Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 14, 2020
Reviving cells after a heart attack
Harvard SEAS researchers have unraveled potential mechanisms behind the healing power of extracellular vesicles and demonstrated their capacity to not only revive cells after a heart attack but keep cells functioning while deprived of oxygen during a heart attack.

Study confirms plastics threat to south pacific seabirds
Plastic gathered from remote corners of the South Pacific Ocean, including nesting areas of New Zealand albatrosses, has confirmed the global threat of plastic pollution to seabirds.

Penn Medicine researchers use artificial intelligence to 'redefine' Alzheimer's Disease
The researchers will apply advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to integrate and find patterns in genetic, imaging, and clinical data from over 60,000 Alzheimer's patients -- representing one of the largest and most ambitious research undertakings of its kind.

Research demonstrates microbiome transmissibility in perennial ryegrass
Tannenbaum's most surprising discovery? Finding a stable bacterial microbiome within surface-sterilized ryegrass seeds that almost disappears when the plant matures but returns in a new generation of seed.

Therapy plus medication better than medication alone in bipolar disorder
A review of 39 randomized clinical trials by scientists from UCLA and their colleagues from other institutions has found that combining the use medication with psychoeducational therapy is more effective at preventing a recurrence of illness in people with bipolar disorder than medication alone.

'Honey bee, it's me'
Honey bees rely on chemical cues related to their shared gut microbial communities, instead of genetic relatedness, to identify members of their colony.

Researchers identify the mechanism behind bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified the mechanism behind bone marrow failure developing in children that suffer from Fanconi anaemia.

New study highlights links between inflammation and Parkinson's disease
An international collaboration involving researchers from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biology (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg established an association between inflammation and specific genetic mutations in Parkinson's patients.

Scientists home in on the mechanism that protects cells from premature aging
A new study by EPFL researchers shows how RNA species called TERRA muster at the tip of chromosomes, where they help to prevent telomere shortening and premature cell aging.

Rochester researchers synthesize room temperature superconducting material
Compressing simple molecular solids with hydrogen at extremely high pressures, University of Rochester scientists have, for the first time, created material that is superconducting at room temperature.

Breakthrough blood test developed for brain tumors
Genetic mutations that promote the growth of the most common type of adult brain tumors can be accurately detected and monitored in blood samples using an enhanced form of liquid biopsy developed by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

Study linking 28 genes to developmental disorders to mean diagnoses for about 500 families
Research into the causes of developmental disorders has identified 285 genes linked to these conditions, including 28 newly-associated genes.

The rise of 'zoom towns' in the rural west
COVID-19 has expedited a trend of migration into rural, western gateway communities -- a flood of remote workers are fleeing cities to ride out the pandemic, perhaps permanently.

An innovative method to tune lasers toward infrared wavelengths
Researchers at Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have discovered a cost-effective way to tune the spectrum of a laser to the infrared, a band of great interest for many laser applications.

Solar-powered system extracts drinkable water from "dry" air
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have significantly boosted the output from a system that can extract drinkable water directly from the air even in dry regions, using heat from the sun or another source.

Team of international scientists identify common vulnerabilities across coronaviruses
In a study published online in Science, today, an international team of almost 200 researchers from 14 leading institutions in six countries studied the three lethal coronaviruses SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV in order to identify commonly hijacked cellular pathways and detect promising targets for broad coronavirus inhibition.

A new land surface model to monitor global river water environment
Incorporating schemes related to nitrogen transport and human activities into land surface models could be an effective way to monitor global river water quality and diagnose the performance of the land surface modeling.

Virus-mimicking drug helps immune system target cunning cancer cells
UCLA researchers found that a drug that activates the body's natural defenses by behaving like a virus may also make certain stealthy melanoma tumors visible to the immune system, allowing them to be better targeted by immunotherapy.

Scientists show jet lag conditions impair immune response in mice
International researchers publishing in Science Advances reveal in a mouse study that chronic jet lag alters the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells, making it more favorable for tumor growth, and also hinders the body's natural immune defenses.

Deep neural networks show promise for predicting future self-harm based on clinical notes
Medical University of South Carolina researchers report in JMIR Medical Informatics that they have developed deep learning models to predict intentional self-harm based on information in clinical notes.

From puppyhood to senior age: Different personality traits age differently
Dogs' personality changes over time, but these changes occur unevenly during the dogs' life, and each trait follows a distinct age trajectory.

Prenatal cannabis exposure linked to cognitive deficits, altered behavior
Regular cannabis exposure in rats during pregnancy may cause their offspring to have long-term cognitive deficiencies, asocial behavior, and anxiety later in adulthood.

As New Yorkers prepare to vote, COVID-19 stays top-of-mind
Nearly three quarters (72%) of New York City residents believe that it is likely or very likely that there will be another surge of COVID-19 cases similar to the height of the pandemic last April.

Volcanic eruptions may explain Denmark's giant mystery crystals
Researchers have long been stumped for an explanation of how tens of millions of years-old giant crystals known as glendonites came to be on the Danish islands of Fur and Mors.

Urban daycare yards outfitted with natural forest floor boosted children's immune systems
Children who played in formerly gravel-covered urban daycare center yards renovated with natural forest floor, sod, and vegetation developed more diverse microbiomes and signs of a better-regulated immune system within one month, according to a new study with 75 children between 3 and 5 years old.

A new protein discovered that repairs DNA
Our cells have DNA repair systems to defend themselves against this sort of damage.

Restoring 30% of the world's ecosystems in priority areas could stave off more than 70% of projected extinctions and absorb nearly half of the carbon built up in the atmosphere since the Industrial Revolution
As world focuses on dual crises of climate change and biodiversity loss, landmark report is the first of its kind to pinpoint the ecosystems that should be restored for the biggest climate and biodiversity benefits--at the lowest cost

A new toolkit for capturing how COVID-19 impacts crime
A new set of assessment tools shows promise in capturing how the COVID-19 pandemic affects patterns of criminal activity.

Turning excess noise into signal
Excess noise fluctuations of light are widely considered to be detrimental in optics and photonics.

Over 150 million websites among a billion tested include sensitive (and tracked) content
The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) includes specific clauses that put restrictions on the collection and processing of sensitive personal data, defined as any data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, or trade union membership, also genetic data, biometric data for the purpose of uniquely identifying a natural person, data concerning health or data concerning a natural person's sex life or sexual orientation...

COVID-19 lockdowns averted tens of thousands of premature deaths related to air pollution
Scientists at Notre Dame found that particulate matter concentrations in China dropped by an unprecedented 29.7 percent, and by 17.1 percent in parts of Europe, during lockdowns that took place between Feb.

Army researchers collaborate on universal antibody test for COVID-19
Researchers with the U.S. Army Futures Command are part of a team that tested alternative ways to measure COVID-19 antibody levels, resulting in a process that is faster, easier and less expensive to use on a large scale.

Wolves attached - Adult wolves miss their human handler in separation similar to dogs
One key feature of the dog's success is that they show attachment towards their owners.

Warm central equatorial pacific sea surface temperatures and anthropogenic warming boosted the 2019 severe drought in East China
A persistent severe drought occurred over East China along the Yangtze River in 2019 that lasted from August to October and caused large-scale negative impacts on lake water shortages and local agriculture.

Researchers mine data and connect the dots about processes driving neuroblastoma
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists lead genome analysis to better understand one of the most common childhood solid tumors.

NTU scientists report plastic could be 'eco-friendlier' than paper &cotton in Singapore
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have modelled the cradle-to-grave environmental impact of using different types of shopping bags and report that in cities like Singapore, single-use plastic bags (made from high-density polyethylene plastic) have a lower environmental footprint than single-use paper and multi-use cotton bags.

A billion tiny pendulums could detect the universe's missing mass
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos' mystery material that has eluded detection for decades.

Could an existing vaccine make COVID-19 less deadly? Mexico City study provides support
A report supporting the concept of trained immunity for protection from severe COVID-19 was published in Allergy.

STAT3 identified as important factor in emotional reactivity
In a study published in leading journal ''Molecular Psychiatry'', MedUni Vienna researchers led by Daniela Pollak from the Division of Neurophysiology and Neuropharmacology showed that STAT3 plays an important role in the serotonergic system as a molecular mediator for controlling emotional reactivity, thereby establishing a mechanistic link between the immune system, serotonergic transmission and affective disorders such as depression.

Distracted learning a big problem, golden opportunity for educators, students
Although experts say using electronic media while doing schoolwork negatively impacts learning, many students believe they're immune to any ill effects because they're good multitaskers, according to University of Illinois food chemistry professor Shelly Schmidt.

Researchers use lab-grown tissue grafts for personalized joint replacement
A multidisciplinary team from Columbia Engineering, Columbia's College of Dental Medicine and Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University, LaCell LLC, and Obatala Sciences has now bioengineered living cartilage-bone temporomandibular joint grafts, precisely matched to the recipient, both biologically and anatomically.

Maltreatment tied to higher inflammation in girls
New research by a University of Georgia scientist reveals that girls who are maltreated show higher levels of inflammation at an early age than boys who are maltreated or children who have not experienced abuse.

Results from COMBINE (OCT-FFR) reported at TCT Connect
Data from COMBINE (OCT-FFR) found that the use of FFR combined with OCT imaging can help improve the accuracy of high-risk lesion identification in patients with diabetes.

New insight into neovessel formation shows promise in future treatment of cardiovascular diseases
A new study by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland provides novel insight into the previously unknown effects of factors regulating blood vessel formation.

Thawing permafrost releases organic compounds into the air
When permafrost thaws due to global warming, not only the greenhouse gases known to all, but also organic compounds are released from the soil.

Seeing evolution happening before your eyes
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg established an automated pipeline to create mutations in genomic enhancers that let them watch evolution unfold before their eyes.

Brain injury survivors and their caregivers can benefit from a resiliency program
An early resiliency intervention program for survivors of acute brain injury and their caregivers has shown clinically significant improvement in emotional distress, according to a study conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).

Bringing a power tool from math into quantum computing
The Fourier transform is a mathematical operation essential to virtually all fields of physics and engineering.

Obesity implies risk of COVID-19 regardless of age, sex, ethnicity and health condition
Conclusion presented by Brazilian researchers in Obesity Research & Clinical Practice is based on analysis of nine clinical studies involving 6,577 patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 in five countries.

Forty percent of renters can't afford essentials as a result of COVID-19
Almost 40% of Australian tenant households can't afford essentials such as bills, clothing, transport and food, after paying rent, because their incomes have reduced significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research from the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute has found.

Is it lawful, ethical to prioritize racial minorities for COVID-19 vaccines?
How COVID-19 vaccines can be distributed strategically, ethically and legally is considered in this article given conflicts between consensus public health recommendations to prioritize allocation to disadvantaged racial and ethnic minorities and laws discouraging explicit consideration of race in policy decisions.

New study examines what human physiology can tell us about how animals cope with stress
Research from the University of South Florida offers a novel perspective on how vertebrates may regulate flexibility in coping with stress.

Aerosols vs droplets
Winter is on its way. And in this year of coronavirus, with it comes the potential for a second wave of COVID-19.

NIRS-IVUSimaging can help identify high-risk plaques that can lead to adverse outcomes
New data from the PROSPECT II study shows that NIRS-IVUS intracoronary imaging can help identify angiographically non-obstructive lesions with high-risk characteristics for future adverse cardiac outcomes.

Robot swarms follow instructions to create art
Controlling a swarm of robots to paint a picture sounds like a difficult task.

Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked.

Research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating
New research demonstrates a molecular dance that keeps your heart beating.

RUDN University doctors suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in endometriosis patients
A team of doctors from RUDN University with their Italian colleagues had studied the data of existing studies on the effect of endometriosis on pregnancy and childbirth and suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in women with this condition.

Scientists identify sensor protein that underlies bladder control
A team co-led by scientists at Scripps Research has found that the main sensor protein enabling our sense of touch also underlies the feeling of having a full bladder and makes normal bladder function possible.

Pandemic lockdowns caused steep and lasting carbon dioxide decline
Climate experts today released an assessment of carbon dioxide emissions by industry, transportation and other sectors from January through June, showing that this year's pandemic lockdowns resulted in a 9 percent decline from 2019 levels.

New blood test predicts which COVID-19 patients will develop severe infection
Scientists have developed, for the first time, a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form of Covid-19.

The atomic makeup of M. pneumoniae's 'nap' structure glides into view
Using X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, an international team of scientists unravel the atomic structure of the proteins P1 and P40/P90 which make up the ''Nap'' structure - a protein complex that the bacterium M. pneumoniae uses to attach and move around human cells to cause pneumonia.

UNLV and University of Rochester physicists observe room-temperature superconductivity
Physicists from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the University of Rochester have made a breakthrough in the long sought-after quest for a room-temperature superconductor, what they call the ''holy grail'' of energy efficiency.

Researchers improve the standard method for assessing cardiovascular disease risk
Taking into account two common kidney disease tests may greatly enhance doctors' abilities to estimate patients' cardiovascular disease risks, enabling millions of patients to have better preventive cardiovascular care.

Rates of food insecurity remain high despite expansion of NYC food assistance programs
In the latest COVID-19 tracking survey from the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy conducted from September 25 to 27, 34% of the sample of one thousand New York City adults reported that their households had received SNAP benefits since September 1st, 2020.

Pharmacist-led digital intervention reduces hazardous prescribing in general practice
A pharmacist-led, new digital intervention that improves patient safety when prescribing medication in general practice reduced rates of hazardous prescribing by more than 40* per cent, 12 months after it had been introduced to 43 GP practices in Salford, finds a new study.

Recent Atlantic ocean warming unprecedented in nearly 3,000 years
Sediments from a lake in the Canadian High Arctic allow climate scientists to extend the record of Atlantic sea-surface temperature from about 100 to 2,900 years.

Tissue grafts of both bone and cartilage could regenerate damage to a crucial jaw joint
Scientists have engineered tissue grafts that, in pigs, regenerated both bone and cartilage in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), a part of the jaw that can cause debilitating pain and disability when damaged.

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science.

UBC research identifies gaps in helping youth diagnosed with early stages of psychosis
New UBC research is highlighting the need for improved training when it comes to helping young people living with psychosis determine their sense of identity.

Divisive dialogue: Why do we engage in virtual political talk?
UNLV social media expert Natalie Pennington explores the impact of politics and partisanship on online friendships.

Mapping out rest stops for migrating birds
A team of researchers have developed a new metric called the stopover-to-passage ratio that can help determine if a majority of birds are flying over a particular site or stopping at the site to refuel or rest.

The Lancet: Herd immunity approaches to COVID-19 control are a 'dangerous fallacy', say authors of open letter
A group of 80 researchers warn that a so-called herd immunity approach to managing COVID-19 by allowing immunity to develop in low-risk populations while protecting the most vulnerable is 'a dangerous fallacy unsupported by the scientific evidence'.

Only 7% of US school districts in poorer, ethnic minority populations to reopen this fall
US schools in poor districts with large non-white student populations are less likely to reopen fully this academic year, according to a major new study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of School Choice.

New scientific study shows brain injuries can be unbroken by innovative neuro-technologies
A recently published scientific study published in Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, led by the Centre for Neurology Studies at HealthTech Connex and a research team from Simon Fraser University (SFU), reports the latest breakthroughs from Project Iron Soldier.

Results from PROSPECT ABSORB reported at TCT Connect and published simultaneously in JACC
New data from PROSPECT ABSORB, a pilot randomized trial of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of non-flow-limiting vulnerable plaques in native coronary arteries, found that PCI was safe, substantially enlarged follow-up lumen areas, and was associated with favorable long-term clinical outcomes.

Modern humans took detours on their way to Europe
Climate conditions shaped the geography of settlement by Homo sapiens in the Levant 43,000 years ago / findings of Collaborative Research Centre 806 'Our Way to Europe' published in 'PLOS ONE'

Online horse race bettors are less keen to gamble after a losing day
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a bettor likely stays away from betting for a 27% longer time after a losing day than after a day on which they won or broke even.

World Mental Health Day -- CACTUS releases report of largest researcher mental health survey
On the occasion of 'World Mental Health Day' 2020, CACTUS, a global scientific communications company, has released a global survey on mental health, wellbeing and fulfilment in academia.

Now you see it, now you don't: Hidden colors discovered by coincidence
Scientists in Australia have stumbled across an unusual way to observe colour that had previously gone unnoticed.

When Fock meets Landau: Topology in atom-photon interactions
Topological photonics concerns the classical wave simulation of electronic band topology.

Making new materials using AI
POSTECH Professors Daesu Lee and Si-Young Choi's joint research team demonstrates a novel physical phenomenon by controlling variations of the atomic structure.

Higher average life expectancy after obesity surgery
People who have undergone obesity (bariatric) surgery live three years longer, on average, than those given conventional treatment for their obesity, a University of Gothenburg study shows.

NYUAD study finds key protein related to the disease-causing malformation of fat tissue
A team of researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD), led by Associate Professor of Biology Piergiorgio Percipalle in collaboration with Research Assistant Professor Mohamed Al-Sayegh, recently studied the molecular basis of adipogenesis and discovered that the protein actin (a specific variant referred to as β-actin) has an important role in activating the genes which need to be expressed in order to create fat tissue.

An alternative to animal experiments
Researchers of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have cultured so-called intestinal organoids from human intestinal tissue, which is a common byproduct when performing bowel surgery.

DNA-peptide interactions create complex behaviours which may have helped shape biology
DNA and proteins are two fundamental biochemical polymers found in all living cells.

Inhibition of HDAC and mTOR may improve outcomes for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma
The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat (Zolinza) in combination with the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus (Rapamune) or everolimus (Afinitor) showed clinical efficacy in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial.

Radiation oncology research and clinical trials to be featured at ASTRO's Annual Meeting
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) announced today the press program for its 2020 Annual Meeting, which will feature studies on cancer treatment advances and discussions of topical issues including COVID-19.

Beak bone reveals pterosaur like no other
A new species of small pterosaur - similar in size to a turkey - has been discovered, which is unlike any other pterosaur seen before due to its long slender toothless beak.

Clean and clear: How being more transparent over resources helps cut carbon emissions
Countries that sign up to improved financial transparency over oil, gas, and mining revenues benefit from significant reductions in carbon emissions, a new study by the University of Sussex Business School reveals.

More diversity needed in oil palm plantations
Growing global demand for palm oil has led to a rapid spread of oil palm monoculture plantations in South East Asia, often associated with the loss of habitats and biodiversity.

What laser color do you like?
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland have developed a microchip technology that can convert invisible near-infrared laser light into any one of a panoply of visible laser colors, including red, orange, yellow and green.

Recovery from grief is a slow, difficult process for families of terrorism victims
People who lose loved ones to terrorism are at a particularly high risk of developing Prolonged Grief Disorder, a condition characterized by severe and persistent longing for the deceased and reduced functioning in daily life.

Immune failure can cause serious COVID-19
Persons with critical corona-disease may have antibodies blocking the body´s most important defence mechanisms.

Results of an individual patient data pooled analysis reported at RCT Connect
An individual patient data pooled analysis comparing the use of bivalirudin versus heparin in heart attack patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) found that bivalirudin use was associated with similar overall rates of 30-day mortality across all heart attack patients, but lower rates of serious bleeding events.

Assessing state of the art in AI for brain disease treatment
The range of AI technologies available for dealing with brain disease is growing fast, and exciting new methods are being applied to brain problems as computer scientists gain a deeper understanding of the capabilities of advanced algorithms.

Study upends understanding about joint injuries
An injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can lead to severe osteoarthritis in both animal and human patients.

Major US hospital-based study shows waterbirths as safe as traditional births
A new US study of waterbirths found that hospital-based births involving water immersion had no higher risk of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or special care nursery admission than comparable deliveries in the control group without water immersion.

Ultra-sensitive nanothermometer under ambient conditions
Nanoscale temperature measurement with high sensitivity is important to studying many phenomena ranging from heat dissipation in nanocircuits to thermal processes in live systems.

Updated Cochrane Review shows electronic cigarettes can help people quit smoking
Updated Cochrane Review shows electronic cigarettes can help people quit smoking; More evidence is needed on long-term harms

Climate change undermines the safety of buildings and infrastructure in Europe
The higher temperatures expected over the next 50 years in Europe will accelerate corrosion of buildings, and will expose infrastructure to higher stresses, thus undermining the safety of constructions.

Fossil footprints tell story of prehistoric parent's journey
Hungry giant predators, treacherous mud and a tired, probably cranky toddler -- more than 10,000 years ago, that was the stuff of every parent's nightmare.

Unexpectedly large number of trees populate the Western Sahara and the Sahel
The number of trees inhabiting the Western Sahara, the Sahel and the Sudanian zone has exceeded the expectations of scientists, with more than 1.8 billion having been located thanks to an international collaboration including researchers from the CNRS.

Bringing people together on climate change
A new study suggests that engaging, high-quality media programming could help Democrats and Republicans see eye to eye when it comes to climate change.

Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy?

Closing the market for fake documents on the open web
New cybersecurity research reveals the shocking number of vendors selling passports and identification documents online.

Studies offer new evidence for possible link between blood type & COVID-19 susceptibility
Two studies published today in Blood Advances suggest people with blood type O may have a lower risk of COVID-19 infection and reduced likelihood of severe outcomes, including organ complications, if they do get sick.

UMaine researcher: How leaves reflect light reveals evolutionary history of seed plants
The way leaves reflect light, known as plant reflectance spectra, can illuminate the evolutionary history of seed plants, according to Dudu Meireles.

Updated recommendations for preventing, treating HIV infection
New evidence on preventing and treating HIV infection in adults was reviewed to update practice recommendations from the International Antiviral (formerly AIDS) Society-USA.

NASA rainfall imagery reveals Norbert regains tropical storm status
Norbert has been meandering around in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for several days as a tropical depression.

Thinning and prescribed fire treatments reduce tree mortality
Frequent fire once kept forests of California and throughout the western US relatively open but with a diversity of habitats preferred by a wide array of plant and animal species.

Experience of caring for a loved one linked to valuable end-of-life discussions
Research centered at Japan's University of Tsukuba examined the association of end-of-life discussions with the experience of the death of or care for a loved one.

Sweetpotato biodiversity can help increase climate-resilience of small-scale farming
Sweetpotato biodiversity can help increase climate-resilience of small-scale farming, according to the findings of a study undertaken by researchers from IRD, CIRAD and the CGIAR center, the International Potato Center (CIP).

Improving health care autonomy for young adults with autism
Independence has always been a driving force in Nancy Cheak-Zamora's life.

Machine learning model helps characterize compounds for drug discovery
Purdue University innovators have created a new method of applying machine learning concepts to the tandem mass spectrometry process to improve the flow of information in the development of new drugs.

Blood test could identify COVID-19 patients at risk of 'cytokine storm' hyperinflammation
Southampton researchers have identified a blood profile that could help identify COVID-19 patients at greatest risk of deterioration and direct them towards trials of specific treatments that could modify their immune systems' responses.

Is English the lingua franca of science? Not for everyone
A UC Berkeley graduate student surveyed young Colombian scientists and found that for many, having to read, write and present in English can be a burden, in terms of anxiety, time and cost.

Glitter litter could be damaging rivers - study
New research indicates that glitter could be causing ecological damage to our rivers and lakes.

Researchers take issue with study evaluating an AI system for breast cancer screening
In a new perspective piece 'Transparency and reproducibility in artificial intelligence' published this week in the journal Nature, an international group of scientists including CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Associate Professor Levi Waldron raised concerns about the lack of transparency in publication of artificial intelligence algorithms for health applications.

Scientists voice concerns, call for transparency and reproducibility in AI research
In an article published in Nature on October 14, 2020, scientists at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Stanford University, Johns Hopkins, Harvard School of Public Health, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and others, challenge scientific journals to hold computational researchers to higher standards of transparency, and call for their colleagues to share their code, models and computational environments in publications.

COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results, research moves to next stages
Rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in about 30 seconds following the test, has had successful preliminary results in Mano Misra's lab at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Protein that keeps immune system from freaking out could form basis for new therapeutics
Treatment with a peptide that mimics the naturally occurring protein GIV prevents immune overreaction and supports a mechanism critical for survival in mouse models of sepsis and colitis, according to a UC San Diego study.

Robots are helping to advance developmental biology
A new robotic tool can preserve and stain fly embryos en masse, enabling new kinds of experiments.

Scientists shed new light on viruses' role in coral bleaching
Scientists at Oregon State University have shown that viral infection is involved in coral bleaching - the breakdown of the symbiotic relationship between corals and the algae they rely on for energy.

Concerns about violence increase in California amid COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has been linked to an estimated 110,000 firearm purchases in California and increases in individuals' worries about violence, according to a new study by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Program (VPRP).

Tied to undiagnosed disease, aortic dissection in pregnancy proves difficult to predict
The 100th report out of the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection details the experiences of 29 women who faced this rare life-threatening complication while pregnant.

Low risk of COVID-19 infection found among people with congenital heart disease
Results of a retrospective analysis suggest that people born with a heart defect who developed COVID-19 symptoms had a low risk of moderate or severe COVID-19 infection, according to a new article published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.

Boost to develop microalgae into health foods
A new discovery may provide the crucial link that helps accelerate development of microalgae into beneficial human health supplements.

Oncotarget: Genomic markers of midostaurin drug sensitivity in leukemia patients
Oncotarget Volume 11, Issue 29 reported that acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous malignancy with the most common genomic alterations in NPM1, DNMT3A, and FLT3.

Gold- and bronze-like paints that don't contain metal
Lustrous metallic paints are used to enhance the beauty of many products, such as home decorations, cars and artwork.

Oncotarget: Efavirenz induces DNA damage response pathway in lung cancer
The cover for Issue 41 of Oncotarget features Figure 7, ''IPA ATM-signaling pathway in (A) EFV treated MRC-5 and (B) A549 cells,'' recently published in ''Efavirenz induces DNA damage response pathway in lung cancer'' by Marima, et al. which reported that the cell-cycle related genes are potential gene targets in understanding the effects of efavirenz in lung cancer.

Human activity has made Murray estuary more vulnerable to drought
In drought prone Australia, it's largest river, the Murray is known to suffer acidification in its estuary in South Australia.

RNA editing of BFP using artificial APOBEC1 deaminase to restore the genetic
Various genetic diseases caused by point mutations have no established therapeutic approaches.

Stay in touch with your emotions to reduce pandemic-induced stress
The coronavirus has ushered in a lot of stress. A team of psychologists at the University of Iowa say people can reduce stress by identifying their emotions and taking mindful action to address them.

Swine coronavirus replicates in human cells
A strain of coronavirus that has devastated the pork industry has the potential to infect humans as well, according to new research from the Baric lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health.

Biggest CO2 drop: Real-time data show COVID-19's massive impact on global emissions
While the ongoing Corona pandemic continues to threaten millions of lives around the world, the first half of 2020 saw an unprecedented decline in CO2 emissions -- larger than during the financial crisis of 2008, the oil crisis of the 1979, or even World War II.

Wearable circuits printed directly on human skin
Wearable electronics are getting smaller, more comfortable and increasingly capable of interfacing with the human body.

New study suggests crucial role for lymphocytes in asymptomatic COVID-19 infection
A retrospective study of 52 COVID-19 patients, published this week in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, may help researchers better understand why not everyone show symptoms of the disease.

Will SARS-CoV-2 become endemic?
To date, a few verified repeat SARS-CoV-2 infections have been documented around the world.

Mount Sinai researchers find that where people live can impact their risk for common chronic conditions including high blood pressure and depression
The researchers found that a persons' place of residence substantially influences their risk of uncontrolled chronic diseases including high blood pressure and depression
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