Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 08, 2020
Higher suicide risk among older immigrants with untreated depression
The risk of suicide is clearly elevated in the category of older women with untreated depression who were born outside the Nordic region, compared with corresponding Swedish-born women.

Setting a TRAP for pandemic-causing viruses
A new laboratory technique quickly sifts through trillions of synthetic proteins to find ones that can target viruses, helping healthcare authorities rapidly respond to evolving pandemics.

Minimizing the movement problem in single-particle cryo-EM
While single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has enabled access to structures of proteins that were previously intractable and, most recently, has done much to inform our understanding of SARS-CoV-2 structure, the technique still has some weaknesses.

ideas42 and University of Chicago Crime Lab challenge assumptions about missed court dates
Behavioral design nonprofit ideas42 and the University of Chicago Crime Lab announced the publication of their new joint paper, Using Behavioral Nudges to Reduce Failure to Appear in Court in Science Magazine.

Blocking immune system pathway may stop COVID-19 infection, prevent severe organ damage
While the world waits eagerly for a safe and effective vaccine to prevent infections from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers also are focusing on better understanding how SARS-CoV-2 attacks the body in the search for other means of stopping its devastating impact.

Deep-seabed mining lastingly disrupts the seafloor food web
Deep-seabed mining is considered a way to address the increasing need of rare metals.

Silence, please: UNSW scientists create quietest semiconductor quantum bits on record
Researchers at UNSW Sydney have demonstrated the lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit, or qubit.

Low-hanging fruit
For seven years now, the University of California system has been working hard to reduce its carbon emissions as part of its Carbon Neutrality Initiative.

Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5
UCLA researchers have found that health inequities can be measured in children as young as 5 years old.

Pollinator monitoring more than pays for itself
Study found pollinator monitoring schemes, which often combine expert and volunteer observations, provide high-quality scientific data at a far lower cost than individual research projects.

HKU Engineering team develops novel miniaturised organic semiconductor
An engineering team led by Dr Paddy Chan Kwok Leung at the Department of Mechanical Engineering of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) has made an important breakthrough in developing the staggered structure monolayer Organic Field Effect Transistors, which sets a major cornerstone to reduce the size of OFETs.

The black hole always chirps twice: New clues deciphering the shape of black holes
A team of gravitational-wave scientists led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) reveal that when two black holes collide and merge, the remnant black hole 'chirps' not once, but multiple times, emitting gravitational waves--intense ripples in the fabric space and time--that inform us about its shape.

Study shows similar antibody response to key SARS-CoV-2 'spike' protein in COVID-19
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that antibody responses to related to the key 'spike' protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus are similar in COVID-19 patients with and without diabetes, boosting hopes that vaccines involving this same protein will have a high chance of being as effective in vulnerable patients with diabetes as they will be in the general population.

A new assembler for decoding genomes of microbial communities developed
The metaFlye assembler is designed to assemble DNA samples from microbial communities.

Scientists reconstruct beetles from the Cretaceous
An international research team led by the University of Bonn (Germany) and Palacky University (Czech Republic) has examined four newly found specimens of the Mysteriomorphidae beetle using computer tomography and has been able to reconstruct them.

Heat has stronger effect on health in less developed cities, study finds
Compared to high income cities, less developed cities in Brazil have a higher hospitalization rate associated with increased heat exposure, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Yuming Guo of the Monash University, Australia, and colleagues.

One electrode fits all functional groups
IBS and KAIST researchers employed the gold electrode and attached the target molecules onto the electrode.

Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs
Researchers from Osaka University processed silk fibers into a versatile component of bioink for 3D cell printing technology.

Ants adapt tool use to avoid drowning
Researchers have observed black imported fire ants using sand to draw liquid food out of containers, when faced with the risk of drowning.

Quality control mechanism closes the protein production 'on-ramps'
Recent work revealed a newfound quality control system in the protein production assembly line with possible implications for understanding neurogenerative disease.

New peer reviews of COVID-19 research highlight promising, warn of misleading studies
Peer reviewers highlight promising research that higher levels of cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 are associated with increased severity of COVID-19, while also flagging misleading research suggesting laboratory modification of the SARS-CoV-2 genome.

Treating cystic fibrosis with mRNA therapy or CRISPR
The potential for treating cystic fibrosis (CF) using mRNA therapies or CRISPR gene editing is possible regardless of the causative mutation.

Novel digital dashboard improves cancer case review efficiency
Researchers at the MU School of Medicine partnered with Roche Diagnostics to evaluate a cloud-based product called NAVIFY® Tumor Board that integrates all relevant clinical data for a tumor board into a single digital dashboard accessible to everyone.

In New York City, behavioral "nudges" improve court attendance
Improving communication around and awareness of critical court information through behavioral interventions, or ''nudges,'' may be more effective at improving court attendance for low-level criminal offenses than threats of further punishment, a new study finds.

Crabs are key to ecology and economy in Oman
The intertidal mudflats of Barr Al Hikman, a nature reserve at the south-east coast of the Sultanate Oman, are crucial nursery grounds for numerous crab species.

New findings from OSIRIS-REx detail complex history of Asteroid Bennu
Six new studies in Science and Science Advances present results from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft and reveal insights about the near-Earth asteroid Bennu.

World's largest experiment shows shack fires move with devastating speed
An experiment by the Fire Engineering Research Unit at Stellenbosch University, the Western Cape Disaster Management, Fire & Rescue Services and the Breede Valley Municipality Fire Department, showed that a fire spreading through an informal settlement can destroy twenty shacks (informal houses) in five minutes.

'Danger molecule' associated with being obese, female and black in younger adults
A 'danger molecule' is higher in the blood of younger black adults than whites, females than males and increases with weight and age, researchers report in the first large, longitudinal study associating circulating HMGB1 levels with obesity, inflammation promoters and early indicators of cardiovascular risk in humans.

Terahertz zaps alter gene activity in stem cells
Terahertz light pulses change gene expression in stem cells, report researchers from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and Tokai University in Japan in the journal Optics Letters.

Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections
Studying bacterial biofilms, EPFL scientists have discovered that mechanical forces within them are sufficient to deform the soft material they grow on, e.g. biological tissues, suggesting a ''mechanical'' mode of bacterial infection.

Musical training can improve attention and working memory in children - study
Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding.

Majority of Americans trust Biden to lead US healthcare system amid COVID-19 pandemic
Ability to manage the pandemic and reducing healthcare costs are equally important to Americans in determining their vote for president.

Study describes COVID-19 transmission pattern
Model developed by Brazilian researchers predicts spatial and temporal evolution of epidemic diseases and can help plan more effective social isolation programs with less socio-economic impact.

Planetary astronomer co-authors studies of asteroid as member of NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission
NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft mission's first attempt to pick up the sample is scheduled for Oct.

Protective antibodies persist for months in survivors of serious COVID-19 infections
People who survive serious COVID-19 infections have long-lasting immune responses against the virus, according to a new study.

Pandemic has widened existing gaps in access to abortion services across Europe
The coronavirus pandemic has widened existing gaps in access to abortion services across Europe, finds a review of country-wide policy changes in response to COVID-19, published in the journal BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health.

Certain pre-existing conditions may double, triple mortality risk for COVID-19
A large, international study of COVID-19 patients confirmed that cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, stroke and cancer can increase a patient's risk of dying from the virus.

Presented a program capable of detecting neurodegeneration biomarkers through magnetic
This tool is able to identify single-person neurodegeneration before the symptom's appearance, which could significate a more effective and personalized medicine.

Inhibiting epileptic activity in the brain
A new study shows that a protein -- called DUSP4 -- was increased in healthy brain tissue directly adjacent to epileptic tissue.

US viewer preference for right-wing TV media linked to fewer preventive measures against COVID-19
Viewer preference for right-wing US TV media is linked to significantly fewer preventive measures against COVID-19 and behaviours likely to increase the risk of infection, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

Human heart in space: What can we learn from mathematical modeling
The research carried out by the Politecnico di Torino shows that space flight ages astronauts' heart.

New drug carrier systems
A UD research team has devised tiny cargo-carrying systems many times smaller than a human hair, made from molecules called peptides that help provide structure for cells and tissues.

Simple solutions reduce court no-shows and subsequent arrest warrants
For low-level offenses in New York City, text nudges and a redesigned summons form decreased court no-show rates by about 20% and led to 30,000 fewer arrest warrants over three years, according to research from criminologist Aurélie Ouss of the University of Pennsylvania.

The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Rapid bedside testing is faster than standard centralised PCR testing for COVID-19, and may improve infection control in hospital
An interventional study tracking SARS-CoV-2 testing on admission to a UK hospital finds that the wait for results was just 1.7 hours using point-of-care testing (POCT) close to the patient's bedside, compared with 21.3 hours using the standard process of PCR testing in a centralised lab within the hospital.

Polarimetric parity-time-symmetric photonic system
Parity-time symmetry (PT), rooting in quantum field theory, are now shining in photonic systems.

Bacterial cellulose degradation system could give boost to biofuels production
Researchers have uncovered details of how a certain type of bacteria breaks down cellulose--a finding that could help reduce the cost and environmental impact of the use of biomass, including biofuel production.

Novel Radioimmunotherapy Reverses Resistance to Commonly Used Lymphoma Drug
A new radioimmunotherapy has proven effective in reversing resistance to the most commonly used lymphoma drug, rituximab, according to research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Scientists developed key principles for creating an artificial vessel
Researchers from St. Petersburg provided a unique experiment. They implanted a polymer scaffold as a vascular prosthesis into the rat abdominal aorta and monitored the process of its bioresobtion for 16 months.

Potential COVID-19 vaccines not affected by dominant "G-Strain"
Vaccines currently being developed for COVID-19 should not be affected by recent mutations in the virus, according to a new study involving a University of York virologist.

Coronavirus antibodies last at least three months after infection, study suggests
Coronavirus antibodies can last at least three months after a person becomes infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study published Thursday in Science Immunology.

Olympic athletes should be mindful of their biological clocks
Biological clocks have sizeable effects on the performance of elite athletes.

Extinctions linked to new assemblages of species
As the world undergoes profound environmental change, identifying and protecting 'novel' communities of species can help prevent extinctions within vulnerable ecosystems.

UCI, others see agriculture as major source of increase in atmospheric nitrous oxide
In a new study in Nature, climate researchers have drawn the clearest lines yet around the problem of nitrous oxide in Earth's atmosphere.

Young people hospitalized with COVID-19 face substantial adverse outcomes
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed records from 419 hospitals using the Premier Healthcare Database to study the clinical trajectories of 3,222 hospitalized COVID-19 patients aged 18-34.

Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals
Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles.

Cannabis use appears to encourage, not replace, non-medical opioid use
Contrary to some claims, people in the US may not be substituting cannabis for opioids, New research at Columbia examined the direction and strength of association between cannabis and opioid use among adults who used non-medical opioids.

Turning a hot spot into a cold spot: Fano-shaped local-field responses probed by a quantum dot
Optical nanoantennas can convert propagating light to local fields. Scientists in China demonstrate that in the nanogap of a nanoantenna, a local-field hot spot can be turned into a cold spot, and the spectral dispersion of the local-field response can exhibit dynamically tunable Fano lineshapes with nearly vanishing Fano dips.

Scientists peer inside an asteroid
New findings from NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission suggest that the interior of the asteroid Bennu could be weaker and less dense than its outer layers--like a crème-filled chocolate egg flying though space.

Nanoscale machines convert light into work
Researchers have developed a tiny new machine that converts laser light into work.

Taking sides - factors that influence patterns in protein distribution
A new paper, published in Current Biology has found that even cells in isolation can become polarised to create the head to tail pattern, and that this polarity can orient how the cell grows.

Vaporized metal in the air of an exoplanet
An international team of researchers led by the National Centre of Competence in Research PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva studied the atmosphere of the ultra-hot exoplanet WASP-121b.

People use, trust different COVID-19 information sources depending on gender, age, and other factors
Gender, age, education level, and political affiliation predict where people turn for information about COVID-19 -- and what sources they use and trust is linked to differing beliefs about the pandemic, according to a new study by NYU School of Global Public Health researchers.

Genomic study reveals evolutionary secrets of banyan tree
The banyan fig tree Ficus microcarpa is famous for its aerial roots, which sprout from branches and eventually reach the soil.

Oncotarget: Exosomes secreted under hypoxia enhance stemness in Ewing's sarcoma
The cover for issue 40 of Oncotarget features Figure 5, ''miR-210 silences the proapoptosis member CASP8AP2,'' by Kling, et al. which reported that hypoxic Ewing's sarcoma cells release exosomes that promote sphere formation, a stem-like phenotype, in EWS cells by enhancing survival.

New algorithm sharpens focus of world's most powerful microscopes
Scientists have shown that an algorithm added to image processing software can improve the resolution and accuracy of cryo-electron microscopes, which are one of the most crucial tools in microbiology and medical research.

Poor families must move often, but rarely escape concentrated poverty
Repeated unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next in a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States.

Men less likely to see food as national security issue amid pandemic
On average, men not only showed less empathy toward temporary agricultural laborers but also were less likely to see food supply and production as national security issues, according to a study led by a Washington State University researcher.

Stem cell sheets harvested in just two days
POSTECH and Pohang Semyung Christianity Hospital joint research team develops a thermoresponsive nanotopography cell culture platform.

Sustainable space management at risk under US-centric policies
''Other nations need to speak up, now,'' argue Aaron Boley and Michael Byers in this Policy Forum, in response to U.S. policymakers' attempts to dominate commercial space mining based on a strategic interpretation of international space law.

The Marangoni Effect can be used to obtain freshwater from the sea
A study conducted at the Politecnico di Torino, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and published in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, presents a solar desalination device capable of spontaneously removing the accumulated salt.

RUDN University scientist suggested a simple model of dense plasma spectral properties
A scientist from RUDN University suggested a new physical model to describe the optical properties of dense plasma.

High intensity training best for older people
Five years of high-intensity interval training increased quality of life, improved fitness and very well might have extended the lives of participants in the Generation 100 study.

An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons
Researchers at Berkeley Lab have found a way to generate single, identical photons on demand.

Cement, salt and water: From Politecnico di Torino a new material toward green heat
A study carried out from the Turin university in collaboration with the Advanced Energy Technology Institute CNR-ITAE and published on the journal Scientific Reports, suggest a low cost technology to store heat during the summer and use it during the winter, thus saving in fossil fuels.

Cannabis ads and store location influence youth marijuana use
States may want to consider the proximity of cannabis retailers and cannabis advertising to neighborhoods to prevent underage use of the drug, according to new WSU research.

Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Unemployed persons whose appointment with the responsible caseworker at the employment office is canceled unexpectedly remain unemployed for an average of twelve days longer.

Dietary migration of Impala rivals the geographical migration of Serengeti wildebeest
Study shows the Impala's migration is a 'dietary migration', where they switch from eating mostly grass in the wet season, to eating more tree leaves or 'browse' during the dry season.

Researchers find increases in nitrous oxide emissions, outpacing global predictions
The term ''greenhouse gas'' is often used interchangeably with carbon dioxide, due to its prevalence in our atmosphere - more than 80 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, estimates the Environmental Protection Agency.

Understanding the progress of viral infections
A team of researchers at the Institute for the Genetics of Heart Diseases at Münster University created a viral expression model that can be used to simulate and analyse a large number of viral infections - including the one with SARS-CoV-2.

Timing, complications, safety of tracheotomy in critically ill patients with COVID-19
The complications, safety and timing of tracheotomy performed for critically ill patients with COVID-19 is assessed in this observational study.

Candidates who lie more likely to win elections - new study
A new economics experiment suggests the electoral system attracts candidates who are dishonest and highlights why greater transparency might foster more trust in politics.

Media trust correlated with COVID-19 prevention behaviors
Whether someone takes proper precautions to fight COVID-19 may be linked to whether they trust right- or left-leaning media outlets, according to a new study from the University of Southern California.

Arctic weather observations can improve hurricane track forecast accuracy
Comparison of mid-range forecast model accuracy of Atlantic hurricane tracks from 2007 to 2019 revealed that when strong winds associated with upper-level troughs caused hurricanes to move northward, track forecast accuracy was lower.

New class of highly effective inhibitors protects against neurodegeneration
Heidelberg University neurobiologists have uncovered how a special receptor can lead to cell death.

New perspectives to treat neuropschychiatric diseases
Researchers studied the major types of neurons of the prefrontal cortex of the brain in an international collaboration.

A new species of Darwin wasp from Mexico named in observance of the 2020 quarantine period
Scientists at the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas in Mexico recently discovered five new species of parasitoid wasps in Mexico, but the name of one of them is quite striking: covida.

Researchers find "missing link" between magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars
Researchers from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have made observations of a new magnetar, called Swift J1818.0-1607, which challenges current knowledge about two types of extreme stars, known as magnetars and pulsars.

Psychology: Human spatial memory prioritizes high calorie foods
Humans more accurately recall the locations of high calorie than low calorie foods, according to a study in Scientific Reports.

Groundbreaking study finds activator of magnesium dynamics in the body
Magnesium, essential for life, has puzzled medical science for a century.

Athletes using sport supplements are more open to doping -- study
Athletes using legal performance enhancing and medical sport supplements are more likely to dope than those using sport foods and superfoods, a new study reveals.

New measurements of the solar spectrum verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity
An international team of researchers led by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has measured, with unprecedented accuracy, the gravitational redshift of the Sun, a change in frequency of the lines in the solar spectrum which is produced when the light escapes from the gravitational field of the Sun on its way to Earth.

Stress-free gel
Researchers at The University of Tokyo studied a new mechanism of gelation using colloidal particles.

Severe COVID-19 infection linked to overactive immune cells
Samples from the lungs of patients show a runaway immune system reaction could be one mechanism behind severe COVID-19 cases.

Experimental glioblastoma therapy shows curative powers in mice models
Houston Methodist researchers used a second-generation prodrug called MP-Pt(IV) to target the deadly cells of glioblastoma tumors and found mice harboring human glioblastoma tumors in their brains had greatly enhanced survival and weight gain when given the newly developed prodrug.

INRS researchers design the world's fastest UV camera
The team of Professor Jinyang Liang, a specialist in ultrafast imaging at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with an international team of researchers, has developed the fastest camera in the world capable of recording photons in the ultraviolet (UV) range in real time.

The CNIO reprograms CRISPR system in mice to eliminate tumor cells without affecting healthy cells
CNIO researchers destroyed Ewing's sarcoma and chronic myeloid leukaemia tumor cells by using CRISPR to cut out the fusion genes that cause them.

Women's incomes improve when democrats hold public office, study finds
New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages, and unemployment relative to men.

Zoologists uncover new example of rapid evolution - meet the Sulawesi Babblers
The zoologists, from Trinity College Dublin, have discovered that male and female Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense, a species of bird) have evolved to attain different sizes on small islands, and in quick-fire time.

FDA support for oncology drug development during COVID-19
This Viewpoint from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration puts into context recent guidance on clinical trials during COVID-19 for oncology and shares insight regarding regulatory challenges and lessons learned.

There's a gene for detecting that fishy smell, olfactory GWAS shows
Some people carry a mutation in a particular gene that makes the smell of fish less intense, reports a paper publishing October 8 in the journal Current Biology.

Drug combination proves effective in rare peripheral nerve sheath tumours
Malignant tumours of the peripheral nerve are rare but aggressive and difficult to treat successfully.

Graphene detector reveals THz light's polarization
Physicists have created a broadband detector of terahertz radiation based on graphene.

NASA examines Hurricane Delta's early morning structure
The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided two nighttime views of Hurricane Delta as it moved toward the U.S.

High-capacity tape for the era of big data
Although out of sight to the majority of end users, data centers work behind the scenes to run the internet, businesses, research institutions and more.

Making bones is less difficult than was previously thought
The way in which bone formation occurs needs to be redefined.

Coordinated efforts on Twitter to interfere in US elections are foreign-based
An analysis of more than 2.2 million tweets has found a coordinated effort to influence the upcoming U.S. presidential election by sowing distrust, exacerbating political divisions and undermining confidence in American democracy.

Avoiding ableist language in autism research
Ableist language is often used by autism researchers, which assumes that autistic people are ''broken'' or inferior to non-autistic people.

Study finds fungal disease of snakes in 19 states, Puerto Rico
In a collaborative effort between scientists and personnel on military bases in 31 states in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico, researchers surveyed for an infection caused by an emerging fungal pathogen that afflicts snakes.

A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests reality does not depend on the measurer
For 100 years scientists have disagreed on how to interpret quantum mechanics.

Light stimulation makes bones heavier
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers showed that laser ablation of bone inhibits expression of the osteogenesis inhibitor protein sclerostin without causing inflammation, unlike the conventional bur-drilling technique.

Siberian scientists identified the most promising Russian forest products
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University evaluated the competitiveness of Russian forest industry products by analyzing international trade data from different regions of the country and comparing it to the data from other markets.

COVID-19 effects highlighted in research presented at ACC Quality Summit
ACC Quality Summit Virtual will feature several poster presentations on COVID-19 impacts within cardiology practice over the last several months.

Revised clinical trial rules during COVID-19 pandemic may benefit patients, survey shows
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to new rules and expectations for clinical trials.

Discrimination contributes to poorer heart health for LGBTQ adults
The majority of LGBTQ adults report experiencing discrimination from a health care professional.

SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein in ocular tissues of patient with previous COVID-19
This case series examined whether SARS-CoV-2 exists in the ocular tissues of a patient with COVID-19.

HIV up close: Unprecedented view of virus reveals essential steps for causing AIDS
Accomplishing a feat that had been a pipe dream for decades, scientists have recreated in a test tube the first steps of infection by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome).

Survey shows broad bipartisan support for a stronger focus on science
A recent survey commissioned by Research!America on behalf of a working group formed to assess America's commitment to science shows overwhelming support for science across political parties.

Breakthrough discovery in gene causing severe nerve conditions
Researchers have made a breakthrough genetic discovery into the cause of a spectrum of severe neurological conditions.

Researchers gain new insight on metastatic prostate cancer
An international research team has discovered a principle that explains the metastasising of prostate cancer.

Scientists detect long-lived antibodies in both blood and saliva of patients with COVID-19
Two separate studies have documented the persistence of antibodies that target SARS-CoV-2 in hundreds of patients with COVID-19 at least 3 months after symptom onset.

SNew solar panel design could lead to wider use of renewable energy
Researchers say the breakthrough could lead to the production of thinner, lighter and more flexible solar panels that could be used to power more homes and be used in a wider range of products.

Signals from distant stars connect optical atomic clocks across Earth for the first time
Using radio telescopes observing distant stars, scientists have connected optical atomic clocks on different continents.

SwRI scientists study the rugged surface of near-Earth asteroid Bennu
As the days count down to NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft's Touch-And-Go asteroid sample collection attempt, Southwest Research Institute scientists have helped determine what the spacecraft can expect to return from the near-Earth asteroid Bennu's surface.

How an egg cell's "operating manual" sets the stage for fertility
Recently published work from Carnegie's Allan Spradling and Wanbao Niu revealed in unprecedented detail the genetic instructions immature egg cells go through step by step as they mature into functionality.
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