Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 02, 2020
Cheating birds mimic host nestlings to deceive foster parents
While common cuckoos mimic their host's eggs, new research has revealed that a group of parasitic finch species in Africa have evolved to mimic their host's chicks - and with astonishing accuracy.

Genetic tracing 'barcode' is rapidly revealing COVID-19's journey and evolution
Drexel University researchers have reported a method to quickly identify and label mutated versions of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Caesarean birth, prolonged labour influence infant gut bacteria, risk of childhood obesity
Events at birth may affect the microbes living in a baby's gut during the first few months of life, leading to a higher risk of childhood obesity and allergies, according to a new study published in the journal Gastroenterology.

Searching for the chemistry of life
In the search for the chemical origins of life, researchers have found a possible alternative path for the emergence of the characteristic DNA pattern: According to the experiments, the characteristic DNA base pairs can form by dry heating, without water or other solvents.

Medicine for multiple sclerosis patients inhibits coronavirus - at least in a test tube
A drug which has already been approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients effectively inhibits the coronavirus when tested on human lung cells.

Solving global challenges using insect research
IRD researchers and their partners have published a special issue in the Current Opinion in Insect Science journal.

Nitric oxide a possible treatment for COVID-19
Researchers at Uppsala University have found that an effective way of treating the coronavirus behind the 2003 SARS epidemic also works on the closely related SARS-CoV-2 virus, the culprit in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Scale-adaptive auto-context-guided fetal US segmentation with structured random forests
https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0016 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal.

Sex-specific adverse drug effects identified by Columbia University algorithm
Columbia University researchers developed an algorithm that uses real-world data to identify sex-specific adverse drug effects, the fourth-leading cause of death in the U.S.

Yan report's claims that SARS-CoV-2 was created in a Chinese lab are misleading, unethical
In the first published scholarly peer reviews of this controversial research, reviewers Robert Gallo, Takahiko Koyama, and Adam Lauring, write that its ''claims are at times baseless and are not supported by the data and methods used.''

Primary care office-based vs telemedicine care visits during COVID-19 pandemic
This observational study quantified national changes in the volume, type and content of primary care delivered during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially with regard to office-based visits compared with telemedicine encounters.

Enhancing blood sugar control boosts brain health for people with type 2 diabetes
Controlling blood sugar levels improved the ability to clearly think, learn and remember among people with type 2 diabetes who were overweight, a new study shows.

Smartphone surveys find a connection between daily spiritual experiences and well-being
Using smartphone check-ins twice a day for two weeks, sociologists in a national study have found a link between individuals' daily spiritual experiences and overall well-being, say researchers from Baylor University and Harvard University.

New nanotechology design provides hope for personalized vaccination for treating cancer
A new study demonstrates the use of charged nanoscale metal-organic frameworks for generating free radicals using X-rays within tumor tissue to kill cancer cells directly.

Woodpeckers' drumming: Conserved meaning despite different structure over the years
How do animals produce and perceive biological information in sounds?

Babies' random choices become their preferences
When a baby reaches for one stuffed animal in a room filled with others just like it, that random choice is very bad news for those unpicked toys: the baby has likely just decided she doesn't like what she didn't choose.

Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels, says study
Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography.

Future climate changes in nature reserves
The Earth's nature reserves are set to be affected by future climate change in very different ways.

A factor limiting recovery from bleaching in corals
A joint research team has examined the effect of pre-exposure to heat stress on the capacity of symbiotic algae to infect cnidarian hosts using the Aiptasia (sea-anemone)-zooxanthellae (algae) model system.

A social-belonging intervention improves STEM outcomes for ESL students
A study conducted at 19 universities by IU researchers and their colleagues in the US and Canada, found that a brief social belonging exercise, administered online before students arrive on campus, boosts the performance and persistence of students in STEM disciplines - science, technology, engineering and math - who speak English as a second language.

Harvesting vegetation on riparian buffers barely reduces water-quality benefits
Allowing farmers to harvest vegetation from their riparian buffers will not significantly impede the ability of those streamside tracts to protect water quality by capturing nutrients and sediment -- and it will boost farmers' willingness to establish buffers.

Potential new tool for frost screening in crops
Agricultural scientists and engineers at the University of Adelaide have identified a potential new tool for screening cereal crops for frost damage.

Liquid biopsies timely and effective testing method for NSCLC patients in Canada
Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from blood samples may improve diagnostic testing in patients with advanced NSCLC, and may also be faster and less expensive compared to standard tissue profiling, according to research presented today at the IASLC 2020 Lung Cancer Hot Topic: Liquid Biopsy Virtual Conference.

UArizona Health Sciences researchers identify new target for creating flavivirus vaccines
Antibodies normally fight viruses, but in the case of flaviviruses, they can make infections worse.

Subsidized cars help low-income families economically, socially
Nicholas Klein, assistant professor of city and regional planning at Cornell University, conducted interviews with 30 people who gained access to inexpensive, reliable cars through the nonprofit Vehicles for Change (VFC).

Physicists build circuit that generates clean, limitless power from graphene
Physicists at the University of Arkansas have successfully generated an electrical current from the atomic motion of graphene, discovering a new source of clean, limitless power.

Vaccine ingredients could be hiding in small molecule libraries
Many vaccines include ingredients called adjuvants that help make them more effective by eliciting a stronger immune response.

Coastal flooding will disproportionately impact 31 million people globally
Indiana University researchers analyzed these geographic regions, which include cities like New Orleans, Bangkok, and Shanghai, using a new global dataset to determine how many people live on river deltas, how many are vulnerable to a 100-year storm surge event, and the ability of the deltas to naturally mitigate impacts of climate change.

COVID-19: Social dilemmas about protective measures
We need to understand how protective actions against contagious diseases are adopted to define the correct preventive approaches.

New clues about the link between stress and depression
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein in the brain that is important both for the function of the mood-regulating substance serotonin and for the release of stress hormones, at least in mice.

Study highlights shortcomings in telemedicine despite large increases in remote consults during COVID-19 pandemic
Despite increased use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans have had significantly fewer consultations with primary care doctors and markedly fewer assessments of common cardiac risk factors.

Effect of avoiding cow's milk formula at birth on preventing asthma in children
Extended follow-up of randomized clinical trial participants was used to investigate whether the risk of asthma or recurrent wheeze among young children was changed by avoiding supplementing breastfeeding with cow's milk formula after birth.

Users of blood pressure medicine have a lower risk of dying from influenza and pneumonia
Thousands of Danes use ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers against elevated blood pressure or heart problems, and they may have an improved chance of surviving severe influenza or pneumonia infections.

New COVID test doesn't use scarce reagents, catches all but the least infectious
Scientists at the University of Vermont and the University of Washington have developed an accurate COVID-19 test doesn't use scarce reagents, paving the way for wide testing in both developing countries and industrialized nations like the United States, where reagent supplies are again in short supply.

National Academies release framework for equitable allocation of a COVID-19 vaccine for adoption by HHS, state, tribal, local, and territorial authorities
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today released the final report of a consensus study recommending a four-phased equitable allocation framework that the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and state, tribal, local, and territorial (STLT) authorities should adopt in the development of national and local guidelines for COVID-19 vaccine allocation.

Cancer immunotherapy 'uniquely suppressed' by liver tumors
Though cancer immunotherapy has become a promising standard-of-care treatment--and in some cases, perhaps a cure--for a wide variety of different cancers, it doesn't work for everyone, and researchers have increasingly turned their attention to understanding why.

Could a poo transplant one day be the secret of eternal youth?
Poo transplants could one day be used to restore cognitive decline among the elderly - according to new research.

Awakening after a sleeping pill
A patient who could not move and talk spontaneously for eight years started to do so again after being administered a sleeping pill.

Laundry lint can cause significant tissue damage within marine mussels
Research by the University of Plymouth showed that ingesting lint caused significant abnormality within the mussels' gills, as well as atrophy or deformities leading to loss of definition in digestive tubules

DECT in the ED: better diagnoses, less follow-up, more savings
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), dual-energy CT (DECT) added value to routine interpretation of emergency department (ED) imaging studies by increasing radiologists' diagnostic confidence, leading to a reduction in downstream imaging and associated costs.

New model examines how societal influences affect US political opinions
Northwestern University researchers have developed the first quantitative model that captures how politicized environments affect U.S. political opinion formation and evolution.

NASA finds heavy rainfall ringing major Hurricane Maria's eye
Imagine being able to look down at a storm from orbit in space, and provide data that lets scientists calculate the rate in which rain is falling throughout it.

The mode of detection of high-risk breast cancers is linked to patient prognosis
Breast cancers that are detected in the interval between national screening programme mammograms have a worse prognosis than those detected at the time of a screening, even if they have the same biology, according to research presented at the 12th European Breast Cancer Conference.

Personalized cancer therapy improves outcomes in advanced disease, says study
Patients receiving care for advanced cancer at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health were more likely to survive or experience a longer period without their disease progressing if they received personalized cancer therapy, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers.

How speech propels pathogens
Speech and singing spread saliva droplets, a phenomenon that has attracted much attention in the current context of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Research shows cell perturbation system could have medical applications
Research by a team from Northwestern Engineering shows that the Nanofountain Probe Electroporation system may lead to quicker and more customized medical treatment plans.

A putative mechanism that switches brain pathology from anxiety to depression discovered
In experiments on mice, putative mechanisms for switching brain pathology from a state of experimental anxiety to depression have been discovered by the international team of researchers led by scientists from St Petersburg University (Russia).

Liquid biopsy faster than tissue biopsy, improves time to treat
A pilot study comparing the effects of a liquid biopsy with tissue-based test showed that liquid biopsy turn-around time for results was approximately 10 days faster than the tissue biopsy, according to research presented today at the IASLC 2020 Lung Cancer Hot Topic: Liquid Biopsy Virtual Conference.

Lab grown tumour models could lead to improved ovarian cancer treatments
Scientists have created a three-dimensional (3D) tumour model in the laboratory for ovarian cancer that could lead to improved understanding and treatment of the disease.

Hidden DNA fragment the 'trigger switch' for male development
Biology textbooks may need to be re-written, with scientists finding a new piece of DNA essential to forming male sex organs in mice.

New tool shows main highways of disease development
New tool developed at University of Copenhagen enables researchers to explore disease patterns from 7.2 million patients spanning 25 years.

Face masks unlikely to cause over-exposure to CO2, even in patients with lung disease
New research findings contradict statements linking wearing face masks to carbon dioxide poisoning by trapping CO2.

New research on cataract surgery in order to improve health care
In general, surgeons who perform numerous cataract operations every year encounter relatively few severe cases, and this probably contributes to their lower complication rate, as shown by a study led from the University of Gothenburg.

Tweaks to land-based conservation efforts would pay huge freshwater ecosystem dividends
Conservation projects aimed at protecting land-dwelling species could net major gains in helping species living in streams, lakes and wetlands with relatively minor adjustments.

Forsyth researchers demonstrate how changing the stem cell response to inflammation may reverse periodontal disease
In new research published recently in the journal Frontiers in Immunology, Forsyth Institute scientists have discovered that a specific type of molecule may stimulate stem cells to regenerate, reversing the inflammation caused by periodontal disease.

Biomedical sciences researchers find new way to prevent and cure rotavirus, other viral infections
A combination of two substances secreted by the immune system can cure and prevent rotavirus infection, as well as potentially treat other viral infections that target epithelial cells, which cover body surfaces such as skin, blood vessels, organs and the urinary tract, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.