than their male counterparts.

Scientists help reboot 50 years of plant advice to solve one of nature's biggest challenges
Scientists from the University of Portsmouth and Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, have come up with a formula to help plant breeders and farmers around the world grow crops in a more sustainable way.

Counties with persistent poverty rates experience higher rates of cancer deaths
Residents of counties that experience persistent poverty face a disproportionately high risk of cancer mortality.

Arnhem Land Maliwawa rock art opens window to past
Stunning Arnhem Land rock art images including three rare depictions of bilbies and a dugong have been described by researchers in a new paper in Australian Archaeology today (Oct 1).

Zebrafish embryos help prove what happens to nanoparticles in the blood
What happens to the nanoparticles when they are injected into the bloodstream, for example, to destroy solid tumours?

New research reveals effects of COVID-19 on breast cancer screening, treatment and care
During the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries paused their breast cancer screening programmes.

Voter reactions to MeToo Scandals: Sexism, not partisanship, has the largest impact
Sexist attitudes influence how politicians accused of sexual misconduct are viewed, even more than partisanship, according to a Dartmouth study.

Efficacy, safety of hydroxychloroquine vs placebo to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care
In this randomized clinical trial, daily hydroxychloroquine didn't prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection among hospital-based health care workers, although the trial was terminated early.

Predator-prey interaction study reveals more food does not always mean more consumption
Decades of data allow researchers at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center to look at predator-prey interactions in a different way: among multiple species throughout the water column.

Dinosaur feather study debunked
A new study published in ''Scientific Reports'' provides substantial evidence that the first fossil feather ever to be discovered does belong to the iconic bird-like dinosaur, Archaeopteryx.

"Liking" an article online may mean less time spent reading it
When people have the option to click ''like'' on a media article they encounter online, they spend less time actually reading the text, a new study suggests.

Coral's resilience to warming may depend on iron
How well corals respond to climate change could depend in part on the already scarce amount of iron available in their environment, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers.

Hackensack Meridian CDI scientists find one-two punch for preclinical cancer models
Research findings published Aug. 14, 2020 in the journal Cancer Research suggest that since some cancer treatments can be undermined by epigenetic changes (altered DNA methylation affecting gene expression) in cancer cells before the treatments are even administered, a worthwhile strategy is to administer an epigenetically-acting drug - which can pave the way for more effective subsequent use of immune-acting cancer treatments.

Oncotarget: NRXN1 as a novel potential target for small cell lung cancer
The cover for issue 39 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''Apoptosis assay of NRXN1-targeted ADC at IC50 dose calculated by growth inhibition curves,'' by Yotsumoto, et al. which reported that the authors identified transmembrane proteins overexpressed specifically in SCLC with little or no expression in normal tissues and decided to focus on the cell adhesion molecule neurexin-1.

Scientists propose immune cocktail therapy to boost cancer-immunity cycle in multiple aspects
A research team led by Prof. TIAN Huayu from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (CIAC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed an innovative immune cocktail therapy that combined ICT along with other therapeutic approaches.

Enforcement more effective than financial incentives in reducing harmful peat fires?
A new study looking at incentives to reduce globally harmful peatland fires suggests that fear of enforcement and public health concerns influence behaviour more than the promise of financial rewards.

How a toxic chromium species could form in drinking water
The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought much-needed attention to the problem of potentially toxic metals being released from drinking water distribution pipes when water chemistry changes.

Work bubbles can help businesses reopen while limiting risk of COVID-19 outbreaks
Creating ''work bubbles'' during the COVID-19 pandemic can help reduce the risk of company-wide outbreaks while helping essential businesses continue to function, as the example of Bombardier Aviation demonstrates in an analysis published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2020/09/29/cmaj.201582.

Gene links short-term memory to unexpected brain area
A new study in mice identifies a gene that is critical for short-term memory but functions in a part of the brain not traditionally associated with memory.

Even in people with Parkinson's gene, coffee may be protective
Even for people with a gene mutation tied to Parkinson's disease, coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of actually developing the disease, according to a new study published in the September 30, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Study highlights dual burden of menstruation and homelessness
Homeless New Yorkers who menstruate face numerous challenges due to inadequate access to toilets, bathing spaces, and laundering services, as well as pervasive menstrual stigma.

Not all patients are offered the same effective breast cancer treatment
Socioeconomic status and race could play a role in treatment decisions, according to new research.

Neandertal gene variant increases risk of severe COVID-19
A study published in Nature shows that a segment of DNA that causes their carriers to have an up to three times higher risk of developing severe COVID-19 is inherited from Neandertals.

Study links low immunity to poor outcomes in patients with HIV who contract COVID-19
Clinical trials are testing whether medications that treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can also treat COVID-19, leading some patients with HIV to believe they might be protected against the coronavirus.

Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter
Venus might not be a sweltering, waterless hellscape today, if Jupiter hadn't altered its orbit around the sun, according to new UC Riverside research.

New detector breakthrough pushes boundaries of quantum computing
A new paper published in Nature shows potential for graphene bolometers to become a game-changer for quantum technology

3D printed 'invisible' fibers can sense breath, sound, and biological cells
From capturing your breath to guiding biological cell movements, 3D printing of tiny, transparent conducting fibres could be used to make devices which can 'smell, hear and touch' -- making it particularly useful for health monitoring, Internet of Things and biosensing applications.

Financial distress linked to suicide risk in people with ADHD
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is linked to higher levels of financial distress in adults -- and a fourfold higher risk of suicide for those with the most debt, according to a large population study.

The ancient Neanderthal hand in severe COVID-19
Genetic variants that leave their carrier more susceptible to severe COVID-19 are inherited from Neanderthals, finds a new study published in Nature.

Scientists capture candid snapshots of electrons harvesting light at the atomic scale
A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has gained important new insight into electrons' role in the harvesting of light in artificial photosynthesis systems.

New research on how fungal cells respond to stress
Numerous species of filamentous fungi are pathogens that can make people sick, especially people who are immunocompromised.

Stellar explosion in Earth's proximity
When the brightness of the star Betelgeuse dropped dramatically a few months ago, some observers suspected an impending supernova - a stellar explosion that could also cause damage on Earth.

The proof is in the pudding
As Australia's aged care sector continues to be scrutinised, researchers at the University of South Australia show that plain solutions are often the best, with a new study finding that aged care residents can improve their nutrition intake simply by increasing their meal sizes.
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