Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 05, 2020
Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.

Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Focused ultrasound waves help ETH researchers to deliver drugs to the brain with pinpoint accuracy, in other words only to where their effect is desired.

Muslim young adult mental health before, after presidential election
How the 2016 US presidential election was associated with changes in the mental health of Muslim college students was assessed in this study.

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study.

Cyanobacteria as "green" catalysts in biotechnology
Researchers from TU Graz and Ruhr University Bochum show in the journal ACS Catalysis how the catalytic activity of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can be significantly increased.

Dozens of mammals could be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2
Numerous animals may be vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, according to a large study modelling how the virus might infect different animals' cells, led by UCL researchers, published in Scientific Reports.

New study reveals one way police officers can reduce shooting errors
In a new research paper published in Police Quarterly, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs Assistant Professor Paul Taylor found officers can significantly improve shoot/no-shoot decisions by simply lowering the position of their firearm.

How malaria parasites withstand a fever's heat
The parasites that cause 200 million cases of malaria each year can withstand feverish temperatures that make their human hosts miserable.

Blocking vibrations that remove heat could boost efficiency of next-gen solar cells
Led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, a study of a solar-energy material with a bright future revealed a way to slow phonons, the waves that transport heat.

40 percent of Amazon could now exist as rainforest or savanna-like ecosystems
Staal and colleagues focused on the stability of tropical rainforests in the Americas, Africa, Asia and Oceania.

Reducing the high social cost of death
Researchers in Japan report on how bereavement can have far-reaching implications to an individual's health and their economic status.

Compact, low-cost system provides fast 3D hyperspectral imaging
Researchers report a new compact low-cost hyperspectral projector system that provides both depth information and hyperspectral images.

Underreported and overlooked: Study shows severity of childhood obesity in Guam
More than 27 percent of children living on Guam between the ages of 2 and 8 were found to be obese or overweight, according to a study from the University of Guam's Children's Healthy Living Program.

How long does the preschool advantage last?
Children who attend preschool enter kindergarten with greater skills than those who don't, but that advantage is nearly halved by the end of the year as their counterparts quickly begin to catch up, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Discovery holds potential for reversing vision loss
Scientists at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation have identified a compound that could reverse the vision loss that occurs when blood vessels in the eyes of premature infants and adults grow out of control.

NASA gages Tropical Storm Delta's strength in infrared
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Delta in infrared imagery as it moved through the Caribbean Sea.

Influenza vaccination may provide roadmap to prevent COVID-19 in CV disease patients
Seasonal influenza vaccine development and mass production, as well as three international influenza vaccine cardiovascular outcomes trials currently underway, may inform future efforts targeted at developing and evaluating vaccine strategies for COVID-19, according to a state-of-the-art review in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Black and Hispanic people more likely to live in high-risk flood zones, study finds
Black and Hispanic people and people with low incomes are more likely to live in areas at high risk of flooding from natural disasters than white and Asian people, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona.

Watching your waste
Researchers recently published a study on the subject in the journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling that employed a values-based intervention in an attempt to reduce household food waste in 53 families in the Phoenix area.

Revealing secret of lithium-rich stars by monitoring their heartbeats
A recent study from an international team led by Prof.

Pitt trauma experts aim to reduce deaths by providing blood-clotting agent
The study found the drug can help the most severely injured trauma patients.

Has COVID-19 knocked us onto our backsides?
A group of Kent State University researchers sought to examine the impact of pandemic-related changes upon physical activity and sedentary behavior, specifically sitting, across the university population.

Looking for the key to predict heatwaves over the Yangtze River basin 20 days in advance
A new research evaluates the subseasonal prediction skill of heatwaves in the Yangtze River basin and identifies the crucial processes influencing the prediction skill using the long-term hindcast data from three operational models.

Study shows antibiotics may be viable treatment option for appendicitis
In the largest randomized US study of appendicitis published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from Henry Ford Health System and 24 other sites around the US report that seven in 10 patients who received antibiotics avoided surgery and that patients who took antibiotics for symptom relief fared no worse in the short term than those who underwent surgery.

Diagnosing COVID-19 in just 30 minutes
POSTECH professors Jeong Wook Lee and Gyoo Yeol Jung's team develops a one-pot diagnostic method for detecting pathogenic RNAs with PCR-level sensitivity.

Snakes reveal the origin of skin colours
The skin colour of vertebrates depends on chromatophores. A team from the University of Geneva is studying the variety of colours within the corn snake species.

On the trail of causes of radiation events during space flight
Scientists have made significant progress in understanding the sources of radiation events that could impact human space-flight operations.

Study defines risk factors for unemployment in working people with multiple sclerosis
'Risk of unemployment is highest during the first three to five years after diagnosis, so we need to be able to intervene early to prevent job losses, and their subsequent impact.

Fly larvae extract will replace antibiotics in fighting plant pathogens
Biotechnologists from MIPT have developed a method for extracting the active constituents from the fat of black soldier fly larvae.

Two's a crowd: Nuclear and renewables don't mix
If countries want to lower emissions as substantially, rapidly and cost-effectively as possible, they should prioritize support for renewables, rather than nuclear power, the findings of a major new energy study concludes.

Safe resumption of research is important, feasible
At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, just as public institutions and businesses closed, research programs performing human participant research (HPR) also largely ceased operations.

New algorithm could unleash the power of quantum computers
A new algorithm that fast forwards simulations could bring greater use ability to current and near-term quantum computers, opening the way for applications to run past strict time limits that hamper many quantum calculations.

COVID-score: A tool to evaluate public perception of countries' response to the pandemic
The Barcelona Institute for Global Health, in coordination with the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy and other international institutions, has developed an easy and reliable tool to evaluate the public perception of governmental response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Impact of HPV vaccination mandates on social inequalities
A postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered Human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccination mandates fall short of ensuring both higher levels of uptake and equal uptake of the vaccine across socioeconomic and racial-ethnic groups.

Study reveals risk factors for acute kidney injury after brain hemorrhage
Patients who suffer an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) face an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) during their hospitalization.

Groundwater depletion in US High Plains leads to bleak outlook for grain production
The depletion of groundwater sources in parts of the United States High Plains is so severe that peak grain production in some states has already been passed, according to new research.

Shattering expectations: novel seed dispersal gene found in green millet
Researchers at the Danforth Plant Science Center, the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology and DOE Joint Genome Institute generated genome sequences for nearly 600 green millet plants and released a very high-quality reference S. viridis genome sequence and also identified a gene related to seed dispersal in wild populations for the first time.

Letter from leading researchers urges terminology update, shift in COVID-19 guidance
Scientists affiliated with leading research institutions across the United States state in a letter published Monday in the journal Science that researchers across disciplines must converge to deliver clear public health guidance about how SARS-CoV-2 is spread in the air.

Hunger encourages risk-taking
An insufficient food supply causes animals to engage in higher-risk behaviour: the willingness to take risks rises by an average of 26 per cent in animals that have experienced hunger earlier in their lives.

Study finds cancer mutations accumulate in distinct regions based on structure of genome and mutation
A study finds that cancer mutations occur in distinct patterns based on the 3D structure of the genome and the underlying cause of the mutation.

Body size of the extinct Megalodon indeed off the charts in the shark world
A new study shows that the body size of the iconic gigantic or megatooth shark, about 15 meters (50 feet) in length, is indeed anomalously large compared to body sizes of its relatives.

Women more likely to embrace behaviors aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19
Women are more likely than are men to follow guidelines outlined by medical experts to prevent the spread of COVID-19, new research finds.

Holidays bring severe spike in nut allergies for children
A new study examining the link between peanut and tree-nut anaphylaxis in children and holidays found spikes at Halloween and Easter.

How narcissistic leaders infect their organizations' cultures
Like carriers of a virus, narcissistic leaders ''infect'' the very cultures of their organizations, leading to dramatically lower levels of collaboration and integrity at all levels--even after they are gone.

Lego-like assembly of zeolitic membranes improves carbon capture
EPFL chemical engineers have developed a new way to manufacture zeolitic membranes, state-of-the-art materials used for gas separation in harsh conditions.

Twisting magnetization with light
A team of scientists led by the Max Born Institute (MBI), Berlin, Germany, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, USA, has demonstrated how tiny magnetization patterns known as skyrmions can be written into a ferromagnetic material faster than previously thought possible.

How Hispanic and Asian populations influence US food culture
A new study found strong evidence that Asian and Hispanic populations are important contributors to local food culture.

Deep learning gives drug design a boost
A computational tool created at Rice University may help pharmaceutical companies expand their ability to investigate the safety of drugs.

Preliminary results of two large immune therapy studies show promise in advanced cervical cancer
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Preliminary results from two independent, phase II clinical trials investigating a new PD-1 (programmed cell death protein 1)-based immune therapy for metastatic cervical cancer suggest potential new treatment options for a disease that currently has limited effective options and disproportionately impacts younger women.

The best of both worlds: A new take on metal-plastic hybrid 3D printing
Current 3D printers employ either plastic or metal only, and the conventional method to coat 3D plastic structures with metal is not environment-friendly and yields poor results.

Acupuncture before surgery means less pain, significantly fewer opioids for Veterans
Veterans who have acupuncture before surgery report less pain and need far fewer opioids to manage their discomfort, according to a randomized, controlled study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting.

COVID-19 transmission rebounds quickly after physical distancing rules are relaxed
Looking at data from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, researchers found that eight weeks after restrictions were lifted or loosened, only nine of 51 still had low rates of transmission.

Researchers use precision medicine to reverse severe lymphatic disorder
Through genetic sequencing and targeted treatment, researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have resolved a severe lymphatic disorder in a young woman with kaposiform lymphangiomatosis (KLA), a complex and rare disorder that causes lymphatic vessels around the heart and lung to leak fluid, causing breathing difficulties, infections, and often death.

Internet searches for mental health issues in New York during COVID-19 pandemic
Changes in internet searches in New York for mental health issues, including anxiety, panic attack, insomnia and depression, during the COVID-19 pandemic were analyzed in this study.

Nanoparticles can turn off genes in bone marrow cells
Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to turn off specific genes in cells of the bone marrow, which play an important role in producing blood cells.

Scientists at NTU Singapore, MIT make electrifying diamond find
Diamond could conduct electricity like metals when deformed to strains at the nanoscale, according to predictions from a study by an international team of scientists led by NTU Singapore and MIT.

Mapping the chaos of movement
Predicting animal behavior could one day be possible, say researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, and a new study has made progress in this area by developing a framework based on the motion of a tiny species of worm.

Advancing multiprincipal alloys
The most significant advances in human civilization are marked by the progression of the materials that humans use.

The Lancet: Lopinavir-ritonavir is not an effective treatment for patients hospitalised with COVID-19
The drug combination lopinavir-ritonavir is not an effective treatment for patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19, according to the results of a randomised controlled trial published in The Lancet.

Carbon storage from the lab
Researchers at the University of Freiburg established the world's largest collection of moss species for the peat industry and science

As pandemic affects children's health, programs that work are still underused
Evidence-based programs known to reverse the negative effects of poverty are being widely neglected, according to a new report in Health Affairs.

Caring for others is a key driver in getting people to use chatbots for mental health
A study assessed what would motivate people to use chatbots for mental health services in the wake of a mass shooting.

New shortcut enables faster creation of spin pattern in magnet
Physicists have discovered a much faster approach to create a pattern of spins in a magnet.

Potential drug treatment for particular type of lung-cancer
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the mechanism making some lung-cancer patients resistant to the drug osimertinib.

Ludwig study finds a common nutritional supplement might boost cancer immunotherapy
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a mechanism by which the tumor's harsh internal environment sabotages T lymphocytes, leading cellular agents of the anticancer immune response.

Memory of the Venus flytrap
In a study to be published in Nature Plants, a graduate student Mr.

Exposure to vitamin D in the womb might minimize risk of high blood pressure for children born to mothers with preeclampsia
Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy--but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb.

210Pb dating of marine sedimentary cores
Fourteen laboratories participated in this interlaboratory comparison exercise (ILC). The results indicated good analytical performance by the participating laboratories, but the results of the 210Pb dating did not reach the desired level of satisfaction.

NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Chan-hom's skewed structure
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Chan-hom as it continued moving though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

Development of haptic touch sensor that works by static electricity
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a team of researchers led by Dr.

Turning diamond into metal
Researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic.

Arrokoth: Flattening of a snowman
The trans-Neptunian object Arrokoth, also known as Ultima Thule, which NASA's space probe New Horizons passed on New Year's Day 2019, may have changed its shape significantly in the first 100 million years since its formation.

CODA appendicitis trial shows risks and benefits of treating appendicitis with antibiotics
Antibiotics may be a good choice for some, but not all, patients with appendicitis, according to results from the Comparing Outcomes of antibiotic Drugs and Appendectomy (CODA) Trial reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Aging-US: 'From Causes of Aging to Death from COVID-19' by Mikhail V. Blagosklonny
Aging-US recently published ''From Causes of Aging to Death from COVID-19'' by Blagosklonny et al. which reported that COVID-19 is not deadly early in life, but mortality increases exponentially with age - which is the strongest predictor of mortality.

6,500-year-old copper workshop uncovered in the Negev Desert's Beer Sheva
A new study indicates that a workshop for smelting copper ore once operated in the Neveh Noy neighborhood of Beer Sheva, the capital of the Negev Desert.

Study identifies characteristics of infused CAR T cells associated with efficacy and toxicity in in patients with large B-cell lymphoma
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have identified molecular and cellular characteristics of anti-CD19 CAR T cell infusion products associated with how patients with large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) respond to treatment and develop side effects.

Telemedicine saves chronic pain patients time and money
Patients who saw a pain medicine specialist via telemedicine saved time and money and were highly satisfied with their experience, even before the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting.

Virtual driving assessment shows feasibility, validity, efficiency as part of licensing
Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of incorporating a virtual driving assessment system into the driver's licensing process in Ohio.

Study shows social media policies can curb HPV vaccine misinformation
A new study led by VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Jeanine Guidry, Ph.D., compared how HPV vaccination was portrayed on Pinterest before and after the social media platform began moderating vaccine-related content.

Vigorous exercise, spongy heart
Sscientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares have used cardiac magnetic resonance technology to measure exercise-related hypertrabeculation in a general, non-athlete population.

New tools improve care for cancers that spread to the brain
The UVA team says its findings will help doctors and patients make better-informed treatment decisions, enhance the care of brain metastases, and enable hospitals to improve the coordination and effectiveness of their interdisciplinary treatment programs.

Health care-associated infections among critically ill children
This observational study looked at changes from 2013 to 2018 in the rates of catheter-associated bloodstream and urinary tract infections among critically ill infants and children the United States.

UQ tech could offer 'faster, cheaper and mobile' COVID-19 diagnosis
Technology that helps to quickly extract and analyse genetic material could be used for cheap, accurate and mobile COVID-19 testing, including at airports and remote testing centres.

Spinach: good for popeye and the planet
Spinach, when converted from its leafy, edible form into carbon nanosheets, acts as a catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

Modest increases in physician productivity can offset the cost of medical scribes
New research led by Neda Laiteerapong MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University Chicago Medicine, indicates the real value of adding a scribe to a medical practice.

Two-dimensional MXene as a novel electrode material for next-generation display
Two-dimensional MXene as a novel electrode material for next-generation display.

Disproportionate extinction of South American mammals when Americas collided evident today
North American mammals were the winners when the North and South American continents collided millions of years ago.

Promising breath-test for cancer
The global quest to use a person's breath analysis for rapid, inexpensive and accurate early-stage testing for cancer and other diseases has taken a leap forward.

Women and men executives have differing perceptions of healthcare workplaces according to a survey report in the Journal of Healthcare Management
Healthcare organizations that can attract and retain talented women executives have the advantage over their peers, finds a special report in the September/October issue of the Journal of Healthcare Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE).

Women, workers of color filling most 'high-hazard/low-reward' jobs in Washington
When exploring data on Washington workers during the pandemic -- demographics, working conditions, wages and benefits, and risks of exposure to disease -- the authors of a new report found that women hold two-thirds of the jobs in the harshest category of work.

Looking sharp: Most detailed image yet of famous stellar nursery
Astronomers using the international Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF's NOIRLab, have captured the western wall of the Carina Nebula in unprecedented detail in a compelling image released today.

Reactions to perceived broken promises lead to workplace stress for police officers
Negative feelings resulting from perceived broken promises from employers within UK police forces are a major cause of workplace stress, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

Spouses of ICU patients may be at increased risk for cardiac events or hospitalization
The intensive care unit (ICU) admission of one spouse can be a risk factor for a cardiovascular event for the other spouse within a few weeks after the first spouse's ICU hospitalization.

Dust dampens albedo effect, spurs snowmelt in the heights of the Himalayas
Dust blowing onto high mountains in the western Himalayas is a bigger factor than previously thought in hastening the melting of snow there, researchers show in a study published Oct.

Parents less aware when their kids vape than when they smoke
Most parents know or suspect when their child smokes, but they are much more likely to be in the dark if the child vapes or uses other tobacco products, according to a large national study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

NIH scientists reveal how the brain may fuel intense neural communication
In an in-depth study of neurons grown in laboratory petri dishes, National Institutes of Health researchers discovered how neuronal synapses find the energy to support intense communications bouts thought to underlie learning and memory.

NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shear displacing Marie's strongest storms
NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Tropical Storm Marie that revealed the effects of outside winds battering the storm.

'Like a fishing net,' nanonet collapses to trap drug molecules
Researchers have discovered a new, rapid method for fabricating nanoparticles from a simple, self-assembling polymer, which present new possibilities for diverse applications, including water purification, diagnostics and rapidly generating vaccine formulations.

Efficient pollen identification
From pollen forecasting, honey analysis and climate-related changes in plant-pollinator interactions, analysing pollen plays an important role in many areas of research.

SIG results from national personalized medicine program for kids with aggressive cancer
This is the first report of significantly positive results from an Australian personalized medicine program for children with aggressive or recurring cancer.

RUDN university summer school of soil sciences covered 5 climatic zones from the barents sea to the
A team of soil scientists from RUDN University organized a summer school to study urban soils in 5 climatic zones.

Researchers identify process for regenerating neurons in the eye and brain
A team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame, Johns Hopkins University, Ohio State University and the University of Florida has identified networks of genes that regulate the process responsible for determining whether neurons will regenerate in certain animals, such as zebrafish.

New method for in utero 4D imaging of baby hearts may aid diagnosis of congenital heart disease
Researchers at King's College London have developed a new method for helping detect congenital heart disease of a baby in pregnant mothers using MRI.

Studies explore the role of cover crops in suppressing glyphosate-resistant horseweed
Horseweed is considered one of the most troublesome weeds in the United States and Canada - able to produce devastating losses in both corn and soybean yields when left uncontrolled.

Tracking sea turtle egg traffickers with GPS-enabled decoy eggs
By placing 3D-printed and GPS-enabled decoy sea turtle eggs into nests on the beach, it's possible to gather key evidence needed to expose rampant illegal trade of the eggs, suggests a study publishing in the journal Current Biology on October 5, 2020.

Statistical model improves analysis of skin conductance
By accounting for sweat physiology, method can make better use of electrodermal activity for tracking subconscious changes in physical or emotional state.

NASA imagery reveals Tropical Storm Gamma battered by wind shear
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Gamma being battered by outside winds in the south central Gulf of Mexico.

Racial bias worse in police killings of older, mentally ill, unarmed men
While young men still bear the brunt of police killings, a new study in the journal Annals of Epidemiology found that police are five times more likely to shoot and kill unarmed Black men over age 54 than unarmed white men the same age.

For red abalone, resisting ocean acidification starts with mom
Red abalone mothers from California's North Coast give their offspring an energy boost when they're born that helps them better withstand ocean acidification compared to their captive, farmed counterparts, according to a study from the Bodega Marine Laboratory at the University of California, Davis.

Research shows benefits/risks of treating appendicitis with antibiotics instead of surgery
NEJM: Results of a first-of-its-kind clinical trial shed light on when antibiotics instead of surgery might be the better choice for treating appendicitis in some patients, according to researchers with UTHealth, who led the Houston trial sites.

NIST innovation could improve detection of COVID-19 infections
NIST has developed a way to increase the sensitivity of the primary test used to detect the virus that causes COVID-19.

Lighting the path to recycling carbon dioxide
Combining solar-harvesting materials with carbon-dioxide-consuming microbes could be an efficient way to generate clean fuels.

Benefits, risks seen with antibiotics-first for appendicitis
Antibiotics are a good choice for some patients with appendicitis but not all, according to study results published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Corn farmers can apply a fungicide just once to protect against foliar diseases
'Our findings suggest that Kentucky corn growers likely can rely on a more cost-effective single fungicide application at R1 for foliar disease management and improve return on fungicide investment rather than making multiple applications at different times,' said Bradley.

New study finds largest population increase among US adult electronic cigarette users is in younger adults that have never smoked combustible cigarettes
A new study from the American Cancer Society assessed trends between 2014 and 2018 in the prevalence of e-cigarette use and population count of e-cigarette users, according to combustible cigarette smoking histories, in younger (18-29 years), middle-aged (30-49 years), and older (?50 years.) U.S. adults.

Scientist maps CO2 emissions for entire US to improve environmental policymaking
With wildfires in the West and hurricanes in the Gulf, the nation is affected by extreme weather-related events resulting from climate change.

Excess folic acid during pregnancy harms brain development of mice
A study of pregnant mice found high levels of folic acid were associated with significant changes in brain development of offspring.

Individual suicide risk can be dramatically altered by social 'sameness,' study finds
Similarities among individuals living in the same communities can dramatically change their risk of dying by suicide, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers.

UB study finds no apparent link between undocumented immigration and crime
An analysis by a University at Buffalo-led team using two estimates of undocumented immigration suggests that, on average, this population reduced or had no effect on crime in 154 U.S. metropolitan areas studied, including places such as New York City, Chicago and Las Vegas.

Some planets may be better for life than Earth
Researchers have identified two dozen planets outside our solar system that may have conditions more suitable for life than our own.

Tohoku University teaches old spectroscope new tricks
Tohoku University researchers have improved a method for probing semiconducting crystals with light to detect defects and impurities.

Gemini South's high-def version of 'A Star is Born'
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is still more than a year from launching, but the Gemini South telescope in Chile has provided astronomers from Rice University and Dublin City University a glimpse of what the orbiting observatory should deliver.

Invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities
New research led by University of Konstanz ecologists reveals invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities and identifies the soil microbiome as a major driver of invasion success.

Seeking ancient rainforests through modern mammal diets
Closed-canopy rainforests are a vital part of Earth's modern ecosystems, but tropical plants don't preserve well in the fossil record so it is difficult to tell how long these habitats have existed and where rainforests might have once grown.

Pancreatic surgery: lower mortality with larger case volumes
Pancreatic surgery: lower mortality with larger case volumes The survival probabilities are higher in hospitals where complex pancreatic surgery is performed more frequently.

IL-21 protein a key part of immune response to central nervous system infections
esearchers at Penn State College of Medicine now better understand the role of a protein, interleukin-21 (IL-21), in the immune system response to infections in the nervous system.

Study: 2016 election negatively affected mental health of Muslim college students
The 2016 presidential election was linked to considerable mental health declines among Muslim college students, with religious Muslims seeing the largest declines in mental health, according to a University of Michigan researcher.

Dog brains do not prefer faces
Even though dogs gaze into man's eyes, dog brains may not process faces as human brains do.

Cannabis use prompts need for more anesthesia during surgery, increases pain
Not only might cannabis users require more anesthesia during surgery than non-users, they may have increased pain afterwards and use higher doses of opioids while in the hospital, suggests first-of-its kind research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting.

Dog and human brains process faces differently
Researchers discovered striking similarities and differences in how dog and human brains process visual information about others.

A small switch with a big impact
Minor changes in immune cells can significantly affect the immune response, scientists of the University of Würzburg have now discovered.

First rehoming of laboratory dogs in Finland successful but required a great deal of work
Researchers at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Helsinki monitored the success of rehoming 16 laboratory beagles in 2015-2018.
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