Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 07, 2020
Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration.

Sensory device stimulates ears and tongue to treat tinnitus in large trial
A device that stimulates the ears and tongue substantially reduced the severity of tinnitus symptoms in 326 patients for as long as 1 year, while achieving high patient satisfaction and adherence.

The world's first successful identification and characterization of in vivo senescent cells
A research team led by Professor Makoto Nakanishi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, generated a p16-Cre ERT2 -tdTomato mouse model to characterize in vivo p16 high cells at the single-cell level.

New approach helps EMTs better assess chest pain en route to hospital
A study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Health shows that on-scene use of a new protocol and advanced diagnostic equipment can help paramedics better identify patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events.

Symptoms of COVID-19 are a poor marker of infection, new UK population study shows
86% of UK residents who tested positive for COVID-19 during lockdown did not have the specific virus symptoms (cough, and/or fever, and/or loss of taste/smell), finds a new study by UCL researchers.

NASA finds dry air sapping Tropical Storm Norbert's strength
Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that dry air is eroding Tropical Storm Norbert, located off the coast of southwestern Mexico.

Study finds 'missing link' in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein rubisco
The discovery of a primitive form of rubisco, a photosynthetic enzyme, will help scientists understand how carbon-fixing microorganisms led to the planet's oxygenation and how modern plants evolved

UCI biochip innovation combines AI and nanoparticle printing for cancer cell analysis
In a new paper in Advanced Biosystems, researchers at the University of California, Irvine describe how they combined artificial intelligence, microfluidics and nanoparticle inkjet printing in a device that enables the examination and differentiation of cancers and healthy tissues at the single-cell level.

COVID-19- to COVID-20
Addressing concurrent co-morbidities: we are dealing more with a 'syndemic.'

Deep learning takes on synthetic biology
Machine learning is helping biologists solve hard problems, including designing effective synthetic biology tools.

Printing organic transistors
Researchers successfully print and demonstrate organic transistors, electronic switches, which can operate close to their theoretical speed limits.

First detailed look at how molecular Ferris wheel delivers protons to cellular factories
All cells with nuclei, from yeast to humans, use molecular machines called proton pumps to regulate the acidity of organelles - compartments where various types of work are done.

Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals.

Study finds older adults using cannabis to treat common health conditions
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that older adults are increasingly using cannabis to treat a variety of common health conditions, including pain, sleep disturbances and psychiatric conditions like anxiety and depression.

Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today.

New findings pave the way to environmentally friendly supercapacitors
Similar to batteries, supercapacitors are suitable for the repeated storage of electrical energy.

Scientists unpack how the brain separates present from past dangers
A team of neuroscientists has identified processes the brain undergoes to distinguish real and present dangers from those linked to past experiences in mice.

Risk of deadly skin cancer may be gauged by accumulated DNA damage
Risk for melanoma, the most deadly skin cancer, can be estimated long before detection of any suspicious moles, according to a UC San Francisco scientist who led a new study to detect DNA mutations in individual skin cells.

Facemask use has lesser consequences on indicators of cognitive performance than expected
A novel study shows that facemask use does not affect indicators of cognitive performance when the wearers are resting or performing moderate physical work in hot environments.

Long-term consequences difficult to predict
In a longitudinal study, an international research team led by Leipzig University has investigated the consequences of changes in plant biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems.

Microneedles for therapeutic gene delivery
Researchers develop a minimally invasive biodegradable microneedle patch as a novel delivery mode for gene therapy applications

Beat the heat: Novel passive cooling device for surfaces and enclosed spaces
Scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology have now developed the first passive radiative cooler that can keep the temperature of enclosed spaces low.

NYUAD study uses mathematical modeling to identify an optimal school return approach
In a recent study, NYU Abu Dhabi Professor of Practice in Mathematics Alberto Gandolfi has developed a mathematical model to identify the number of days students could attend school to allow them a better learning experience while mitigating infections of COVID-19.

Scientists are more specialized in larger and interdisciplinary teams
The roles of scientists change as research teams become more interdisciplinary and larger, finds new research from ESMT Berlin.

GSA publishes three research articles on COVID-19 and aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19.

Prevalence of suicide-related behaviors among physicians
An analysis of published studies has found a relatively high prevalence of suicidal behaviors among physicians.

Next-gen smartphones to keep their cool
Multilayered carbon material could be the perfect fit for heat management in electronic devices.

Native milkweed cultivars planted by the public can support monarch butterflies and bees
Millions of people plant pollinator gardens in an effort to provide monarch butterflies with food along their annual migration route from overwintering sites in the highland forests of central Mexico to summer breeding grounds in the United States and southern Canada.

First relatives of rubella virus discovered in bats in Uganda and mice in Germany
In a Ugandan forest, a team of American and African scientists take oral swabs from insect-eating cyclops leaf-nosed bats.

The propagation of admixture-derived evolutionary potential
Adaptive radiation - the rapid evolution of many new species from a single ancestor - is a major focus in evolutionary biology.

Sicker livestock may increase climate woes
Climate change is affecting the spread and severity of infectious diseases around the world -- and infectious diseases may in turn be contributing to climate change, according to a new paper in Trends in Ecology & Evolution.

Cortex-wide variation of neuronal cellular energy levels depending on the sleep-wake states
The brain is assumed to exert homeostatic functions to always keep the cellular energy status constant, this has not been proven.

Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins.

NASA analyzes Hurricane Delta's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Caribbean Sea on Oct.

Applying artificial intelligence to science education
A new review published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching highlights the potential of machine learning--a subset of artificial intelligence--in science education.

High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail
How things deform and break is important for engineers, as it helps them choose and design what materials they're going to use for building things.

Women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, Dartmouth-Gallup study finds
A Dartmouth-Gallup study finds that women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, a difference that transcends party lines.

Pregnant women with severe COVID-19 face additional risks and early delivery
Pregnant women with severe or critical COVID-19 and their unborn infants face increased health risks before and after delivery but those with mild cases had similar outcomes compared to those who were uninfected, a Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School study finds.

Taking the STING out of MND
Melbourne researchers are working towards a potential treatment to slow the progression of motor neuron disease (MND).

Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics
2D materials - combined with optical fibres - can enable novel applications in the areas of sensors, non-linear optics, and quantum technologies.

Climate change could mean fewer sunny days for hot regions banking on solar power
Changes to regional climates brought on by global warming could make it so that areas such as the American Southwest that are currently considered ideal for solar power would be less viable in the future, a Princeton-based study suggests.

Does general anesthesia increase dementia risk?
There are concerns that exposure to general anesthesia during surgery may contribute to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease.

Plant-based spray could be used in n95 masks and energy devices
Engineers have invented a way to spray extremely thin wires made of a plant-based material that could be used in N95 mask filters, devices that harvest energy for electricity, and potentially the creation of human organs.

New efficacies of Ganoderma lucidum: Treatment of skin conditions like atopic dermatitis
Ganoderma lucidum, known as Yeongji mushroom in Korea, has long been used medicinally in China, Japan and Korea.

Major deficits in addressing mental health needs of asylum seekers
A new study of asylum seekers in Germany suggests that, among those with symptoms of depression, anxiety, or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), few receive a diagnosis from the health care system, and of those diagnosed, many do not receive treatment.

Yes or No: Forcing a choice increased statin prescribing for heart disease patients
Adding an 'active choice' nudge to the electronic health record increased statin prescribing for patients with heart disease, but not for those 'at-risk'.

New study confirms advice given to the UK government about school closures
Several predictions made by experts ahead of the UK-wide lockdown in March are confirmed in a detailed re-analysis of the data published by The BMJ today.

Risk of human-to-wildlife transmission of the COVID-19 virus
There's considerable risk that humans transmit SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, to wildlife, according to a perspective article published in Mammal Review.

Individual psychological well-being may guard heart health in Black adults
A strong sense of psychological well-being, also called psychosocial resilience, may contribute to better cardiovascular health in Black Americans.

Diamonds are a quantum scientist's best friend
New research details the phenomenon of what is called ''triplet superconductivity'' in diamond.

Teens diagnosed with depression show reduction in educational achievement
Teenagers who receive a depression diagnosis during their school career show a substantial decline in attainment in Year 11, new King's College London research has found.

Early COVID-19 cases in Southern California linked to New York
Most COVID-19 (coronavirus) patients in Southern California during the early months of the pandemic appear to have been infected by a variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus introduced to the region from New York state via Europe, not directly from China.

A hydrogel that could help repair damaged nerves
Injuries to peripheral nerves -- tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body -- often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability.

Amniotic fluid may yield new, better treatment for ischemic stroke
A study released in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine points the way to a possible new avenue of treatment for ischemic stroke.

Broken promises: Almost 80% of threatened species lack sufficient protection
A failure by governments to deliver on commitments under a global nature conservation treaty, the Convention on Biological Diversity, could have devastating effects.

The effects of oxytocin on social anxiety depend on location, location, location
The findings of the study show that oxytocin produced in the BNST increases stress-induced social anxiety behaviors in mice.

Phosphorus deficit may disrupt regional food supply chains
Phosphorus-based fertilizer is essential in modern agriculture. In regions with high population growth, more phosphorus will be needed to produce more food.

Boosting chickens' own immune response could curb disease
Broiler chicken producers the world over are all too familiar with coccidiosis, a parasite-borne intestinal disease that stalls growth and winnows flocks.

COVID-19 has a prolonged effect for many during pregnancy
Symptoms for pregnant women with COVID-19 can be prolonged, lasting two months or longer for a quarter of the women who participated in a national study led by UC San Francisco and UCLA.

Are online grocery stores being designed to support consumer nutrition information needs?
With a steady growth in online grocery shopping, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, examines the availability of nutrition-related information on leading grocery store websites.

Oral cancer pain predicts likelihood of cancer spreading
Oral cancer is more likely to spread in patients experiencing high levels of pain, according to a team of researchers at NYU College of Dentistry that found genetic and cellular clues as to why metastatic oral cancers are so painful.

Suicide deaths among youth following antidepressant boxed warnings
A public health advisory issued by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2003, followed by drug label warnings, indicated that children and adolescents taking antidepressants were at increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

A 2014 seal flu illustrates how avian flu viruses can adapt to spread between mammals
In a study appearing October 7, 2020 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, researchers pinpoint the mammalian adaptation mutations that appeared during a deadly 2014 avian influenza outbreak in seals.

Global food production poses an increasing climate threat
According to the authors of a new study published in Nature, rising nitrous oxide emissions are putting reaching climate goals and the objectives of the Paris Agreement in jeopardy.

Could arm squeezes with blood pressure cuffs help the brain recover after stroke?
People who are given clot-busting drugs after a stroke may recover better if they also are given a therapy called remote ischemic postconditioning, according to a new study published in the October 7, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Molecular swarm rearranges surface structures atom by atom
Researchers at the University of Münster have now developed a molecular tool which makes it possible, at the atomic level, to change the structure of a metal surface.

A step toward a universal flu vaccine
Researchers at MIT and the Ragon Institute of MIT, MGH, and Harvard are now working on strategies for designing a universal flu vaccine that could work against any flu strain.

Women's expected longevity linked to age at birth of last child
CLEVELAND, Ohio --No one knows for sure how long they will live.

Traveling brain waves help detect hard-to-see objects
A team of Salk Institute scientists led by Professor John Reynolds has uncovered details of the neural mechanisms underlying the perception of objects.

UMD researchers develop tools to sharpen 3D view of large RNA molecules
University of Maryland scientists developed a method for generating high resolution 3D images of RNA, overcoming challenges limiting 3D analysis and imaging of RNA to only small molecules and pieces of RNA for the past 50 years.

New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 - New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters.

Factors that increase or decrease suicidal behavior risk in adolescents
An analysis of relevant studies published to date has identified certain risk factors associated with suicidal behavior in adolescents.

Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field
An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth's surface.

Detecting SARS-CoV-2 in the environment
Researchers have outlined an approach to characterize and develop an effective environmental monitoring methodology for SARS CoV-2 virus, that can be used to better understand viral persistence in built environments.

The benefits of a prostate cancer screening tool
Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate (mpMRIp) is a promising tool for diagnosing prostate cancer, and prior to its availability, detection relied on clinical exams and prostate specific antigen screening.

COVID-19 disproportionately affects low-income workers' finances in developing countries
Results from a large-scale survey of households in Latin America and the Caribbean show that the negative economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have been concentrated among those who had lower incomes prior to the pandemic, according to a study published October 7 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nicolas Bottan of Cornell University, Bridget Hoffmann and Diego Vera-Cossio of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Genomic characteristics, transmission routes of patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 in Southern California during early stage of COVID-19 pandemic
This case series of 192 patients positive for SARS-CoV-2 analyzes the transmission routes of SARS-CoV-2 to Southern California and explains local community spread within the Los Angeles metropolitan area.

Scientists reveal urgent solutions for boosting Protected Areas effectiveness
New research published today in Nature identifies the actions needed from governments, private entities, and conservation organisations to boost the effectiveness of Protected Areas and other area-based conservation efforts in protecting biodiversity and providing benefits to people.

N2O emissions pose an increasing climate threat, finds breakthrough study
Rising nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are jeopardizing the climate goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a major new study by an international team of scientists.

Researchers find consistent mercury levels in arctic seals
Ringed seals and other Arctic marine mammals are important in the diet of Arctic Indigenous peoples.

Comeback of drug-resistant neglected tropical disease tracked through genomic surveillance
Genome sequencing has shed light on the re-emergence of the bacterium that causes yaws, a neglected tropical disease of the skin, bones and joints.

Clashing medications put older adults at risk but many haven't had a pharmacist check them
Two-thirds of older adults rely on at least two prescription drugs, and many take over-the-counter medicines and supplements as well.

Moon's magnetic crust research sees scientists debunk long-held theory
New international research into the Moon provides scientists with insights as to how and why its crust is magnetised, essentially 'debunking' one of the previous longstanding theories.

Faster COVID-19 testing with simple algebraic equations
A mathematician from Cardiff University has developed a new method for processing large volumes of COVID-19 tests which he believes could lead to significantly more tests being performed at once and results being returned much quicker.

New research explores how super flares affect planets' habitability
New research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will help astrobiologists understand how much radiation planets experience during super flares and whether life could exist on worlds beyond our solar system.

The good cough and the bad cough
Researchers might be able to treat a troublesome cough in disease without disrupting the protective cough we need for optimal lung health, by targeting the different brain circuits involved.

Sea-level rise projections can improve with state-of-the-art model
Projections of potentially dramatic sea-level rise from ice-sheet melting in Antarctica have been wide-ranging, but a Rutgers-led team has created a model that enables improved projections and could help better address climate change threats.

Cerenkov luminescence imaging identifies surgical margin status in radical prostatectomy
A new intraoperative imaging technique, Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI), can accurately assess surgical margins during radical prostatectomy, according to a first-in-human research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Enhanced reimbursement to oncology clinics increases prescriptions of evidence-based drugs
A pay-for performance program that offers enhanced reimbursement to oncology practices for prescribing high-quality, evidence-based cancer drugs increased use of these drugs without significantly changing total spending on care, Penn Medicine researchers report in a new study published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Chromosome defects seen from over-exchange of DNA in sperm and eggs
The exchange of DNA between chromosomes during the early formation of sperm and egg cells normally is limited to assure fertility.

Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication.

Airdropping sensors from moths
University of Washington researchers have created a sensor system that can ride aboard a small drone or an insect, such as a moth, until it gets to its destination.

RUDN University soil scientists: Green suburbs can be more harmful than city centers
A team of soil scientists from RUDN University confirmed that traditional approaches to urban soil pollution monitoring ignore actual risks for urban residents because they don't take into consideration the barrier function of the soil.

Physical activity and sleep in adults with arthritis
A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research has examined patterns of 24-hour physical activity and sleep among patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and knee osteoarthritis.

Past tropical forest changes drove megafauna and hominin extinctions
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and Griffith University have discovered that Southeast Asia, today renowned for its lush rainforests, was at various points in the past covered by sweeping grasslands.

Protective factors against suicidal behaviors among black college students
Having a strong ethnic identity was linked with a lower risk of suicidal behaviors among Black college students in a recent study published in the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development.

Same-gender couples interact better than heterosexual couples
Same-gender couples have higher-quality interactions with one another than heterosexual couples in Southern California, a new UC Riverside study finds.

Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat - new psychology study
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have discovered a way for humans to bond with cats.

Fighting intestinal infections with the body's own endocannabinoids
Endocannabinoids, signaling molecules produced in the body that share features with chemicals found in marijuana, can shut down genes needed for some pathogenic intestinal bacteria to colonize, multiply, and cause disease, new research led by UT Southwestern scientists shows.

Barriers and facilitators for social distancing recommendations during COVID-19
Survey of North Americans and Europeans examines motivations and barriers for social distancing; finds men and young people relatively less likely to comply

New biomarker to prevent graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplants discovered
With more than $1.5 million in funding from the National Cancer Institute, MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researchers discovered a new biomarker, plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing the ICOS ligand, whose activity can be blocked by the dual-acting drug candidate ALPN-101 to prevent graft-versus-host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Hearts harvested from pigs may soon help solve chronic shortages of these donor organs
An analysis discusses scientific breakthroughs that have overcome obstacles to cardiac xenotransplantation.

Advanced prostate cancer has an unexpected weakness that can be targeted by drugs
Kanazawa University researchers reported that the SUCLA2 gene is frequently involved in the deletion of the tumor suppressor gene RB1 in advanced prostate cancer.

Experience and instinct: Both count when recognizing infant cries
Caregivers learn to decipher differences in newborn cries through a combination of hard-wired instincts and on-the-job experience, a new study in rodents shows.

Urban air pollution may make COVID-19 more severe for some
As the pandemic persists, COVID-19 has claimed more than 200,000 lives in the United States and damaged the public health system and economy.

Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change
A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant's cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant's changing needs.

Why some friends make you feel more supported than others
It's good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it - but it's even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a new set of studies suggests.

Trust and income inequality fueling the spread of COVID-19
Trust in public institutions is linked to fewer COVID-19 deaths, but trust and belonging to groups is associated with more deaths, according to a wide-ranging, McGill-led study of 30-day COVID-19 mortality rates in 84 countries.

Study identifies brain cells most affected by epilepsy and new targets for their treatment
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have identified new potential drug targets for treatment of epilepsy.

Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag
A new research study conducted by City, University of London's Professor Christoph Bruecker and his team, has revealed that fish scale arrays generate a streaky base flow on the surface of the animal which yields important clues into reducing drag - the aerodynamic force that opposes an aircraft's motion through the air - by more than 25 percent.

Association between chain restaurant advertising, obesity in adults
Researchers examined whether changes in chain restaurant advertising spending were associated with weight changes among adults across 370 counties in the United States.

Simple sugar possible therapy for repairing myelin in multiple sclerosis
N-acetylglucosamine, a simple sugar found in human breast milk and sold as an over-the-counter dietary supplement in the United States, promotes myelin repair in mouse models and correlates with myelination levels in multiple sclerosis patients according to a new University of California, Irvine-led study.

The Lancet Planetary Health: Restricting supermarket promotions of high-sugar food and drinks reduces sales without reducing store profits
Restricting the promotion and merchandising of unhealthy foods and beverages leads to a reduction in their sales, presenting an opportunity to improve people's diets, according to a randomised controlled trial of 20 stores in remote regions of Australia published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.

NASA analyzes rainfall around Typhoon Chan-hom's ragged eye
A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations found heavy rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Chan-hom and the heaviest rainfall in the eyewall.

Data tool helps users manage water resources, protect infrastructure
River systems are essential resources for everything from drinking water supply to power generation - but these systems are also hydrologically complex, and it is not always clear how water flow data from various monitoring points relates to any specific piece of infrastructure.

DNA test identifies genetic causes of severe fetal and newborn illness
A new study by University of California researchers shows the promise of high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies to improve prenatal diagnosis and pregnancy outcomes for women who have experienced an abnormal prenatal ultrasound.

Neanderthals already had their characteristic barrel-shaped rib cages at birth
Neanderthal babies were born with the characteristic barrel-shaped rib cage shape previously identified in adult specimens, according to an analysis of digitally reconstructed rib cages from four Neanderthal infants.

Stopping opioid-related addiction, harm and accidents after surgery
An international group of global experts including anaesthetists, surgeons and other healthcare professionals have come together to publish a consensus statement on the prevention of opioid-related harm in adult surgical patients.

Mental illness, mental health care use among police officers
A survey study of Texas police officers examines how common mental illness and mental health care use are in a large urban department.

JNCCN: New research finds low bone health testing rates after prostate cancer treatment
New research in the October 2020 issue of JNCCN--Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds the rate of bone mineral density (BMD) testing in people with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has improved in recent years, but remains low.

Discovery of a new key player in long-term memory
A McGill-led multi-institutional research team has discovered that during memory consolidation, there are at least two distinct processes taking place in two different brain networks - the excitatory and inhibitory networks.

Exercise intensity not linked to mortality risk in older adults, finds trial
Exercise intensity appears to make no difference to risk of mortality among older adults, suggests a randomised controlled trial from Norway published by The BMJ today.

Paleontologists identify new species of mosasaur
A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.

Polar ice, atmospheric water vapor biggest drivers of variation among climate models
A Florida State University researcher is part of a team that has found varying projections on global warming trends put forth by climate change scientists can be explained by differing models' predictions regarding ice loss and atmospheric water vapor.

Study confirms genetic link in cerebral palsy
An international research team including the University of Adelaide has found further evidence that rare gene mutations can cause cerebral palsy, findings which could lead to earlier diagnosis and new treatments for this devastating movement disorder.

Electric clothes dryers: An underestimated source of microfiber pollution
Electric clothes dryers (tumble dryers) may be a hitherto unsuspected source of microfibers, widely emitting fibers from laundry into the environment through their vents, according to an experimental study.
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